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FRONT 3

9/23/13 10:20 AM


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ISSUE: 943 NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

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FILM / 16 ARTS / 24 MUSIC / 31 EVENTS / 33 ADULT / 34 CLASSIFIED / 36

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MUSIC

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16

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SNOW ZONE

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FRONT VUEPOINT

REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Union rights Although hidden from the eyes of most Canadians—unlike headlines involving big-spending and bobble-heading politicians—there is another scandal that has been quietly brewing in Canada for years and just last week made an impact on the international stage. On November 8, the International Labour Organization's Committee on Freedom of Association—a United Nations group—found the Protection of Air Act that was part of the March 2012 omnibus Bill C-33, and which took away the rights of two Canadian unions to strike, was breaking international laws that Canada had agreed to follow.

But putting on a show on the world stage equates to a much different story at home as union rights are stripped away left and right by the Canadian government. The two unions affected are the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and the Air Canada Pilots Union. The Harper government claimed this law had to be put in place to protect an essential service. The ILO didn't agree and decided Canada was taking away the rights of these union members based on two ILO conventions that Canada was integral in drafting and adopting more than 60 years ago. Canada supported the adoption of Convention 87—Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organize—in 1948 and Convention 98—The Right to Organize and Collective Bargaining—in 1949. Convention 87 was ratified in 1972 and yet Canada is one of 24 of the total 183 member states left to ratify No 98. Canada is a major human-rights offender in this regard as it has had more complaints filed against it by unions than any of the other member states of the ILO—there have been 85 complaints against both provincial and federal legislation since 1982. The ILO has tried 80 of the cases so far and found that 73 of them violated freedom of association principles. The ILO was formed in 1919 with Canada as one of its founding members. Canada has been integral in supporting the adoption of many of its conventions since that time. But putting on a show on the world stage equates to a much different story at home as union rights are stripped away left and right by the Canadian government. Of the 189 ILO conventions, Canada has only ratified 34 (some of which have since been denounced). The last one ratified by Canada was Convention 29, created in 1930 regarding forced labour, but only ratified by Canada in 2011. Unfortunately, the ILO doesn't have much power to make Canada or any of its other member states enact the conventions they've ratified. They can pressure Canada and hear cases, but it is up to Canadians to ensure these conventions are actually followed. That means doing your research, making some noise and ensuring the rights of Canadians stop being trampled over. V

NEWS EDITOR : REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

NEWS // FOIP

The right to know

Disclosure of political information not uniform across province or country

// Image courtesy of Peel's Prairie Provinces, a digital initiative of the University of Alberta Libraries. peel.library.ualberta.ca

Y

ou would be hard pressed to find a poli- no uncertain terms that the integrity of the sonable search fees totaling $11  580 that tician who campaigns on a platform of federal access to information program is at were clearly designed to discourage investigation of councillors' expenses," Fildebopacity. When it's time to ask you for your serious risk," Legault said in a press release. randt says. According to the CTF, obtaining vote, everyone is on Team Transparency. It's only after they get elected that politicians The provincial system isn't in much better copies of Mandel's expenses alone would tend to circle the wagons around information shape, according to critics, with inconsistency trigger a fee of $4630. The same request and start behaving like the public's right to across departments and municipalities the made in Calgary for Mayor Nenshi's expensknow is something to be fought at every turn. most frequent complaint. Associate minister es? A mere $25. Both Clark and Fildebrandt suggest governAccess to information is critical to holding of Accountability, Transparency and Transforgovernments accountable. Though most citi- mation Don Scott hopes the current review of ments need to be more proactive in discloszens will never make a request for informa- FOIP will address these and other concerns. ing information, and it would appear that tion, we rely on journalists and other organi- Scott travelled the province to gather feed- Alberta's Information and Privacy Commiszations to do so and to pass that information back on how FOIP can be improved. He heard sioner Jill Clayton agrees with them. In her on to us. Without access to information laws, from 150 Albertans at these sessions, from submission to Scott's FOIP review, she called we would never know about the illegal do- another 399 who completed an online survey for a legislated requirement that public bodies commit to "proactive disclosure" of infornations made by Alberta municipalities and and received 30 written submissions. Tony Clark, director of research with the mation, minimizing the need for formal repost-secondary institutions to the provincial quests from citizens and Progressive Conservatives, unjournalists. covered in 2012 by CBC investigaAll together, these circumstances tell me in no While acknowledging tive reporter Charles Rusnell. The uncertain terms that the integrity of the federal that Alberta has taken robo-calls employed during the 2011 federal election would still access to information program is at serious risk. some positive steps lately, such as the manbe secret were it not for infordatory expense disclomation dug up by Post Media resure policy for MLAs and porters Stephen Maher and Glen McGregor, whose requests under the Access Alberta Federation of Labour, suggests that senior civil servants introduced following to Information Act revealed Elections Canada most of the problems with FOIP would be re- the Alberta Health Services executive expense scandal last year, Clayton pointed to was investigating an electoral "scam" linked to solved with cleaner language. "As it is, interpretations vary from depart- a study of four provinces' FOIP legislation the Conservative Party. Federally, the Access to Information Act ment to department," he explains, "especially conducted by the Centre for Law and De(ATI) gives any Canadian citizen, resident or the part that says they have to help the ap- mocracy in 2012 which ranked Alberta's the least transparent. company who pays a $5 fee the right to re- plicant." While the federal government, through His concerns are echoed by the Canadian quest and receive information from federal institutions, including Crown corporations. Taxpayers Federation's Derek Fildebrandt, Treasury Board President Tony Clement, has The law, in place since 1983, sets out that whose attempts to uncover information dismissed any criticism of their track record, requests for information must be responded about expenses incurred by members of Ed- we are assured that these criticisms have to—providing the requested information or monton and Calgary city councils revealed been heard loudly and clearly by his provincial an explanation as to why the request will the level of inconsistency to be found from counterparts. "The lack of consistency is one of the things municipality to municipality, which are also take longer—within 30 days. Last month, the information commissioner subject to the province's FOIP law along with we heard from different communities, includof Canada tabled her annual report to Parlia- universities, school boards and other govern- ing the media, during our consultations," Scott says in a telephone interview. He plans ment. Suzanne Legault, identifying a number ment-funded institutions. Last fall, the CTF filed FOIP requests for to bring forward legislative amendments of weaknesses in the system, reported that a number of departments don't have enough the expense claims of former mayor Stephen next year to strengthen the Act, but was staff to even acknowledge receipt of access Mandel and a number of councillors; at the hesitant to specify exactly what changes we requests for six months, with some taking as same time, they made an identical request to might expect. MIMI WILLIAMS the City of Calgary. long as three years to respond. MIMI@VUEWEEKLY.COM "Edmonton responded by levying unrea"All together, these circumstances tell me in

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

FRONT 5


FRONT NEWS // PUBLIC ART

Art for all

Calgary and Edmonton's public-art projects not supposed to be controversial—but they are

W

hen Calgary recently unveiled its latest addition to the city's public-art collection, the response from the community was less than positive, to say the least. Travelling Light, a 17-metre blue ring erected on the side of a newly built bridge connecting Airport Trail and 96 Avenue, was immediately attacked from every angle. Some complained about its $470 000 price tag, while others lamented its chosen location. Others, like Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi, were a bit more blunt: "I don't like it, I think it's awful," he told the Calgary Sun. Sun While Calgary's artistic woes are at the forefront of the local art scene right now, Edmonton's no stranger to controversy surrounding its public art either, with the debacle surrounding the Talus Dome back in 2011 still a topic of conversation. At the time of its creation, the sculpture of roughly 1000 stainless steel balls stacked up beside the southeast on-ramp of the Quesnell Bridge created an uproar from supporters and challengers alike. While some found it whimsical and enjoyed the flash of artistic brilliance on their morning commute, others were less than pleased to see public dollars being used this way. Not long after being erected, the Talus Dome was tagged, resulting in a fence being put around it for several months. But even that didn't stop further vandalism, with another later sign popping up over the fence saying, "$600 000. Edmonton, have you lost your marbles?" Choosing these pieces of artwork and deciding how much money should be spent on them isn't a random act, however, and money is not taken away from other projects to build them. They're part of a much larger effort to beautify cities through public art and are the fruit of months of work by artists and public-art committees. The Percent for Art to Provide and Encourage Art in Public Areas Policy has been contributing to this effort since it was initiated in Edmonton in 1991 and in Calgary in 2004. The policy stipulates that one percent of eligible construction budgets pertaining to civic construction with a budget of over $1 million—which includes bridges and transportation, but excludes maintenance, sewers and utilities— must be set aside for the purpose of acquiring public art on the site. In Edmonton, the art becomes part of the city's civic collection, which stood at 226 artworks—38 of which were currently in production—in the Public Art Committee's 2012 report to the city. Calgary's young collection currently stands at 37 pieces. Katherine Kerr, the Public

Art Director at the Edmonton Arts Council, knows are in front of them," Kerr explains. It takes a majority vote to make the final choice, and the amount of work and deliberation that goes on behind closed doors in order to make public art with seven members on the committee there's no happen. As a not-for-profit arts organization, one of chance of a tie. Although Kerr isn't sure if an artist has EAC's many duties is directing Edmonton's Percent ever turned down an offer, the committee wouldn't for Art Policy, which has become an important part just go for their second choice if they did, but would start the process all over again. of the city's efforts to promote arts and culture. "I really think that the reasons people like or dislike art are multiple and varied and what we have is For some, it's not the money or the artwork itself a policy that has been put in place because the de- they take issue with, but the location. A stipulation sire or aptitude for public art as part of our civic and of the Percent for Art Policy says that the art has to urban environment has been established, and we're be made within a certain distance of the construction administering that process as best we can for each site, and it was this point that led to contention with many Travelling Light objectors. and every project," Kerr says. Travelling Light is in a less than ideal spot for those "What we hope for in the end is to have an amazing collection that appeals to more than one type of who want to peruse what the money has bought them. Michele McDonald, a spokesperson with the person, so there's something for everybody." In charge of administering the public art in the City of Calgary's Culture division (through which city, it's EAC's door that gets knocked on whenever their Public Art Program is run), points at Luminous a civic construction project is put into play. After Crossings, another public-art project currently befinding out the budget, the opportunities for art ing constructed in Calgary, as an example of how and several other factors, an open call is put out location matters. She says the Luminous Crossings to the public for submissions. Sometimes the pool project has been well received so far and that one is restricted to locals, while other times it's open of those factors may just be its location in a main downtown corridor across Canada or even near the LRT. internationally. I don't think [the selection com- "I'm not sure, I'm specuFrom there, Kerr describes a stringent mittee] goes into a set of pro- lating, but I guess that's people think process, wherein a posals thinking I'm going to pick where they should see public new selection commitcontroversial or I'm going to art," McDonald muses. tee is put in place for "Some of the chaleach new project, and pick safe art. lenge [with Travelling includes representaLight's location was] it's tives from the community, the city and the artistic community. From there, kind of a bridge way in the northeast of Calgary, and there's a period of deliberation, as the members go what's this public art thing doing on it? Even though it gets a fair amount of traffic. Those are some of the over every detail of the applicants. "It takes quite a bit of time and there's a lot of details questions that Calgarians are asking, and so therefore administration is looking at ways to compose ... how to look through in terms of the artists' credentials, we can perhaps be a bit more flexible." the feasibility of the work, the diversity of the Though the choice of location for these collection, the type of work that's being public-art pieces is often off the table looked for, the quality of the art— for selection committees, Kerr there's a number of criteria says their end goal isn't to that each selection combe controversial and get mittee will look at as people talking— pertains to the though that portfolios often ends that up being a by-

product. "I don't think [the selection committee] goes into a set of proposals thinking I'm going to pick controversial or I'm going to pick safe art. I think what they go into the process thinking is, 'I want to pick the best art that's on the table and the best art for the project,'" Kerr says. McDonald has found Calgary's selection committee to be much the same. When it comes time to choose a piece of art, they form a five-person committee made up of three professionals from the art, architecture and design community, one representative from the business unit building the capital project and a community representative. While this diverse group is meant to convey a variety of thoughts and opinions on the art pieces, McDonald says Calgarians often miss out on their chance to get in on the action and voice their own opinion. "[With Travelling Light,] there were engagement sessions, but the people just don't usually come out to them," she explains. "We did have engagement opportunities for the community to take a look at what had been chosen for the area or what we were looking at or what the committee was looking at. But until it really became a media issue, people just didn't choose to go to those engagement sessions." McDonald says the Public Art Board may soon reexamine the way in which they form these selection committees, already anticipating recommendations from city council for more public consultation in the future. But in the end, no matter how involved the public is or how much work is put into choosing a piece of public art, there's no guarantee of what the reception will be. While many people appreciate and see value in the chosen pieces, there will always be opponents whose voices shout the loudest. "I think there are pros and cons for controversy," Kerr says. "You know, it's always the negative opinion you hear. There is a lot of silent, positive support. There's absolutely no way that everybody's going to come behind every piece of art ... so part of it is just accepting that that is the way it goes." Indeed, that mindset seems to have worked with formerly controversial pieces like the Talus Dome. While differing opinions are no doubt still lurking in the shadows, the public seems to have tentatively warmed up to the idea of the Talus Dome over time, even if it is begrudgingly so. Only time will tell if the same will go for Calgary's Travelling Light, but Kerr's personal opinion is that Calgary will soon see the benefits of the controversial artwork. "I do believe Travelling Light is going to become an icon for Calgary." ALANA WILLERTON

ALANA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Shiny Balls! Apparently, not for everyone. Who knew?

6 FRONT

// Eden Munro

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FRONT 7


FRONT DYERSTRAIGHT

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Iran nuclear deal: the aftermath Many nations fear the consequences if Iran's nuclear reactor is approved What will the Middle East look like after Iran and the great powers negotiating over its alleged nuclear weapons ambitions—the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany (P5+1)—sign a deal that ends the confrontation? It's time to ask the question, because there is going to be a deal. It didn't get signed in Geneva last weekend, but it came close. The only foreign minister at the Geneva talks on Friday was Mohammad Javad Zarif of Iran, but progress was so rapid that by Saturday almost all the foreign ministers of the "P5+1"—American, British, French, German and Russian—dropped whatever they were doing and flew in for the grand finale. Only the Chinese foreign minister was absent. The grand finale has been postponed. There were just too many details to clear up in a single weekend, and a couple of sticking points that have yet to be resolved. But the date for the next meeting has already been set (November 20) and nobody went away angry. "We are all on the same wavelength," Zarif said. "There is a deal on the table and it can be done," said British Foreign Secretary William Hague. There are "still some gaps" between Iran and some of the other countries

POLITICALINTERFERENCE

present, Hague said, but "they are narrow gaps. You asked what went wrong. I would say that a great deal went right." Even French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, the one who apparently dropped a last-minute spanner in the works, said that "we are not far from an agreement with the Iranians, although we are not there yet." Fabius' demands were that the reactor in Arak, now nearing completion, should never be activated, as it would produce plutonium as a byproduct, and that Iran's store of uranium enriched to medium level (20-percent pure) should be brought back down to five percent to move it farther away from weapons-grade (90 percent). His demands, introduced into the talks at a late stage, brought the proceedings to a temporary halt. All the other Western powers closed ranks and insisted these were joint demands, but they were not part of the original draft agreement. Speculation was rife that France was acting on behalf of its customers (for French weapons) on the Arab side of the Gulf, notably in the United Arab Emirates, who view the deal under discussion with just as much horror as Israel does. But France can only delay things: the deal is going to happen.

One immediate consequence of the deal will be that Israel has to stop threatening to attack Iran. The threat was always 90-percent bluff—Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu's own military chiefs would probably refuse to obey him if he ordered such an attack without American support—but now it will be simply ridiculous, which will swing the spotlight back to Israel's treatment of the Palestinians. Iran's economic isolation will also end, although it may take several years to unwind all the economic sanctions. The gradual return of prosperity in Iran will make the current Islamic regime more secure (which may be the main reason that the Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, authorized newly elected President Hassan Rouhani to negotiate the nuclear deal and end the confrontation.) But the big question is whether a nuclear deal with Iran will cool the rapidly intensifying Sunni-Shia conflict that threatens to suck in the whole of the Fertile Crescent and the Arabian Peninsula. The answer, alas, is probably not. The split is as incomprehensible to non-Muslims as the religious wars of Europe four centuries ago were to nonChristians, and mercifully Sunni-Shia hostility has never reached quite that intensity of violence and hatred. But right across the Islamic world it has been get-

ting worse for several decades now and the eye of the storm is in the Middle East. Iran is the sole Shia great power, so it is inevitably the focus of the fears of Sunni Arabs and the hopes of Shia Arabs. Moreover, given Turkey's semi-detached relationship with the region, Iran is in practical terms the greatest power in the entire Middle East. For the past decade, Iran has been greatly weakened by the arms and trade embargoes the West imposed because of the nuclear issue. Once those embargoes are removed Iran will regain much of its former strength. This is already causing great anxiety in the Sunni Arab countries, especially those that face it across the Gulf. Even quite experienced people in Washington and other Western capitals don't realize the extent to which the Sunni Arab countries of the Middle East thought that their close ties with the Western great powers gave them a kind of guarantee against Shia power—and how betrayed they feel now that they think that guarantee is

// Creative Commons

being withdrawn. Sunnis outnumber Shias almost 10 to one in the Islamic world as a whole, but in the smaller world that stretches from Iran and Turkey to Palestine and Yemen, the "Middle East," Shias make up more than a third of the population. The war is already hot and quite openly sectarian in Syria and in Iraq. In many other places (Lebanon, Bahrain, Yemen) it is bubbling just underneath the surface. It will get worse before it gets better. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

RICARDO ACUÑA // RICARDO@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Evidence versus ideology in health care Privatization in health care has not shown itself to be beneficial to recipients 3” wide version

How does the Alberta government the traditional, old-fashioned pubfeel about the idea of a publicly- lic health-care system." She didn't funded, publicly-delivered health- make clear, of course, whether her care system in the province? If their issue was with the fully funded part or the delivery nonpart. Either answers in question period overfaster the than 36 times salt...public but harmless, past couple of weekstoxic. are anything way,shrubs, her response demonstrates a Protect cement, grass, metal, tile, to go by, they see itcarpet, as 12345 old-fashclear disdain theinstantly, type of healthetc. Exothermic action for starts ioned, stuck in the '80s care system thatrefreezing. Albertans have worksand up ideoto 36 hours to prevent logical—and not in a good stoodCommercial up loudly Industries, to fight for over Used inbya way. Businesses, overSchools, again foretc. the past On October 30, in Institutions, response toCities, a and Towns, NOT30 years. question from NDP SOLD leader Brian Exactly a week later, Health MinIN STORES. Mason about the imminent priva- ister Fred Horne responded to ECONOMICAL PRODUCTS tization of medical-lab services in questions from Liberal MLA David the province, RedfordP49@telus.net re- Swann and New 560-8177 Democrat MLA Garth:Premier (403) 888-5593 Bob: (403) sponded that "the only thing that David Eggen about the impact of their party believes in is nothing privatization on Alberta's elder-care but fully funded public health care system by suggesting the questions that is only delivered in some of the were based on ideology rather than ways that are most connected to facts, and that they were stuck in

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the '80s and '90s. The minister's response, once again, revealed more about his government's ideology and what they want to do with our health-care system than it did about Eggen's and Swann's.

The questions that Horne was trying to respond to were based on information contained in a report released earlier that same day by the Parkland Institute. Parkland's report, which used data from Statistics Canada and the reports of Alberta's own Health Facilities Review Committee, tracked the impact of growing privatization of residential elder care in Alberta and the province's moving of seniors from longterm care to what they call assisted living, especially since 1999. So, not only was the Institute's report based on hard data rather than ideology, it focused explicitly on what both the minister and the Premier would seem to consider the modern era of health-care provision in Alberta. And the results were unequivocal. Between 1999 and 2009 the number of long-term care spaces in the province decreased by 20 percent and the overall number of spaces fell by four percent. By 2008, Alberta had the second-

lowest availability of long-term care spaces in the country. In addition to the reduced number of spaces (despite a growing population), the report found that facilities across the board were failing to meet the minimum staffing requirements to achieve the safety and comfort of residents. For-profit facilities fell short of the indicators of reasonable quality elder care by more than 90 minutes of care per resident, per day. While public facilities also fell short, they did significantly better than for-profit facilities. At the same time, the report highlights that while this shift in the quality of care was happening, for-profit assisted living facilities were generating average returns for their investors of more than nine percent—significantly higher than almost anything on the US stock markets over the same period. Minister Horne claimed to be interested in facts over ideology, and the facts are clear. Privatization in the elder-care system has resulted in fewer spaces, higher costs and lower quality of service—results that are impacting the safety, dignity and well-being of our seniors and having a significant impact on

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

the public interest. When presented with these facts, however, Horne made clear that the government will continue to move forward with reclassification and privatization of the residential elder-care system. Likewise, when presented with clear data showing privatizing medical-lab services would endanger lives and cost more, the premier remained steadfast in her commitment to move the privatization forward. This compulsion to move forward with privatization at all levels despite the facts and evidence should make clear to Albertans exactly who it is who is operating exclusively from a place of ideology and a desire to go back to an old-fashioned health-care system based on maximization of profits rather than the well-being of Albertans. It didn't work in the early 1900s, it's not working today, and no amount of re-framing and rhetoric by the government is going to change that reality. V Ricardo Acuña is the executive director of the Parkland Institute, a non-partisan, public policy research institute housed at the University of Alberta.


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FRONT 9


DISH

DISH EDITOR : MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FEATURE // WILD

FROM FOREST TO DINNER TABLE Untamed Feast goes back to the wild

// Darcy Beck

'W

e've seen this explosion of interest in organic food and local, and I strongly believe that wild is next," says Michelle Whitehead, who runs the business Untamed Feast alongside her husband Eric. The company is a "patron of all things wild," specializing in bringing consumers the best nature has to offer, right from the Canadian wilderness. Right now, that focus is gourmet wild mushrooms, but the Whiteheads plan to expand further to encompass wild berries and other such harvestable fare. "I can't think of a more logical and simple way of having a healthier body and a healthier lifestyle, a healthier planet and even economy," Michelle adds of the back-to-nature approach. "Why are we shipping stuff from all over the world? When it gets here it tastes terrible; it's lost half of its nutrient content. When we have undiscovered things that we just walk by ... these are some of the best wild mushrooms in the world and most of it is exporting." Untamed Feast, which Michelle and Eric began on Vancouver Island before relocating to St Albert, has been officially in business since 2007 and moved to full-time operations in 2012. The products, which range from dried morels and smoked cask-aged Chant-

10 DISH

relles to rubs and porcini risotto, are currently sold at 132 retail outlets— including Acme Meats and Planet Organic in Edmonton. The business is relatively new, but Michelle and Eric are no strangers to digging around the forest for mushrooms. After the pair met during a yoga teaching retreat in Thailand, they realized they had both picked mushrooms with their families as children: Eric grew up in Kleena Kleene, BC in a household that took full advantage of the food nature had in store while Michelle was "dragged" into the bush along with her five siblings to pick mushrooms and berries. "I hated every single moment of it," Michelle laughs. "Now for my husband and my entire work life to revolve around mushrooms, my dad would definitely be getting a giggle out of that." Eric's background is in forestry, and he began picking pine mushrooms (popular in Japanese export) to sell as a side business—his family had done the same, generating favourable profit. However, the market fell and

the mushrooms, which were once worth nearly $100 per pound, were suddenly worth roughly one dollar per pound. Michelle and Eric had a successful harvest that year and were suddenly left with truckloads of fresh mushrooms worth next to nothing. They decided to slice and dry the mushrooms as an experiment and began shopping the product around to local restaurants. The fresh mushroom market is a challenging one, as they can spoil very quickly depending on the species and moisture content, Michelle notes. Selling dried mushrooms offered an alternative that still delivered a superior, nutritious product without the limited shelf life. "I always use the analogy of a raisin versus a grape: they're both wonderful, they're both very, very different," adds Michelle, who worked for Parks Canada and as a yoga teacher prior to Untamed Feast. "If you're looking for a culinary ingredient that can be used year round that has concentrated fla-

vour and gives you all kinds of broth you can work with, dried mushrooms are the way to go." The mushroom harvest runs from spring until fall, with the team travelling throughout Western Canada and the territories to gather mushrooms, which boast different properties depending on the region, much like grape varietals do when it comes to wine making. "Some, it's quite time-sensitive," Michelle says, noting 100 percent of the company's morel harvest took place in Alberta. "If you're waiting around for your mushroom network people to give you a call and say, 'I found one,' you've kind of missed the boat because if you show up three days later it might be over." Handling this winter and the holiday season is going to take some strategic planning, as the harvest is over but demand is increasing thanks to food shows (Eric is off in Vancouver for the third of seven during our interview) and a recent successful run on CBC's Dragon's Den. Michelle and Eric faced the infamous bunch with a pitch for $60 000 in exchange for 20 percent of their company. Michelle and Eric decided on Arlene Dickinson after receiving offers from three of the five dragons. "We've never spent a cent on adver-

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

tising; we've never paid for any slot in any magazine or anything. We knew that it would be a very effective move to have her on our side," Michelle says of their decision. "She has a very extensive investment portfolio and a lot of that is with more natural products, whether that be food or cosmetics." Now begins the arduous due diligence process with Dickinson's team, and if all goes well the Whiteheads will be able to use the $60 000 to implement machinery into the business that will help with efficiency, such as applying the labels designed by Michelle's brother, Matthew Cabej, to the handmade products. Despite being increasingly busy the Whiteheads are pushing ahead with expanding Untamed Feast and working on their next project, Wild Trader (wildtrader.ca). "What we're doing with that is basically an eBay for anything wild, not just food but so anybody in a rural area who has an interest in harvesting something can, for free, post an ad on Wild Trader," she says of the project, which is in its early stages. "Anybody who needs something that they know is growing wild, they can go there and connect with the harvester." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


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Shaking the sherry stigma

Recommendations: Osborne Santa María Cream Sherry Fernando de Castilla Classic Manzanilla Sherry Noe Pedro Ximenez Viejo Sherry

A look at Spain's historical wine I avoided sherry for years, though looking back I'm puzzled as to why. Perhaps it was the stigma—people reacted very similarly when I mentioned it: a mixture of dismissal and outright disgust, because in this area of the world a lot of people, even those in the wine industry, are only familiar with cheap cooking sherry. Yet sherry deserves attention in its own right. It is Spain's most historically significant wine, functioning as the foundation of the Spanish wine industry much like icewine in Canada or port in Portugal. While sherry is often thought of as a version of port for the simple fact that both are fortified wines, in actuality this is not so simple.

Sherry hails from the region around the town of Jerez de la Frontera in Andalusia, Spain; the name comes from the Anglicization of Jerez (also spelled Xeres). Sherry has been produced here for more than a millennium and by the 16th century had become a favourite drink of European nobility; the United Kingdom took a particular liking to sherry and many of the major sherry cellars were founded by British families. Ninety-five percent of sherry is made from the local Spanish white grape variety Palomino, with the Muscatel and Pedro Ximénez varieties making up the balance. After the wine is made in the usual method it is fortified with brandy and then put through a process known

as solera, a system of progressively blending and aging sherry by moving it through a network of old oak barrels. There are seven different types of sherry, created by using the solera in different ways, and they fall along a spectrum of dry to sweet: • Manzanilla and Fino: light, elegant and bone dry, with a peculiar salty sea-spray tang that is redolent of the air of the coastal Spanish region from which they originate. These wines are dependent on the development of flor, a yeast that develops on the surface of the wine as it ages. • Amontillado and Palo Cortado: aged Finos that are fortified to a higher level of alcohol and then put through

another solera, causing them develop a deep colour and rich, nutty flavours. Amontillado is off-dry while Palo Cortado is dry and aged slightly longer. • Oloroso: an aged sherry that remains untouched by flor and is quite dark and nutty, resulting from the highest level of fortification and exposure to oxygen of any sherry. • Cream: originally created specifically for the British export market in the 1800s, made by sweetening Oloroso sherry with a hefty amount of Pedro Ximénez wine. Cream sherries range in quality from syrupy and cloyingly sweet to wonderfully complex and balanced. • Pedro Ximénez: the very sweet, dark

and viscous as molasses, made solely (as the name suggests) from the eponymous grape variety. Manzanilla and Fino sherries are among the best wines to pair with seafood; that salty tang is perfect beside freshly shucked oysters or ceviche. They also must be consumed within a day or two of opening, just like regular white wine. Palo Cortado and Oloroso sherries are surprisingly good accompaniments to soups, olives and cheese (especially Spain's manchego) while cream sherries are usually best served on their own after a meal, or, in the case of superrich Pedro Ximénez, slathered over vanilla ice cream.

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REVUE // THE BEATS

FILM

FILM EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Opens Friday Directed by John Krokidas 

T

he Beats have been getting hit a lot lately, with handsome actors resurrecting the likes of literary outlaws Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs in films such as Howl, On the Road, and Big Sur. I still haven't seen that last one, but the two others, as well as Kill Your Darlings, don't give me much reason to hope for anything with the sort of reckless transcendence aspired to by the films' subjects. Though, for the record, I think On the Road, while flawed, was elegantly crafted and made a far more concerted effort to capture the particular sense of camaraderie and betrayal at the heart of Kerouac's seminal, dazzling and sentimental source novel. It's now available on DVD, etc, and is worth checking out. Perhaps only Naked Lunch, one of David Cronenberg's most brilliant and imaginative films, can boast an approach as radical, beautiful, funny, horrific and perverse as its source material, which was not only the Burroughs novel but Burroughs' biography, fraught as it was with psychosis, accidental murder and troubled sexual ambivalence. Kill Your Darlings is, of course, not drawn from literature at all. It takes

its narrative from the 1944 murder of David Kammerer by Lucien Carr (Dane DeHaan), an intimate of Ginsberg (Daniel Radcliffe), Kerouac (Jack Huston) and Burroughs (Ben Foster). The event is well known to Beat aficionados and was subsequently referenced in a number of texts. One of the problems with trying to dramatize such an event is that, one on hand, there is a temptation to freight every word or gesture with meaning and thudding portent and, on the other, it's not easy to re-enact the hagiography surrounding such events without rendering

Carr as an annoying, pretentious, manipulative twerp. Director John Krokidas has Carr leaping on library tables during a guided tour of Columbia University and reciting Henry Miller while using a lamp as a phallus. He's got Carr, his voice aquaver, fondling his scarf, offering chianti and being generally condescending to Ginsberg—the films protagonist—while forging an entirely vaguely conceived literary movement called "The New Vision," while offering nothing to this vision save ostensible inspiration. It isn't necessarily a bad thing to depict Carr this

way—maybe he really was like that— but Krokidas' lack of distance means that his film itself becomes aligned with the character's wearying spirit. Carr claims his killing of Kammerer, a lover, sugar daddy, ghost-writer— Carr apparently never wrote any of his own papers at school—and stalker, was prompted by a sort of homophobic panic. I'm not sure that this fact as explored in Kill Your Darlings adds much that's new or provocative to our sense of the development of the

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

Beats' riddled sexual identities. So in the end we're more or less just along for a seedy ride, lots of hi-jinx, some attractive sweaters, an incomprehensibly anachronistic soundtrack—TV on the Radio—and the intermittent pleasures of witnessing the evocation of cult heroes: Foster's Burroughs is limited but a lot of fun and Radcliffe's Ginsberg is suitably earnest, though Huston's Kerouac is kind of a bore. As for the female characters, don't ask.

JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FILM 13


FILM REVUE // DRAMA

The Broken Circle Breakdown A

Singing it out

“RADCLIFFE DELIVERS HIS BEST SCREEN PERFORMANCE.

‘KILL YOUR DARLINGS’ GETS INSIDE YOUR HEAD AND STAYS THERE.” - Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

“DeHAAN SMOULDERS WITH SEDUCTIVE CHARM.” - Claudia Puig, USA TODAY

“A CAPTIVATING LOOK AT AN AMERICAN LITERARY GIANT.”

dapted from Johan Heldenbergh's the next dip or climb. We rarely know play, The Broken Circle Break- what's coming next. Past happiness down is so often brought to such and present pain tumble around—for startling life—and death—on-screen Didier, especially, whom the movie by writer-director sticks closer to (there's a few too Felix Van Groenin- Fri, Nov 15 – Tue, Nov 19 admiring gen's razor-sharp Directed by Felix Van Groeningen many cuts, slashing back Metro Cinema at the Garneau glances from Elise, whom we don't get and flashing for-  to know as well). ward. We've only And it seems as if, just adjusted to the fact that Didier (Heldenbergh) almost as soon as they've made a new and Elise (Veerle Baetens) are visiting life, Didier and Elise must think about daughter Maybelle (Nell Cattrysse) its death. For all its talk of America— in hospital in 2006 because the six- Didier loves that nation's dream and year-old's fighting cancer—then much of its music, but increasingly we're thrown back into the bluegrass detests the false hope and pro-life hysinger and tattooist's first night to- pocrisies of religion, epitomized by gether in 1997, having sex in a trailer President Bush's stance on stem-cell research—this is a resolutely European on his ramshackle ranch. The effect is a snarling rollercoaster art-film, unsparing in its sadness. of emotions (anguish and blame, exultation and resignation, anger and long- That encroaching sadness, always ing) with few calm stretches before first and foremost, justifies the film's

quirkier touches: an Elvis-impersonator presiding over a wedding, a laboured bird-metaphor, even Elise in a star-spangled swimsuit and heels, lying across Didier's pickup truck hood after their first night together. And though the film betrays its stage origins in its penultimate scene, where Didier becomes a mouthpiece for his anti-religious (and itself fanatical) viewpoint, this over-vocalization's drowned out by the film's stirring songs. In Didier and Elise's performances (she becomes a singer in the band), we see and hear the passion, pangs, and heartbreak of their ride together. Like the film around it, this music brings out the deep, dark, bruising blues of lives, and deaths, that could never have been different—no matter how much we want to re-edit those slashes and flashes of memory.

BRIAN GIBSON

BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // SUPERHERO

Thor: The Dark World

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ven before Thor 2 has started the jor lessons to be learned, no large Marvel Studios franchise machine themes to be revealed after multiple is hard at work, pumping the trailer viewings—that isn't the point. The for the upcoming Captain America se- point is to buy the movie ticket, to quel to remind us that this sequel is be there, to follow along in the next just one property in a stable of lucra- chapter of the endless saga, to not tive comic-book properties. And after miss an episode. That Marvel has the film we are been able to sucshown a bewilder- Now playing cessfully perform ingly cryptic scene Directed by Alan Taylor these gigantic featuring what ap-  cross-promotional pears to be Benicio gymnastics for Del Toro in a lowthis long—tying budget Doctor Who cutaway. (A later in Thor, Iron Man, Captain America, Google search reveals this postscript Hulk, Avengers and S.H.I.E.L.D. simulwas meant to be a tie-in for yet another taneously—is itself a superheroic feat of marketing ingenuity. forthcoming Marvel franchise.) And what, you may ask, does any of this have to do with the actual movie This promotional balancing act is in question? As might be expected of perhaps the most interesting thing a disposable superhero sequel, the about these movies. Thor: The Dark content of Thor: The Dark World is World is, effectively, a running checkalmost irrelevant. There are no ma- list of how to make a successful

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

blockbuster. A barrage of CGI special effects in superfluous 3D: check. A healthy balance between irreverent humour and cataclysmic gravity: check. A musclebound leading man who appears shirtless onscreen for about 30 seconds: check. The film's "core"—the bad guy's plot to destroy the universe—is just the skeleton around which to drape a lot of flying, cape-flapping and hammer-tossing. Add in some healthy laughs (and what's more universally funny than Stellan Skarsgård in his underwear?) and you've got the recipe. This movie, like all superhero movies, is a bloated Saturday morning cartoon, but one that (thankfully) doesn't take itself too seriously. It is a perfectly enjoyable, perfectly predictable way to lose two hours of your life.

JAMES CUMING

JAMES@VUEWEEKLY.COM


ASPECTRATIO

JOSEF BRAUN // JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The spiritually moribund

La Notte a difficult film of architecture and emotional remoteness

Love gone cold

The centre of a trilogy that begins with L'Avventura (1960) and ends with L'eclisse (1962), Michelangelo Antonioni's La Notte (1961) is in some ways the most difficult. While the characters—like the camera—are almost always adrift, roaming Milan and its modern spacious interiors, they appear spiritually moribund— is it an accident that at one point we spy a woman reading The Sleepwalkers? Whatever the dreams or desires that once animated Giovanni Pontano (Marcello Mastroianni) to become a novelist and stake his claim amongst the cultural elite seems to have drained away. He goes to clubs and parties, even chases women, without enthusiasm. His wife Lidia (Jeanne Moreau) conveys somewhat more of a sense of genuine engagement with the world, though her engagement is almost entirely that of a searcher or observer. Even when surrounded by people seeking to include her in their activities—the second half of the film unfolds at a party thrown by an affluent family—she usually keeps her distance. When, at the beginning of the film, she and Giovanni visit a dying friend in hospital, she cuts short her visit and leaves Giovanni behind, opting instead to wander the city for a long while, losing herself amidst people and buildings and traffic, eventually making her way toward the outskirts, where she finds discarded objects and stumbles upon a fight between two men with many others watching. None of these men holler or speak. No one even says "ow." It is a

sequence of anonymous clamour or eerie silence. Lidia's protracted city tour may seem emotionally remote, yet it is wildly cinematic. The film's emotions are expressed by contrast and compositions which not only attend to what's in the frame but what's outside the frame yet reflected on surfaces within. Repeatedly using glass as a sort of sculptural material, Antonioni and his cinematographer Gianni Di Venanzo create a series of palimpsests. I said the film was difficult, but by this I simply mean that it doesn't much lend itself to character identification, that bedrock of so much narrative cinema. Its mastery and richness lie elsewhere. La Notte is a movie made of architecture, noise and time. It is now available as Blu-ray, DVD or download from Criterion. The alienating aspects of the film were much noted at the time of its release. Mastroianni and Moreau were huge international stars at the time. The melancholy Mastroianni we'd seen attending a soirée the year previous in La Dolce Vita (1960) was a party animal next to the morose Mastroianni halfheartedly attempting to seduce Monica Vitti at the all-nighter in La Notte. Mastroianni was reportedly unhappy with both the production and the finished result. Indeed, the film doesn't look like it was a blast to make, at least not for the leads. They pose as much as they perform—though, watching it again, I'm struck by the fath-

omless depths Moreau conveys by the force of her sheer presence, by a glance, a stride, a way of placing her body alongside a piano or into a sports car. Her movements are hypnotic. Again, the film is far from inert—there is almost too much going on in any one shot to take in. It rewards repeat viewing. And it does have its wonderfully amusing moments. My favourite occurs at dawn, when Vitti's character, having been the object of Giovanni's insistent, listless affection and Lidia's knowing benevolence and fascination, stands by a wall, as if in need of support, and, just as the couple finally leave her, says, "You two really have worn me out tonight." See Criterion's superb package. Hell, buy it if you can. It contains a visual essay by scholar Giuliana Bruno on the role of architecture in Antonioni that is brilliant, insightful and can only widen one's appreciation for the film exponentially. V

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

FILM 15


FILM

BHAJI IN PROBLEM (STC) Punjabi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE

Captioned, No passes FRI-SUN 12:20, 3:10, 6:30, 9:20; MON 1:20, 4:10, 9:45; TUE-WED 2:30, 5:20, 8:10; THU 1:00, 4:10; 3D : FRI-SUN 1:00, 1:40, 3:50, 4:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:50, 10:20; MON-WED 1:00, 1:30, 3:50, 4:20, 6:40, 7:10, 9:30, 10:00; THU 1:15, 1:30, 4:00, 4:20, 6:00, 6:45, 7:10, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00' 3D: ULTRAAVX : FRI 2:20, 5:10, 8:00, 10:50; SAT 11:30, 2:20, 5:10, 8:00, 10:50; SUN 11:15, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30; MON-WED 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30; THU 2:00, 4:50

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THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening

GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI

INEQUALITY FOR ALL (PG) THU, NOV 14: 3:45, 6:55,

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) Closed Captioned: SAT

7:15, 10:15

FRI-SUN 12:55, 4:05, 7:20, 10:25; MON-THU 1:05, 4:05,

10:00; 3D : SAT 10:00

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G)

GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned

Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:30; MON 2:15; TUE 2:20; WED 1:55; THU 1:25; 3D : FRI, SUN 2:50, 5:10, 7:25; Sat 2:45, 5:10, 7:25; MON-TUE 4:35, 6:55; Thu 3:45

DAILY 2:00, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00

THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (G) Closed

CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) FRI 12:35,

Captioned SAT 9:15

ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:10, 4:10, 7:00, 7:50, 9:40, 10:30; MON, WED 1:10, 4:10, 7:00, 9:40, 10:30; THU 1:10, 4:10, 7:50, 10:30 not recommended for young children) No passes THU 8:30, 9:30, 10:30; ULTRAAVX: THU 8:00

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G)

ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 10:05; SAT 11:10, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 10:05; SUN 12:55, 4:05, 7:20, 10:25; MON 1:10, 3:55, 6:40; TUE-WED 1:10, 3:55, 6:40, 9:25; THU 2:15, 4:55

Closed Captioned DAILY 1:20, 3:55

ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) Closed Captioned

FREE BIRDS (G) FRI-SAT 12:15, 2:35, 4:50; Sun 12:10,

THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (G) SAT 9:15

ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) Closed

Closed Captioned FRI-TUE, THU 12:35, 2:50, 5:10; WED 12:35, 2:45, 5:00; 3D : FRI-WED 1:30, 3:45, 6:30, 8:45; THU 1:30, 3:45, 6:30

DELIVERY MAN (STC) THU 9:30 12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing

content) Closed Captioned FRI-TUE, THU 12:50, 3:50, 7:10, 10:15; WED 3:50, 7:10, 10:15; Star & Strollers Screening: WED 1:00

RUSH CLOCKWORK ANGELS TOUR (Classification not

6:55, 9:45

OUT OF AFRICA (STC) THU 6:45

not recommended for young children) Ultraavx, No passes THU 8:00

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening

CITY CENTRE 9

scenes, not recommended for young children) Closed

14: 6:50, 9:40

FREE BIRDS (G) THU, NOV 14: 6:35; 3D: 8:55 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) THU, NOV

14: 6:55, 9:25

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language)THU, THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening

scenes, not recommended for young children) THU, NOV 14: 6:30, 9:20; 3D: 6:45, 7:00, 9:35, 10:00

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK 2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening

scenes, not recommended for young children) 3D: No passes FRI-SUN 1:20, 2:00, 4:10, 4:50, 7:00, 7:40, 9:50, 10:30; MON-THU 6:40, 7:20, 9:30, 10:10

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned SAT 9:45 SAT 10:00

GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) FRI-SUN 12:40, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:15; MON-THU 7:30, 9:55

Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 1:40, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10; MON-THU 7:15, 10:00

R

CYLCED P % RE A P 00 ER S1 P EY

THEN

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GREYS’ 100% recycled paper products are part of a recycling loop that recycles your office paper – turns it into new paper products – then you buy it back for reuse.

EA

GA

CTS DU RO

CY

CL

IN

content) FRI 6:45, 9:20; SAT-SUN 2:00, 6:45, 9:20; MON-THU 6:45, 9:20

KILL YOUR DARLINGS (18A substance abuse) FRI 6:50, 9:10; SAT-SUN 2:30, 6:50, 9:10; MON-THU 6:50, 9:10 SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening

scenes, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, No passes DAILY 12:30, 3:30; Star & Strollers Screening: WED 1:00; 3D: DAILY 6:30, 9:30; WED 4:30, 7:30, 10:30; ULTRAAVX: THU 2:00, 5:00; FRI-TUE, THU 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30; ULTRAAVX: FRI-WED 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 10:50

GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned DAILY 12:50, 3:10, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10

ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:50, 4:40, 7:25, 10:25 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not recommended for young children) No passes THU 9:00; ULTRAAVX: THU 8:00 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 12:40, 3:50, 7:10, 10:15

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:10, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20; MON-THU 1:20, 4:10, 6:50 CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) Closed Captioned DAILY 9:50

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) Closed

Captioned FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:40, 10:20; MON-TUE, THU 1:45, 4:20, 7:20, 10:05; WED 4:20, 7:20, 10:05; Star & Strollers Screening: WED 1:00

SUN 12:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; MON-THU 6:30, 9:35

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G)

FREE BIRDS (G) FRI-SUN 12:45; MON-THU 1:15; 3D : FRI-SUN

Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 1:50, 4:15, 6:45; MON-WED 6:45

3:00, 5:15, 7:35, 9:45; MON-THU 4:15, 7:15, 9:40

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG violence) Closed Captioned SAT

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude con-

ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) Closed Captioned

DAILY 1:00, 3:20, 5:45, 8:15, 10:45

9:00

tent, coarse language, not rec for children) Closed Captioned

FRI-SUN 1:00, 3:55, 6:55, 9:55; MON-THU 6:50, 9:50

THE SMURFS 2 (G) Closed Captioned SAT 9:30

Get in the loop!

10337-82 Ave, 780.433.0728

12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing

ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE-WED 1:40, 4:50, 7:45, 10:35; MON 12:45, 3:40, 10:35; THU 12:30, 3:15, 6:00

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language)

US EG R

PRINCESS

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) Closed Captioned FRI-

Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 2:10, 4:45, 7:30, 10:05; MON-THU 7:00, 9:40

LE YC EC

14: 5:15, 7:45

NOV 14: 6:40, 9:15

THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (G) Closed

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence,

1525-99 St 780.436.8585

ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) THU, NOV

Captioned SAT 9:15

Cineplex Odeon Windermere, Vip Cinemas, 6151 Currents Dr, 780.822.4250

CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH

ENDER'S GAME (PG coarse language, sexual content)

AN EVENING WITH CRYSTAL PITE (Classification not

CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS

NOV 14: 5:05, 7:40

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language)THU, NOV

RUSH CLOCKWORK ANGELS TOUR (Classification not

OUT OF AFRICA (STC) THU 7:00

ENDER'S GAME (PG coarse language, sexual content) THU,

CARRIE (14A gory violence, disturbing content) THU, NOV

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not recommended for young children) No passes THU 8:00, 8:30

AN EVENING WITH CRYSTAL PITE (Classification not

THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not

content, coarse language, not rec for children) THU, NOV 14: 5:10, 7:20

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude

available) MON 7:30

scenes, not recommended for young children) THU, NOV 14: 5:00; 3D: 5:30, 8:15, 8:00

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) THU, NOV 14: 6:40, 9:45

ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children)

available) SUN 12:55

available) SUN 12:55

DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, NOV 14

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) Closed Captioned

available) MON 7:30

FRI-SUN, TUE 1:15, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45; MON, WED-THU 4:05,

4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600

12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing content) Closed Captioned FRI 12:50, 3:55, 7:10, 10:10; SAT 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; SUN 12:50, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; MON, WED-THU 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 10:05; TUE 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 10:20 content, coarse language, not rec for children) Closed Captioned FRI-SAT 1:10, 3:35, 6:00, 8:20, 10:40; Sun 1:00, 3:25, 5:40, 8:00, 10:20; MON-WED 2:10, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; THU 2:10, 4:25, 7:00, 9:20

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude

PLANES (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:50; 3D : DAILY

KRRISH 3 (PG violence) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 1:55, 5:00, 9:00; MON, WED-THU 5:00, 9:00

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: EUGENE ONEGIN– ENCORE (Classification not available) SAT 10:55

FREE BIRDS (G)

content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRI-SAT 10:55; Closed Captioned SUN-WED 2:10, 4:40, 7:45, 10:20; THU 2:10, 4:40, 7:40, 10:40; FRI-SAT 2:10, 4:40, 7:40

Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:05, 4:20, 7:00, 9:35; MON, WED-THU 4:20, 7:00, 9:35

DELIVERY MAN (STC) THU 9:30

Captioned FRI-SAT 6:50, 10:50; SUN-WED 6:50, 9:30; THU 6:50

language) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:40, 4:10, 7:25, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 4:10, 7:25, 9:50

THE FAMILY (14A coarse language, brutal violence)

rec for children) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 10:00; MON-TUE 9:15; Wed 10:30; THU 10:25

DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, NOV 14

rec for children) THU, NOV 14: 5:10

EMPIRE CLAREVIEW 10

THU, NOV 14: 7:05, 9:50

Captioned FRI-SAT 12:25, 3:00, 5:35, 8:10, 10:45; Sun 11:30, 2:00, 4:35, 7:20, 9:55; MON, THU 1:40, 4:15, 6:55, 9:50; TUE-WED 1:40, 4:15, 7:00, 9:50

SAT, MON-WED 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 9:55; SUN 3:40, 6:45, 9:55; THU 12:40, 3:40, 9:55

10:00

ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) Closed

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) Closed Captioned FRI-

not rec for children) THU, NOV 14: 9:25

14: 7:10, 9:40

1:50, 4:45, 7:50, 10:40; SAT 11:00, 1:50, 4:45, 7:50, 10:40; SUN 1:20, 4:20, 7:10, 10:15; MON 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:05; TUE-THU 1:05, 4:05, 7:20, 10:25

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence,

ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) THU, NOV 14: 3:40,

3:00, 5:25, 8:00, 10:30; SAT 3:15, 5:25, 8:05, 10:30; SUN 4:55, 7:35, 10:05; MON-WED 2:35, 5:10, 7:35, 10:10; THU 1:20, 3:45, 6:10

9:00

LEE DANIELS' THE BUTLER (14A) Closed Captioned

130 Century Crossing, Spruce Grove 780.962.2332

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) Closed Captioned

3:55; MON, WED-THU 3:55

4:30, 7:05, 9:10

EMPIRE THEATRES–SPRUCE GROVE

scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned SAT 9:45

THE SMURFS 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:30,

MACHETE KILLS (18A gory violence, crude coarse

THU, NOV 14: 4:00, 7:15, 10:10

MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE (PG) Turkey Shoot Live

Comedy: THU 9:30

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening

THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence, not

language) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 9:55; MON, WED-THU 4:25, 7:20, 9:55

ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children)

METRO SHORTS (14A) Mostly Water: THU 7:00

THE COUNSELOR (14A sexual content, gory violence,

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG violence, frightening

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG violence) Closed Captioned SAT

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14A sexual content, crude coarse

content, coarse language, not rec for children) THU, NOV 14: 4:05, 6:40, 9:40

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) THU, NOV 14: 7:50

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) SAT 10:00

2 GUNS (14A violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 7:30, 10:00

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude

FORREST GUMP (STC) Gateway to Cinema: WED 6:45; Free

for Students

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not recommended for young children) No passes THU 8:15, 8:30; ULTRAAVX: THU 8:00

2:35, 4:50; MON-THU 2:30, 4:40; 3D: Closed Captioned Fri-Sat 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 7:55, 10:15; SUN 12:40, 3:30, 5:45, 7:55, 10:15; MON-THU 1:15, 3:25, 5:35, 7:50, 10:00

9:00

NOV 14: 3:05, 6:35, 9:30

BARBARELLA (M) TUE 7:00

FREE BIRDS (G) THU, NOV 14: 7:30

Closed Captioned FRI-WED 1:40, 4:30, 7:30, 10:10; THU 1:40, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG violence) Closed Captioned SAT

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language)THU,

6:45, 9:50

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language)

DAILY 9:20

HEADWIND–LAST CALL (STC) SUN 4:00

scenes, not recommended for young children) THU, NOV 14: 7:00; 3D: 3:10, 3:30, 6:30, 9:45, 10:15

FREE BIRDS (G) THU, NOV 14: 3:50, 7:10, 9:35

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE

THE WOLVERINE (14A violence) Closed Captioned

MUSCLE SHOALS (STC) SAT 7:00; SUN 1:45, 9:15; WED 9:30

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening

GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) THU, NOV 14: 2:45, 6:50

FRI-TUE, THU 1:15, 4:15, 7:20, 10:20; WED 4:15, 7:20, 10:20; Star & Strollers Screening: WED 1:00

PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening scenes) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:25; 3D : DAILY 3:45, 6:40, 9:15

TRIGGER (14A coarse language, substance abuse) SAT 4:00

FRI, SUN 7:05, 9:45; SAT 11:20, 2:10, 7:05, 9:45; MON-WED 6:50, 9:45; THU 6:50; Closed Captioned: FRI 2:10, 5:00, 7:45, 10:35; SAT 5:35, 8:15, 10:50; SUN 1:50, 4:45, 7:40, 10:25; MON-THU 2:05, 4:45, 7:30, 10:20

scenes, not recommended for young children) 3D: Closed Captioned, No passes FRI-WED 12:30, 3:20, 6:20, 9:10; THU 2:20, 5:10, 8:00, 9:00; 3D: ULTRAAVX: FRI-SAT 1:50, 4:50, 7:45, 10:40; ULTRAAVX: SUN-WED 1:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30; THU 12:30, 3:20, 6:20 3D: FRI-WED 2:30, 5:20, 8:10; ULTRAAVX: THU 1:30, 4:30

scenes, not rec for young children) SAT 9:45

1:00; 3D : DAILY 3:50, 7:10, 9:40

10200-102 Ave, 780.421.7018 DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, NOV 14

ESCAPE PLAN (14A violence, coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 9:20; MON-WED 9:15 FREE BIRDS (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:30, 2:45; 3D : FRI-SUN 5:00, 7:15, 9:40; MON-WED 7:15, 9:25

ENDER'S GAME: THE IMAX EXPERIENCE (PG violence, not rec for young children) DAILY 1:10

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE: THE IMAX

(PG violence, not recommended for young children) No passes THU 8:00

THOR: THE DARK WORLD: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for

young children) No passes FRI-WED 4:00, 7:00, 10:00; THU 4:00

LEDUC CINEMAS

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude

content, coarse language, not rec for children) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:45, 3:10, 5:35, 8:00, 10:25; MON-THU 7:40, 10:05

GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.458.9822 DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, NOV 14

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) THU,

NOV 14: 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30

ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) THU, NOV 14: 12:35, 2:45, 4:55, 7:10, 9:20

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude

content, coarse language, not rec for children) THU, NOV 14: 1:45 3:45 5:45 7:45 9:40

4702-50 St Leduc, 780.986-2728 DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, NOV 14

THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) THU, NOV 14: 3D : 6:55, 9:35 FREE BIRDS (G) THU, NOV 14: 3D: 7:05, 9:30 LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) THU, NOV 14: 7:10, 9:40

ENDER'S GAME (PG coarse language, sexual content) THU, NOV 14 : 6:55, 9:35

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude

content, coarse language, not rec for children) THU, NOV 14: 7:00, 9:45

WETASKIWIN CINEMAS

THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening

scenes, not recommended for young children) THU, NOV 14: 1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:40

Wetaskiwin 780.352.3922 DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, NOV 14

THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) THU, NOV 14: 3D : 6:55, 9:35;

With no added virgin pulp in our unique manufacturing process, we mean it when we say "100% recycled."

FREE BIRDS (G) THU, NOV 14: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:50, 8:45 METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU

Greys is a partner facility at the Edmonton Waste Management Centre.

15 REASONS TO LIVE (STC) FRI 6:45; SAT 9:15; SUN

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) THU, NOV

THE BROKEN CIRCLE BREAKDOWN (18A mature

ENDER'S GAME (PG coarse language, sexual content) THU,

Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212

Get in the loop. Call us at (780) 442-0450 for a free sample of our paper products or visit www.greys.ca

12:00; MON 7:00

subject matter) English subtitles FRI 8:45; SAT 1:30; SUN 7:00; MON 9:00; TUE 9:15

GOZU (R) Metro Bizarro, English subtitles FRI 11:00

FREE BIRDS (G) THU, NOV 14: 3D : 7:05 14: 7:10, 9:40

NOV 14: 6:55, 9:35

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) THU, NOV

14: 9:30

16 FILM

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013


SNOW ZONE // THE SEASON

SNOW ZONE

MEGHAN BAXTER MEGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

// ©iStockphoto.com/ilchoni

I

'm sure I'm not alone when the first sight of snowfall arouses a particular daydream of barrelling down a hill amidst my friends and clouds of snow. After convincing myself that this will be the year I finally buy some gear and join them, I think back to the last time I tried skiing and the abject horror of discovering the lack of friction between waxed plastic and snow while I braced myself for impact with an unsuspecting ski instructor. Such longing for the mountains may trigger many eager adventurers to book the earliest available hotel room and lift pass, all the while neglecting to properly prepare their body and gear before hitting the slopes. In another effort to learn to ski and not repeat the errors of my past, I talked with some local retailers to learn the essentials of finding and maintaining my own equipment. Preparing for the season starts as early as spring for beginners and pros alike, when the previous ski season comes to a close. Georgette Look, rental and retail manager at Snow Valley, says those coming off the mountain for the last time should already be thinking ahead for next season, and the most essential and yet overlooked step is ensuring they prepare their equipment for storage. "They need to properly put their

equipment away for the summer," no pressure points or pinch points for the workers at the shop to put new customers through a parade of Look says. "That means having it or anything like that." questions and fittings, as entirely tuned up, or at least getting some wax on it to protect it over the sum- Taking your time is essential in en- different factors are taken into acmer. People bring their equipment suring that you can communicate count than simply buying casual in starting in the fall and we've well with the retailer and that they footwear. "You go into the back and you sit got a lot of rust, a lot of dried-out can properly assess your needs. Heading into Skiers Sportshop, the down with the guys and they ask bases, and that kind of damage can be prevented. Now, that dam- task at hand feels no less daunting. you a bunch of questions—what age is repairable, but it's better to Endless walls of skis, snowboards, type of skier are you? How much put your equipment away in good boots and apparel have me think- do you weigh? What kind of feet do you have?— shape than to try and then they'll to get it back into People bring their equipment in starting in the bring out a good shape come the fall when you fall and we've got a lot of rust, a lot of dried-out couple of boots you have to pull it back out of bases, and that kind of damage can be prevented. and try everything your garage." on," Platten exThose hoping to plains. hop on skis for the But in the end, first time would benefit from thinking about buying ing that I'm going to be there for a personal preference often plays very while their friends are packing their while. As a seasoned snowboarder little in what boots you end up with. "The boots kind of pick the person," skis and snowboards away. With the and employee of Skiers Sportshop, spring thaw comes discounted snow Conner Platten has experienced the Platten says. "It's not necessarily like gear, as hills and retail shops begin discomfort of being on the slopes 'I like those!' or 'These feel good!' And off-loading old stock to prepare for with ill-fitted gear, and the crux of it can be really hard for somebody the new arrivals in the fall. Starting any skiing or snowboarding experi- who hasn't worn a ski boot because so early in the year highlights what ence tends to rest where body con- they want the most comfortable, but they're going to get you in a boot and Look sees as a necessity in ensuring nects with board: the boot. "It can be so brutal when you go make you walk around the store for a smooth entry in the sport: time. "What I send people away with out and you're in the wrong equip- a while, or even take the boot home most of the time is that when ment," Platten says. "I would say and try it on for two weeks." As intense as it may be, there's only you're buying your equipment, take boots are probably most important your time," Look says. "Don't feel for beginners, because if you're in so much one can do to prepare their rushed; don't let the sales people the wrong boot, you're having the gear. Comfort and safety will also depend on how skiers and snowboardrush you. Spend time standing in worst day of your life." It's routine, according to Platten, ers prepare their mind and body. the boots to make sure there are

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

"Yoga is wonderful for skiing, because you want to keep your joints and muscles in tune and stretched out," Platten says. "That's where most people get injured, because their body isn't prepared." Like any sport, a certain amount of year-round dedication is required, and while some late-bloomers might be hesitant to follow through, Look points out that skimming through the preparation process will only make things worse. "Skiing and snowboarding are difficult sports to get into already— there might be a fear factor, especially with adults," she adds. "Adults are terrified of falling; they're a bit more afraid than kids are. Take the time and don't be rushed." Ultimately, both agree that confidence is key in skiing and snowboarding, and whether you're a beginner or a seasoned rider, being prepared and knowing that you've done all you can to protect yourself goes a long way in being able to enjoy yourself on the slopes. "The best thing for beginners, intermediate and advanced is keeping a great mindset and having a positive outlook towards skiing," Platten says. "Because confidence really is key in what keeps you going." RYAN STEPHENS

RYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

SNOW ZONE 17


SNOW ZONE HART GOLBECK // HART@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Getting their snowpacks on Operations staff are fully mobilized at all of the resorts and local hills. There hasn't been an overabundance of the natural stuff yet, so the snow guns are blazing and groomers are moving the piles all over the runs. A few resorts like Nakiska and Lake Louise opened early, but most of the others plan to crank their lifts up this weekend or in the very near future. Big White near Kelowna is opening early this year. Heavy snowfalls have created a 65-cm base that has it moving its opening day up two weeks to November 16. But what do you do if you don't have an extensive snow-making system? Sunshine Village practises snow farming. It's an art the staff perfected during the last 20 years. Early in the season, six mountain operation staff members strategi-

cally place 30 km of fencing designed to collect snow. These reservoirs of snow are the source for snow cats to push the snow onto a number of the resort's 111 runs for the start of the season and acts as a supplement to runs throughout the year. Sunshine Village relies strictly on Mother Nature to produce its snow, and snow farming is a large reason why. Big party plans In 1964, Marmot Basin Ski-Lifts Ltd was issued a license of operation by Parks Canada. I have fond memories here because this is where I strapped on my first pair of skis back in 1976, struggled my way to the Tranquilizer chair and once at the top, friends pushed me forward into this snowy wonderland. For many years Marmot Basin was just another relatively

small, friendly ski resort. For the young and fit, a short hike would set you up with some amazing natural terrain off the beaten path. All of that changed in 2003 when new owners took over and began an improvement scheme, investing $29 million for new facilities and lifts—and they're not done by any means. For now, more lifts and parking-lot improvements are on the short list, all part of a

master plan that Marmot Basin has been working on with Parks Canada. This is going to be a great year as not only will there be a number of 50th anniversary celebrations, but this is the 25th anniversary for the Jasper in January Festival and, you know, that's going to be three weeks of amazing deals and parties.

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SKI SHOP 18 SNOW ZONE

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

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VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

SNOW ZONE 19


SNOW ZONE SNOW ZONE // WEATHER

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he ski and snowboard season is upon us again and it's time for yours truly to scour the web and check in with a few weather experts from in and around our resorts. Last winter snow conditions and temperatures were quite good at our local ski hills and mountain resorts. We're all hoping for a repeat with even more snow, and that's always a possibility. My first weather check-in was early this fall and data from the National Climate Prediction Center pointed out that December to January stood an equal chance of being below normal or above normal for snowfall for the west.  Their guidance suggested  neither  a strong El Niño or La Niña and a good bet for near normal snowfall, or what weather climatologists call a "neutral pattern." Next I checked the ever-reliable Farmers' Almanac. Last year it predicted a mild winter with a normal snowpack, except for Alberta, where several strong storms were to push the snow accumulations above normal. This winter the Almanac is predicting above average snow fall in the mountains with

some massive snowstorms in January. I sure hope the Almanac pulls through again considering its accuracy rating of nearly 80 percent. The website accuweather.com is calling for normal winter conditions in our region with the possibility of major snow in western and southern Alberta. A number of other climate specialists, including Environment Canada and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), are forecasting Alberta and Saskatchewan to be quite cold with drier air, but they do agree major snow accumulations in our mountains are quite probable. However, the British Columbia coast is another story. Most weather models are predicting a drier winter for the west coast, so Whistler may not have a stellar year, although, I don't quite see how the coast can ever be drier than the interior of BC and the mountains. The experts are painting a pretty picture, but what is Mother Nature telling us, and do our local mountain men agree with such a snowy picture? Matt Mosteller VP marketing and sales at Fernie

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

Mountain Resort reports peculiar behaviour by local muskrats living along the banks of the rivers and ponds. Typically when the winter is going to be big, muskrats burrow in deeper and deeper to protect themselves from the elements. This fall it looked like they were digging to China. Rocket Miller, mountain operations manager at Lake Louise, is known to be a bit of a weather expert, but definitely a man of few words. His report: "This year, cold and snowy." Dave Gibson, president and CEO of Marmot Basin, points to an overabundance of berries on the mountain ash this fall. He reports squirrels at Marmot have been stockpiling for months. On top of that, the geese left town much earlier this year, and that's a clear sign of another great winter. I like what I'm hearing and although early season snowfall is a little light, cold temperatures and an upcoming snowy 14-day forecast by The Weather Network gives me hope that this will be another great year on the slopes. HART GOLBECK

HART@VUEWEEKLY.COM


ARTS

ARTS EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ARTIFACTS

REVUE // VISUAL ARTS

Punctuate! Fundraiser / Sat, Nov 16 (7 pm) Punctuate! Theatre, one of Edmonton’s most helpful independent theatre companies— one that, so far, has built its seasons by sharing its theatre with other fledging companies—is looking for a little love itself. It’s hosting a fundraiser at the Druid, including a silent auction and a raffle. And beer, because it is definitely happening at a bar and bars are definitely where beer likes

Until Sat, Nov 23 Utopia/Dystopia Works by Michelle Lavoie Modern Painter’s Gallery (Great Bear Framing)

PAUL BLINOV // PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

to hang out. There’s a complimentary drink with admission. (The Druid [Jasper Ave], $10, email info@punctuatetheatre.com for tickets) Funhouse Refinery / Sat, Nov 16 (9 pm) The Art Gallery of Alberta’s latest installment of its semi-regular series of late-night art parties is looking to keep the unpredictable spirit of Halloween alive in November: it’s drawing inspiration from Geoffrey Farmer’s

The Intellection of Lady Spider House, and its curatorial duties are being handled by performance artist Kristine Nutting, who has booked “The World’s Smallest Circus Show” and spooky garage rockers the Lad Mags (who just put out a Halloween EP), among other acts. Plus, the galleries are all open to be wandered and experienced, long after regular visiting hours are over. (Art Gallery of Alberta, $39 – $45)

Body Awareness by Annie Baker

ure fades in a blur of motion; only feet remain visible, solidly planted on the ground. But the ground itself is shifting. Like in a cubist painting, nothing is at the same angle: vanishing points converge in random directions. There is nothing stable for these figures to hold onto, not even the earth they stand on.

The Utopia/Dystopia of technology // Michelle Lavoie

H

ow did people survive without cell phones? I forgot mine a few days ago and suffered withdrawal. I felt lonely, anxious and abandoned in a city jungle—and that was just on my way to get groceries. This kind of modern-day angst is what Michelle Lavoie explores in her show Utopia/ Dystopia. Her impressively large series of 4'x6' acrylic gel transfer paintings constitute something of an installation that surround and enclose the viewer in a hyper urban world. Of course, Lavoie isn't just examining the hazards of forgetting one's cell phone. Her art sheds light on modern experience: the zeitgeist of a plugged-in, fast-forward life. A lifestyle so surrounded by technological change that on a graph it looks like an upward line of a heart attack of an electrocardiogram. Technology permeates our every waking moment. About a half of an average person's waking hours are spent online, on the phone, or watching TV (based on a survey by Ofcom's annual Communications Market Report). Technology

invades not just what we think but what we eat: even fresh produce looks more like it was spat out of a mechanical contraption than grew on anything remotely resembling a tree. We pop a shocking number of pills: according to the National Center for Health Statistics the use of antidepressants in the US alone has increased by almost 400 percent between 1988 and 2008. In sum, the line between technology and our bodies is increasingly blurred. How do people cope with such tremendous technological stresses? Lavoie answers this question through the poetic metaphor of her paintings. Each of the figures in her paintings stands in a warrior stance battling invisible forces. The foe is no longer a good old dragon that can be slain with a sword. Modern-day struggle is amorphous. It's in the in the food we eat (like the futurist, genetically modified objects that surround Lavoie's figures) and in the atmosphere we breathe (like the silent pressure to accomplish multiple tasks at the snap of a finger). Each fig-

Despite appearances Lavoie is not opposed to technology and progress. She is savvy with computers and uses them like old-fashioned paintbrushes. Confined to a very small studio, she has a clever technique for viewing large paintings at a glance. She takes digital photos of work in progress, downloads it onto an editing program and hashes out ideas at the click of a button. She even uses her cell phone to see her works on a tiny scale. In fact, her paintings' format is proportional to a cell screen. It's hard to know if these artworks portray progress as a utopian dream designed to make life easier, faster and more productive or dystopian nightmare. Lavoie's figures are neither vanquished nor victorious. They persist and persevere. Theirs is not the illustrious heroism of soldiers but the invisible courage to confront an ever-shifting environment. It's the small-scale audacity to wake up in the morning and check off an increasing multitude or tasks, answer endless emails, digest a monsoon of information, and figure out—yet again—how to get that new computer program or iPhone operating system to actually work.

Canadian premiere!

November 6-24, 2013 Varscona Theatre 10329-83 Ave

For tickets call:

Tix on the Square 780-420-1757 or Shadow Theatre 780-434-5564 www.shadowtheatre.org

AGNIESZKA MATEJKO

AGNIESZKA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

ARTS 21


ARTS REVUE // THEATRE

Until Sun, Nov 24 (8 pm; 2 pm Sun matinee) Directed by Brad Moss Roxy Theatre, $15 – $27

Pig Girl 'I

've got a life, and I'm gonna keep it," says Dying Woman, quite a ways into Pig Girl, having almost certainly already realized, on some level, that she won't. Her statement reads more as defiance than naivety; rejection of, rather than submission to, the man who has her tied up and wounded in a barn on his pig farm. In other words, it's a matter of soul over body, a struggle that lends Colleen Murphy's raw, unflinching oneact—based on the Robert Pickton murders—the bulk of its strength. The plot comes in a split-focus: Killer's shack looms in centre stage—a creepy design by Cory Sincennes that juts, ever so slightly and imposingly, into the house—where we find Killer (Randy Hughson) and Dying Girl (Na-

dien Chu) at 4 am one lonesome night. On the sides of the shack stand Police Officer (Brian Dooley) and Dying Girl's Sister (Elinor Holt), and we follow that pair's interactions over the span of nine years, spent trying to discover, mostly vainly, what happened that night. So on its corporeal side, Pig Girl is a raw, teeth-gritter drama about missing women and murder and the failures of bureaucracy to prevent both of those things. It's ugly stuff, both in terms of on-stage violence and in exposing the nightmarish frustrations of bureaucracy's blind eye to high-risk lifestyles. It's watching the worst-case scenario of a missing-persons scenario played out as someone desperately hopes against that worst-case scenario.

On its less physical level it's about, as playwright Colleen Murphy quoted in an interview last week, letting the dead speak. And Pig Girl's strongest resonance is there: Dying Woman gives a life and a humanity and a vibrancy to the lost, nameless women that were never identified. We're shown a fictionalized, composite one, of course, but that doesn't lessen the potency. In Pig Girl, the ghosts of the unaccounted for, and the people who wait for them, are haunting. The cast, led by director Brad Moss, bravely goes into this very dark place with compelling performances. As Dying Woman, Chu gives the bravest performance of the year, one of heart-

wrenching resilience and visceral humanity in the face of her approaching end. Hughson, an import from Stratford, offers a carefully constructed Killer, damaged in his own way. On the outsides of the shack, Holt's increasing, inescapable despair is palpable; only Dooley, as the cop, feels a little encumbered by the show's difficult, open structure, but still manages to mine pathos out of his arc, one of weary resignation: first of dealing with the family of another missing person, then of the guilt of the failure. Theatre Network's run is Pig Girl's world premiere, and as such there are various nuts-and-bolts that could use adjusting. The show's tread towards the inevitable gets bogged down for long

strips of inertness; frustrations of progress on both sides of the story occasionally translates to the audience, too. I'm not sure the duel time-signatures, as arranged here, benefit the overall arc. Still: this is unusual theatre, brave and bold and violent and, in its honesty, an opening into a necessary discussion we don't often force ourselves have. It's not preaching a message—Murphy was adamant about that in the interviews leading up to the show—but instead, Pig Girl seems engineered to make you feel this damage more than think about it. (That's left to you, in its aftermath.) And in that, it's a stunning, haunting success. PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // PHOTOGRAPHS

Beyond Photography

There was no existing model to help kids get off the streets, so the iHuman Youth Society invented one. Since 1997, thousands of traumatized youth have changed their lives through the arts.

C

Wallis Kendal & Sandra Bromley Co-Founders - iHuman Melissa and Jason iHuman Youth Mentors

22 ARTS

huck Samuels never got the of my mother that's in the exhibichance to ask his father why he tion ... there was something about became a photographer before he it that I couldn't get out of my mind passed away in the early '90s. for a number of months," Samuels Instead, he's created Before Pho- says. "And then suddenly it occurred tography, a fictional investigation to me: contrary to everything I saw into his father's nearly obses- when I was growing up that, in fact, sive venture, as well as the era my father loved my mother and he before Samuels expressed his love for his wife and for received his first Fri, Nov 15 – Sat, Dec 21 his kids through phocamera from his Opening reception Fri, Nov 15 (7 pm) tography. At that father in 1967. same moment I realSamuels has Latitude 53 been exhibiting ized—if you look at his own work since 1980, often it from a strictly Freudian, mechaniturning the lens inward and inves- cal perspective—why I became a tigating the medium of photogra- photographer who photographs phy itself as his subject matter. Be- himself. So it's sort of recapturing yond Photography is no exception the love of the parent." as it examines his father's journey and what photography meant to The exhibition, which consists of him, as well as what may have led three sections made up of video Samuels himself to pursue a ca- and still photography, also invites audiences to question photography reer in the medium. "I found this one particular photo as Samuels does and look at it criti-

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

cally rather than simply accepting its veracity. He says it should be questioned as a practice, as a narrative, and for what it means in terms of the spread of information. Samuels began his practice on film, but he does not believe the manipulation present today occurs any less readily than it did when he began. "Photography's always been manipulated. Photography's thought of as objective, that a picture's worth 1000 words, photographs don't lie, but in fact, they don't tell the whole truth," he explains. "What you're seeing with an unmanipulated photograph is a particular portion, a particular moment cropped out of linear time and cropped out of space, so it's a very precise choice that a photographer's making when they take a picture—that is manipulation." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


REVUE // THEATRE

Sia 'W

No easy answers in Sia // Mat Simpson

e must separate the sense stumbling drunk and taken captive by his friend Abraham (Thomas Olafrom the nonsense." A dark and captivating look into a jide), a former Liberian child soldier world of violent conflict and compet- who describes the act as "neither poing power dynamics, Matthew Mack- litical nor fanatical." Abraham's ranenzie's Sia has transformed the Arts som demands are very specific, and Barns' PCL Thewhile I won't share atre into a grim, Until Sun, Nov 17 (8 pm) the details—too foreboding space Directed by Laura Raboud much of the plot is balanced upon with a towering ATB Financial Arts Barns, tree of ripped $15 – $20 them—I will say burlap branches that they are intiand twisted metal mately connected roots rising above a broken brick with Abraham's sister Sia (Makambe wall and patchwork corrugated K Simamba), whom we meet in a semetal sheeting. We're in Buduburam, ries of flashbacks to when they are a Liberian refugee camp in Ghana, 16 and 11, just about to have their watching University of Alberta stu- border village invaded by the Libedent Nick (Patrick Lundeen) become rian rebels during the civil war.

Sia is fascinating for its refusal to give the audience a clear trajectory of interpretation. We can follow each of the characters' stories easily enough, but Mackenzie's sophisticated script (which won the 44th Alberta Playwriting Competition in 2010) firmly avoids becoming a collection of stereotypes and indulgence of First World guilt. Sia does not attempt to offer a trite solution or false hope for these immense problems, nor is it an exercise in catharsis. Through the very specific situation playing out on stage, Sia unseats a host of the audience's ingrained biases—I suspect a majority of the crowd will leave feeling puzzled and unsure what the cor-

REVUE // THEATRE

rect response should be. Much of the play's success derives from this trio of talented actors, who create and sustain a gripping stage chemistry with one another. The suspense between Olajide and Lundeen grows increasingly anxious as the play progresses, and is neatly juxtaposed by Simamba's charming portrayal of the precocious and spirited Sia. "I want to help, but I don't know what I'm helping!" shouts Nick, a sentiment the keenly captures the crux at Sia's heart: before you can help, you must first be asked to do so.

MEL PRIESTLEY

MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

NORTHERN LIGHT THEATRE PRESENTS

Body Awareness

Gettin' argumentative

S

hadow Theatre's first offering of the season wants you to think about how you think about your body. Annie Baker's 2008 play Body Awareness is laden with competing ideologies at the social, political, sexual and philosophical levels—but never once does it feel like a soapbox piece. All those issues are neatly packaged in a distinctly contemporary—and definitely not wholehearted—family comedy. The action is spurred by Frank Bonitatibus (Paul Cowling), a photographer of nude women who comes to stay at the home of partners Joyce (Coralie Cairns) and Phyllis (Stephanie Wolfe) during "Body Awareness" week at Phyllis' university. Also in the mix is Joyce's adult son Jared (played by the hilariously glib Caleb Ellsworth-Clark), who still lives at home and has significant behavioural problems; as a psychology professor, Phyllis attributes these to Asperger's while Jared vehemently denies this prognosis. The show starts with Phyllis addressing the audience as her class on the first day of "Body Awareness" week, a scene that repeats over the

course of the show as we move from ders her futilely combative. Each of Monday to Friday. While a bit awk- the characters experiences a similar ward and uncertain in front of her moment over the course of the show: class, Phyllis becomes a wildcat of while Jared may have serious psychofeminist rhetoric when she's at home logical issues, he may also just be a with her partner and stepson, imme- spoiled brat—especially when he suddenly changes diately dismissing his standpoint in Frank's work as Until Sun, Nov 24 (7:30 pm; Sun misogynist. While matinee 2 pm) a clear ploy to absolve himself of this provides a Directed by Valerie Planche responsibility for provocative coun- Varscona Theatre, $21 – $27 his actions. Thus, terpoint to Frank's there's a circularown casual interpretation of his art, Body Awareness ity to Body Awareness that necesholds both sides up for scrutiny, and sitates the audience stepping in and the show is therefore both refreshing sorting out the conflicting messages and frustrating for its lack of adher- for themselves—a freedom that ence to either side of the feminist- some will appreciate, but others may misogynist dichotomy—or to any of find irksome. Ultimately, Body Awareness points the competing ideologies presented. to the necessity of retaining the huThe audience is able to simultane- manity in grand philosophical disously empathize with and reject each cussions: arguments on paper don't argument as it shifts over the course always translate to reality, and what of the show. Wolfe expertly delivers use is clinging to a set of principles Phyllis' zealous feminism, which is rel- when it means sacrificing everyone evant albeit militant—but this char- you love, and who loves you? acter's stalwart refusal to comprise MEL PRIESTLEY MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM undermines her arguments and ren-

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

Bitches & money 1878

BY MARTIN HENSHELL

NOVEMBER 22 - 30, 2013 PREVIEW NOVEMBER 21

7:30PM NIGHTLY TUESDAY – SUNDAY BOOTY CALL PERFORMANCE 11:30PM FRIDAY NOVEMBER 29 2-FOR-1 TICKETS TUESDAY AT THE DOOR In 1878 London,”Black” Jack, Cora and Patience believe they are the perfect criminal team – until one night the job goes horribly wrong and they’re left stranded in a hideout wondering who to trust now that the chips are down and the guns are out. On the run from the law and with no one to trust, each crook fights to escape with their life, their freedom, and most importantly - the loot. Bitches & Money - a play about gambling, greed and time travel. PCL STUDIO, ATB FINANCIAL ARTS BARNS 10330 84 AVENUE EDMONTON, ALBERTA

FOR TICKETS CALL 780-409-1910 OR VISIT WWW.FRINGETHEATREADVENTURES.CA W W W. N O RT H E R N L I G H T T H E AT R E . CO M

ARTS 23


ARTS WEEKLY

EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LiSTiNGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRiDAY AT 3PM

DANCE ZUMBA BASHFIERY FRIDAYS • Central Senior Lions Centre, 11113-113 St • Shake your body to the Latin beat, and freestyle dance to live DJ music. Featuring Tamico Russell, Ike Henry, DJ Rocko and Zumba instructors Dru D, Manuella F-St, Michelle M, Sabrina D. and Cuban Salsa instructor Leo Gonzales • 3rd Fri each month • Nov 15, 7pm • $20 (online)/$25 (door) VINOK WORLDANCE • Chateau Louis Centre, 11727 Kingsway • Christmas Around the World: • Until Nov 17 • $70: Nov 14, 5:30pm (buffet), 7pm (show); $75: Nov 15-16, 6pm (buffet), 7pm (show); $75: Nov 17 11:30am (buffet), 1pm (show), $39 (child 12 and under) at christmas.vinok.ca, 780.454.3739

Stony Plain, 780.963.9573 • CELEBRATE THE SEASON: pottery, handmade decorations • Until Dec 24; Open house: Nov 15 and Dec 7; Proceeds to local Christmas charity

DC3 ART PROJECTS • 10567-111 St, 780.686.4211 • OUR FAMILIES: The Impact of Contemporary Family on Art; works by Paul Freeman, Francois Morelli (w/son Didier), Tammy Salzl • extended to Nov 30; open: Thu-Fri 6-9pm; Sat 11am-6pm DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St, 780.760.1278 • APPROACHING RIVER CITY: Meghan Dauphineé; until Nov 23 • REPRISE: Works by various gallery artists; Nov 24-Dec 22 DEVON POTTERY GUILD • Guild Studio, Old Robina Baker School, 1 Jasper ourt South, Devon • Christmas sale • Nov 22, 7-9pm; Nov 23-24, 10am-4pm DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY • 10332-124 St • RECOLLECTIONS: Works from Private Collections • Until Nov 23 EDMONTON GALLERY WALK • Gallery Walk Galleries:

Kong: The 8th Wonder of the World; Nov 16, 8pm; $15

Society of Strathcona County artists • Nov 16-17

FRONT GALLERY • 12312 Jasper Ave, 780.488.2952 • New works by Jennifer Poburan • Nov 23-Dec 11 • Artist opening: Nov 23, 2-4pm GALLERIE PAVA • 9524-87 St, 780.461.3427 • NATURAL POWER: Works by Barbara Hull Chan; Until Nov 27 GALLERY 7 • Bookstore on Perron, 7 Perron St, St Albert • CORNUCOPIA: Paintings by Marina Bazos; until Nov 25 GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.944.5383 • Gallery: The Seventh Kingdom: Mixed media artwork by Lori Kieser • Display Cases: VESSELS OF PURPOSE: Clay figurines by Corwin Cherwonka • Until Nov 30 HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112 St • Main Gallery: QUIET REBUILD: Alexis Marie Chute • Front Room: Yael Brotman; 'til Nov 29; Artist Talks: Brotman 7pm, Chute 7:30pm JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY (JAAG) • Strathcona Place Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 109 St, 78 Ave,

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St, 780.407.7152 • IMAGES MAKE THE WORDS COME ALIVE: by Barbara Hartmann & Gwen Molnar; until Dec 22 • After Hours Hallway Gallery: THE TEXTURE OF LIGHT AND LOVE: Paintings by Nancy Corrigan; until Nov 30 MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-51 St, Stony Plain, 780.963.9935 • multicentre.org • Parkland Potter’s Guild: Fifth Biennial Exhibition; until Nov 22 MUTTART HALL–CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC • 10050 MacDonald Dr • Fall Music Festival Gala: David Shkolny, pastel artist • Nov 16; art exhibition: 3pm, Concert: 2pm; reception to follow featuring art inspired edibles NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81 Ave, 780.432.0240 • paintspot.ca • WHAT’S YOUR HANG UP?: Craft by Edmonton Calligraphic Society Members; until Nov 15 • ALL IN A DAY'S DREAM: Works by Kristina Sobstad; until Nov 15 • MEINE BILDER SIND KLUGER ALS ICH: Painting and Installation by Nathaniel Wong; Nov 21-Dec 31 NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS • 9225-118 Ave • CHIMERIUM: HYBRIDS FROM NINA'S STUDIOS: Works by the NHCA Collective; curated by Sherri Chaba; until Dec 20 • IT’S A WHALE: Desiree McCook; until Nov 30; opening: Nov 14, 5-7pm, music, food and festivities PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave, 780.455.7479 • Works by Amy Claire Huestis and Robert Wiseman; Until Nov 19 • WINTER GROUP SHOWS: New work by gallery artists; Nov 23-Feb 8 PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA • 8555 Roper Rd, 780.427.1750 • culture.alberta.ca/paa • VICTORY ON THE FIELD EXHIBIT: Exploring the effects of the First and Second World Wars on sports in Alberta; until Jan 31; free Pro's Art GAllery • 17971-106A Ave • Mon-Sat 10am-1:30pm; Wed 2-5:30pm; Mon-Fri 6:30-9pm; Closed Thu • GENE PROKOP AND FRIENDS: Artworks by Gene Prokop with works by Zhaoming Wu, Robert Johnson, Sherri McGraw and Gregg Kreutz, and Monte Carlo car artist, Alfredo de la Maria (Argentina), and artists from the Ukraine and Russia • Until Dec 20 ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102 Ave, 780.453.9100 • royalalbertamuseum.ca • CHOP SUEY ON THE PRAIRIES: Until Apr 27, 2014 • MILTON AND CHEADLE PLATES: until Dec 9 • Feature Gallery: Pattern Wizardry. until Mar 9 • Orientation Gallery: SPECIES AT RISK: Nov 23-Mar 9 • Spotlight Gallery: SEEDS IN DISGUISE: The Biology and Lore of Ornamental Seeds; Nov 16-Feb 23 SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • Paintings by Marianne Watchel; Until Nov 23 SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta PrintArtists, 10123-121 St; PRiNTSHOP: 12056 Jasper Ave, 780.423.1492 • Print Affair 2013: Bright Lights: Fundraiser art auction and sale; music from local DJs; $20/$15 (member): Nov 23, 7pm-late STEPPES GALLERIES • 1253, 1259-91 St, 780.965.2534 • PRISMATIKA–ILLUSIONS OF THE UNIVERSE: Artists from Canada, Croatia, Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Poland, Ukraine, and the US • Until Dec 7 STRATHCONA COUNTY ART GALLERY@501 • 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • LANDMARKS ON THE STUDIO WALL: Art by Robert Dmytruk, Les Graff, and Paddy Lamb • Until Dec 20 THE STUDIO • 11739-94 St • Works by Glen Ronald, Bliss Robinson, Debra Milne and guest artists • Until Dec 31, 12-5pm TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-142 St • HARRY POTTER: THE EXHIBITION: Peer into the wizard’s world in an interactive exhibit featuring hundreds of authentic props and costumes from the Harry Potter films; Nov 23-Mar 9; tickets start: $14 U OF A MUSEUMS • Human Ecology Gallery: Main Fl, 116 St, 89 Ave: THE RE-BIRTH OF VENUS: Fashion & The Venus Kallipygos: Explores the influence of art on fashion through the study of Venus Kallipygos, and its pervasive influence on dress • Until Mar 2, 2014 VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St, 780.421.1731 • Keith Harder; until Nov 30 • THINK SMALL: MEMBERS MINIATURES: until Nov 24; Closing Event: Nov 24, 1-3pm VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.460.5990 • vasa.ca • cu•ri•os•i•ty [KYOOR-EE-OS-I-TEE]: 24 artists from SWCA in an eclectic exhibition of curious works • Until Nov 29 WEST END GALLERY • 12308 Jasper Ave, 780.488.4892 • WH Webb New Work; until Nov 21 WOMEN’S ART MUSEUM SOCIETY OF CANADA • Ottewell Community League, 5920-93A Ave • IN LITTLE BOXES: Art, Craft and Collectible Sale • Nov 23, 10am8pm; Nov 24, 10am-5pm

C ELEBRATE

THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR WITH A HOLIDAY MEAL

FILM BACKSIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD FILM FEST • Myer Horowitz Theatre, 8900-114 St, U of A • Matchstick Productions McConkey; Nov 14, 6:30-9pm (show); $15$45 at ticketfly.com CINEMA AT THE CENTRE •Stanley Milner Library Theatre, 780.496.7000 • Before Midnight (USA, 2013, 14A); Nov 20, 6:30pm FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley Milner Library Centennial Rm, 780.496.7000 • The Jane Austen Book Club (PG 2007); Nov 15, 2pm GARNEAU METRO CINEMA • Headwind (DVD release party): Last Call and Edmonton concert film screening CJSR fundraiser • Nov 17, 4pm • $10 SCIENCE IN THE CINEMA • Metro Cinema at the Garneau Theatre • Salud!, introduced by Dr Dominic Allain who will discuss global health • Nov 14, 6:30-9pm • Free UNITARIAN CHURCH • 10804-119 St • Common Ground–Defending the Public Sector, director Tom Radford: introduce film, answer questions; 10:30am: Rev Brian Kiely’s sermon on Active Spirituality, Spiritual Activism • Nov 17, noon

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ALBERTA COLLEGE • 10050 MacDonald Dr • Alberta College Fall Music Festival Gala: Pastels by David Shkolny • Opening: Nov 16, 2-4pm; concert, art exhibition and reception ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF SPRUCE GROVE • Spruce Grove Art Gallery, Spruce Grove Library, 35-5 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.0664 • THE LANDSCAPE AROUND US: Artworks by Anne McCartney; until Nov 30; reception: Nov 16, 1-3pm ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY • 10186-106 St, 780.488.6611 Feature Gallery: POTWORKS: until Dec 24 • Discovery Gallery: FAIRY TALES, FOLKLORE, AND MYTHCOMMUNICATIONS... PART II: Shona Rae's sculptural rings; until Nov 30 • Discovery Gallery: ILLUSIONS, REVELATIONS, TRANSFORMATIONS: Fibre artist Diane Krys; until Nov 30 ARCHIVES SOCIETY OF ALBERTA • 913 Ash St, Sherwood Park, 780.467.8189 • REMEMBRANCE DAY EXHIBIT: Until Nov 18 ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.422.6223 • Manning Hall (main level public space): NOW YOU SEE IT: A giant word search puzzle by Megan Morman • WATER INTO ART: British watercolours from the V&A, 1750-1950; until Nov 24 • LADY SPIDER HOUSE: Until Jan 12 • ANGAKKUQ: BETWEEN TWO WORLDS; until Feb 16 • Daphnis & Chloé: Chagall; until Feb 16 • BMO World of Creativity: CABINETS OF CURIOSITY: Lyndal Osborne's curious collection; until Jun 30 • RBC New Works Gallery: ISACHSEN, 1948-1978: Works by Aaron Munson and David Hoffos; until Nov 24 • Bring Your Own Party: BYOP: 3rd Wed each month, 5-9pm; BYOP: LEGO-mania; Nov 20, 5-9pm • Funhouse Refinery: Late-night art party; Nov 16; 45/$39 (member); Funhouse Refinery: ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St, St Albert, 780.460.4310 • INVISIBLE CITIES: Daniel Evans; until Nov 30 • Artventures: Powerful Prints: Drop-in for child 6-12; Nov 16, 1-4pm; $5 BEARCLAW GALLERY • 10403-124 St, 780.482.1204 • SHAMAN'S TRANSFORMATION: Collections of drawings by Inuit artist Simon Tookoome; Nov 16-28 BOYLE STREET PROJECTIONS • Boyle Street Plaza, 9538-103A Ave, 780.422.5857 • Launch Party: Nov 22 • Installation by Jill Thomson, Darcia Parada and Owen Brierley; and MOVING ON: by Allen Ball and Alysha Creighton: until Nov 14, ongoing after BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • 12310 Jasper Ave, 780.482.2854 • THE ROAR AND THE SILENCE: Watercolour landscapes by Jerry Heine; until Nov 15 • LANDINGS: Landscapes paintings by Edward Epp and Jane Everett; Nov 21-Dec 5; opening: Nov 21, 6-9pm; artist in attendance: Nov 23, 1-5pm CARROT COMMUNITY ARTS COFFEEHOUSE • 9351118 Ave • LONGITUDINAL STUDY: Works by William G Prettie • Until Nov 30 CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTAS (CAVA) • 9103-95 Ave, 780.461.3427 • Artworks by Claude Boocock, Valerie Solash, Rollande Brodeur, Deborah Lenihan, Fondation Jean Gauthier; until Nov 20 • FANTASY: Antony Cumming, Ginette Vallières-D'Silva, Doreen Poitras, Sylvia Grist and Luc Josh, Dana Rayment; opens: Nov 22; opens: Nov 22, 7-8:30pm CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51 Ave,

24 ARTS

November 20, December. 4, 11 and 12

Christmas High Tea Join us for a high tea experience with a festive twist!

December 9 and 10

Murder Mystery: It’s a Wonderful Death Take an enjoyable break from the busy holiday season and spend an evening full of suspense and intrigue. 

December 16 - 21

Christmas Lunch & Dinner buffet Perfect for small corporate groups!

King Kong

The 8th Wonder of the world

Nov 16th at 8:00pm RE-LIVE THE 1933 WORLD PREMIERE

LITERARY

WWW.FORTEDMONTONPARK.CA Daffodil Gallery, Scott Gallery, Bearclaw, Bugera Matheson, Front, West End, Peter Robertson Gallery, SNAP

ENTERPRISE SQUARE GALLERIES • 10230 Jasper Ave • Open: Thu-Fri 12-6pm, Sat 12-4pm • SANAUNGUABIK: Traditions and transformations in Inuit art, featuring prints, sculpture, textile, and video art; until Dec 21 • POP GOES CANADIANA: Iconic Art by Charles Pachter; until Nov 30 • Lecture: How to Survive and Thrive as a Contemporary Canadian Artist: lecture by renowned artist Charles Pachter, Canada's answer to Lichtenstein, Warhol, and Hockney. Reception to follow; Nov 14, 6pm FAB GALLERY • 1-1 Fine Arts Bldg, 89 Ave, 112 St, 780.492.2081 • CREATURE OF CLIMAX: Works by Agata Derda (MFA Printmaking) final visual presentation for Master of Fine Arts-Printmaking; until Nov 30 • PRINT RESONANCE: Musashino Art University Museum, Ryuta Endo; Extended to Nov 30 FORT EDMONTON PARK • Capitol Theatre: Film: King

780.433.5807 • OIL ON CANVAS: By Dawn Dlashinsky • Until Nov 27

KING'S UNIVERSITY COLLEGE ATRIUM • 9125-50 St • OMAR AHMED KHADR. CANADIAN: William G Prettie's art inspired by Stephen Harper’s definition of social justice • Until Nov 19 LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St, 780.990.1161 • AWAKENING: Paintings by Works by Shirley Elias • EMBRACING COLOUR: Paintings by Jana Milne: until Nov 20 • HOLIDAY EXHIBITION: Gallery artists and secondary market works; Nov 22-Dec 24 LATITUDE 53 • 10242-106 St, 780.423.5353 • Main Space: BEFORE PHOTOGRAPHY: Chuck Samuels mixes photographic history and fiction by Chuck Samuels; Nov 15-Dec 21; reception: Nov 15, 7-9pm LOFT GALLERY • A.J. Ottewell Arts Centre, 590 Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park, 780.449.4443 • CHRISTMAS MARKET: Artwork and gifts by members of the Art

AUDREYS BOOKS • 10702 Jasper Ave • Arthur Slade, reading and signing; Nov 14, 7pm • Author Alison Neuman book launch for her memoir, Searching for Normal; Nov 16, 12:30pm • Poets' Haven poetry reading: Harold Cashman, Audrey Seehagen (mic host); Nov 17, 2pm • Social Media for Authors: Writer's Guild of Alberta and Arthur Slade; Nov 18, 7pm CANADIAN LITERATURE CENTRE • 4-115 Humanities Centre, U of A • arts.ulberta.ca/clc • Blue Pencil Café: Writers' Guild of Alberta, Canadian Literature Centre: discussing your writing with one of these two terrific authors: Doug Barbour on Nov 14, and S.G. Wong on Nov 15, 10am-4pm • Free, pre-register: E: cdnlit@ualberta. ca; T: 780.492.9505 DEWEY'S–North Power Plant, U of A • Parkland Institute present reading from, the Oil Man and the Sea • Nov 23, 7:30pm BOHEMIA • 10217-97 St • Edmonton Story Slam • 3rd Wed ea month • Nov 20, 7:30pm (7pm sign-up) • $5 (donatation) JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY • Stanley Milner Library. Churchill Sq • What Would Mr. Darcy Drive?: Multimedia presentation on carriages in Austen's time. Would Mr.

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

Darcy drive a curricle, barouche-landau or the shocking high-perch phaeton? • Nov 23, 2-4pm • Free

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St, 780.902.5900 • Spoken Word Tue: Presented by the Breath In Poetry Collective (BIP); info: E: breathinpoetry@gmail.com ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE • 12845-102 Ave • Government House Book Launch: Author Jane Ross gives a free talk about the history of Government House • Nov 17, 1:30-3pm •Free UPPER CRUST CAFÉ • 10909-86 Ave, 780.422.8174 • Poets’ Haven Reading Series: Stroll of Poets Society: David Brydges, Leslie Dawson, Myrna Garanis. Alida van Braeden • Nov 18, 7pm • $5

THEATRE THE 11 O'CLOCK NUMBER • Varscona Theatre, 1032983 Ave • An Improvised Musical • Every Fri through until Dec 13, 11pm ANGELS IN AMERICA, PART I: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES • By Tony Kushner • Until Nov 17, University of Alberta Abbedam Productions • Matinee followed by talk-back session with the director, drama team, and cast; Nov 17, 12:30pm • $10 (student/senior)/$5 (preview)/$15 (adult)/$10 (preview) available weekdays: 2nd Fl of Fine Arts Bldg, U of A campus, 11am-2pm BITCHES & MONEY 1878 • PCL Studio Arts Barns, 10330-84 Ave, 780.471.1586 • Northern Light Theatre • By Martin Henshell • Nov 22-30; Preview: Nov 21 BODY AWARENESS • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • Shadow Theatre • By Annie Baker, starring Coralie Cairns, Paul Cowling, Caleb Ellsworth-Clark, Stephanie Wolfe, directed by Valerie Planche • Until Nov 24 • $23-$27 (adult)/$21-$24 (student/senior)/$16 (Sat mat: Nov 16 & 23)/$11 (any perf for under 18's); at TIX on the Square; Tue: 2-for-1 CINDERELLA • Horizon Stage, 1001 Calahoo Rd, Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995 • DuffleBag Theatre, Theatre for Young Audience • Nov 16, 2pm • $20 (adult)/$16 (child/senior) DIE-NASTY • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • Live improvised soap opera • Runs Every Mon, 7:30pm • Until May 26, 2014 CHIMPROV • Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • Every Sat, 10pm, until Jul • $12 (door or buy in adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun, 2014 CHRIS GIBBS: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON? SORRY • Horizon Stage, 1001 Calahoo Rd, Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995 • Comedy about Parenthood • Nov 22, 7:30pm • Ticketpro.ca THE DAISY THEATRE • The Club, Citadel Rice Theatre • Presented by Ronnie Burkett Theatre of Marionettes; recommended for ages 16+ • Until Nov 17, 8pm ELVIS AND THE LAS VEGAS HANGOVER • Jubilations Dinner Theatre • The annual Elvis festival in sunny Las Vegas featuring hit songs by Elvis Presley, and more • Until Feb 14 FORBIDDEN BROADWAY'S GREATEST HITS • La Cité Theatre • Two One-Way Tickets to Broadway Production • Directed and choreography by Linette Smith; music directon by Robert Bradford • Until Nov 16 • TIX on the Square THE HISTORY OF ROCK ‘N ROLL STARS & STRIPES • Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615-109 Ave, 780.483.4051 • mayfieldtheatre.ca • A musical evening all-American music review of the origins of rock ‘n roll from its infancy highlighting Chuck Berry, Elvis, the Doo-Wop groups of the '50s, the Beach Boys, and R&B groups of the '60s • Until Feb 2 LADY WINDERMERE’S FAN • King’s University College, 9125-50 St • By Oscar Wilde, The King’s Players • Until Nov 16, 7:30pm • $15/$10 (student/senior) at King’s Bookstore, 780.465.8306, 780.465.3500, kingsu.ca MACBETH • La Cité Francophone, 8627-91 St • Theatre Prospero production directed by Mark Henderson featuring Elliott James and Sereana Malani as Macbeth and his ambitious queen, and Evan Hall, Mat Simpson, and students from Theatre Prospero’s school residency program • Nov 20-29 • $20 at TIX on the Square, door the Pick Me UPs • The Bower, 10538 Jasper Ave • magpietheatre.ca • By Nathania Bernabe, starring Leah Beaudry, Kayla Nickel, April A Killins, Kristen J Welker, Kristyn Emmerzael, • Nov 24-28, preview for press: Nov 21 no minors • $15/$10 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square, magpietheatre.ca PIG GIRL • Roxy Theatre, 10708-124 St • By Colleen Murphy, Theatre Network –Live at the Roxy: world premiere • Until Nov 24 PRAIRIE BOWL • Citadel Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • Rapid Fire Theatre • Theatresports Tournament, face-off for the title of best in the west • Nov 21-23 • $15 SHREK THE MUSICAL • Arden, 780.459.1542 • Presented by St Albert Children’s Theatre. Music by Jeanine Tesori; Book and Lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire; and based on the DreamWorks Animation Motion Picture and the book by William Steig • Nov 20-Dec 1 • $26 (adult)/$20 (child/ senior) at Arden box office SIA • Arts Barns’ PCL Studio, 10330-84 Ave • fringetheatre.ca • Pyretic Productions• Arts at the Barns Presentation Series: The day Canadian volunteer Nick Summers is scheduled to fly home from Ghana, he wakes up hung over and tied to a chair • Until Nov 17 • $20 (adult)/$15 (student/senior) THEATRESPORTS • Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828101A Ave • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30pm and 10pm • Until June • $12/$10 (member) at TIX on the Square two PiAnos–FoUr hAnds • Citadel Shoctor Theatre, 9828-101A Ave, 780.425.1820 • Written, starring, directed by Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenblatt. The farewell tour of a Canadian Theatre musical sensation plays at the Citadel Theatre • Until Nov 17 THE V.I.P. KIDS SHOW • Varscona Theatre • Kids show with music, comedy, art, puppets, and guests • Selected Saturdays until May 24 • Nov 24, 11am


COVER // ROCK

MUSIC

MUSIC EDITOR : EDEN MUNRO EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

IGNITING THE

FIREBALL

'I

might sound kind of weird," Greg MacPherson says, and he isn't wrong. Over the phone, the Winnipeg musician's genial cadence is distorted beyond the usual effects speaker mode. There's extra echo: MacPherson's standing in a totally empty house he'll soon be leaving. After we're done speaking, its new owner will come to collect the keys, and the house will no longer belong to MacPherson. It's been an eventful period of downtime between tours, then. Back in Winnipeg from touring the East coast, MacPherson's finishing up the house business, getting caught up with the day job, and then prepping to head out west behind Fireball, his sixth album and one that proves itself an unusually taut addition to the MacPherson oeuvre. Right from opening ignition of "1995"—an angry, stadium-sized guitarline that underscores MacPherson's speak-shouting in tight, dynamic bursts—through the paranoid disaffection of closer "Scientist Cowboy" ("You don't even feel anymore / You just see everything through a telescopic lens," he repeats like it's a bitter warning), Fireball finds MacPherson amplifying the hell out of the threadbare combo of guitar and drums and voice, then cutting 'em off quick, and moving on to the next one. That's not too far from his usual wheelhouse—MacPherson's typically played rock 'n' roll that oscillates between brash dynamism and quiet vulnerability. His best songs are usu-

ally slow-burners that carve peaks and had to. I looked around at the people I valleys out of that instrumental sparse- respected or the music I was listening ness. Fireball simply ignites those pat- to, and it sounded complicated to me. terns faster: spartan rock structures But now, as I've learned how to play it myself, I gravitate more towards attempted at much tighter pace. "I take basically the best songs avail- simple music. "I like the simplicity and the urgency able to me at any given time, and then I record them. You know? Just of a small band," he adds later in the get set up and record," MacPherson conversation. "And I love the urgency explains. "But this time I thought I'd of songs that aren't filled with multiple try something a little more focused, chord changes or key changes or stops. where we would only play short, I think the record is pretty reflective of—I don't want uptempo songs. Beto call myself a cause I found myself Sat, Nov 16 (8 pm) luddite, but I like looking at all the re- Greg MacPherson to think of myself cords I really loved: The Artery, $14 (advance), as a bit of a cavea lot of my favourite $16 (door) man musician. I'm singer-songwriters not writing comput out varied releases, but some of my favourite art- plicated music; it's relatively simple. But ists, if you listen to all their songs, the tension and the emotion in the song is where it gets complicated. I think it's their first records were all so short." He names the Clash (The Clash's a different kind of skillset to make a runtime: 35:18) and Wire (Pink Flag: song sound urgent and to put lyrics in 35:37) to illustrate his point. Fireball it that are compelling somehow than it is, coincidentally, also between 35 is to just be a gifted musician and make and 36 minutes long, though, unlike a song take a complicated arc." those two albums, it didn't come out in 1977. A few songs on MacPherson's A prehistoric approach or not, it's breach the five-minute mark, but given MacPherson's music an honmost don't. Some don't even make a est appeal over the years, one that matches his history of a DIY approach. full three minutes. That all said, MacPherson's quick His early records were released by to point out that, while brevity was the G7 Welcoming Committee Rea focus, more pressing an issue was cords, a label run by Chris Hannah allowing himself to trust in simplicity. and Jord Samolesky of Propagandhi "I find it's more permission; it's not so that, as the name implies, focused much limitation," he says. "I gave my- on songwriters with a certain sharp self permission not to have to write awareness to their worldviews. In the complicated songs. And for a long wake of that label's folding and some time, when I was younger, I thought I time spent on Winnipeg's Smallman

records, MacPherson now releases his on Disintegration Records, a label he co-founded and still runs. Independence is obviously something MacPherson holds in high regard, but as he's gotten older his relationship with the idea of DIY seems to have realigned: a few years ago, he took a day job. MacPherson is the executive director of the West Broadway Community Organization, a Winnipeg non-profit focused on sustainable social and economic development in its titular neighbourhood. (To hear MacPherson tell it, he was in over his head for the first year or so. Now he's started to find his fit a bit more comfortable.) And far from restricting his work as a musician, he notes that having a regular paycheck coming in has let him operate more ideally than ever. "I'm actually able to do more on my own now than I used to, because I don't come from needs," he says. "I had no money going into any of this. I was really depending on my work to save up to buy an amp, or to get myself out on the road somehow, or buy a train ticket. It's harder to be DIY if you have lofty goals. If your goal is to make a living, and you don't mind sleeping on the floor, you don't mind living out of a box, then it's not so hard to achieve that goal. But as I got older, I found I had goals like having a reasonable standard of living. Nothing lavish, but I like to be able to lead a reasonable life, and enjoy some of the comforts of our society. It became more difficult to me to become exclusively DIY in that context, when that was my one source of income. But now that I

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

actually have a reasonable job, I'm doing way more than I used to." That includes booking his own shows, managing the label, and generally having the funds to do lots of recording in-house. "There's no one telling us anything beyond whether they like the music or not." "I think that's maybe more political, in a way," MacPherson continues. "Just maybe less obviously political. I think back in the old days, I was pretty focused on ideology, and that side of DIY as well. I think I've shifted away from that a lot. I'm still very much focused on trying to make the world a better place for me and the people I care about, but I think I'm approaching it in a different fashion than I used to. Less about soap box, you know? The message is the music; it's not that I use the music as a soap box. "Part of me felt at one point that there's so much ugliness in the world, so much stuff to feel frustrated by," he says. "I'm a sensitive person. I feel a sense of justice, and I look around my immediate neighbourhood here and I see a lot of disparity. And so I'm frustrated by it. I see a lot of the systems we have in our society these days, in the world, failing vulnerable people in particular, and marginalizing a lot of us, and I get frustrated by that. But I felt at one point that I have a better chance of adding beauty to the world, or making the world a better place, by creating songs and making art than I do as a spokesperson." PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MUSIC 25


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Cockatoo

I

FRI, NOV 15, THE ARTERY

PAPER LIONS W/ JORDAN KLASSEN & WHITE LIGHTNING

SAT, NOV 16, THE ARTERY

GREG MACPHERSON W/ GUESTS BAND

TUE, NOV 26, THE ARTERY

BRENDAN CANNING

t's astonishing how a judicious help- constrained by her former band. ing of fear can kickstart an artistic She rejoined with original bassist Rod Wolfe, added drummer Robert endeavor. In the spring of 2012, when Edmon- Burkosky (Energetic Action) and ton's Cockatoo found out that it was American guitarist Rich Witherspoon (The Wake) and in line for a Rawltook what reco Radio grant the Wed, Nov 20 (9 pm) mained of the reband immediately With Rhythm of Cruelty cording budget to went to work on The Buckingham, free produce a brand the album it's new album, Presbeen meaning to make for the last seven years. One ent. With Rawlco prodding them to year into intensive writing and re- finish up, and a limited amount of cording the members discovered cash that kept overdubs to a minithat they weren't completely on mum, the lean and pared down Presthe same page about how the music ent doesn't necessarily reflect what should sound. Frustrations arose as they'd like to do given an extended the recording process dragged on period of time in the studio, but does interminably, and eventually singer reflect what they sound like live. Robyn Bright left the band she "For the longest time we ran the band as a democracy," Bright sighs. founded. "It wasn't fun anymore," says Bright. "We had members with different "Not that it necessarily has to be fun, tastes in music, because I wanted the but you do have to be able to work band to reflect something different. well together, and we weren't work- It didn't work. Now, everybody in the band is into much the same music. I ing well together." The rest of Cockatoo decided to sol- really like this record, but definitely dier on with the recording, intending the next one will sound different." to hire a new singer, but this apparently went against the rules of the Cockatoo has always been somecontract Bright signed with the radio thing of an anomaly in Edmonton, station. As these were Bright's songs, where the group's mid-'80s sound— Bright was the one to complete the think as a starting point Dead Can album. As it turned out, the singer Dance, the Cure, Bauhaus—has had gone on something of a writing marked it outside of the city's traspree now that she no longer felt ditional indie scene. In the UK the

group's picked up some high profile fans like musician and DJ Tom Robinson, who made a point of praising it on his BBC show. Cockatoo even made more of an impact in Toronto, where the band recently opened for the Mission UK at a packed Lee's Palace and managed to sell so many copies of Present that it's reduced to only a handful for the Edmonton release. Europe would seem to beckon for the future, whether for short tours in the UK or a longer term move to somewhere more hospitable. Many of Bright's musical friends from her time spent in Toronto a decade ago have assured her that Berlin is the place to be, and she's carefully considering the possibilities. "It can be tough living here, for sure," she admits. "It just seemed to take so long to get a band together, and the Goth scene here tends more towards the industrial side of things. I like the people that play that music, but it's not really what I'm into. One thing that's great about Edmonton is that you can just be you, because it's not really a scenester town. You can really find your musical voice here without being overly influenced by what's happening. A lot of musicians from different genres are authentic for that reason." TOM MURRAY

TOM@VUEWEEKLY.COM

OF BROKEN SOCIAL SCENE

W/ DINOSAUR BONES WED, NOV 27, AVENUE THEATRE

THEE ATTACKS (DENMARK)

W/ HEAVISIDE & GUESTS

The Motorleague

FRI, NOV 29, AVENUE THEATRE

BARNEY BENTALL’S GRAND CARIBOO OPRY

W/ THE GOLD RUSH ALL STARS

SAT, NOV 30, AVENUE THEATRE

BASIA BULAT

W/ EVENING HYMNS

SUN, DEC 1, THE ARTERY

GENTLEMAN HUSBANDS

W/ SHORT OF ABLE, AND THE RED CANNONS

THU, DEC 5, AVENUE THEATRE

DUSTIN BENTALL & THE SMOKES AND THE MATINEE

26 MUSIC

W/ THE GIVE ‘EM HELL BOYS, AND GUESTS

Fri, Nov 15 (8 pm) With One Day Late Pawn Shop, $10 Think you know your vintage video games? The Motorleague will put your skills to the test with its video for "Failsafes," the latest single from its new album Acknowledge, Acknowledge. Before its stop in Edmonton, lead vocalist and guitarist Don Levandier shared his soundtrack picks with Vue.

At home Morning: Something fast and heavy to wake up to—usually the Flatliners or Say Anything. Noon: I'm usually on a computer, so local stuff or friends' bands. Recently I've been listening to a great band called Savage Young from Moncton.

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

Night: If it's a weekend, Abba! For weeknights, anything by John K Samson or the Weakerthans.

On the road Morning: Fun stuff. Today's 10-hour haul is powered by Dexys Midnight Runners. What a blast to listen to. Noon: We usually throw

the iPod on shuffle, so there will be an assortment of Grand Theft Bus, Said the Whale, Northcote, Taylor Hawkins, old Weezer and Wintersleep. Night: On the road, this has to be something that won't put you to sleep, so loud and heavy rules here: Cancer Bats, Gallows and Comeback Kid. V


VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

MUSIC 27


MUSIC PREVUE // TRANCE

Paul Oakenfold NOV. 15 & 16 • ROB TAYLOR SUNDAY CELTIC MUSIC 5 - 8PM NOV. 18 • ZOLA MCADIE WEDNESDAY • OPEN STAGE W/ DUFF ROBISON

Trance Mission: activated

'C

LIVE MUSIC AT “THE ROSE”

AMIE WEYMES NOVEMBER 15 & 16

THE RURAL ROUTES NOVEMBER 22 & 23

anada has always been ahead of the curve," states DJ and producer Paul Oakenfold, recalling ithe country as one of the first he performed in outside of Britain during the early days of electronic music. That's not a bad thing to be known for coming from a man noted for producing the likes of Madonna, U2, Justin Timberlake, and who is considered to be a pioneer of trance music. Oakenfold has achieved widespread success globally, but while trance has been popular in Europe for many years, it hasn't been as quick to break into the American market. "I don't know what it is with Canada, whether it's the relationship with England ... they were miles ahead of America when it came to electronic music and, I think, embraced that culture a lot

more than America did many years ago," ica," he adds, noting tracks will include Oakenfold says, adding that the US has "Simple Minds - Theme for Great Cities, always seemed to lean more towards "Lonely Ones" and "Barbara." "If I deliver hip hop and urban sounds than trance. current production and make them re"But now America's culture, America's ally melodic, I think it will, like it did youth, are into electronic music." many years ago in Europe, it will really Oakenfold believes trance is going to touch them; it will really connect with be the "big sound of next year" due to them; it will really embrace them." its depth, emotion and soul, something he says it has always had, but is con- Oakenfold, who has plans to release necting with people in North America his third artist album Pop Killer later on in more and more as electronic music 2014, isn't concerned that a younger gencreeps into mainstream Top-40 tracks. eration likely won't recognize any of the "People want change, people always tracks. Instead, he hopes it will prompt want to move forward and it's just the them to dig deeper into the genre and find out what it's all about, rather than right time," he notes. To bring this change, Oakenfold is taking everything at face value. "There's a whole generation of kids that launching his Trance Mission tour, playing small venues rather than the large- don't seem to dig deeper ... I think it's just scale arena shows that have become the way it is in society now. Everyone the norm in electronic music in order wants everything now and they don't look to connect with at the history of anything," Oakenfold his audience. The Sat, Nov 16 (9 pm) says, adding that the sound will reflect SET Nightclub, $30 his Full on Fluoro same is true with his own music. Fans series that has become immensely popular in Europe, but know what they hear in the moment, but is on the road for the first time in North will rarely investigate what brought him America. Oakenfold is also releasing a to that point. "It doesn't seem to matter, Trance Mission album early next year. as sad as that sounds. That's the vibe I The album will rework—not remix—10 get from being in clubs every weekend. classic dance tracks from the early '90s Everyone's seeking that moment of fame and '00s. He feels there is no need to ... That's what you're dealing with. Do you remix these songs as it's been done be- understand it? No. No one's here to judge fore, but rather, bring them up to speed it. I'm talking about understanding it and moving forward and that's where we are with contemporary production. "The idea is to share those moments in music." we've grown up with in Europe with MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM the current generation in North Amer-

In Sutton Place Hotel #195, 10235 101 Street, EDMONTONPUBS.COM

Amanda Rheaume Thu, Nov 21 (8:30 pm) With Chloe Albert Blue Chair Café, $12 Hometown: Ottawa, ON Genre: Roots-pop Lastest album: Keep a Fire (2013) Fun fact: Rheaume is of Métis descent, and the track “Keep a Fire in the Rain” is about her great-grandfather and great-grandmother, who was Ojibway, and the couple’s struggles due to not being welcome in either of their respective communities.

First album [The] first album I ever bought was probably New Kids on the Block, but Alanis Morissette, Jagged Little Pill, was the first influential album I ever purchased.

DOWNTOWN

Nov 14 - Nov 16, STAN GALLANT • Nov 19 - 23, AMIE WEYMES WEM Nov 14 - Nov 16, DOUG STROUD • Nov 19 - 23, TONY DIZON

CAMPUS

Nov 14 - Nov 16, MIKE DOMINEY • Nov 20 - 23, STAN GALLANT EDMONTONPUBS.COM Colleen’s Amber Ale now available at all pub locations. $0.50 from each pint sold will be donated to Ovarian Cancer Research in memory of Colleen Tomchuk.

28 MUSIC

First concert New Kids on the Block! Oh no, I am recognizing a theme. Last album Rose Cousins, We Have Made A Spark

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

Last concert Lynn Miles and Keith Glass at Ottawa Folk Festival Favourite album Del Barber, Headwaters Favourite musical guilty pleasure Sometimes I will put on Tom Waits, Rain Dogs and imagine the impossible. V


VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

MUSIC 29


MUSIC

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PREVUE // METALCORE

The Devil Wears Prada

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Sometimes it's OK to be a little miserable

F

or the first time, the Devil Wears multitude of forms. "I felt like that was a sort of noPrada had to start from scratch when it set to begin work on a new tion that had been crawling around album. Guitarist and principle song- all of Dead Throne, but via means of writer Chris Rubey had exhausted love lost or adultery, and this time the back catalogue of material he I wanted to look at all of suffering and misery," exhad been amassSat, Nov 16 (5 pm) ing since his teenplains lead vocalWith the Ghost Inside, Volumes, ist Mike Hranica, age days, and the Texas in July group began the noting, for examStarlite Room, $28 long haul to conple, that the title track is about a struct something completely new. young man who The result is 8:18, a bleak, heavy is murdered. "I think I'm very drawn album pairing the juxtaposition of to that subject because of our gun thundering double-kick drums, hard- problem and murder rate within the hitting guitar riffs and metal growls United States, but more specifically with atmospheric keyboard lines and Chicago where it's terribly predomipowerful yet melodic "clean" vocals. nant ... I auctioned off lyric sheets for At the album's core is an examination an anti-gun charity earlier this year, of misery and what that means in its so in an off-handed way, I think it

comes from a personal place within me and the songs about loneliness are by all means very personal and by no means fictional." The album's title is derived from Romans 8:18 which states "For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us." It was a verse that Hranica found particularly profound and moving, not to mention it continues to tie in the faith-driven aspect of the band's music—for those unaware, the Devil Wears Prada is a Christian band. "I love that it's so confrontational with suffering. I think a lot of people try really hard to never be unhappy, which I think is what we're made to be, we're made to do, but at the same time I think that a lot of people are dishonest or not entirely realistic in being able to approach suffering," says Hranica, who notes he does not have to put himself in a dark place to be able to write about grim subject matter. It has always come naturally. "The fact that the Bible comes out and speaks so abruptly right there, it also gives off that connotation of hope and glory that can be found in God or within love and it's all in that short little verse." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

30 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013


MUSIC

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Joal Kamps; 9pm; donation

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Rockwell, Kris Glabush, Zyla, Lou Wreath, MAKC; 7-11pm; $5

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Alberta College New Music Edmonton Presents Incantation: Quasar Quartet; 7:30-9:30pm; $20 (adult)/$15 (student/ senior)/$10 (NME member) at door, TIX on the Square

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Yardbird Suite Blues from New York: Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton; 8pm (door), 9pm (show)

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THE COMMON Good

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Christopher Peterson (impersonator); 5:30pm

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE

Improv Burlesque a la Carté; 8pm; donation

Sat Open mic; 7pm; $2

DV8 A Decade Of The Mange, Zero Cool, Down the Hatch EARLY STAGE SALOON– Stony Plain Lyle Hobbs

(singer songwriter)

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Pinto Coy (CD release party, jazz singer), Bob Tildesley, Andrew Glover, Sandro Dominelli, Wes Caswell; 9pm, $10

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Frank & the Men from MARS; 9pm-1am; no cover

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Band, guests; no minors; 8pm (door); $14 (adv at YEG Live, Blackbyrd)/$16 (day of show) ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL The Derina Harvey

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NOV/29

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Jordan Klassen, White Lightning; no minors; 8pm (door); $13 (adv)/$16 (day of show)

BOHEMIA DARQ

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ARTERY Greg MacPherson

ARTERY Paper Lions,

Sat afternoon: Jam with Back Door Dan; Evening: Russell Jackson

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Wakefield; 9-11:45pm

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the Borderline, Doug Cox, BettySoo; 8:30pm; $20

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SAT NOV 16

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FRI NOV 15

music every Sat); 4-6pm; no cover

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VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

MUSIC 31


Boogie Parol and Graham Guest; 7pm; Memphis Bound fundraiser; all ages; $20 (door) ON THE ROCKS Rocket

Sauce with Edmonton’s Hottest DJs

THU NOV 14

KEN MODE W/ FULL OF HELL, DEMISE & DISABLER

THE MOTORLEAGUE ONE DAY LATE, W/ GUESTS SAT NOV 16

STRIKER EUROPEAN TOUR KICKOFF... W/ DIEMONDS, MORTILLERY & THE OUTLAWS OF RAVENHURST

MON NOV 18

FINNTROLL W/ BLACKGUARD, METSATOLL & TROLLBAND FRI NOV 22

THE STANFIELDS ‘FOR KING & COUNTRY’ TOUR W/ THE TOWN HEROES, THE BLACKSTONE & ANCHORS NORTH

SAT NOV 23

COWPUNCHER ALBUM RELEASE

W/ FIRE NEXT TIME, TALLEST TO SHORTEST & THE GIVE ‘EM HELL BOYS

HELLBOUND HEPCATS WITH GUESTS SAM HATE & THE SPADES FRI NOV 29

ART BERGMANN CANADAS PUNK ROCK LAUREATE

W/ A BUNCH OF MARYS & BEN DISASTER FOR TICKETS- PLEASE VISIT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA

$2.75 DOMESTIC PINTS

SAT NOV 16

FREE SHOW 4PM

CREAKS W/ KEVIN MAIMANN

FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip

request live; 9pm-2am every Fri and Sat; no cover

PAWN SHOP Striker

(European Tour Kick-off), Diemonds, Mortillery, the Outlaws of Ravenhurst

(live), Salsaton (direct from Miami); 8pm; $30

QUEEN ALEXANDRIA HALL Highway 3 Roots

RevueL John Wort Hannam, Dave McCann, Leeroy Stagger; 7pm (door); $20 (adv)/$25 (door); children 6 to 12 1/2 price reimbursed at door. Children under 6 are free at TIX on the Square, Acoustic Music, Myhre’s Music RED PIANO BAR

Hottest dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Sat; 9pm-2am RENDEZVOUS PUB

Monarch Sky, A Hundred Years, the Blackhole Illusion; 8pm THE RIG Dark Rooster STARLITE ROOM The

Devil Wears Prada, the Ghost Inside, Volumes, Texas In July; 5pm; all ages; $28 (adv at Unionevents.com, Ticketfly.com, Blackbyrd)

YARDBIRD SUITE

Yardbird Suite BLUES From New York: Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton; 8pm (door), 9pm (show)

Classical ALBERTA COLLEGE

Fall Music Festival Gala; 2-4pm; concert, art exhibition and reception

THE RIG Every Sun Jam

NEWCASTLE PUB Top 40 requests every Sat with DJ Sheri

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ

PAWN SHOP

Transmission Saturdays: Indie rock, new wave, classic punk with DJ Blue Jay and Eddie Lunchpail; 9pm (door); free (before 10pm)/$5 (after 10pm); 1st Sat each month RED STAR Indie rock, hip hop, and electro every Sat with DJ Hot Philly and guests

Who Know...: House and disco with Junior Brown, David Stone, Austin, and guests

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

WUNDERBAR Xelif, and

two other bands; 7pm; $10 (door); fundraiser for white ribbon campaign, for opening a women’s shelter YARDBIRD SUITE

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE Your

Classical

ROUGE LOUNGE Rouge

Saturdays: global sound and Cosmopolitan Style Lounging with DJ Mkhai

Famous Saturday with Crewshtopher, Tyler M

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM Swing Dance

Party: Sugar Swing Dance Club every Sat, 8-12; no experience or partner needed, beginner lesson followed by social dance; sugarswing.com

FESTIVAL PLACE

Stephanie Kwan and Emilio De Mercato for The Alea Piano Duo; 2pm; $32 (table)/$30 (box)/$28 (theatre) HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN CHURCH

SUITE 69 Stella Saturday:

retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests

Josephine van Lier (viola da gamba), Judy Loewen (harpsichord), Jolaine Kerley (soprano); 2pm; music by Bach

TEMPLE Step’d Up

WINSPEAR CENTRE The

Saturdays with Lolcatz, Yaznil, Badman Crooks, Ootz UNION HALL Celebrity

Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous Saturdays

BLACKJACK’S ROADHOUSE–Nisku

THE BOWER For Those

Hair of the Dog acoustic Sun Jam with Bonedog and Bearcat; every Sun; 2-6pm

Peruvian Dinner Latin Music Night: Marco Claveria Project, others; 5-9pm; $30 (single)/$50 (for two in adv)/$40 (single)/$60 (for two door); fundraiser for Standing Up for Peruvian Children

MUTTART HALL– Conservatory of Music

Sessions: Alt Rock/Electro/ Trash with Miss Mannered; Wooftop: Sound It Up!: classic hip-hop and reggae with DJ Sonny Grimezz; Underdog: Dr Erick

hosted by Andrew White and the Joint Chiefs; 4-8pm

hosted by Steve and Bob; 5-9pm

ARTERY The Fugitives, White Ash Falls, guests; 7pm

Main Floor: The Menace

Eyed Blonde

Sat with resident DJ Chad Cook

Kokopelli and Òran Choirs; 7:30-9:30pm; $20/$15 (student)

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

ROUGE RESTO-LOUNGE

every Sun; 9:30pm-1am

LUCKY 13 Every Fri and

SUN NOV 17

DJs

O’BYRNE’S Open mic

RICHARD’S PUB Sun Jam

MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH Long Road:

Meyer’s Bass Concerto: ESO, William Eddins (conductor), Edgar Meyer (double bass), Robert Uchida (violin); 7:30pm; $24-$79

Soul Service (acoustic jam): Willy James and Crawdad Cantera; 3-6:30pm

NEWCASTLE PUB Sun

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Collective Saturdays underground: House and Techno

Open mic every Sun hosted by Tim Lovett BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ

Sunday Brunch: Jazz Passages trio; 9am-3pm; donations BLUES ON WHYTE

Russell Jackson

CHA ISLAND TEA CO

Live on the Island: Rhea March hosts open mic and Songwriter’s stage; starts with a jam session; every Sun, 7pm DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB Celtic Music with Duggan’s House Band 5-8pm EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ

Murray Forbes (release of SwordSongs II); 7pm $15 (adv at yeglive. ca/events/murrayforbes/)/$20 (door) FANDANGO’S Sun

Industry Night: House mix with DJ JEZ LF; Show and Shine/open stage every Sun: hosted by Marshal Lawrence; 6-11pm

HOG’S DEN PUB Rockin’

the Hog Jam: Hosted by Tony Ruffo; every Sun, 3:30-7pm HORIZON STAGE The

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm; contact Vi Kallio 780.456.8510

ON THE ROCKS Green

Y AFTERHOURS Release

Fall Music Festival Gala: David Tutt, Michelle Powell (piano), Julian Savaryn (cello), Zane Liang (violin); 2pm; reception to follow featuring art inspired edibles; art exhibit: pastels by David Shkolny at 3pm

Bills (folk/roots rock); 7:30pm

hop and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Sat

Lives: i Coristi Chamber Choir; 7:30pm; TIX on the Square; contributions for Edmonton’s Food Bank

THE COMMON Get Down It’s Saturday Night: House and disco and everything in between with resident Dane

32 MUSIC

FANDANGO’S DJs night

Park Dueling Piano’s, all

WINSPEAR CENTRE

WEDNESDAY PINT NIGHT’S

Sat: Sound and Light show; We are Saturdays: Kindergarten

OVERTIME Sherwood

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

TUE NOV 26

ENCORE–WEM Every

every Fri and Sat with DJ Stouffer

PORTUGUESE CANADIAN CULTURAL HALL eddy K La Academia

FRI NOV 15

every Sat; 9pm

Company of Heaven– Britten at 100: Madrigal Singers, University Symphony Orchestra and Concert Choir; 8pm

fantastic voyage through ‘60s and ‘70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Main Floor: Glitter Gulch: live music once a month; On the Patio: Funk and S

Wednesdays, Featuring Gorgeous Geordie, Cabral, Crittergrom

WINSPEAR CENTRE

BLUES ON WHYTE Bill BOHEMIA Wednesday

Prussian Quartets III: Enterprise Quartet; 12pm; free

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE PJ

DJs BLACK DOG

BUCKINGHAM Cockatoo (CD release party), Rhythm of Cruelty; 9pm; no cover

FREEHOUSE Main Floor:

DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

Blue Jay’s Messy Nest: mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay DV8 T.F.W.O. Mondays: Roots industrial,Classic Punk,Rock, Electronic with Hair of the Dave

TUE NOV 19 ARTERY Matchbreaker’s (EP release for No Windows), Royce Mathew, Ken Stead, and Cheap Date; 7-11pm; $15 BLUES ON WHYTE Bill

Durst

DRUID IRISH PUB

Jamhouse Tues hosted by Chris Wynters, guest FIDDLER’S ROOST

Perry every Wed; 8-11pm; $10

Wed open mic with host Duff Robison ELEPHANT AND CASTLE–Whyte Ave Open

mic every Wed (unless there’s an Oilers game); no cover

FANDANGO’S Wed open stage hosted by Michael Gress and Cody Noula; Original artist showcase at 9pm FIDDLER’S ROOST

Wednesday Nights Folk and Roots Open Stage: amateur and professional musicians welcome; 7:30pm; $3 HOOLIGANZ Open stage every Wed with host Michael Gress; 9pm J+H PUB Acoustic open

Tuesday Nights fiddle circle jam; all levels of musicians welcome; 7:30pm; $3 cover

Beaudin; 8pm; $10

J+H PUB Acoustic open

LEAF BAR AND GRILL

mic night every Tue hosted by Lorin Lynne; Everyone will have 10-15 minutes to play L.B.’S PUB Tue Variety Night Open stage with Darrell Barr; 7-11pm LEAF BAR AND GRILL

O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam

Main Floor: Soul Sundays: A

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Classical

LIBRARY Prussian

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Open stage Wed with Trace Jordan; 8pm-12

Durst

WHITEMUD CROSSING

DJs

ALBERTA BEACH HOTEL

Open Mic Night with Darrek Anderson from the Guaranteed; every Mon; 9pm

Tuesday Moosehead/ Barsnbands open stage hosted by Mark Ammar; every Tue; 7:30-11:30pm

Quartets III: Enterprise Quartet; 1pm

WED NOV 20

every Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm OVERTIME Sherwood Park The Campfire Hero’s

(acoustic rock, country, top 40); 9pm-2am every Tue; no cover RED PIANO Jamoeke

with the Nervous Flirts: Sing with the band; no cover

mic night hosted by

JEFFREYS CAFÉ Marc

Wed variety night: with guitarist, Gord Matthews; every Wed, 8pm MERCURY ROOM Little Flower Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12 NEW WEST HOTEL Free classic country dance lessons every Wed, 7-9pm OVERTIME Sherwood Park Jason Greeley

(acoustic rock, country, Top 40); 9pm-2am every Wed; no cover

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic Bluegrass jam presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; every Wed, 6:3011pm; $2 (member)/$4 (non-member)

Stylus Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky, Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am

WUNDERBAR Picture the

Ocean, Passburg

RED PIANO BAR Wed Night Live: hosted by dueling piano players; 8pm-1am; $5

MON NOV 18

YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday

THE RIG Open jam every

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sleeman

Mon: Pernell Reichert; live music monthly; no cover

BLUES ON WHYTE Bill

Durst

DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

Singer/songwriter open stage every Mon; 8pm; host changes weekly EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ

Murray Forbes (release of SwordSongs II); 12am; $15 (adv at yeglive. ca/events/murrayforbes/)/$20 (door) FIDDLER’S ROOST

Monday Nights Open stage hosted by Norm Sliter’s Capital City Jammers; all styles and skill levels welcome; 7:30pm; $3 cover OVERTIME–Sherwood Park Monday Open Stage PAWN SHOP Finntroll,

Blackguard =, Metsatöll, Trollband

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

Session: Andrew Glover Quintet; 7:30pm (door), 8pm (show); $5

Classical CITY HALL Prussian Quartets III: Enterprise Quartet; 7:30pm; free

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: alternative retro and not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail

DV8 Creepy Tombsday:

Psychobilly, Hallowe’en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

RED STAR Experimental

Indie rock, hip hop, electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue

SUITE 69 Rockstar

Tuesdays: Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

Wed hosted by Will; 8pm12am

ZEN LOUNGE Jazz

Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: RetroActive Radio: Alternative ‘80s and ‘90s, post punk, new wave, garage, Brit, mod, rock and roll with LL Cool Joe

BRIXX BAR Really Good...

Eats and Beats: every Wed with DJ Degree and Friends

THE COMMON The Wed Experience: Classics on Vinyl with Dane NIKKI DIAMONDS Punk and ‘80s metal every Wed RED STAR Guest DJs

every Wed

TEMPLE Wild Style Wed:

Hip hop open mic hosted by Kaz and Orv; $5


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LiSTinGS@VUeWeekLY.COm FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FriDaY aT 3Pm

COMEDY BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Underdog Comedy

show: Alternating hosts • Every Thu, 8-11pm • No cover

CENTURY CASINO • 13103 Fort Rd •

780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:30-9pm

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment

Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Thu: 8:30pm; Fri: 8:30pm; Sat: 8pm and 10:30pm • Vilmos; Nov 14-16 • Ryan Wingfield; Nov 21-23 • Steven Juliano Moore; Nov 28-30

COMIC STRIP • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999 • Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm • Hit or Miss Mondays: Amateurs and Professionals every Mon, 7:30pm • Battle to the Funny Bone; last Tue each month, 7:30pm • Sam Tripoli; until Nov 17 • Sean Lecomber; Nov 20 • Greg Fitzsimmons; Nov 21-23 • David Dempsey; Nov 27 • Rhys Darby; Nov 28-30

DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • 780.710.2119 • Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm FILTHY MCNASTY'S • 10511-82 Ave •

780.996.1778 • Stand Up Sundays: Stand-up comedy night every Sun with a different headliner every week; 9-11pm; no cover

JUBILEE AUDITORIUM • 11455-87 Ave • Just for Laughs–Comedy Tour 2013: The Comedy Rat Pack Edition: Darrin Rose, Tom Pap, Alonzo Bodden, Orny Adams, Ben Seidman • Nov 15, 8pm • MythBusters: Behind the Myths Tour: Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage; Nov 29 OVERTIME PUB • 4211-106 St • Open mic

comedy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free

95 Ave • 780.465.2019, 780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm

Provincial Historic Resource and National Historic Site by author, Jane Ross. Free tours after the talk • Nov 17, 1:30-2:30pm

HOME–Energizing Spiritual Community for Passionate Living • Garneau/Ashbourne Assisted

BUY BUILD RENO RETRO • Robbins Health Learning Centre, Heart) (Grant McEwan, 109 St, 104 Ave • Learn about the latest practices in sustainable building featuriing speakers and workshops • Nov 17, 9am-4:30pm • Free at Eventbrite: http:// buybuildrenoretro-efbevent.eventbrite.ca/ • facebook.com/events/218088708366506/ • buybuildrenoretro-efbevent.eventbrite.ca/

Living Place, 11148-84 Ave • Home: Blends music, drama, creativity and reflection on sacred texts to energize you for passionate living • Every Sun, 3-5pm

LOTUS QIGONG • 780.477.0683 • Downtown • Practice group meets every Thu

MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION ��� Faculté

St Jean, Rm 3-18 • 780.490.7332 • madeleinesanam.org/en • Program for HIV-AID’S prevention, treatment and harm reduction in French, English and other African languages • 3rd and 4th Sat, 9am-5pm each month • Free (member)/$10 (membership); pre-register

Ave • 780.973.5311 • nashvillesongwriters.com • NSAI (Nashville Songwriters Association International) meet the 2nd Mon each month, 7-9pm

ZEN LOUNGE • 12923-97 St • The Ca$h Prize

comedy contest hosted by Matt Alaeddine and Andrew Iwanyk • Every Tue, 8pm • No cover

GROUPS/CLUBS/MEETINGS AIKIKAI AIKIDO CLUB • 10139-87 Ave, Old

Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm

AFFIRM COVENANT SERVICE • McDougall United Church, 10025-101 St • 780.428.1818 • Service followed by the documentary Love Free or Die, about the ministry of Gene Robinson, the first openly gay Bishop in the Anglican Communion • Nov 24, 10:30am-12 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL EDMONTON •

8307-109 St • edmontonamnesty.org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug) E: amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org for more info • Free

ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE AT FOOT NOTES STUDIO • Foot Notes Dance Studio (South side),

9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pm-midnight • $15

BRAIN TUMOUR PEER SUPPORT GROUP • Mount Zion Lutheran Church, 11533-135 St NW • braintumour.ca • 1.800.265.5106 ext. 234 • Support group for brain tumour survivors and their families and caregivers. Must be 18 or over • 3rd Mon every month; 7-8:45pm • Free CANADIAN INJURED WORKERS ASSOCIATION OF ALBERTA (CIWAA) • Augustana

Lutheran Church, 107 St, 99 Ave • canadianinjuredworkers.com • Meeting every 3rd Sat, 1-4pm • Injured Workers in Pursuit of Justice denied by WCB

CANADIANS DEFEND OUR CLIMATE & COMMUNITIES • Alberta Legislature, 10800-97 Ave

• Come build a united wall of opposition to pipelines, reckless tar sands expansion and runaway climate change • Nov 16, 1pm

EDMONTON NATURE CLUB • King’s University

College Atrium, 9125-50 St • 780.459.6389 • Conservation of the ‘Canadian’ Burrowing Owl, featuring speaker Geoff Holroyd • Nov 15, 7pm • Donation

EDMONTON NEEDLECRAFT GUILD • Avonmore United Church Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm

10804-119 St • Documentary screening: Soup & buns; Rev Brian Kiely’s sermon Active Spirituality, Spiritual Activism, 10:30am • Nov 17, 12pm • Free

FACTS, FICTIONS, AND THE POLITICS OF TRUTH • CCIS North Lecture Theatres, Rms 1-430

St • 780.435.0845 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

and 1-440, U of A • parklandinstitute.ca/fallconf2013/ speakers • Presentation: Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt by Christopher Hedge (Nov 22, 7pm); also Munir Sheikh, Katie Gibbs, Arno Kopecky, Kevin Taft; closing speaker Michael Geist (Nov 24, 12pm) • Nov 22-24 • $10 for a single low income session to $195 for a the full package

ORGANIZATION FOR BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm

0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

SAWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP • Braeside Presbyterian Church bsmt, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon, 7:30pm

GLOBAL HEALTH FILM SERIES • globaled.

SEVENTIES FOREVER CLUB • Call 587.520.3833

ualberta.ca/events • ECHA 2-420, U of A: Heart of Sky, Heart of Earth; Nov 14 • ECHA 2-420, U of A: Water Wars: When Drought, Flood & Greed Collide; Nov 21 • ECHA 2-420, U of A: A Walk to Beautiful; Nov 28

GREAT EXPEDITIONS • St Luke’s AnglicanChurch, 8424-95 Ave • 780.469.3270 • 1st Mon every month, 7:30pm • Suggested donation of $3

• Meet inside Millennium Place, Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10-min discussion, followed by a 30 to 40-min walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta)

THE EXCEPTIONAL LIFE AND TIMES OF WINSTON CHURCHILL • Strathcona County

SOCIETY OF EDMONTON ATHEISTS • Stanley

REGIONAL PLANNING SPEAKER SERIES •

Library, 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • Churchill And Stalin: A Tricky Alliance and a Common Enemy: presented by Rod MacLeod • Nov 17, 2-4pm • $10 (adult)/$5 (student) at door

A. Milner Library, Centennial Rm (bsmt); edmontonatheists.ca; E: info@edmontonatheists.ca; Monthly roundtable 1st Tue each month

Ledcor Theatre, AGA, 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • What is an Innovative City?: panel discussion with Kevin Jones, Rob Shields, Chris Lumb, Mark Hall • Nov 19, 5:30-7pm

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave •

780.604.7572 • Swing Dance at Sugar Foot Stomp: beginner lesson followed by dance every Sat, 8pm (door)

INTRODUCTION TO KOMBUCHA MAKING •

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY (TOPS) • Grace

NATURAL HEALTHCARE FOR COLD & FLU SEASON • Pixie Glassworks Glassblowing Studio,

United Church annex, 6215-104 Ave • 780.479.5519 • Low-cost, fun and friendly weight loss group • Meets every Mon, 6:3pm

THOUGHTFUL TUESDAY • King Edward Com-

munity Small Hall, 8102-80 Ave • Movie Monday: In Organic We Trust: Nov 18, 7-9pm; Ingredients; Nov 25, 7-9pm • Free; pre-register

TOASTMASTERS • Fabulous Facilitators

Jasper Ave; 780.467.6013, l.witzke@shaw.ca; fabulousfacilitators.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 12:05-1pm

Community League, 8751-153 St (top fl); Meet every Wed, 7-9pm; Contact: VP Ed, 780.720.2277 • Y Toastmasters Club: Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); Meet every Tue, 7-9pm except last Tue ea month; Contact: Antonio Balce, 780.463.5331

VEGANS/VEGETARIANS OF ALBERTA •

Riverdale Rinkhouse (beside main hall) • vofa.ca/event • Raw Vegan Edmonton joint potluck • Dec 8

WILD ROSE ANTIQUE COLLECTORS SOCIETY • Delwood Community Hall, 7515 Delwood Rd • wildroseantiquecollectors.ca • Collecting and researching items from various periods in the history of Edmonton. Presentations after club business. Visitors welcome • Meets the 4th Mon of every month (except Jul & Dec), 7:30pm

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of the Old Strathcona Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence

LECTURES/PRESENTATIONS ALANIS MORISSETTE AND MARGARET ATWOOD • Winspear, Sir Winston Churchill Sq • Life.

FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church, 8424-

RETHINKING FLUORIDATION • Edmonton Clinic

Ave, upstairs • 780.554.6133 • Free instruction into the meditation on the Inner Light • Every Sun, 5pm

• Power Speakers Toastmasters Club: Jasper Park

ALBERTA'S GOVERNMENT HOUSE • Royal Alberta Museum Theatre, 12845-102 Ave • Free public talk on the history of Government House, a

9322-60 Ave • 780 436 4460 • Learn how essential oils work with your body to build your immune system. Get the latest research on essential oils, and practical recipes and remedies to help you stay healthy throughout the winter • Nov 18, 7-9pm • Free

SEEING IS ABOVE ALL • Acacia Hall, 10433-83

NEW ONGOING LISTING UNTIL DEC 1:

EDMONTON UKULELE CIRCLE • Bogani Café,

King Edward Community League Smalll Hall, 8102-80 Ave • Learn the Basics • Nov 27, 7-9pm • $25

Health Academy, Rm 2-190, 11405-87 Ave, U of A • A fresh look at Edmonton's tap water with speakers Dr Jim Beck and Dr Anthony Hall • Nov 21, 7pm • Free

Toastmasters Club: 2nd Fl, Canada Place, 9700

Love. Art: A conversation with Alanis Morissette and Margaret Atwood • Fri, Nov 22, 8pm • Part of Festival of Ideas

2023-111 St • 780.440.3528 • 3rd Sun each month; 2:30-4pm • $5

SUSTAINABILITY SPEAKER SERIES: COMMON GROUND–DEFENDING THE PUBLIC SECTOR • Unitarian Church of Edmonton,

Academy, U of A • Interactive Workshop with Paul Hawken • Nov 20, 11am-12:30pm • Free Register at yegpaulhawkenworkshop-es2.eventbrite.ca

NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-106

SHERWOOD PARK WALKING GROUP + 50

9938-70 Ave • A step-by-step process that helps you identify and correct the most common problems in writing; with Jim Taylor, presented by EAC-PPB • Nov 29, 9am-4:30pm • Pre-register at eacppb8stepediting. eventbrite.ca

A DISCUSSION ON ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE • L1-420 Edmonton Clinic Health

SONGWRITERS GROUP • The Carrot, 9351-118

RUMORS ULTRA LOUNGE • 8230 Gateway Blvd

VAULT PUB • 8214-175 St • Comedy with Liam Creswick and Steve Schulte • Every Thu, at 9:30pm

EIGHT-STEP EDITING • Expressionz Café,

gew2013 • Alongside presenting partners Junior Achievement, and EO Edmonton, celebrates Global Entrepreneurship week • Nov 18-24 • Startup City Luncheon: Delta Edmonton Centre Suite Hotel, 10222102 St: Nov 18, 11:30am (door); $65 • Students to Startups: Startup Edmonton, 10359-104 St: Nov 20, 6pm; free for students; RSVP at studentstostartups. eventbrite.ca • Launch Party Edmonton 4: at Startup Edmonton: Nov 21, 6:45pm; $25/$15 (early-bird by Nov 18)

for location • deepsoul.ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm

• Every Thu Neon Lights and Laughter with host Sterling Scott and five comedians and live DJ TNT; 8:30pm

evolvehds.com • Free introduction • Wed, Nov 20, 7-9pm

STARTUP EDMONTON • startupedmonton.com/

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • Sterling Scott

every Wed, 9pm

DYNAMICS OF AWAKENED LIVING WITH EVOLVE • Expressionz Café, 9938-70 Ave •

SENIORS CARE PROVINCIAL SPEAKING TOUR • Lions Seniors Centre, 111 Ave, 113 St • To

raise awareness about the concerns on seniors care in Alberta • Dec 11, 7-9pm

WASKAHEGAN TRAIL HIKE • waskahegantrail. ca • Meet at McDonalds, 14920-87 Ave: Explore the Devon Ravine trails with hike leader JoAnne 780.487.0645; Sun, Nov 17; $5 Carpool • Meet at Capilano McDonalds, 9857-50 St at 9:45am; 10 km guided hike on Edmonton's river trails from the Low Level Bridge to the Kinsmen Park Recreation area with hike leader Sandra 780.467.9572; Nov 24; Carpool available McDonalds to the trailhead; return by 3pm WHYS AND HOW TO'S OF A RAW FOOD DIET • King Edward Community League Small Hall, 81 St, 80 Ave • Earth's General Store • Nov 20, 7-9pm

WINTER CYCLING WORKSHOP • BikeWorks

South, 10047-80 Averear lane • How to prepare your bicycle, body and mind for riding a bike in the winter • Nov 14, 6:30-9pm

QUEER AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sun-

nybrook United Church, Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month

BEERS FOR QUEERS • Empress Ale House, 9912

Whyte Ave • Meet the last Thu each month

BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP • A

social group for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo.com/group/ bwedmonton

BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm EPLC FELLOWSHIP PAGAN STUDY GROUP

• Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • eplc.webs.com • Free year long course; Family circle 3rd Sat each month • Everyone welcome

EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE • 10220-103 St • 780.424.0077 • yourgaybar.com • Community Tue: partner with various local GLBT groups for different events; see online for details • Happy Hour Wed-Fri: 4-8pm • Wed Karaoke: with the Mystery Song Contest; 7pm-2am • Fri: DJ Evictor • Sat: DJ Jazzy • Sun: Beer Bash FLASH NIGHT CLUB • 10018-105 St •

780.969.9965 • Thu Goth + Industrial Night: Indust:real Assembly with DJ Nanuck; 10pm (door); no cover • Triple Threat Fridays: DJ Thunder, Femcee DJ Eden Lixx • DJ Suco beats every Sat • E: vip@ flashnightclub.com

G.L.B.T. SPORTS AND RECREATION • teamed-

monton.ca • Blazin' Bootcamp: Garneau Elementary School Gym, 10925-87 Ave; Every Mon and Thu, 7pm; $30/$15 (low income/student); E: bootcamp@ teamedmonton.ca • Mindful Meditation: Pride Centre: Every Thu, 6pm; free weekly drop-in • Progressive Core Stability and Abdominal Training with Barb Turner: Parkallen Community League Hall; Every Thu, Sep-Dec 19, 6pm (beginner/intermediate), 7:15pm (advance); $50 (month), $200 (season) • Swimming–Making Waves: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; E: swimming@teamedmonton.c; makingwavesswimclub.ca • Bowling: Bonnie Doon Bowling Lanes: Every Tue, 6:30pm; until Apr 1, 2014; $15/week • Volleyball: Westminster Junior High School (Garneau) every Thu, until Nov 21, 7-9pm; St Matthew Elementary School (NE): Tue, Dec 3-Mar 11, 8-10pm; Stratford Junior-Senior High School (west end): every Tue, Mar 18-Apr 29, 7-9pm, $65 (season), $35 (Half season), $5 (drop-in) • Curling: Granite Curling Club: Every Tue, until Mar 25, 7pm • Martial Arts–Kung Fu and Kick Boxing: Every Tue and Thu, 6-7pm; GLBTQ inclusive adult classes at Sil-Lum Kung Fu; kungfu@ teamedmonton.ca, kickboxing@teamedmonton.ca, sillum.ca

G.L.B.T.Q SENIORS GROUP • S.A.G.E Bldg, Craftroom, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: tuff @shaw.ca ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB • Pride Centre, 10608-

105 Ave • 780.387.3343 • edmontonillusions.ca • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7:30-9pm

INSIDE/OUT • U of A Campus • Campus-based

organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, academic, straight allies and support staff • 3rd Thu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. E: kwells@ualberta.ca

LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB • geocities. com/makingwaves_edm • Recreational/competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu

PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • A safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental drop-in space, support programs and resources offered for members of the GLBTQ community, their families and friends • Daily: Community drop-in; support and resources. Queer library: borrowing privileges: Tue-Fri 12-9pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, closed Sun-Mon; Queer HangOUT (a.k.a. QH) youth drop-in: Tue-Fri 3-8pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, youth@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Counselling: Free, short-term by registered counsellors every Wed, 5:308:30pm, info/bookings: 780.488.3234 • Knotty Knitters: Knit and socialize in safe, accepting environment, all skill levels welcome; every Wed 6-8pm • QH Game Night: Meet people through board game fun; every Thu 6-8pm • QH Craft Night: every Wed, 6-8pm • QH Anime Night: Watch anime; every Fri, 6-8pm • Movie Night: Open to everyone; 2nd and 4th Fri each month, 6-9pm • Women’s Social Circle: Social support group for female-identified persons +18 years in the GLBT community; new members welcome; 2nd and 4th Thu, 7-9pm each month; andrea@pridecentreofedmonton. org • Men Talking with Pride: Support and social group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; every Sun 7-9pm; robwells780@hotmail.com • TTIQ: a support and information group for all those who fall under the transgender umbrella and their family/supporters; 3rd Mon, 7-9pm, each month • HIV Support Group: Support and discussion group for gay men; 2nd Mon, 7-9pm, each month; huges@shaw.ca PRIMETIMERS/SAGE GAMES • Unitarian

Church, 10804-119 St ��� 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm

ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH • 11526-76 Ave •

780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

WOMONSPACE • 780.482.1794 • womonspace. ca, womonspace@gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured WOODYS VIDEO BAR • 11723 Jasper Ave •

780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

SPECIAL EVENTS ALL IS BRIGHT • 124th Street Area • al-

lisbright124.ca • An outdoor, culturally unique, event hosted by Hey Ladies (Theatre Network) celebrating the coming of the winter season with light installations, the Fortrelles , the Awesome Hots, Wool On Wolves, Shout Out Out Out, and family programs • Nov 23, 12-10pm; 5pm (light-up)• Free

BLACK AND WHITE FUNDRAISER • Festival Place, Sherwood Park • Featuring the Retrofitz • Nov 16 CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY • Various Venues throughout South Rural Strathcona • Christmas Market Activities: Crafts, sleigh rides, food markets, 10am-3pm; Light-Up South Strathcona: 3:30-5:30pm; refreshments, family fun, live entertainment, fireworks, and ofcourse Santa • Nov 23, 10am-5:30pm CHRISTMAS ON THE SQUARE • Holiday Light

Up: Sir Winston Churchill Sq; Nov 16, 4-6:30pm • Santa Claus Parade: City Centre Mall, 100 St, 102A Ave; Dec

1, 10am-noon

DEEPSOUL.CA • 587.520.3833; text to:

780.530.1283 for location • Classic Covers Shindig Fundraiser • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins on Les Paul Standard guitars: upcoming Century Casino show as well; Twilight Zone Razamanaz Tour; all ages • Fundraising for local Canadian Disaster Relief, the hungry (world-wide through the Canadian Food Grains Bank)

DENIM AND DIAMONDS GALA • Shaw Conference Centre • in support of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation • Nov 15

DBG CRAFTERS CHRISTMAS SALE • Devonian Botanical Gardens • 780.987.3054 ext. 2223 • Crafter’s Workshop: handmade crafts from the bounty of the Garden • Nov 22-24; Nov 22, Nov 24, 1-4pm; Nov. 23, 10am-4pm • Proceeds to programs and projects at the Garden

FESTIVAL OF TREES–Sherwood Park •

Strathcona County Community Centre, 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • 780.464.5339 • ivcstrathcona. org • Silent auction of fully decorated trees, wreaths and centrepieces; support volunteer initiatives within Strathcona County • Nov 22-24, Fri 10-8pm, Sat 106pm, Sun 10-5pm • $2

JUST CHRISTMAS–AN ALTERNATIVE GLOBAL MARKET PLACE • Alberta Avenue Hall, 9210-118 Ave • justchristmas.org • Just Christmas offers the opportunity to give gifts that help make the world a better place • Nov 22, 5:30-9pm; Nov 23, 9:30am-4pm; food and entertainment • Admission by donation

LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE • 780.963.5691 • Donation

boxes at WestView Health Centre, Good Samaritan Facilities in Stony Plain and Spruce Grove; $10 donation will light a bulb on one of the campaign symbols that will glow in memory of your loved one • OrienT reSTaUranT: 4305 South Park Dr (across from WestView Health Centre): Buffet: Nov 18, 11am-2:30pm; proceeds to Light Up Yur Life Society

LIFE, LOVE, ART: AN EVENING WITH ALANIS MORISSETTE AND MARGARET ATWOOD

• Winspear • festivalofideas.ca • Festival of Ideas: includes a Q&A with the audience #UAlbertaIdeas • Fri, Nov 22, 8pm • $47.25 (adult)/$31.50 (senior)/$18.90 (student)/$52.50 (door)

MAKE IT! ALBERTA'S HANDMADE MARKET • The Enjoy Centre, 101 Riel Dr, St Albert

• Canadian crafters and makers!Make It is the largest event of its kind in Western Canada • Nov 21-24 • $6 (door)

PERUVIAN DINNER–LATIN MUSIC NIGHT

• Yardbird Suite, 11 Tommy Banks Way • Marco Claveria Project, others • Nov 17, 5-9pm • $30 (single)/$50 (for two in adv)/$40 (single)/$60 (for two door); fundraiser for Standing Up for Peruvian Children

PREMIERE TO WINTER • EPCOR tower • See the premiere of a new short film on winter in Edmonton, listen to a reading from Jason Lee Norman's winter anthology, 40 Below; help launch Edmonton's first official winter drink competition • Nov 14, 5:30pm • Pay-what-you-wish, proceeds to Boyle Street Community Centre; donations of socks, hats, mittens and scarves taken at door

PURE SPECULATION FESTIVAL • Ramada Conference Centre, 11834 Kingsway Ave • A science and fiction festival • Nov 15-17 • $40 (adv)/$50 (door)/$30 (daily pass) • STeamPUnk BaLL: Ramada Hotel • Featuring Punch Drunk Cabaret (swing-rockabilly band), the Robed Rogues of the Airship Vargos, Sugar Swing Dance Club. Enthusiasts dress-up in science fiction-enhanced Victorian fashions • Nov 16, 8pm • $20 (adv)/$25 (door)/$15 (with Pure Speculation weekend pass) XMAS CRAFT AND GIFT SALE • BritanniaYoungstown Community League Hall, 15927-105 Ave • Hand made crafts and gifts • Nov 16 10am-4pm • Free

MUSIC 33


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It takes balls to get up in front of a to write more songs and soon the dirty ones became a dominant part crowd and sing, but it takes even bigger balls to get up in front of a crowd of their repertoire. and sing about balls. That's exactly So is it scary to take the stage and what Red Deerians Melody Stang tear into a song about anal sex? a div. of Kokotilo Holdings Inc. and Kayla Williams do. With songs "We have been performing for so long now that it's not usually nerves," such as "Titty Shake," "Hairy Balls," and, my personal favourite,12345 "Dildo," Stang says. "It is just an uneasy feeltheir musical comedy duo, The Dirrty like, how is the PREPARE FOR ing A CAREER IN crowd going to react to us tonight?" Show, has a decidedly blue tinge. FIREFIGHTING & POLICING Although singing funny songs Williams agrees. "Depending on the crowd, we go into it wonderabout sex might seem like a rather odd artistic choice, it came ing what their reaction will be, naturally for Stang and Williams. but nine times outta 10 everyone laughs. Regardless, we would still They had been singing and writing songs together for years when perform our hearts out even if no their raunchy humour surfaced and one was laughing." they came up with a song about There's a little more to it than just laughs, though. Melody has bigger anal sex called "Fine By Me." It was such a crowd pleaser they decided aspirations for the songs. Funded in part by the Government of Canada.

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To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com 130.

Coming Events

OIL CITY DERBY GIRLS All tickets are $10.00 in advance and $15.00 at the door, Kids under 10 are free! Next up: sk8mare #7 Nov 23 @ Oil City Grindhouse 14420 112 street Doors at 5pm Visit www.oilcityderbygirls.ca for more information RETHINKING FLUORIDATION: A fresh look at Edmonton’s tap water Featuring Dr. James Beck professor emeritus medical biophysics U of Calgary and Dr. Anthony Hall U of Lethbridge. Is it effective? Is it safe? Is it ethical? Bring your questions. University of Alberta Edmonton Clinic Health Academy (ECHA) Room 2-190 11405-87 Ave. Edmonton, AB Donations appreciated to www.WeDeserveSafeWater.com

to help spread awareness

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Are You Looking for a Great Volunteer Experience? Habitat for Humanity’s On-Tap volunteer program allows busy people to get out and volunteer when they can ON-TAP VOLUNTEERS This is a new volunteer program designed for busy volunteers who need to schedule shifts with very short notice. If you would like to volunteer but struggle to commit to a shift until the last minute because your schedule is so hectic, contact us to get more information about the On-Tap program. angela@hfh.org or 780-451-3416 ext 223. HFH.org Bells will be ringing November 14th - December 24th for the 2013 Christmas Kettle Campaign We are looking for volunteers to come out and ring in Christmas to help us reach our goal of $500,000. We have 9000 volunteer hours to fill. If you have a few hours we would love to have you join us. Call 780-423-2111 ext 241 to sign up or email:

edmonton_kettles@can.salvation army.org or online

http://www.salvationarmy.ca/ volunteer/

If you can’t make it out to a kettle but would still like to give visit: www.fillthekettle.com Can You Read This? Help someone Who can’t! Volunteer 2 hours a week and help someone improve their Reading, Writing, Math or English Speaking Skills. Call Valerie at P.A.L.S 780-424-5514 or email palsvol@shaw.ca

SHARKS LIKE THE COLOUR YELLOW

36 AT THE BACK

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Growing Facilitators Volunteer Opportunity Sustainable Food Edmonton offers a Little Green Thumbs indoor gardening program to schools and childcare agencies and we are looking for volunteers. A green thumb is not a pre-requisite. However, gardening experience and a passion for children and youth are an asset. For info and volunteer application form: www.sustainablefoodedmonton.o rg

Habitat For Humanity is building a pool of volunteers to help us with renovations at our newest ReStore. Flexible hours, no experience necessary If interested, please contact Evan at ehammer@hfh.org or call (780) 451-3416 Habitat for Humanity is building at Neufeld Landing! We are actively scheduling individuals and groups of volunteers for Canada’s largest project located in South Edmonton’s Rutherford area. To get involved, go to www.hfh.org and register as a volunteer. Questions? Contact Kim. Beginners to trades people welcome. We provide all tools, equipment and lunch. All volunteers participate in onsite safety orientation/training. No minimum number of shifts required. Contact for more info about the event: Kim Sherwood 780-451-3416 ksherwood@hfh.org Habitat for Humanity requires volunteers for our ReStores We are recruiting customer service volunteers to help us at least one shift per week at store locations in north, south or west Edmonton. Customer service volunteers at our new and used building supplies stores help customers, load vehicles, clean items, stock shelves and many other tasks. Help our community to recycle everything from furniture to building supplies! Contact for more info about the event: Evan Hammer 780-451-3416 ehammer@hfh.org Habitat for Humanity requires volunteers for our prefab shop. We are now booking 10 – 15 volunteers per day Beginners to trades people welcome to help us build walls for our build projects. We provide all tools and equipment. All volunteers participate in onsite safety orientation/training. No minimum number of shifts required. Contact for more info about the event: Kim Sherwood 780-451-3416 ksherwood@hfh.org Help someone in crisis take that first step towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation create a future without breast cancer through volunteerism. Contact 1-866-302-2223 or ivolunteer@cbcf.org for current volunteer opportunities

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Needed for our Long Term Care residence, daytime volunteers for various activities or just for a friendly visit! Please contact Janice at Extendicare Eaux Claires for more details jgraff@extendicare.com (780) 472 - 1106 Room to Read is changing children’s lives in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our work, and spread the word about our amazing results. Edmonton@roomtoread.org www.roomtoread.org Volunteering - Does your employer have a Day of Caring program? We invite you to come and spend some time with us at Habitat for Humanity! It’s easy to sign up a group of volunteers to work on one of our builds. Volunteers from beginners to garage “putterers”, to trades people come out and help us to build homes for families in our community. We provide all tools, equipment, safety gear and lunch. Volunteers work in small crews under the direction of our site supervisors. Our primary focus is safety and we have a fun, welcoming environment that’s great for an employee group to experience giving back to community together. For more information, go to our website at www.hfh.org or contact Kim at 780-451-3416 ext 232. Volunteering - Improve the Lives of Children in the Developing World Room to Read is changing the lives of children in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our programs, and spread the word about the fantastic results we are achieving. Skills in event planning, PR, marketing, graphic design are needed, but not essential. We welcome all volunteers. If this sounds interesting, email us at Edmonton@roomtoread.org We’re Seeking Volunteers for Our Casino! Workshop West We are holding our casino on January 1 and 2, 2014 at the Palace Casino, located at West Edmonton Mall. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Natalia at tickets@workshopwest.org Volunteering for Workshop West Theatre is a great opportunity for independent theatre artists who are looking for affordable rehearsal space. For every hour that you volunteer at our casino, you get three hours of free rehearsal space at EPIC Underground. For more information on EPIC Underground, email tickets@workshopwest.org

Volunteers Wanted

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous

CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we are looking for people to volunteer as Toy Pickup Drivers collecting our toy donations from various locations around the city. To be eligible for this work, you must have a vehicle, show us your valid driver’s license and insurance and be willing to undergo a police check. You will need your vehicle for two or three trips a week to your location, where you will fill up the supplied bags with toy donations and bring them to our warehouse at Northgate Industries (12345 121 ST). For more information, visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca , email

CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we have been granted a booth at the Edmonton Christmas Show 2013 which runs from Nov 28 to Dec 1st. We are looking for volunteers to help us man the booth. Shifts are mornings, afternoons and evenings. We will be setting up a silent auction table and a table with information on CHED Santas Anonymous. Please visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca for more information on CHED Santas Anonymous and the Edmonton Christmas Show 2013 event.

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or call Janet at 780 428-8697

Toy Pickup Drivers for CHED Santas Anonymous are needed at these locations: CHED RADIO STATION (5204 84 ST) - We need four volunteers for this location; one person for each day of the week, Tue-Frid. Pickups must be done before 5pm. COSTCO SOUTH (2616 91 ST NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). MILLWOODS TOWN CENTER (2331 66 ST NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). SOUTHGATE MALL (5015 111 ST NW) WEEKDAYS - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). WALMART WINDEMERE (6110 Currents DR NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). ON CALL DRIVERS sometimes a location driver cannot make a trip and the location will call us asking for a pickup as their box is full. We need people who are available either morning or afternoons in all sections of town. Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we are looking for people to volunteer as Greeters welcoming and signing in our warehouse volunteers. Our warehouse is located at 12345 121ST, inside Northgate Industries. Shifts available are: Saturday afternoons from 2pm to 5pm on Nov 16, Nov 23, Nov 30 and Dec7. Sunday afternoons from 1pm to 3pm on Nov 17, Nov 24, Dec 1 and Dec 8.

Interested people may contact Janet at

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or 780-428-8697.

2005.

Artist to Artist

2013 Palaeo Arts Contest at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, AB. This year, our scientists have selected a Stygimoloch skull to discover and interpret through art. Our annual Palaeo Arts Contest is open to all grade levels, has prizes for every winner, including two $500 draw prizes that are awarded to schools, and offers the chance to have students’ winning artwork displayed at the Museum. For more information, including topics for each grade level, visit: http://www.tyrrellmuseum.com/ Palaeo_Arts_Contest.htm. Art Gallery of St Albert (AGSA), a contemporary public art gallery, seeks submissions from artists working in all styles and mediums for exhibition in the 2015 calendar year. Submissions are adjudicated by a panel of visual art professionals who represent a spectrum of expertise in the visual arts. The artists chosen to exhibit receive CARFAC fees. Deadline for submissions: Saturday, March 1, 2014, 5 pm For more information: Jenny Willson-McGrath, Exhibition Curator 780.651.5741 I jennyw@artsheritage.ca ARTIST requires agent/manager to assist in selling ART. Commission is generous percentage % . Contact BDC at monkeywrench@live.ca Call for Submissions : FAVA FEST FILM AND VIDEO ARTS FESTIVAL MARCH 25 – 29, 2014 FAVA FEST exposes the larger community to the artistic work of membership, stimulates new work, rewards past success and just generally makes a bigger noise about FAVA.

For more information, visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca , email

Hosting a media art gear expo and BBQ, screen 30-40 films directed by Northern Alberta filmmakers, hold an Artist Talk or Panel ( 2013-brought in noted Art Director Todd Cherniawsky) and give away $20,000 worth of awards at FAVA GALA – a celebration of excellence in media arts and FAVA’s big fundraiser for the year.

or call Janet at 780 428-8697.

Festival details and schedule to come in early 2014.

Tuesday daytime hours available on Nov 19, Nov 26, Dec 3 and Dec 10. Thursday afternoons from 3pm to 5pm on Nov 21.

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

2005.

Artist to Artist

Botanical Artists of Canada (BAC) – Juried Exhibition, The Four Seasons, March 26 – April 6, 2014, Paper Mill Gallery, Toronto. Entry deadline: Friday, January 10, 2014. Open to all BAC members in good standing; non-members may join prior to entering exhibition

www.botanicalartistsofcanada.org/ join.

Submission fee $45 for up to three works. Awards: Best in show – $350 and three other awards – $150 each. To download the call for entries: http://www.botanicalartistsofca nada.org/exhibitions/calls-forentries For more information or questions, email exhibition coordinator Gerry Jenkison, gerry@jenkisonnetwork.com Call for Submissions 2014/15 Gallery Exhibition Programming Submission Deadline: November 30, 2013 Harcourt House Arts Centre is currently accepting submissions for our 2014/2015 gallery exhibition programming for the Main Gallery and Front Room Gallery exhibition spaces. For full submission details please visit www.harcourthouse.ab.ca STAGE STRUCK 2014! CALL FOR ENTRANTS Submissions for ADFA/Edmonton one-act adult play festival on February 21/22, accepted until December 15, 2013. Information and registration package from Mary-Ellen at 780-481-3716 or mperley@shaw.ca STUDENT POSTCARD EXCHANGE CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS, THEME: MAPPING Create a postcard that follows the theme of MAPPING. Here are some ideas to get you thinking about mapping, these are only to start thinking about your piece and in no way are meant to be restrictive. Maps can direct you where to go; they can chart both physical places and ideas. Technology has changed the way that we understand mapping. Maps are no longer a static representation of space but change as quickly as the place that they represent. They can record public knowledge or a private understanding of an environment; they can be clear or cryptic. For this exhibition artists can make up to 2 original postcards. Postcards must be 2-dimensional, 4 x 6 inch postcards. Artists are encouraged to use any media (drawing, print media, painting, collage, etc.). Submission Deadline (postmarked by): Friday, December 13, 2013 Please contact Brittney Roy for more details. harcourtexhibit@shaw.ca 780.426.4180 The EAC’s annual Community Investment Program Arts Operating Grant is fast approaching. If you are running an non-profit in Edmonton, and primarily support the production of artwork, you could be eligible for this grant. The deadline for submission is December 1st. Application guidelines can be found through Art Rubicon: http://artrubicon.com/2322/eaccip-arts-operating-grantsorganizations-closesdec-1-annually/

2005.

Artist to Artist

The Art Gallery of Alberta (AGA) is pleased to announce the 2015 Alberta Biennial of Contemporary Art Call for Submissions is now open to resident Alberta artists. Details of the call, which closes at 4 pm on Friday, December 13, 2013, can be found at youraga.ca. The exhibition will be on view at the AGA in early 2015 All resident Alberta artists are eligible to submit works for consideration. Submissions should include: a curriculum vitae; a brief artist’s statement; a CD with a maximum of 20 images formatted as a PowerPoint presentation of recent work (with artist’s name, title, media and date of work clearly indicated for each image) or a maximum of three videos or DVDs for media or time-based work; and a self-addressed envelope with appropriate postage for return delivery if required. Submissions should be sent directly to the Art Gallery of Alberta by Friday, December 13, 2013 by 4 pm. Please visit youraga.ca for more information The Paint Spot, Edmonton would like to extend an invitation to your organization, club, society, school or association to make use of the many exhibition opportunities we offer to members of the Alberta art community. We encourage individuals and curators, particularly those who are emerging, as well as groups, to make exhibition proposals to our galleries: Naess, Gallery, Artisan Nook, and the Vertical Space. For further information on these three show spaces, please visit our website, www.paintspot.ca The Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Northern Italy Call for literary arts / visual arts residencies Deadline: December 3, 2013 Through residencies and conferences, the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Northern Italy supports innovations that change the way we address complex global issues. Here, people of diverse expertise and backgrounds come together in a thoughtprovoking, creative, collegial environment that helps create change and have impact on a wide range of world issues. Applications for Academic Writing as well as Arts & Literary Arts residencies are due by December 3, 2013. Applications from practitioners and for conferences are accepted on a rolling basis. http://www.rockefellerfoundatio n.org/bellagio-center The Writers’ Guild of Alberta Gears Up for the 2014 Alberta Literary Awards! The Writers’ Guild of Alberta (WGA) is preparing to celebrate another successful year with the 2014 Alberta Literary Awards. Writers from across Alberta and their publishers are invited to check out and submit to this year’s award categories. The deadline for submissions to the Alberta Literary Awards is December 31, 2013. For more information and submission guidelines, please visit www.writersguild.ab.ca


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2010.

Musicians Available

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FREEWILLASTROLOGY

ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): There's something resembling a big red snake slithering around in your mind these days. I don't mean that literally, of course. I'm talking about a big red imaginary snake. But it's still quite potent. While it's not poisonous, neither is it a pure embodiment of sweetness and light. Whether it ends up having a disorienting or benevolent influence on your life all depends on how you handle your relationship with it. I suggest you treat it with respect but also let it know that you're the boss. Give it guidelines and a clear mandate so it serves your noble ambitions and not your chaotic desires. If you do that, your big red snake will heal and uplift you.

TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): In my astrological opinion, almost nothing can keep you from getting the love you need in the coming days. Here's the only potential problem: you might have a mistaken or incomplete understanding about the love you need, and that could interfere with you recognizing and welcoming the real thing. So here's my prescription: keep an open mind about the true nature of the love that you actually need most and stay alert for the perhaps unexpected ways it might make itself available. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): "People fall so in love with their pain, they can't leave it behind," asserts novelist Chuck Palahniuk. Your assignment, Gemini, is to work your ass off to fall out of love with your pain. As if you were talking to a child, explain to your subconscious mind that the suffering it has gotten so accustomed to has outlived its usefulness. Tell your deep self that you no longer want the ancient ache to be a cornerstone of your identity. To aid the banishment, I recommend that you conduct a ritual of severing. Tie one side of a ribbon to a symbol of your pain and tie the other side around your waist. Then cut the ribbon in half and bury the symbol in the dirt. CANCER (Jun 21 – Jul 22): "You can look at a picture for a week and never think of it again," said painter Joan Miró. "You can also look at a picture for a second and think of it all your life," he added. The coming days are likely to bring you none of the former kind of experiences and several of the latter, Cancerian. It's a numinous time in your long-term cycle: a phase when you're likely to encounter beauty that enchants you and mysteries that titillate your sense of wonder for a long time. In other words, the eternal is coming to visit you in very concrete ways. How do you like your epiphanies? Hot and wild? Cool and soaring? Comical and lyrical? Hot and soaring and comical and wild and cool and lyrical?

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

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LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): There's a new genre of erotic literature: dinosaur porn. Ebooks like In the Velociraptor's Nest and Ravished by the Triceratops tell tall tales about encounters between people and prehistoric reptiles. I don't recommend you read this stuff, though. While I do believe that now is a good time to add new twists to your sexual repertoire and explore the frontiers of pleasure, I think you should remain rooted in the real world, even in your fantasy life. It's also important to be safe as you experiment. You really don't want to explore the frontiers of pleasure with cold-blooded beasts. Either travel alone or else round up a warm-blooded compassion specialist who has a few skills in the arts of intimacy. VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): The saxifrage is a small plant with white flowers. It grows best in subarctic regions and cooler parts of the Northern Hemisphere. The word "saxifrage" is derived from the Latin word saxifraga, whose literal meaning is "stone-breaker." Indeed, the plant does often appear in the clefts of stones and boulders. In his poem "A Sort of a Song," William Carlos Williams celebrates its strength: "Saxifrage is my flower that splits the rocks." I nominate this darling little dynamo to be your metaphorical power object of the week, Virgo. May it inspire you to crack through blocks and barriers with subtle force. LIBRA (Sep 23 – Oct 22): You're not being swept along in a flood of meaningless distractions and irrelevant information and trivial wishes, right? I'm hoping that you have a sixth sense about which few stimuli are useful and meaningful to you and which thousands of stimuli are not. But if you are experiencing a bit of trouble staying wellgrounded in the midst of the frenzied babble, now would be a good time to take strenuous action. The universe will conspire to help you become extra stable and secure if you resolve to eliminate as much nonsense from your life as you can. SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): Sweetness is good. Sweetness is desirable. To be healthy, you need to give and receive sweetness on a regular basis. But you can't flourish on sweetness alone. In fact, too much of it may be oppressive or numbing. I'm speaking both literally and metaphorically: to be balanced you need all of the other tastes, including saltiness, sourness, bitterness and savouriness. From what I understand, you are headed into a phase when you'll thrive on more bitterness and savouriness than usual. To get an idea of what I mean, meditate on what the emotional equivalents might be for bitter tastes like coffee, beer and olives and for

savoury tastes like mushrooms, cheese, spinach and green tea. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21): When you procrastinate, you avoid doing an important task. Instead, you goof off, doing something fun or simply puttering around wasting time. But what if there were a higher form of procrastination? What if you could avoid an important task by doing other tasks that were somewhat less important but still quite valuable? Here's what that might look like for you right now: you could postpone your search for the key to everything by throwing yourself into a project that will give you the key to one small part of everything. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): In his utopian novel Looking Backward, American author Edward Bellamy wrote a passage that I suspect applies to you right now: "It is under what may be called unnatural, in the sense of extraordinary, circumstances that people behave most naturally, for the reason that such circumstances banish artificiality." Think of the relief and release that await you, Capricorn: an end to pretending, a dissolution of deception, the fall of fakery. As you weave your way through extraordinary circumstances, you will be moved to act with brave authenticity. Take full advantage. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): "I have your back" is an American expression that could also be rendered as "I'm right behind you, ready to help and defend you" or "I'm ready to support you whenever you've got a problem." Is there anyone in the world who feels that way about you? If not, now would be an excellent time to work on getting such an ally. Cosmic conditions are ripe for bringing greater levels of assistance and collaboration into your life. And if you already do have confederates of that calibre, I suggest you take this opportunity to deepen your symbiotic connection even further. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): More than 100 countries around the world celebrate a holiday called Independence Day, memorializing a time when they broke away from another nation and formed a separate state. I encourage you to create your own personal version of this festival. It could commemorate a breakthrough moment in the past when you escaped an oppressive situation, a turning point when you achieved a higher level of autonomy or a taboo-busting transition when you started expressing your own thoughts and making your own decisions with more authority. By the way, a fresh opportunity to take this kind of action is available to you. Any day now might be a good time to declare a new Independence Day. V

AT THE BACK 37


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

DAN SAVAGE SAVAGELOVE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

"You Had to Be There"—and there you is. SLUTS AND SUCH Why am I such a slut? Girl, Corrupted

Across

1 Scraps 8 Annoy 11 Greek letters 14 Perfect example 15 Autumnal chill 16 Bambi’s aunt 17 Keep a distance 20 Gets under control 21 Dispensable candy 22 Off kilter 23 ___ out a living 24 “Pet” that’s really a plant 26 Not one’s best effort, in a sports metaphor 27 Hi-___ monitor 28 With just us, not anyone else 30 Compass dir. 31 Utah city 32 Rocky Balboa opponent Apollo ___ 33 Schoolboy 34 Server of Duff Beer 35 “Watership Down” director Martin 38 Director Gus Van ___ 39 Atlanta health agcy. 42 Malt liquor amount 44 Antipoverty agcy. created by LBJ (hidden in SHOE ORGANIZER) 45 1994 Nobel Peace Prize sharer 46 No voters 47 “Alice’s Restaurant” singer Guthrie 48 “Change the World” singer Clapton 49 Keebler cookie maker 50 Airport runway 51 The right way (for things) 55 Carly ___ Jepsen 56 ___ center 57 Kindle, for one 58 Avg. level 59 Demand 60 Bum out

Down

1 Guinea pigs 2 Passages for drawing smoke

38 AT THE BACK

3 Kind of cat or twins 4 Eye problems 5 Bathrooms, for Brits 6 Big bird 7 “Go” preceder 8 Unpleasant way to live 9 Cracker brand 10 Speed meas. in Europe 11 Outgrowth of punk rock 12 Without weapons 13 Agree 18 Drug in a den 19 Bird on a coin 24 Monsieur de Bergerac 25 Broke new ground 26 Artists’ headwear 28 One of Henry VIII’s wives 29 Tea accompaniments 34 “I Try” singer Gray 35 Greets with lots of laughter 36 Circled the sun 37 1991 Wimbledon champ Michael 38 Total mess 39 Act like rust 40 “Coppelia” composer 41 Barrel makers 42 Director of “The Grifters” 43 Open an achievement, e.g. 47 Fragrant oil 49 They’re looking for you? 50 “Shake well,” e.g. 52 Time 53 Diploma alternative 54 Charlemagne’s domain: abbr. ©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords

friends and family in eighth grade. I just wanted to thank you.

bad? It's the Internet, for goodness sake, and for all I know I am chatting with other straight dudes who are pretending to be lesbians. Isn't some lying to be expected? And if I'm not trying to pursue these women in real life, where's the harm? Don't You Know Everything, Savage?

Two gay men living in the same Are you a slut? city—two gay men with similar Or are you a woman who loves sex, sexual interests (including an inhas a high libido and has consensual terest in each other)—could wind sex with a lot of willing and grate- up owning two identical bottles of ful partners? Those are all traits for lube and a pair of identical cock which culture wouldn't conspire to rings. It's unlikely, of course, and Loathe as I am to contradict the leave you feeling conflicted or com- it's even less likely that Jerry owns Lesbians of Reddit—which sounds pelled to slap a pejorative label on the exact same lube and cock ring like the title of a '50s lesbian pulpyourself—if you were a dude, gay or as the lube and cock ring of yours fiction novel—I don't think you're an straight. that went missing when Jerry asshole, DYKES. Don't buy into the sexist double packed your place up. But seeing If you created fake personal ads, standards, GC. So long as your sex as Jerry helped you out of a jam, if you actively misled lesbians who life isn't negatively impacting your UIC, you should repay his kindness contacted you, if you sent women relationship(s), your health, your by either giving him the benefit of pics that weren't yours in an effort friendships, your family life, your the doubt or turning a blind eye to to trick them into believing that you classwork or your career, GC, you what amounts to a little harmless were an actual lesbian, if you strung aren't dolesbians along via ing anything email for weeks Lube isn't that expensive and that cock ring wrong. Don't months—if you wasn’t from Tiffany's—or was it?—so replacing or let shitty, sexwere doing any of them isn't going to ruin you. ist people that shit—then make you feel you would be an like you have asshole. But spinto slap a shitty, ning out a few sexist label on yourself for the crime perving. Lube isn't that expensive masturbatory fantasies on a site of enjoying sex while female. and that cock ring wasn't from Tif- designed to facilitate one-on-one Have fun out there, GC, be thought- fany's—or was it?—so replacing conversations between people who ful, be safe, be considerate of the them isn't going to ruin you. are never going to meet? That's not feelings of others and of your own. PS Thanks for the very sweet post- asshole behaviour. You found a way And remember: what works for you script! to enjoy your wannabe-lesbian fannow—slutting around in the sex- PPS Assuming Jerry didn't leave your tasies without doing harm to any acpositive/reclaiming-the-shit-out-of- intimate items out in plain view, UIC, tual flesh-and-vulva lesbians. that-word sense, ie, a lot of healthy that means you snooped. If you have And yes, DYKES, most of the "lesand rewarding sex, a lot of happy sex the kind of friendship with Jerry bians" you chatted with on Omegle partners—may not work for you al- where you can confront him about were other straight dudes. ways. Don't look back on this part of his theft, admit to your snooping your life with shame or regret if or and have a laugh about it—and DON'T BE A DRAG when you elect to downsize your sex maybe put the lube and cock ring to Is drag done by cisgender straight life, ie, less sex, fewer sex partners/a good use—leave him a cheeky note men for "humour" problematic? I lot of sex, one sex partner. Do what's in the drawer where you found your thought drag was mostly about right for you, eliminate the risks that intimate items: "I see you like my humour. I am acquainted with a bi can be eliminated, mitigate the risks cock ring. Let me know if you want trans woman who thinks this is ofthat can't be eliminated and don't to see me in it." fensive and at risk of further offendworry about what other people ing her, I haven't asked why. Maybe think. LYING LESBIAN you know? Haven't we come a long I've been reading your column way if straight men are comfortable STICKY FINGERS for years and I feel like I should enough with their sexualities to dress I am a 24-year-old gay man living know your answer by now, but I'm as women? in a major urban centre. My ques- stumped. I'm a man. Recently I dis- Not Feeling Offended tion has to do with etiquette. One covered Omegle, the online chat site of my very good friends—I'll call that allows you to "talk to strang- "Freedom means freedom for everyhim Jerry—helped me out of a huge ers," and I've had some fun posing as one," as a huge asshole once said. jam last summer. I received notice a lesbian. I would talk to women my That means straight guys who want that I had to vacate my apartment own age (mid-20s) about life, love to do drag are free to do drag, NFO, while I was overseas and Jerry vol- and, of course, sex. Many times, like and bi trans women who want to unteered to pack up my stuff and 99 percent of the time, these chats take offence are free to take offence. put it into storage. Needless to say, included role play or sexy chat. We For the record: good/funny/subI am extremely grateful, as Jerry has would both be masturbating on our versive drag is a burlesque on what saved me a huge amount of money respective ends and, from what I can it means to be male, not a denigraand hassle. Recently, though, I was tell, I am pretty good at writing this tion of what it means to be female. house-sitting for Jerry while he was stuff. I want to be clear that this was And while gay men seem to have on vacation and I found some inti- just chatting. I wouldn't trade pics, an innate affinity for drag, there are mate items of mine—a cock ring and since I'm missing the goods the wom- straight guys out there who do it a bottle of lube—that I thought had en I'm chatting with are interested and do it right. Instead of arguing been lost in the move. In the inter- in, and it's certainly not fair for me with a bi trans friend who wants to est of full disclosure, me and Jerry to accept pics without being able to police the freedom and gender exhave fooled around before, but I find provide them. I don't keep in touch pression of others, get your hands the fact that he took these items with my chat partners after our chat on the DVDs of An Audience with very strange and I don't really know is over and I am pretty sure everyone Dame Edna and invite your bi trans what to do. Do I confront Jerry about is satisfied. friend over to watch. the items, or just leave them as Here is my question: am I an ass"payment" for helping me move? Or hole for doing this? I made a post This week on the Savage Lovecast, should I just take them back without on Reddit to some real lesbians and Dan speaks with Daniel Bergner saying anything and let him figure they clearly feel like I am an asshole. about foot fetish shame at savagelit out? One woman told me I need help. So, ovecast.com. V believe it or not, I stopped. I do not Unsure In Canada PS Your work is one of the big rea- like being an asshole. But I can't help @fakedansavage on Twitter sons I was able to come out to my but wonder: was this really that

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013


VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013

AT THE BACK 39


40 IF I COULD TUUURN BACK TIME

VUEWEEKLY NOV 14 – NOV 20, 2013


Vue Weekly: 943