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#945 / NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013 VUEWEEKLY.COM

The provocations of Vic + Flo 24 | Holiday Survival Guide 46


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VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

UP FRONT 3

9/23/13 10:20 AM


ISSUE: 945 NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013 COVER PHOTO: ALEX WATERHOUSE-HAYWARD

LISTINGS

ARTS / 21 FILM / 32 MUSIC / 43 EVENTS / 49 CLASSIFIED / 50 ADULT / 52

FRONT

5

"I think throughout time people have been in search of answers."

DISH

11

"The majority of my clientele aren't even vegan."

ARTS

15

"I think we've got over 200 feet of silk in there."

FILM

24

"Beautiful" is not the same as "precise.""

MUSIC

37

34

"I've been writing notes and lists on the margins of books."

SNOW ZONE

VUEWEEKLY #200, 11230 - 119 STREET, EDMONTON, AB T5G 2X3 | T: 780.426.1996 F: 780.426.2889 FOUNDING EDITOR / PUBLISHER .................................................................................. RON GARTH PRESIDENT ROBERT W DOULL .......................................................................................rwdoull@vueweekly.com PUBLISHER / SALES & MARKETING MANAGER ROB LIGHTFOOT.................................................................................................. rob@vueweekly.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER / MANAGING EDITOR EDEN MUNRO .................................................................................................... eden@vueweekly.com NEWS EDITOR REBECCA MEDEL ....................................................................................... rebecca@vueweekly.com ARTS & FILM EDITOR PAUL BLINOV .................................................................................................... paul@vueweekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS Ricardo Acuña, Jared Bernard, Chelsea Boos, Lee Boyes, Josef Braun, Rob Brezsny, Ryan Bromsgrove, Gwynne Dyer, Brian Gibson, Hart Golbeck, Fish Griwkowsky, Andrea Hirji, Brenda Kerber, Scott Lingley, Jordyn Marcellus, Tom Murray, Stephen Notley, Mel Priestley, Dan Savage, Mike Winters

DISTRIBUTION Terry Anderson, Shane Bennett, Jason Dublanko, John Fagan Aaron Getz, Beverley Phillips, Justin Shaw, Choi Chung Shui, Parker Thiessen, Wally Yanish

MUSIC EDITOR EDEN MUNRO .................................................................................................. eden@vueweekly.com DISH EDITOR / STAFF WRITER MEAGHAN BAXTER ................................................................................. meaghan@vueweekly.com LISTINGS GLENYS SWITZER ....................................................................................... listings@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION MANAGER CHARLIE BIDDISCOMBE .............................................................................charlie@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION SHAWNA IWANIUK ..................................................................................... shawna@vueweekly.com GENERAL MANAGER/ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE ANDY COOKSON ...................................................................................... acookson@vueweekly.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE JAMES JARVIS ................................................................................................... jjarvis@vueweekly.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE DALE CORY ....................................................................................................... ...dale@vueweekly.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER MICHAEL GARTH ..........................................................................................michael@vueweekly.com

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VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

Vue Weekly is available free of charge at well over 1200 locations throughout Edmonton. We are funded solely through the support of our advertisers. Vue Weekly is a division of Postvue Publishing LP (Robert W. Doull, President) and is published every Thursday. Vue Weekly is available free of charge throughout Greater Edmonton and Northern Alberta, limited to one copy per reader. Vue Weekly may be distributed only by Vue Weekly's authorized independent contractors and employees. No person may, without prior written permission of Vue Weekly, take more than one copy of each Vue Weekly issue. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40022989. If undeliverable, return to: Vue Weekly #200, 11230 - 119 St, Edmonton, AB T5G 2X3


FRONT

NEWS EDITOR : REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEPOINT

REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Big hair on trial It's hard to believe that a seventh grader attending a Christian school in the States was told her naturally poofy hair was a distraction to other children and would have to be cut and straightened or she would be expelled. Yes, the school has rules about not allowing hair with funky cuts or colours so that it can apparently maintain some type of "decency," but to tell a young girl that she is not accepted just the way she is because she looks different than the norm is both misogynistic and racist. Misogynistic because it is an attack on natural female beauty in the same way that Brazilian bikini waxes, douching, breast enhancements and a range of other things suggest to women that their labia needs to be smooth, their vaginas shouldn't smell natural and their breasts should always point forward and fill out C or D cups. Young girls and boys hear these messages and internalize them. Adults hear these messages and internalize them. These internalized messages become the beauty norm and those who follow a different path are made fun of. Sure, any woman can make the decision to

The message seems to persist in our culture that hair that is kinky, poofy and out-of-control is not beautiful. We are told that smooth, shiny hair with no fly-aways is what is ideal for women. shave, douche, enhance, etc if that is what she wants. The point is not that these things are wrong in themselves, it's that the message that stereotypical beauty is what makes one special is often louder than the messages that intelligence is beautiful, that artistic talent is beautiful, that creativity is beautiful and that one's natural looks are beautiful. That telling this girl to cut and straighten her hair is racist is evident. Most black people do not have naturally smooth and straight hair while many white people do. African-American singer/songwriter India Arie wrote in the mid2000's "I am not my hair / I am not this skin / I am the soul that lives within." She recognized that there was still a stigma attached to black women who chose to wear their hair naturally. But, sadly, the message seems to persist in our culture that hair that is kinky, poofy and out-of-control is not beautiful. We are told that smooth, shiny hair with no fly-aways is what is ideal for women. Curly hair? Sure, if it's under control and shiny. Sadly, some of the chemicals used to straighten hair have been linked to burns and even cancer. It's time for beauty in its varied forms to be celebrated and for the focus on women not to centre on how closely they resemble this stereotypical beauty but on how kind, intelligent and unique they are. A seventh grader should not be made to worry about her hair offending anyone. The teenage years are a time of selfdiscovery, and enforcing the idea that natural black hair is not acceptable is terribly offensive damaging to self esteem. V

FANS DEMAND BARENAKED REALITY A Barenaked Ladies fan from Ontario has started a petition asking the band to cancel an upcoming SeaWorld performance in February because of conditions that documentaries like Blackfish have exposed at the park. Drummer Tyler Stewart responded on Twitter, "Like you, we've seen the movie and were affected. We're currently looking at options on how to proceed." Approximately 2000 people have already signed the change.org petition asking the band to cancel the show.

HIDING THE HOMELESS Los Angeles city council is considering a ban on feeding homeless people in public because of complaints from upset neighbours who claim that handing out food on the street without offering any other services leads to squatters. The Greater West Hollywood Food Coalition hands out meals to homeless people on the street every night. Other charities across the US, including in Raleigh, North Carolina and Orlando, Florida have already been banned from feeding the homeless in public.

CETA IN THE HOT SEAT Over 100 different organizations in Canada and Europe are opposing the investment protection chapter of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement that's being negotiated by Canadian trade officials in Brussels this week. The organizations say the chapter is anti-democratic and threatens climate change and municipal independence from big corporations. The investor-to-state dispute settlement process, as it's known, has been rejected by many countries in various free trade agreements already as it protects corporations at the expense of the public's best interest.

RE: LIVING LIKE ANIMALS (NOV 21 – 27)

Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, whether critical or complimentary. Send your opinion by mail (Vue Weekly, Suite 20011230 119 St NW, Edmonton, AB, T5G 2X3), by fax (780.426.2889) or by email (letters@vueweekly.com). Preference is given to feedback about articles in Vue Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Not every letter will be published.

Canadian Finals Rodeo was just here and my reaction to rodeo is always, "Think rodeo is humane? Let's see you trade places with one of the animals." So your article "Living Like Animals" comes at an interesting time. The article bravely mentions outrages that even this long-time vegetarian didn't know. The documentary Farming Humans will tell all whether humans heed the Golden Rule when they use animals as food. Do humans do unto a lower species as they would have a higher species do unto them? Thank you for not ignoring the inconvenient facts the way the selfish, undisciplined majority does. Alvin Carrier Leduc

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

FRONT 5


FRONT NEWS // YOGA

The yoga generation Traditional practice meets modern culture

T

he demands of modern society leaves little time to slow down. There's work to be done, errands to run, children to care for—not to mention that smartphone buzzing incessantly with the latest text, email or social-media update. Yoga challenges us to leave all of that behind—at least for an hour or so—to focus purely on breathing and reconnecting with oneself. Its exact origins are disputed, but it is believed the practice began in ancient India around 500 BC. However, it wasn't until the mid 19th century that yoga was brought to the western world. Yoga—particularly hatha yoga, which relies on a series of physical postures called asanas—experienced surges of popularity throughout the early 20th century before hitting a boom of sorts around 1980. The popularity has continued today, with yoga culture growing not just for its physical benefits such as increased flexibility and muscle strength, but its mental and spiritual attributes as well. Eileen Chan, who has been practising yoga for nine years and teaching for six of those, began offering a class once a week to the downtown business crowd before launching Red Owl Yoga at the Citadel three months ago, where easily accessible and affordable daytime yoga classes are available. She believes the upswing in popularity has a lot to do with the representation of yoga in media—not to mention the growing prevalence of yoga-based fashion—but also because people crave something more than a physical exercise routine. "I think throughout time people have been in search of answers, and not just answers to why we're here and what the purpose of our lives are, but how to find inner peace and connectedness," says Chan, who began her own practice to rehabilitate

6 FRONT

an injury. "Even though people might be drawn to yoga because their butt will look good in their pants or they'll be able to touch their toes or their friends are doing yoga, I think, and it was definitely the case for me, that immediately it became more about the mental and emotional benefits of the practice ... you can keep learning and studying and you never exhaust what yoga has to offer." "We teach a lot of downtown workers that are really quite stressed out a lot of the time and are sitting at their desk and they're not moving, and I think that giving them something to focus on and to kind of change that perspective of maybe where they have been focusing their thoughts on is a nice way to open up that door for them," adds Erin Westman, an educator at Red Owl Yoga who began teaching in 2008 and had practised for five years prior to that. "I think that we spend so much time in modern-day Western society disembodied or not in our bodies, so yoga, the first thing that we do is centre ourselves in the body and use the body as a gateway to connect with these other realms: the breath, the mind, the emotions and the spirit." There are approximately 65 studios located throughout the greater Edmonton area—it's rumoured the city has the most per capita in North America—teaching yoga styles such as hatha, vinyasa, yin and the ever popular hot yoga. The high concentration appears as though it would create a great deal of competition to secure regular clientele, but it seems as though studio owners have ad-

// Andrea Hirji

opted a "more the merrier" mentality. "It just means more people are able to do yoga and more people are able to get a class in a studio that they like or that's in a good location for them or with a good teacher that really resonates with them. That's good news for me as a teacher and as a student of yoga," Westman says. Setting up shop isn't as simple as a love for yoga, however. Chan recalls it being difficult to get her foot in the door as a new teacher, noting it was often the cycle of needing experience to teach, but being unable to get that experience. "I had to do it on my own. I created one class and just from that it's grown from there," she says, acknowledging the karma class Red Owl offers—a minimum donation of $5 gets you into class, plus benefits a local charity—as a way for new teachers to gain experience. "It does let new teachers come in and find their voice, and we help guide them and we come and support them. Instead of these new teachers out there fending for themselves we try to create this community where a new teacher can go and have a chance to learn." Pernille Tjelum, director of teacher education at bē HOT YOGA Edmonton, was among the first to bring hot yoga to the city, and has undergone her share of challenges getting to where she is in the yoga community today. She opened Bikram Yoga Edmonton in 2002 as part of the franchise founded by Bikram Choudhury, who has battled alleged rape charges and other legal trouble in recent years. Tjelum started with a

studio on 116 Street and 105 Avenue before opening a Bikram location off Whyte Avenue in 2005 and a second Bikram studio on 124 Street in 2008. The studios were packed and soon the franchise grew, adding locations in West and East Edmonton under different ownership. Bikram's mandate had been to keep studios within a five-mile radius of one another to avoid competition, but Bikram Yoga East Edmonton opened 3.5 miles away from Tjelum's Whyte Avenue location and the West Edmonton location was two miles away from the 124 Street location. Tjelum's studios began to lose students due to it being more convenient for them to frequent the other Bikram studios, and she was eventually forced to close the Whyte Avenue location. She has since disassociated from the franchise and rebranded to offer a variety of class types and lengths she was not able to do under the Bikram name and program. "From a personal, teaching perspective it has freed me to be able to encompass so many more people and also give them the freedom for when there's something they can't do, I can give them alternate solutions," she adds, noting that initially this was met with resistance from "die-hard" Bikram practitioners, but has benefitted her students who sought more options in their practice. "We found trying to be a boutique type of studio where you're only offering one type of class, one length, wasn't viable anymore," adds Michael Wild, director of bē HOT YOGA. "It worked great when Pernille was the only game in town, but

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

as soon as competition came into play and other studios started offering different types of yoga and different class lengths, you have to evolve and change with that otherwise you're going to cease to exist. Politics aside, Tjelum says she has seen an expansion in the demographics participating in yoga. Often, classes are filled with men and women in their 20s upwards, but children are starting to get involved as well. "I have a principal who has a yoga studio in her school because of her practice; she's been practising with me for years," Tjelum notes. "At my sons' schools—they both go to different schools—but there's yoga teachers that come in and work with them. The kids are asking for it because they see their parents benefitting." Although, half the battle for newbies is actually getting to class. No, you don't have to be flexible and no, you don't have to know what you're doing. Yoga studios strive for a community-driven atmosphere that is inclusive to all abilities and body types. "Anybody can do yoga and I think that's what makes it so accessible, because sometimes certain sports or certain activities, only certain body types can do it, whereas the reality is, yoga is so inclusive and I think that's a huge reason why there's so much of it around," Chan says. "I would love to see yoga become even more popular," Wild says. "Ultimately I would love to see all of the studios in town become great successes because that would just mean people in our two who want to come and do different types of yoga, there's a studio and there's enough practitioners for everyone." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


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FRONT 7


FRONT POLITICALINTERFERENCE

RICARDO ACUÑA // RICARDO@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Will the real Redford please stand up

Alberta's Conservative convention proved 77 percent of convention goers still support the Premier After much speculation and punditry over the past few months, Albertans have their answer to the immediate future of the Conservative Party. At the annual convention of Alberta's Progressive Conservative Party on November 23, 77 percent of delegates voted against holding a leadership review and, as such, provided a pretty solid endorsement of Premier Alison Redford's leadership. But, other than the fact that Redford will now likely remain the party's leader into the next provincial election in 2016, what does the result really mean for her and, more importantly, for Albertans? Is the result a clear signal that a majority of party members support Redford? Probably, but not necessarily. Conventions of this nature tend to be carefully orchestrated and managed events with everything from delegate selection to the weekend's agenda designed to obtain the desired result. Remember, this wasn't a party-wide vote, only those delegates at convention were able to vote on the motion. What it does show, however, is that Redford still has the support of the party's power brokers and inner circle, and that's enough for her on the party front. The result also does not say any-

DYERSTRAIGHT

thing at all about the status of the informal coalition of right liberals and left tories that got her elected leader—and then premier—in the first place. Many of those folks bought Conservative memberships exclusively to support her leadership bid and it is not likely they were terribly well represented at the convention. Do they still support her as leader of the party? Likewise, their electoral support of Redford in the last election was less a vote in favour of Redford than it was a vote against the extreme views of Danielle Smith and the Wildrose Party. Redford has been governing from the far right of the ideological spectrum since the day after the election and has moved even further right since the last provincial budget. Would 77 percent of these folks that voted for her in the last election still vote for her today? Recent polls would seem to indicate that it is unlikely, but it is impossible to determine from the results at convention.

very close to her chest in anticipation of the leadership review. No controversial policies or bills have been introduced, no potentially controversial or embarrassing reports have been allowed to see the light of day and no further cuts have been announced to public services. The "finding" of $50 million to put back into post-secondary education the week before the convention was

party's move to the right. With that will come more public sector cuts and privatization and a continued refusal to consider anything even remotely resembling revenue reform. She will also continue to put the needs and agenda of the province's energy sector ahead of the public interest more staunchly than ever before. There is, however, another possibility, albeit an unlikely one. It is entirely possible that Redford understands that, regardless of what PC convention-goers say, the people from outside the party that actually elected her, especially those in the centre of the political spectrum, have become completely disillusioned by her failure to follow through on any of the progressive rhetoric and promises she espoused during the campaign. And with the Wildrose working hard to appear more moderate, even those folks on the right who plugged their noses and voted for Redford in the last election are starting to find their way back to Smith's party. If the Premier is able to look beyond the 77-percent result and understand this reality,

Redford still has the support of the party’s power brokers and inner circle and that’s enough for her on the party front.

It has been suggested by both the opposition and the media that the Premier has been playing her cards

seen by most Albertans as little more than a ploy to shore up her support at convention. The bigger question that comes out of that assertion is what direction Redford's policies will take now that the hurdle of a leadership review is out of the way. The answer to that question depends almost entirely on how Redford herself chooses to interpret the results of the vote at convention. If she takes the 77-percent vote as an all-out endorsement of her leadership and her government, then she will whole-heartedly continue her

then we could see her spending the next two and a half years slowly moving back toward the middle to win back the support of the people who elected her. All indicators are, however, that she either doesn't see this or is choosing to ignore it. Her speech after the results were announced highlighted the degree to which she sees the result as an all-out endorsement of her policies. And had she been interested in winning back the folks on her left flank, she would have started rolling out a more progressive set of policies long before the convention, as they could only have helped her position over the weekend. What all of this means is that what we will see from this government during the next couple of years is a continued assault on public services and an unapologetic embracing of the small government, no-taxes rhetoric of the right. We are about to see the real Alison Redford step forward, and that should be of concern to all Albertans. V Ricardo Acuña is the executive director of the Parkland Institute, a non-partisan, public policy research institute housed at the University of Alberta.

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Iran and the US: neither blind nor stupid

No weapons-grade uranium allowed in Iran hasn't stopped Israel from sounding the warning bell "We are not blind, and I don't think we are stupid," said US Secretary of State John Kerry in response to fierce Israeli criticism after the first round of talks about Iran's nuclear program earlier this month failed to reach a deal. Now the deal is done and Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu is even harsher in his condemnation of Kerry's handiwork. "Israel has many friends and allies," Netanyahu said, "but when they're mistaken, it's my duty to speak out. ... What was achieved last night in Geneva (November 24) is not a historic agreement, it was a historic mistake. Today the world has become a much more dangerous place because the most dangerous regime in the world took a significant step towards obtaining the world's most dangerous weapon." What he meant was that the interim agreement implicitly recognizes Iran's right to enrich uranium for peaceful uses. But that right is already enshrined in the Non-Proliferation Treaty, which Iran has signed, and nobody ever thought that Iran was really going to renounce it. What was at issue was whether it would

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enrich its uranium to "weapons grade"—90-percent pure—and make nuclear bombs. The "Plan of Action" signed by Iran, the United States, Russia, Britain, France, Germany and the European Union ensures that it will not, at least for the next six months. All uranium enrichment above five percent is to be halted, and Iran's entire stockpile of 20-percent enriched material—the potential feedstock for a "dash" to weapons-grade material—is to be diluted or converted to a form not suitable for further enrichment. Iran is not to install any more centrifuges (the machines used to enrich material) and large numbers of the existing banks of centrifuges are to be left inoperable. Even Iran's stockpile of 3.5-percent enriched uranium (for use in nuclear power reactors) is to remain the same between now and the end of the six-month period. And there will be no further work done on the Arak reactor, which might give Iran plutonium and thus a second route to a nuclear bomb. Iran will also allow more intrusive inspections by International

Atomic Energy Agency officials, including daily access to the key enrichment sites at Natanz and Fordow. All it gets in return is $7-billion worth of relief (about $100 per Iranian) on the sanctions that are crippling its economy. All the main sanctions will stay in place until a final agreement has been signed—if it is— six months from now. Iran can therefore make no further progress towards nuclear weapons while the detailed negotiations continue, if that is actually what Tehran ever had in mind. Yet Israeli officials are talking as if the United States has been both blind and stupid. On Sunday, Israeli Intelligence Minister Yuval Steinitz said, "Israel cannot participate in the international celebration, which is based on Iranian deception and the world's self-delusion." And Naftali Bennett, Israel's minister of trade and industry, warned: "If in five years a nuclear suitcase explodes in New York or Madrid, it will be because of the agreement that was signed this morning." This is so far over the top that you wonder whether the speak-

ers even believe it themselves. Israel has talked itself into this obsession with Iran's alleged nuclear weapons project—Israeli sources have been warning that Iran is two years away from a bomb at regular intervals for the past 20 years—but the constant talk about it has also served to draw attention away from Israel's settlement policy in the Palestinian territories. Israel's basic position is that the Iranian regime is entirely composed of evil terrorist fanatics who should never be allowed to have refined uranium of any sort. The only recourse is therefore to tighten the sanctions more and more until Iran's entire economy and government crumble and a completely different sort of people emerge from somewhere to take over the country. No deal can be a good deal. Israel's leaders are dismayed they can no longer keep their allies and friends pinned in this extreme position, but endlessly quoting the ravings of former Iranian prime minister Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is not enough. They would have to demonstrate that Iran actually intends

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

to attack Israel, and they cannot. So eventually their allies just moved without them. As Israel's Finance Minister Yair Lapid told Time magazine, "We've lost the world's ear. We have six months, at the end of which we need to be in a situation in which the Americans listen to us the way they used to listen to us in the past." But the game is not over yet. Israel's influence in the US Congress is still immense and its Congressional allies are already talking about heaping more sanctions on Iran (in order to kill the deal, though they don't admit that). President Obama could veto those new sanctions, of course, but he will find it a lot harder to get Congress to revoke the existing sanctions if the final deal is done six months from now. That's why Iran gets so little relief from sanctions now in return for its concessions: Obama needs more time to work on Congress. But Israel may still win this tug-of-war. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.


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DISH

DISH EDITOR : MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FEATURE // VEGAN

Healthy vegan meals to go VegPalette combines nutrition and convenience

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ooking for an easy way to eat just want lunches for the week can healthy with minimal effort, es- opt for the five-meal Business Lunch pecially with the arrival of the hectic plan, while those who want the litholiday season? Considering a switch eral full meal deal can choose the to a vegetarian or Stress Free plan, vegan diet? Or are 780.937.3764 which covers you just interested info@vegpalette.ca their breakfast, in trying some inter- vegpalette.ca lunch and dinner esting and delicious for the whole new food? week. The plans Jenna Carton started VegPalette for are sold in two-week packages, with all of these reasons. Carton has been a one-week trial version also availa vegan for about eight years and a able; customers either pick-up or vegetarian since elementary school, have their meals delivered on a weekbut found that she was struggling to ly basis to ensure that they are still maintain diversity and proper nutri- getting some fresh meals. Everything tion in her eating habits—a common comes in reusable containers, so you pitfall for those who switch to vegan- simply choose which to eat now and ism, especially a few years ago when which to put in the freezer for later. "The majority of my clientele aren't there wasn't as much literature availeven vegan," says Carton, who does able on the subject. "Back then, because most dieticians her cooking and pick ups out of Britfollowed the Canadian Food Guide, tany's Lounge downtown. "They're there wasn't any room for veganism just people who know that eating and it wasn't really known at that more plant-based foods is important, point," Carton says. "It had a lot of and they try to have so many days that are free of animal products— bad stigma attached to it." To resolve this, Carton worked with that's where I come in." One might expect the person bea holistic nutritionist to create herself balanced meal plans, which in- hind a business like VegPalette to cluded the creation of a stash of pre- have formal training in cooking and/ pared meals. This habit became the or a business education, but this concept for VegPalette: after offering isn't the case. Carton is completely this service to a fellow vegan friend self-taught. "My parents didn't take it seriin February 2013, interest began to grow and by May, Carton had opened ously when I went vegan in high school. They were like, 'Let's see it up to the public. Essentially a vegan "meals on how long this lasts,'" Carton notes. wheels," VegPalette consists of four "Then when I stuck with it, my mom different meal plans based around bought a series of books for me different lifestyle options: those who which I'm really grateful for—that's

PROVENANCE

ABOUT

FRUIT CAKE

Hold the butter During the Middle Ages, people in Europe were forbidden to use butter in recipes as per the church in order to regard the observance of fast. The Butterbrief (Butter Letter) was penned by Pope Innocent VIII in 1490 and gave Saxony permission to use milk and butter to make North German Stollen fruit cakes.

basically how I learned to cook." VegPalette dishes include everything from international fare like chana masala and injera berberé to "veganized" North American dishes like Tex-Mex and beet burgers. Customers can also add individuallypriced snacks like zucchini muffins and hemp protein bars to their order. Just in time for the Christmas season, VegPalette is also offering stand alone single dishes, perfect for those upcoming holiday potlucks or to help offset the burden of cooking up a huge holiday feast on your own. Wherever possible, Carton chooses local, organic and non-GMO ingredients for her made-from-scratch meals, and she already has several customers with various food sensitivities and allergies so she is able to adapt each meal to fit an individual's needs. Even if you aren't interested in pursuing a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle, there's no denying that most of us aren't getting enough veggies in our diets—it's just not the way most of us grew up eating. Carton hopes VegPalette will help people reinvent their approach to food. "It's definitely harder for people that have just spent their whole life with the standard [North] American diet," she says. "It's very overwhelming, because you have to start eating a lot of different cultural dishes and moving away from the meat and potatoes."

MEL PRIESTLEY

MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Jenna Carton, owner and chef // Meaghan Baxter

Far-flung confection Manitou Springs, Colorado has held the annual Great Fruitcake Toss since 1995. The event takes place on the first Saturday of January and the record toss occurred in 2007 when a group of Boeing engineers launched a fruit cake 1420 feet.

You'll need more rum Fruit cake in the Bahamas gets an extra dose of alcohol. The cake is drenched in rum, but so are the ingredients—candied fruit and nuts are soaked in dark rum for between two weeks and three months prior to baking.

Cake of a different time The earliest recipe for fruit cake—or Christmas cake as it is often called in Canada and other Commonwealth countries—dates back to ancient Rome. It contains pomegranate seeds, pine nuts and raisins mixed together with barley mash. Ingredients such as honey, spices and preserved fruit were added to recipes during the Middle Ages. V

Better with age Fruit cake can be soaked in alcoholic spirits, which is most often done in family recipes rather than commercially prepared varieties. The alcohol acts as a preserving agent, making the cake edible for years after it is prepared. A family in Tecumseh, Michigan has kept a fruit cake as a family heirloom since 1878 and it was sampled by Jay Leno on The Tonight Show in 2003. Chew carefully Barmbrack, a version of fruit cake found in Ireland, is consumed on Halloween. Rather than standard fruit and nuts, different objects are baked throughout and each signifies a fortune for the person who discovers it.

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

DISH 11


DISH VENI, VIDI, VINO

MEL PRIESTLEY // MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Mull it over

A festive take on standard wine Winter has firmly established itself in our fair city and the holiday season is just around the corner. You've likely broken out the mittens and holiday sweaters, so it's high time to switch to winter-appropriate drinks—and mulled wine is a classic way to warm up on a snowy night. Mulled wine is the winter version of summer's sangria: a wine-based beverage made by heating red wine with a mixture of spices. Mulled wine tastes like Christmas in a cup, and it's also a great way to transform cheaper wine (or wine that's been open a tad too long) into something more palatable. If you have European relatives you may already be familiar with mulled wine, as it is much more popular overseas than it is in North America. It goes by several different names depending on which country you're in: glühwein (Germany), glögg (Nordic countries) and vin chaud (France) all refer to mulled wine. Mulled wine dates back to the Roman Empire: the Romans were fond of drinking hippocras, a spiced and sweetened wine that was served both cold and hot. By the Middle Ages hippocras was popular throughout Europe and prized for its purported medicinal properties. Mulled wine can be made with any number of spices, but some of the most common include cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom, black pepper, vanilla pods, star anise, ginger, orange and lemon. Plain white sugar can be used to sweeten it, but you can also substitute brown sugar, honey or molasses. Some recipes also include raisins

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and nuts. While premixed flavour packages are available for sale (especially around Christmas) in various home and gift stores, it's very easy (and cheap) to whip up a batch on your own—and then you can adjust the ingredients to suit your personal preferences. Hearty, full-bodied red wines are the best choice for making mulled wine, as lighter-bodied varieties don't handle the heating process well. Traditionally the British use Bordeaux (also called claret) to make mulled wine, as well as port (which doesn't need to be sweetened nearly as much, if at all, as a red table wine). However, any full-bodied red wine will make good mulled wine: Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel are all good choices. Mulled wine can be made using a couple of different methods, depending on whether you're using whole spices (like cinnamon sticks and cloves) or powdered spices. If your spices are all powdered, you simply need to heat the red wine in a saucepan over mediumlow heat—you never want to boil the wine, so pay attention—and add your spices and sweetener of choice, then let it all simmer for a good half hour. When using whole spices, it helps to boil them in water or juice first to extract their flavour. To do this, add your spices to about half a cup of water or orange juice and bring to a slow boil for about five minutes. Remove from heat, add the red wine and then heat it again over low heat for about half an hour. Strain through fine cheesecloth and serve piping hot. V

Mulled wine recipe

1 bottle red wine ½ cup orange juice ½ cup brown sugar 1 cinnamon stick (plus more for garnish) 1 star anise 5 cloves 1 tsp grated fresh nutmeg Pinch of powdered ginger Peel of one lemon Orange slices, for garnish Place all ingredients except the wine in a saucepan and place on medium heat. Add just enough red wine to cover everything. Bring to a slow boil for five minutes. Add the rest of the wine and warm on low heat for 30 minutes. Strain through fine cheesecloth, garnish with the orange slices and cinnamon sticks and serve.


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DISH 13


CHEERS TO THE EDMONTON BARS, PUBS, LOUNGES AND CLUBS WHO’VE MET A HIGHER STANDARD. A group of hardworking Edmonton venues have just achieved Best Bar None Accreditation for 2014. And it didn't come easy. They are committed to making a safer night out with friends that much more enjoyable. They are Edmonton's best, bar none. Find out who they are at bestbarnone.ab.ca

14 DISH

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VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

GOAB-183-13M01E HEADING/VERSION Cheers to the...

11/8/2013 1:49 PM


PREVUE // CIRCUS ARTS

ARTS

ARTS EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Craniatrium melds circus arts with music and theatre

I

t's that time of year again—and no, ers, along with a few guest circus artists I'm not talking about Christmas. It's from farther abroad. that time of year when the limberlimbed folks at Firefly Theatre host an- Those Mind Monkeys will be performing a brand-new style of aerial work: triple other high-flying aerial show. This time around it's Craniatrium, a full- loops, which consist of three silk loops strung from the ceiling of the Westbury length aerial musical. "It's going to be pretty epic," says Annie Du- Theatre, with a pair of performers on each. "I think we've got over 200 feet of silk gan, artistic director of Firefly Theatre & Circus, and one of the four minds responsible in there," Dugan says. The aerial perforfor creating Craniatrium (the others being mances will also include other acts such sound designer Dave Clarke, set and costume as regular silks and a Chinese pole. Matching the eclecticism of Craniadesigner Marissa Kochanski and performer John Ullyatt). "This isn't a cabaret. It's really a trium's aerial acts is Dave Clarke's sound 90-minute play, and it does reach epic propor- design; Dugan has difficulty pinning the show's music to a particular genre or style. tions in music as well as circus." "The music of Craniatrium is the music Craniatrium tells a tale in line with the writings of Jules Verne or HG Wells: set in of Peter Gabriel meets David Bowie meets the Victorian era, Craniatrium speaks of the Pet Shop Boys meets Andrew Lloyd flamboyant inventions, experiments and Weber meets Ennio Morricone," she says with a laugh. theories that pushed Until Sun, Dec 8 (8 pm; Firefly Theatre's through the boundarperformances always ies of science into the 2 pm Sunday matinees) showcase amazing realm of the fantastiDirected by Annie Dugan aerial feats, but Ducal. A Doctor, played ATB Arts Barns, $20 – $40 gan notes that Craby Ullyatt, uses a niatrium is evidence device called a "Craniator" to delve into the mind of a woman of a new form of theatre. "I think that we've really pushed the (Cathy Derkach) who has succumbed to chronic ennui. As the Doctor maps the hid- boundaries," she says. "We're pushing the den recesses of her brain, he encounters envelope of where circus and theatre can what Dugan has termed the "Mind Mon- go together." keys"—aspects of her internal world, em- MEL PRIESTLEY MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM bodied by a cast of Firefly's aerial perform-

Mind Monkeying around

Run!

PREVUE // THEATRE

The Three Sisters

T

he downside of anything reaching describe, but they're so close that if you masterpiece status is the stone- translate it more literally, you'll end up faced solemnity most people treat it with heightened moments of extreme with. Sure, it sounds impressive, but it emotion. And you buy it—you see most also sounds more obligatory than any- translations of Chekhov done, and you thing you'd simply go to see of your own buy that. But I was convinced that when Checkov said his plays were comedies, inclination. Take, for instance, the collected that he wasn't lying to us." Carew and Elena Porter, of Broken works of Anton Chekhov: for all the enduring legacy of his plays (as well as Toys Theatre, are sitting in a coffee shop his letters, short stories, etc), Chekhov discussing Chekhov's tale of a trio of himself noted them to be comedies, an provincial women, a family beginning to element that's often lost in translation pull apart at the seams just a few years in favour of the great sweeps of drama before the Russian Revolution uprooted the country. his legacy suggests. So in producing his The Three Sisters, Producing the play has been a 'what if we did?' daydream Broken Toys Theof Porter's for a few atre has decided to Until Sat, Dec 7 (7:30 pm; 2 pm years now. It stems take Chekhov at his Saturday Matinee) word, not the his- Directed by Clinton Carew back to a joke beVarscona Theatre, $19.75 – $23 tween Porter and torical one. fellow local actors "I think [Chekhov] Melissa Thingelstad gets turned into melodrama, because there's a very close and Lora Brovold. All of them were workconnection between subtle, intelligent ing together in a clothing store, and freRussian humour and melodrama," direc- quently found customers (and, um, some tor Clinton Carew explains. "It's hard to loved ones) mistaking one for the other.

"And then a year ago, [I started] wanting to make my own work, because work is often few and far between," Porter says. "And we received funding, and it was like, 'Guys, when are you free? This is happening.'" They found a time all three could commit to, and assembled the rest of the cast around the trio. All 14 characters of the script are represented by individual actors. Nobody plays multiple roles, however minor, and, productionwise, everyone's wearing multiple hats, calling in favours to make such an ambitious project feasible for a company with just one production behind it (that was September's Midsummer [A play with songs]). "It's super-indie," Porter says. "Everybody's like, 'What do you need done? OK, let me see what connections I have.' Michael Peng's neighbour is in the army, and he's gotten us free uniforms." And, impressively, after being less than satisfied with the online translations of the script, Carew has been

translating the work himself from the original Russian text, keeping a careful eye on its comic value. This has been its own trying process—he finished the first draft about a year ago, and has been making plenty of adjustments in rehearsal, as he hears lines live for the first time. But it's been necessary to finding the comedy inherent in it.

"For me, when I was doing the translation, it was like, I'm gonna translate it with a humourous eye whenever possible," he says. "Number one was always respect for and fidelity to the text, and the intention of the text. But a close second was, 'Don't fuck up the jokes.'"

PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

What's cooler than being cool? Chekhov, apparently

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

ARTS 15


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ARTS REVUE // THEATRE

Bitches and Money 1878

Fighting over the junk in the trunk // Ian Jackson, EPIC

F

or a man with a bullet wound in his back, the male lead of Northern Light Theatre's season opener is remarkably lively. Shady cardsharp "Black" Jack (Benjamin Gorodetsky) is in a mesmeric state, you see, so he isn't yet

affected by the wound. So explains his smug cohort Patience (Andréa Jorawsky), one half of Jack's female partners-in-crime. It's the kind of pseudo-medical diagnosis you'd expect to find in the pages of a nineteenth-century science-fiction

novel, and indeed that's precisely the era and atmosphere evoked by Bitches & Money 1878. The show's title is a wild card— UK playwright Martin Henshell named it after a line from an NWA song, but the show is about a trio

of Victorian-era card hustlers (not trying to piece together what a very common subject in hip actually transpired, especially in hop). Ringleader Jack is a bum- the show's more outlandish moments when the bling dunce who actors really dig needs his female Until Sat, Nov 30 (7:30 pm) into their characpartners, the Directed by Trevor Schmidt ters: what those aforementioned ATB Financial Arts Barns, $16 characters lack science-obsessed – $28 in depth and dePatience and the velopment, they sexually wily Cora (Laura Gillespie) to help ex- make up for in the performers' ecute his cons. On this particular ability to convincingly navigate evening the deal has gone wrong, the instantaneous shifts in power people are dead, Jack has been shot and the hoop-jumping they force and their booby-trapped trunk of upon the others. All of this inloot can only be opened with three trigue is quashed, however, by an abrupt and unresolved ending. keys—and one has gone missing. Steampunk, that intersection of It's a peculiar choice: a gang caVictorian England and American per's stakes are built upon having West conveyed by peculiar gadgets an ultimate victor who gets away and fanciful clothing, is a trendy with it, so taking that away feels esthetic these days. Director Trev- like an invalidation of the story's or Schmidt uses it judiciously here: entire premise. Bitches & Money 1878 is lighter a few flourishes in the costuming and some exposed pipes—one of fare than we've recently seen from which literally hisses steam—make Northern Light Theatre. It isn't a show that will challenge or proup the bulk of it. voke you, but rather is a fun diverBitches & Money builds sus- sion that's capably acted by a trio pense artfully by doing away with of young performers. chronology, jumping through the MEL PRIESTLEY MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM events out of order. It's a fun ride

Bloody Poetry

November 28 – December 7, 2013

7:30 pm at Timms Centre for the Arts University of Alberta Matinee: December 5 at 12:30 pm

a play by

Howard Brenton

Tickets $11 – $22 At the Timms Centre box office and TIX on the Square www.studiotheatre.ca

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

ARTS 17


ARTS

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PREVUE // THEATRE

Bloody Poetry single

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Poets gone wild // Ed Ellis

I

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

t's hard to think of poets as being on the same level as rock stars, but in 19th century Europe a famous poet like Lord Byron was very much the Jim Morrison of his day: Byron eschewed traditional politics and philosophies in favour of a "free love" ideology that put him way, way—like over a century—ahead of his time. The third entry in Studio Theatre's current season delves deep into Lord Byron's radical world. Bloody Poetry, a 1984 play by Howard Brenton, follows Byron on his travels throughout mainland Europe with a cohort of similarly

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libertine artists: fellow poet Percy Bys- remembered the beautiful poetry; they she Shelley, Shelley's wife and Franken- forgot it was poetry of a revolution. stein novelist Mary We needed to be reminded Shelley, and Claire Clairmont, Mary's Thu, Nov 28 – Sat, Dec 7 (7:30 pm; of the power step-sister and By- 12:30 pm matinee on Thu, Dec 5) of words and Directed by Glenda Stirling ron's lover. storytelling to "The political be- Timms Centre for the Arts, $11 – $22 challenge the came the personal, status quo." the philosophical Each rebecame the physical. They talked hearsal has seen Stirling shift her about these ideas, they wrote about focus amongst these various ideothem—but then they actually lived logical layers; she also notes that them," explains Glenda Stirling, a Uni- Bloody Poetry has strong comments versity of Alberta theatre graduate on women's rights and the spectre of who has returned to her alma mater celebrity. to direct this production. "We've moved those arguments forward, and now we're having different Bloody Poetry resonates particu- arguments about what is a relationship, larly strongly for Stirling: the play has what is a family, who has the right to a strong subtext speaking to the rise decide," Stirling says. "Then there's the of Thatcherism (under which the play layer of them being sexy rock stars was written), Britain's increasing rates of their time. It has this language and of unemployment and poverty, and these politics, but at the end of the its tense class and race relations; Stir- day they're these hot, sexy young folks ling's Scottish family was profoundly trying to reinvent the world to reflect impacted by these issues. what they would like it to be—and I "I think [Brenton's] feeling was that think that's kind of a fun ride." the UK needed those bloody voices," MEL PRIESTLEY MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM she says. "At that point in the UK they

// Meaghan Baxter

B

ullying is nothing new, but the ways in which it occurs has evolved over the years, along with the awareness of it's potentially devastating consequences. I Am For You, a new play written by Governor General Award nominee Mieko Ouchi, offers a glimpse into the world of teenage girls where its central characters have come to blows, but Mr Morris, an ex-professional actor turned student teacher takes the pair on as a project, helping them understand the costs of violence through the meticulously choreographed art of stage combat. The lesson leads to the pivotal fight scene between Mercutio and Tybalt for the school's production of Romeo and Juliet. "The idea of taking two girls who had a violent fight and teaching them stage fighting seems like a really bad idea on paper," Ouchi chuckles. "But, in fact, I took stage combat in theatre

school and the interesting thing about girls as her subject matter because of it is it's incredibly choreographed and its unexpected nature when it comes rehearsed within an inch of its life. In to physical violence. "I thought it was many ways it's all about team work a great metaphor to look at all the and support and helping one another ways girls hurt each other or use inand working together ... he [Mr Morris] timidation or bullying to make themknows that they will have to work to- selves feel better ... acting out to deal gether and cooperate and kind of cho- with things that are going on at home reograph and work as a team to make that we don't know about." it look good, so he hopes he can draw Fri, Nov 29 (1 pm and 7:30 pm); Audiences never them in enough to Sat, Nov 30 (2 pm and 7:30 pm) do find out what Directed by Mieko Ouchi get to that stage." the catalyst for the fight between The production C103, $16 – $19 has been travelling the two girls is, to junior and sebut that was an innior high schools throughout Alberta, tentional move by Ouchi. She wanted and is now making its public debut. to give glimpses of the source of conMany of the students in the junior flict, allowing viewers to impose their high schools are about to tackle Ro- own issues onto the story rather than meo and Juliet for the first time, and make it black and white. Ouchi feels the play can bring some "We do start to find out a little bit life to the revered original text and about what's maybe going on in their perhaps make it less daunting. But personal lives, just a hint or a hair, and above that, the aim of the produc- the kids really speculate about that a tion is to engage students—as well lot," she adds. "I hope that every kid as their families—and prompt them sees a little bit of themselves in one to examine the issue of violence of the characters. We always make up our own narratives as we watch stoamongst young people. "I think there's a lot of focus on ries—our own back stories for charthe violence that happens between acters and motivations—so I hope young men and we often think of girl they will use that as a way to maybe fights as being kind of, oh, they're think about some of the things they more emotionally vicious to each oth- may be doing or may see happening er, which may be true, but there's still around them and bring some of their a lot of physical violence between own perspective and context to the girls," explains Ouchi, adding that story." she hopes the play can be universal MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM for young men as well, but she chose

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


ARTIFACTS

MEAGHAN BAXTER // MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

has a new bunch of late-night shenanigans to fill the void left by the departure of Susanna Patchouli and her party-chat-gameshow, Oh Susanna!. That’s Terrific! features a cast of Varscona mainstays in a “magazine-style musico-variety show” featuring all things notable and of the moment. The first edition welcomes First Lady Sarah Chan along with soon-to-be regular segments such as “What’s Old? / What’s New?”, “Can I Get Away With This?” and “Drop Dead Gorgeous.” (Varscona Theatre, $10 – $12 introductory rate) // kabaret burlesk

Kabaret Burlesk / Fri, Nov 29 and Sat, Nov 30 (10 pm) Murray Hill, “the hardest working middleaged man in show business” and New York City nightlife favourite plays host to an evening of tease, featuring Angie Pontani—named Top International Touring Artist of 2009—and Raven Virginia, alongside musical guests Lex Justice, Jim Good, Keith Picot, Paul Bellows and Tippy A-Go-Go (The Club [Citadel Theatre], $35) That’s Terrific! / Sat, Nov 30 (11 pm) The Varscona Theatre

BE MOVED BY A HOLIDAY CLASSIC

BEAMS with Rapid Fire Theatre Multimedia Extravaganza / Sat, Nov 30 (8 pm) What happens when physical theatre meets electroacoustic music and multimedia? It’s hard to say, but Tim Mikula and Colin Matty of Rapid Fire Theatre are going to take it on alongside the soundscapes of St Crispin’s Improv, Skruntskrunt, flEm, agapéraygunexperiment and sound artists such as Don Ross, Cam Neufeld, Shawn Pinchbeck, Gene Kosowan, Abram Hindle and Phil Jagger. (Ortona Room, $10 at the door, $5 BEAMS members)

DEC 12 – 15 Music Society

Winter

presents:

Wonderland

community concert bands in performance under the artistic direction of Wendy J. Grasdahl

Saturday, Dec 7, 2013 7:30 p.m. Robert Tegler Centre

Concordia University College of Alberta 112 Ave & 73 St

Tickets at the Door:

$10

N O R T H E R N A L B E R TA JUBILEE AUDITORIUM A L B E R TA B A L L E T. C O M BOX OFFICE: 780.428.6839

Bethel Gospel Chapel

ALBERTA BALLET’S AKIKO ISHII AND COMPANY ARTISTS, PHOTOS BY PAUL MCGRATH & CHARLES HOPE

VUEWEEKLY FCW Winter Wonderland ad for Dec 7 concert - 4x6.75 grayscaleNOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

ARTS 19


ARTS PREVUE // FAIR

Royal Bison 3” wide version

T

hough he's long since handed off the reigns ly settled in, and realized that my understanding and uprooted to Montréal, Royal Bison Craft of Montréal and its history, and the surrounding & Art Fair founder Raymond Biesinger can still, cities, was quite lacking," Biesinger says over the occasionally, be found among the weekend-long phone. even Inc. understanding the basic layout a div. of "And Kokotilo Holdings bustle of tables and foot traffic. of those cities and the key parts of them." He willed the DIY-favouring take on a fair into He had some time and was looking to start a 12345 self-directed project anyway, existence back in 2007 with PREPARE FOR A CAREER IN some sensible ground rules— Fri, Nov 29 (5 – 9 pm) so a series of prints was creFIREFIGHTING & (10 POLICING keep costs low for artists and Sat, Nov 30 ated: one for Montréal as am – 5 pm) well as Toronto, Ottawa and patrons alike, which current Sun, Dec 1 (11 am – 5 pm) organizers Vikki Wiercinski Cosmopolitan Music Society, $2 Quebec—as "an excuse for a getting-to-know-you exercise and Jim Johansson have certainly adhered to as they've in my new region." overseen its expansion. And back now for the fair's Once they were out in the world, more commis15th iteration, Biesinger's bringing a print rooted in sions came in, first for Sherbrooke and then HamilEdmonton history, though it stems from trying to ton. Biesinger figured a fine capstone to the whole get to know his new home. project would be his old hometown of Edmonton. "Maybe a couple years after living here, I got my Of course, as he'd gone along, the level of detail in feet on the ground, met some people, felt relative- each had intensified: the original batch took three

esthetically I needed them to be more dense and more intricate to keep interested in the project. It just felt empty otherwise."

Funded in part by the Government of Canada.

MÉTIS EMERGENCY SERVICES PREPARATION 1-888-48-MÉTIS 3.75” wide version

a div. of Kokotilo Holdings Inc. Funded in part by the Government of Canada.

12345FOR A CAREER IN PREPARE FIREFIGHTING & POLICING

MÉTIS EMERGENCY SERVICES PREPARATION 1-888-48-MÉTIS

That's Edmonton for you // Raymond Biesinger

to four days to complete. His look at the City of Champions took nine. "Every single city I made, when it would be done, it wouldn't feel finished until I went a little further than the one before it. So you can call that detail-inflation, perhaps," he says. "I think it's just,

Each print is set on a specific date in that city's history: Edmonton's is opening of the Summer Universiade in 1983. Biesinger's prints will be on display alongside the usual myriad of hand-crafted curios the Bison's built its reputation out of: DIY works stretching from clothing to art to other sorts of things. There's even the work of who's likely the youngest Bisoner ever: Max's Monsters, a four-yearold's collection drawings of the things that go bump in the night, the proceeds of which he's donating to help a three-year-old friend battle leukemia. Kids these days. PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The Arden Theatre presents Meaghan Smith Retro-tinged holiday classics

Friday, December 13 7:30 pm | $32

HARNESS THE EXCITEMENT RACING | DINING | CASINO

RIDE AWAY WITH A PERFECT DATE NIGHT FIND A FUN, REASONABLY PRICED ENTERTAINMENT EXPERIENCE YOU CAN’T GET ANYWHERE ELSE.

The Craig Brenan Big Band performs Duke Ellington’s The Nutcracker Suite

Saturday, December 14 7:30 pm | $35

BUFFET DINNER, HARNESS-RACING THRILLS, GAMES, PRIZE DRAWS AND CASINO ACTION— YOU’LL FEEL LIKE YOU MADE IT INTO THE WINNER’S CIRCLE WHEN YOU’RE THROUGH.

Arden Theatre Box Office

ardentheatre.com

780.459.1542 northlandspark.ca Cultural Services

20 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


ARTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

DANCE GOOD WOMEN • L’Uni Théàtre, 8627-91 St •

Convergence 2013 • Dec 5-7, 8pm; Dec 7, 2pm • Talk Back: After the show with all artists, moderated by Fawnda J. Mithrush; Dec 6 • $20 /$15 (student)/$15 (member) at TIX on the Square

FILM Boyle Street Community league •

9538-103a Ave • heartofboylestreet.ca • Free Movie Night • Nov 29 & Dec 6, 8-10pm; Free

CINEMA AT THE CENTRE • Library Theatre, Stanley A. Milner Library basement, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • epl.ca • Centre for Reading and the Arts showcases little-known films every month • The Look of Love (18A); Nov 27 FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley A. Milner

Library Centennial Rm, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.496.7000 • epl.ca • Romeo + Juliet (1996, 14A); Nov 29, 2pm

ISBE EDMONTON • 9529 Jasper Ave • Shred Island Documentary Premiere Featuring Joe Nolan and Wares • Nov 28, 7pm (door), 8pm (show) • $10 at YEG live U OF A • ED North 2-115 • The Feature (re) Presentation film series: screening of Reel Injun • Nov 28, 4pm • Free

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF SPRUCE GROVE

• Spruce Grove Art Gallery, Spruce Grove Library, 35-5 Ave, Spruce Grove • 780.962.0664 • alliedartscouncil.com • THE LANDSCAPE AROUND US: Artworks by Anne McCartney; until Nov 30 • Mini Show: Members show; Dec 2-Jan; reception: Dec 6

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY •

10186-106 St • 780.488.6611 • albertacraft. ab.ca • Feature Gallery: POTWORKS: Showing the contemporary state of the ancient tradition of pottery; until Dec 24 • Discovery Gallery: FAIRY TALES, FOLKLORE, AND MYTHCOMMUNICATIONS... PART II: Calgary artist Shona Rae's sculptural rings; until Nov 30 • Discovery Gallery: ILLUSIONS, REVELATIONS, TRANSFORMATIONS: A journey in seven stages by Edmonton fibre artist Diane Krys; until Nov 30

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.422.6223 • youraga. ca • Manning Hall (main level public space): NOW YOU SEE IT: A giant word search puzzle by Megan Morman; until Dec 31 • LADY SPIDER HOUSE: Until Jan 12, 2014 • ANGAKKUQ: BETWEEN TWO WORLDS; until Feb 16 • DAPHNIS & CHLOÉ: Chagall; until Feb 16 • BMO World of Creativity: CABINETS OF CURIOSITY: Lyndal Osborne's curious collection; until Jun 30 • AGA Presents: Brenda Draney in Slave Lake: Northern Lakes College, 1201 Main St, Slave Lake; Nov 29, 7pm; free • Book Club: Yellow Studio, Singhmar Centre for Art Education, Lower Level: As You Like It, by William Shakespeare; Wed, Dec 4, 7pm ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19

Perron St, St Albert • 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert.ca • INVISIBLE CITIES: Daniel Evans examines the imaginative potential of urban environments; until Nov 30

BEARCLAW GALLERY • 10403-124 St • 780.482.1204 • THE TRICKSTER SERIES: Artworks by Jason Carter • Nov 30-Dec 5 • Double-opening: Who Is Boo 2: The Continuing Adventures of One Trickster Rabbit, by Bridget Ryan, book launch: Nov 30, 1-4pm • CHRISTMAS EXHIBITIONS: Artworks by Jane Ash Poitras, Linus Woods, Aaron Paquette, Diane Meili, others; Nov 30-Dec 31 BLOCK 1912 10361-82 Ave • EXPLORING THE ROCKIES: Landscape paintings by Donna Miller • Until Jan 15 BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • 12310

Jasper Ave • 780.482.2854 • bugeramathesongallery.com • LANDINGS: Landscapes paintings by Edward Epp and Jane Everett; until Dec 5

CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain • 780.963.9573 • CELEBRATE THE SEASON: pottery, handmade decorations • Until Dec 24 DC3 ART PROJECTS • 10567-111 St •

780.686.4211 • dc3artprojects.com • OUR FAMILIES: The Impact of Contemporary Family on Art; works by Paul Freeman, Francois Morelli (w/ son Didier), Tammy Salzl • extended to Nov 30; open: Thu-Fri 6-9pm; Sat 11am-6pm

DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St •

780.760.1278 • REPRISE: Works by various gallery artists; until Dec 22

DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY • 10332-124 St • Dominique Gaucher • Nov 30, 2-4pm

EDMONTON GALLERY WALK • Gallery Walk

Galleries: Daffodil Gallery, Scott Gallery, Bearclaw, Bugera Matheson, Front, West End Gallery, Peter Robertson Gallery, SNAP Gallery • First Thursday Event: The art galleries will be open late after work, for an informal gathering of culture lovers the First Thursday of every month, year round • Dec 5, 5-7pm

SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta Print-Artists, 10123-121 St • 780.423.1492 • snapartists.com • MEMBERS SHOW & SALE: Nov 28-Dec 21 STEPPES GALLERIES • 1253, 1259-91 St •

VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St •

780.421.1731 • Keith harder; until Nov 30 • #ICONICCANUCK: Artworks by Brandy Saturley Dec 5-Jan 25; Opening: Dec 5, 7-9:30pm

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill

Ave, St Albert • 780.460.5990 • vasa.ca • cu•ri•os•i•ty [kyoor-ee-os-i-tee]: 24 artists from SWCA in an eclectic exhibition of curious works • Until Nov 29

WEST END GALLERY • 12308 Jasper Ave •

780.488.4892 • westendgalleryltd.com • PAINTINGS OF WESTERN CANADA: By Ken Faulks • Until Dec 5 • ANNUAL ChRISTMAS EXhIBITION: A group exhibition from gallery artists; Dec 5-28

780.965.2534 • PRISMATIKA–ILLUSIONS OF THE UNIVERSE: Artists from Canada, Croatia, Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Poland, Ukraine, and the US • Until Dec 7

LITERARY

STRATHCONA COUNTY ART GALLERY@501

AUDREYS BOOKS • 107 St, Jasper Ave • hen-

• 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • LANDMARKS ON THE STUDIO WALL: Art by Robert Dmytruk, Les Graff, and Paddy Lamb • Until Dec 20

drik Slegtenhorst's book launch of Caravaggio's Dagger, book launch; Nov 28, 7pm • Corrine Jeffery signing Choosing: 1940–1989; Nov 30, 1pm

CHRISTMAS REFLECTIONS

DECEMBER 4 - 23

THEATRE THE 11 O'CLOCK NUMBER • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • varsconatheatre.com • An Improvised Musical • Every Fri through until Dec 13, 11pm A CHRISTMAS KAROL• John L. haar Theatre, Centre for the Arts and Communications Campus, 10045-156 St • Edmonton's only full-scale nativity play • Dec 1, 2-3:30pm BITCHES & MONEY 1878 • PCL Studio Arts

Barns, 10330-84 Ave • 780.471.1586 • Northern Light Theatre • By Martin henshell • Until Nov 30

BLOODY POETRY • Timms Centre, U of A •

Studio Theatre; by howard Benton • Nov 28-Dec 7, 7:30pm; No show Dec 1; Mat: Dec 5, 12:30pm

A CHRISTMAS CAROL • Maclab Citadel Theatre • citadeltheatre.com • Adapted by Tom Wood Directed by Bob Baker Based on the story by Charles Dickens • Nov 30-Dec 23 CHIMPROV • Zeidler hall, Citadel Theatre,

9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • Every Sat, 10pm, until Jul • $12 (door or buy in adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun, 2014

CRANATRIUM • Westbury Theatre Arts Barns, 10330-84 Ave • Firefly Theatre's aerial musical spectacle created by Dave Clarke, Marissa Kochaski, Annie Dugan, and John Ullyatt • Until Dec 8 • $40/$20 (previews and special 8pm show: Sun, Dec 1); at Fringe Theatre Adventures DIARY OF ANNE FRANK • Festival Place, 100

Festival Way, Sherwood Park • Nov 26-28, 7pm

DIE-NASTY • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave

FORT EDMONTON PARK • fortedmontonpark.

ca • 1905 and 1920 Street • Christmas Reflections • Dec 4-23; Mon-Fri 5-9pm; Fri-Sat: 2-6pm (Excludes Dec 7, Dec 9, Dec 16) • $15.75 (kids under two get in for free)

• varsconatheatre.com • Live improvised soap opera • Runs Every Mon, 7:30pm Until May 26, 2014

FRONT GALLERY • 12312 Jasper Ave •

• Morinville Community Cultural Centre, 9502100 Ave, Morinville • A search for balance with a stack of chairs, high-wire walk • Nov 30, 10:30am & 2pm

FLYIN' BOB ONE MAN, THREE RING CIRCUS

780.488.2952 • thefrontgallery.com • New works by Jennifer Poburan • Until Dec 11

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.944.5383 • epl.ca/art-gallery • Gallery: THE SEVENTH KINGDOM: Mixed media artwork by Lori Kieser • Display Cases: VESSELS OF PURPOSE: Clay figurines by Corwin Cherwonka; until Nov 30 HAPPY HARBOR COMICS V1 • 10729-104 Ave

• happyharborcomics.com •OPEN DOOR: Collective of independent comic creators meet the 2nd & 4th Thu each month; 7pm

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-

112 St • Main Gallery: THE QUIET REBUILD: Alexis Marie Chute • Front Room: Yael Brotman; Until Nov 29; GEORGE BOTCHETT: CURTAIN CALL: A retrospective exhibition of the work of George Botchett; Dec 5-Jan 17; Opening: Dec 5, 8-10pm

LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St •

780.990.1161 • landogallery.com • HOLIDAY EXHIBITION: Gallery artists and secondary market works • Until Dec 24

LATITUDE 53 • 10242-106 St • 780.423.5353

• Main Space: BEFORE PHOTOGRAPHY: Chuck Samuels mixes photographic history and fiction by Chuck Samuels; until Dec 21 • ProjEx Room: PHANTOM LIMB: Shyra de Souza; until Dec 21

LENDRUM POTTERY GROUP • 11335-57 Ave •

GREEN DAY'S AMERICAN IDIOT • Jubilee

Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave • The story of three boyhood friends , each searching for meaning in a post 9-11 world • Nov 26-27

STEP

BACK IN TIME

A

CHRISTMAS'

MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-51

HEY LADIES! • Roxy, 10708-124 St •

PAST!

• MEET FATHER CHRISTMAS • DECORATE OUR WISHING TREE • DISCOVER HOW FAMILIES CELEBRATED CHRISTMAS IN THE 1900S • ENJOY THE HOLIDAY PLAY THE GIFT OF THE MAGI • TAKE A HORSE-DRAWN SLEIGH RIDE AROUND THE PARK

AND

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A hospital,

8440-112 St • 780.407.7152 • IMAGES MAKE THE WORDS COME ALIVE: by Barbara hartmann & Gwen Molnar; until Dec 22 • After Hours Hallway Gallery: THE TEXTURE OF LIGHT AND LOVE: Paintings by Nancy Corrigan; until Nov 30

HALF SHAMBLES • Azimuth Theatre, 11315 106 Ave • An original short film, clown, dance and a new one-act play • Dec 5 - 7; 7:30pm • $12 (door; cash only)

AND FEEL THE MAGIC OF

Christmas Sale • Nov 30, 10am-2pm

DECEMBER 6 - 24

• 780.432.0240 • paintspot.ca • MEINE BILDER SIND KLUGER ALS ICH: Painting and Installation by Nathaniel Wong • Until Dec 31

NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS

• 9225-118 Ave • CHIMERIUM: HYBRIDS FROM NINA'S STUDIOS: Works by the NhCA Collective; curated by Sherri Chaba; until Dec 20 • IT’S A WHALE: Desiree McCook; until Nov 30

WWW.FORTEDMONTONPARK.CA

PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA • 8555

Pro'S art gallery • 17971-106A Ave • GENE PROKOP AND FRIENDS • Until Dec 20 ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102 Ave • 780.453.9100 • royalalbertamuseum.ca • MILTON AND CHEADLE PLATES: until Dec 9

ROYAL BISON • 8426 Gateway Blvd •

Edmonton-based, twice-a-year festival of the best and quirkiest art, craft and design • Nov 29-Dec 1 • $2; kids free

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • scottgallery.

780.453.2440 • attheroxy.com • Theatre Network • The Roxy Performance Series: Womanly talkshow/gameshow/varietyshow/sideshow starring Davina Stewart, Cathleen Rootsaert, Leona Brausen • Nov 29, 8pm • $25 at TIX on the Square

I AM FOR YOU • C103, 8529 Gateway Blvd • Concrete Theatre; by Mieko Ouchi • Nov 29, 1pm, 7:30pm; Nov 30, 2pm (Pay-What-You-Can), 7:30pm • $19 (adult)/$16 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square, door

MACBETH • La Cité Francophone, 8627-91 St

• Theatre Prospero production directed by Mark henderson • Until Nov 29 • $20 at TIX on the Square, door

the PiCk me uPS • The Bower, 10538 Jasper

Ave • magpietheatre.ca • By Nathania Bernabe • Until Nov 28, no minors • $15/$10 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square, magpietheatre.ca

PROOF • Walterdale Theatre, 10322-83 Ave • Walterdale Theatre, 10322-83 Ave • On her journey to try to prove work to be her father’s, Catherine struggles with relationships and her fear of becoming mentally ill as her father had • Dec 4-14, 8pm; Dec 5: 2-for-1 Thu (door); Dec 8, 2pm • $12-$18 at TIX on the Square

SARTRE’S SHORTS • C103, 8529 Gateway Enjoy the award-winning Blvd • surrealsorealtheatre.ca • Dec 5-13, 8pm; Sat-Sun 2pm • $22 (adult)/$18 (student/senior) at adaptation of the classic TIX on the Square children's book!                                        SHREK THE MUSICAL • Arden Theatre • A heartwarming seasonal 780.459.1542 • Presented by St Albert Children’s Theatre. Based on the DreamWorks Animation favourite for the Motion Picture and the book by William Steig • Until Dec 1 • $26 (adult)/$20 (child/senior) at whole family Arden box office

NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81 Ave

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave • 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery.com • WINTER GROUP SHOWS: New work by gallery artists • Until Feb 8

MUCH, MUCH MORE!

THE VELVETEEN RABBIT

St, Stony Plain • 780.963.9935 • multicentre.org • Drawings by Erin Schwab; until Jan 14; artist’s reception: Sun, Dec 1

CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTAS (CAVA) • 9103-95 Ave • 780.461.3427 • FAN-

COMMON SENSE • 10546-115 St • TAKE A WALK ON ThE WILD SIDE: Prints and Paintings by Stephen Pardy and Sandra Márcia • Nov 30-Dec 20, by appointment • Opening: Nov 30, 7-11pm

• 11208-65 St • PRETTIE SHORTEN: SOME ASSEMBLY [WAS] REQUIRED: William Prettie with architect Sherri Shorten • Nov 30-Dec 21 • Opening: Nov 30, 12-5pm

FAB GALLERY • 1-1 Fine Arts Bldg, 89 Ave, 112 St • 780.492.2081 • CREATURE OF CLIMAX: Works by Agata Derda (MFA Printmaking) final visual presentation for Master of Fine ArtsPrintmaking; until Nov 30 • PRINT RESONANCE: Musashino Art University Museum, Ryuta Endo; Extended to Nov 30

• 9351-118 Ave • LONGITUDINAL STUDY: Works by William G Prettie • Until Nov 30

TASY: Antony Cumming, Ginette Vallières-D'Silva, Doreen Poitras, Sylvia Grist and Luc Josh, Dana Rayment; until Dec 3

SHORTEN ARCHITECTS–Highlands Studio

ENTERPRISE SQUARE GALLERIES • 10230 Jasper Ave • Open: Thu-Fri 12-6pm, Sat 12-4pm • SANAUNGUABIK: Traditions and transformations in Inuit art, featuring prints, sculpture, textile, and video art; until Dec 21 • POP GOES CANADIANA: Iconic Art by Charles Pachter; until Nov 30

Roper Rd • 780.427.1750 • culture.alberta.ca/ paa • VICTORY ON THE FIELD EXHIBIT: Exploring the effects of the First and Second World Wars on sports in Alberta; until Jan 31; free

CARROT COMMUNITY ARTS COFFEEHOUSE

com • PANFORTE: Group exhibition featuring a three dimensional advent calendar; Dec 1-25

STRATHCONA COUNTY MUSEUM ARCHIVES

• 913 Ash St, Sherwood Park • strathconacountymuseum.ca • CHRISTMAS IN THE MUSEUM: until Jan 15, 2014

THE STUDIO • 11739-94 St • Works by Glen

Ronald, Bliss Robinson, Debra Milne and guest artists • Until Dec 31, 12-5pm

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-142 St

• telusworldofscienceedmonton.com • HARRY POTTER: THE EXHIBITION: Peer into the wizard’s world in an interactive exhibit featuring hundreds of authentic props and costumes from the harry Potter films; until Mar 9, 2014; tickets start: $14

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE • 9351-118 Ave • vze-

STORIES WE DON'T TELL • Glacier Room, Lister hall, 87 Ave, 116 St • Community created theatre piece produced by the Gender Based Violence Prevention Program, APIRG and U of A Residence Services • Nov 29-Dec 1, 7:30pm; facilitated talk back with the director and participants following the performance THEATRESPORTS • Zeidler hall, Citadel

nari@gmail.com • Prose Creative Writing Group • Every Tue, 7-9pm

Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30pm and 10pm • Until June • $12/$10 (member) at TIX on the Square

KOFFEE CAFÉ • 6120-28 Ave • 780.863.4522 • Glass Door Coffee house Reading Series: Monthly readings with new headliner • Last Thu each month, 7-9pm • Launch of the 40 Below Anthology; featuring contributors from the Mill Woods Artists Collective; Nov 28, 7-9pm

THE THREE SISTERS • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • Anton Chekhov’s presented by the Broken Toys Theatre • Nov 28-Dec 7, Sat mat 2pm; no shows Sun or Mon, Pay-What-You-Can: Dec 3 • Tickets at door, Varscona Box Office, TIX on the Square

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St •

THE VELVETEEN RABBIT • Fort edmonton Park • fortedmontonpark.ca • This modern take

780.902.5900 • Spoken Word Tuesdays: Weekly spoken word night presented by the Breath In Poetry Collective (BIP); info: E: breathinpoetry@ gmail.com

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

on the classic children’s tale • Dec 6-24 • $28 (adult)/$12 (child)/$20 (student/senior)

ARTS 21


22 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


GET YOUR MORNING LATTE from your favourite Edmonton Celebrities! In honour of World AIDS Day (observed every year on December 1) local celebrities are donating their time to help raise awareness and funds for HIV Edmonton. Every 12 seconds someone around the world contracts HIV Every 2 hours someone in Canada contracts HIV Every 2 days someone in Alberta contracts HIV On Friday, November 29 purchase your coffee and a Red Ribbon and help us get to Zero... Zero new HIV infections, Zero discrimination and Zero AIDS related deaths!

STARBUCKS BARISTA EVENT Ryan Jespersen & Kari Skelton

Adrienne Pan

Stacy Brotzel

Todd Babiak

Stephanie Barsby

Bryan Finlay

Dave Cournoyer

Mark Scholtz

CBC Empire -10AM

Portia Clark

Rapid Fire Theatre

Mack Male

CityTV / Up99.3 Jasper 109 - 10AM 630 CHED Jasper 109 - 9AM

Nancy Carlson Global Southpark - 11AM

Jennifer Crosby Global Southpark -10AM

CBC Empire - 12PM

CBC Empire -11AM

Kim Taylor

CTV Chapters 170 St. -9AM Musician Jasper 109 - 11AM

Theatre Troupe Empire - 9AM

Ara CTV Chapters 170 ST - 10AM 99.7 The Bounce Jasper 109 - 11AM

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

Writer Empire -12PM

Twitter Empire -10AM

Twitter Empire - 10AM

Ryan Hastman Twitter Empire - 10AM

ARTS 23


REVUE // DRAMA

FILM

FILM EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Hustle and Flo

Vic + Flo Saw a Bear's Denis Côté talks countryside menace, precision versus beauty and not taking film too seriously

Fri, Nov 29 – Tue, Dec 3 Directed by Denis Côté Metro Cinema at the Garneau  Trying to start again

V

ictoria (Pierrette Robitaille) goes straight to her uncle's old sugar shack when she gets out of the pen. She was given a life sentence for some unspecified crime, so one supposes she's lucky to be free to start over in some quiet place tucked away from the world at the age of 61. "I'm old enough to know that I hate people," she says, though the truth is she's good at connecting with them one on one: the shirtless adolescent who's been taking care of her catatonic uncle; the young parole officer who seems to genuinely want the best for her; the strange, dark-haired, flirtatious woman (the great theatre artist Marie Brassard) who arrives and offers to help with the gardening. Postpenal life looks promising for Vic. Flo (Romane Bohringer), her adored girlfriend from prison, has even come to stay, though for her country life is a little too much "like death." Little does she know that something like death does in fact lay waiting in this place, something from out of the past. Quebec writer/director/producer Denis Côté's eighth feature, winner of the Alfred Bauer Prize at this year's Berlinale, seems at first to be his most conventional, a rural noir with a storyline far less elliptical than even Curling, Côté's 2010 film that almost felt audience-friendly—a film he promptly followed up with the magnificently confrontational Bestiaire, shot entirely in a zoo with a cast comprised of animals. Yet Vic + Flo Saw a Bear, its title recalling both children's books and a certain masterpiece by Jacques Rivette, is also challenging, albeit in less obvious ways than Bestiaire or Côté's 2009 documentary-fiction hybrid, Carcasses. The titular lovers do not fit neatly into progressive notions of how same-sex couples should be portrayed onscreen, yet their relationship strikes me as complex and quite touching at times,

24 FILM

while the film's last act plunges into an unnerving tonal shift, guided by Brassard's sublimely eerie performance. Early in the film, Melissa Lavergne's stark percussive score invoked for me certain Japanese horror films of the '60s, of Onibaba in particular. When Brassard appears, with her masklike face and vaguely Asian features and unreadable stillness, the suggestion of Onibaba feels less than accidental. There seems to be a demon in our midst. I spoke with Côté last week. "So long as there's at least one person in every audience hating my film," he told me, "I think this is healthy." Côté may be stuck on the idea of provoking his audience, but his films are, at their best, so much more interesting than mere empty provocation.

VW: Yet there's lots of beauty in Vic + Flo, especially the two-shots of the title characters. There are really lovely images of these women alone together. DC: It depends on what you mean. "Beautiful" is not the same as "precise." When something is well-framed and rigorous we say that's beautiful cinematography. I would say it's precise.

I'm interested in rural spaces in your films. They're at once inviting and sinister. DENIS CÔTÉ: It seems like every time I film the countryside there's a sense of menace. I think it's because I never go there. I don't have a car or driver's license. I've never caught a fish. If I go to the countryside it's to shoot. I would never do something in the countryside for fun. For me it's not a peaceful place. I like to tell stories there because I feel free. Things happen more easily. In the woods there's going to be a maniac. In the lake there's going to be a monster.

Perhaps the word "beautiful" also comes to mind because of the sentiment these images convey, this deep, intimate camaraderie shared by Vic and Flo. DC: I was working in a really rough environment. That sugar shack is aluminium and grey, no identity or charm. I knew the location was rough. I knew the events at the end of the film would be rough. I knew I had Pierrette Robitaille. She's not exactly a beauty queen. I knew I didn't want to use much make-up. I knew they would talk in a very rough way, so I needed some warmth. I knew in the first scene Vic would look like a misanthrope, so I needed to find spaces for her to become warmer. I wanted the viewer to become comfortable with these women, even if you wouldn't want to be friends with them in real life. The story, as you know, finds its way to this very ugly place. People get angry with me for what they see as violence against women.

Is that why most of the exteriors in Vic + Flo are photographed from a distance, with a very square frame? So people and things can move through? So that something can happen? DC: Yes, I like tableaux, but I always make sure there's a character in the frame. I'm totally allergic to transition shots, beautiful landscapes, postcards. Things should never be comfortable or beautiful.

But the film is about women, so if there's violence it's probably going to involve women. DC: I regularly get questioned about whether I'm trying to punish lesbians. People don't like the way I portray the couple. But I worked with a parole officer who explained to me how women usually meet in jail, creating security couples and networks. They may not actually be gay per se. She

VUE WEEKLY:

VW:

VW:

VW:

also said that, while some women get out of jail and are in a hurry to meet guys, it was very normal for other women to continue living with women after being released, in part because they've been away from men for so long. She approved of everything in my script. As for the parole officer being gay, it was more or less accidental. I wanted to close the door between him and Flo, to eliminate the possibility of their having sex. He doesn't "act" gay, whatever that means. He just says one thing to confirm that he has a boyfriend and that's it. For me, these are not gay issues. I think the more interesting moral or karmic equation has to do with the fact that Vic and Flo are ex-convicts. Do they, in their own minds, feel they deserve whatever they have coming? Though we never learn what they were convicted of. DC: I like to work with the present. I never imagine myself filming a flashback. I'm also obsessed with society and community. How do we disconnect or reconnect? I like that Vic's in transition. It allows me to work in the present tense. I'm also interested in fatalism. So I had this question about whether I can create this more or less conventional story about these two women and then, bang, it slips into some kind of vengeance tale. Some people are grateful for the ending, some say we lost them with it. I'm more interested in the mechanics of storytelling than in a good story. It's about trying things. VW:

I want to back up to something you said about Robitaille. You mentioned that she's not exactly a great beauty, but when you have her in close-up she radiates this kind of wizened glamour. DC: Yeah, there's something there, in VW:

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

her features and her character. But Pierrette still says that she doesn't know what she was doing in the movie. Her background is in popular comedy. People think of her as a clown. She still thinks I played a joke on her. Even on the red carpet in Berlin, she was looking at me like this was a trick. Of course, it was meant as a challenge. She's not supposed to be in art cinema. I told her, "Honestly, everything you did before I think is crap. But you have 30 or 40 years of experience that I want to put to work on something else." Now she's really proud of the film. She says that people talk to her as though there was a before and an after. That can be hard to hear when you're 63. Vic + Flo is full of scenes in which people play games or with toys. They ride go-karts, play pool or horseshoes, or with a remote-control helicopter. It seems like a way of reminding the audience that storytelling is, in a way, a game. DC: I'm very afraid of people taking my films too seriously. But I'm also afraid of using the word "play" in interviews. It doesn't look good when you say you're playing, either with the audience or with your film. It doesn't sound sacred. VW:

Sure, but we could say that Borges was playing a game. We could say Buñuel was playing a game. DC: I don't know if I want to say I'm playing with the audience, but I think we have a contract. I'm the master. I'm pulling the strings. I might have a little fun with you. Just trust me. Don't take it too seriously. There's a comic-book energy flowing through Vic + Flo. Yes, things might get a little dark, but let's have some fun. VW:

JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM


ASPECTRATIO

JOSEF BRAUN // JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Ceaseless simplicity

Ozu's Tokyo Story a vivid chronicle of ordinary life

The extraordinary, ordinary Tokyo Story

T

he Story is simplicity itself—less a plot than a clothesline on which to hang characters, incidents, places, impressions, stray observations, emotions too deep to be spoken aloud. Elderly couple Shukichi (Chishu Ryu) and Tomi (Chieko Higashiyama) leave their village of Onomichi to visit their adult children, with whom they seem to have largely cordial relationships tainted by obligation, impatience, disinterest and resentment. They also visit Noriko (Setsuko Hara), widow to the son they lost to the war. Noriko has far less reason to maintain relations with Shukichi and Tomi, yet she clearly treasures their company so much more than do their own children. Little in the way of drama transpires in Tokyo Story (1953), yet by the time we reach its ending we're left with a feeling of having been swept up in a chronicle of vividly rendered ordinary life, with all the fleeting joys and frustrations and lingering heartbreak that entails. The greatness of this unsentimen-

tal, rigorously unimposing film is not easy to convey to those who haven't seen it or any of the other films by Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu. It is a greatness that works on you only gradually, sinking in as one scene gently and precisely gives way to another. I'm hardly the first person to declare this greatness—the film has for three decades in a row made the BFI's Top Ten of All Time list—but I think it bears constant repeating, and the fact that Tokyo Story is now available in a handsome new dual-format edition from Criterion seems as good an excuse as any to do so. A neighbour stopping by a window to chat; sulking kids fiddling with their father's medical equipment; a mother sleeping in the bed of her dead son; a trio of drunken men speaking of living for the next generation, even though one of these men no longer has any children, while the others can barely hide their disappointment with theirs; a long, wordless gaze at a

young woman's melancholy smile as she travels by train while we wonder if she will ever move on with her life: such moments, some moving, many amusing, all of them fascinating, accumulate over the course of Tokyo Story, sewn together into a larger vision of family and time by the immaculate camerawork of Ozu and cinematographer Yūharu Atsuta. Their compositions offer us a deep sense of the geography of houses, of rooms leading onto other rooms, of the way people share space. Ozu's famous intermediary scenes, images of surrounding landscapes, are not mere establishing shots; they give us a sense of a larger world in which these domestic happenings unfold, of life passing by, fluid and ceaseless. Tokyo Story is a masterwork of rhythm and pacing, its time signature perfectly suited to the very subtle build of revelation and emotion. My favourite of the supplements featured on Criterion's Tokyo Story is a documentary titled Talking with Ozu (1993), made to celebrate what would have been the director's 90th birthday. The film contains a series of homages from various filmmakers strongly influenced by Ozu, among them Wim Wenders, who describes Ryu—who appeared in 52 of Ozu's 54 films—as a sort of "universal father," Claire Denis, who reads a scene from Late Spring (1949), the film whose story served as a sort of template for her own masterwork, 35 Rhums (2008), and Aki Kaurismäki, who greets a photograph of Ozu and says to it, "I've made 11 lousy films, and it's all your fault." V

REVUE // DRAMEDY

Delivery Man D

espite Delivery Man's best efforts in Moby Dick [factually accurate but to dress up Vince Vaughn in a too easy a pun]). The movie mostly kind-of-indie dramedy, this movie can't settles into a somewhat thoughtful escape its tight pair of genes: from drama about paternal pride, family the paternal manobligation, and the child side, the lowlawsuit launched born comedies of Now playing by 100-plus "Stardickish Vaughn- Directed by Ken Scott buck Kids" to discharacters past;  cover Dad's idenfrom the matertity. But there's nal mainstreama mood-bullying Hollywood side, a nagging tendency score and the tepid comic elements towards pretty, simplistic characters of typical Vaughn vehicles simmer: a (aka caricatures). sports obsession, his shrugging bachDirected and adapted by Ken Scott elor lifestyle in a cool apartment, his from his co-written Quebec movie shambling efforts to be responsible to Starbuck (2011), this NYC-set remake buddies or The Girl. sees David Wozniak (Vaughn), a meatdelivery man, discover his sperm-for- While David's quest to secretly check cash work in the early '90s produced on all 100-plus kids is decently han533 children. (For the original, "Star- dled—even scenes with a mentally buck" was the name of a bull that handicapped son avoid being cringfathered hundreds of calves via ar- ingly sappy or condescending—Startificial breeding in the '80s and '90s, buck, despite its sprawling family, falls though Starbuck was also the seaman back on type with cheerful simplicity.

So almost every kid (even the Drug Addict) is photogenic, white, and coolcasual—a Gap model of a twentysomething. Adults often act like childish absolutists: David wants to be a "guardian angel" to his biological children; his Buddy says his young children never listen to him; his Love Interest worries kids are "monsters." The only Starbuck Kid we get to know is a creepy version of a leftie bookworm who discovers David's secret and then moves in with him, saying, "I wanna keep you all to myself." He's just dropped for the film's third act. It's as if other characters—even Dave's Girl, in his delivery-room speech to her— are mostly there to try to make us like Vaughn/Dave even more. Dave's dad even tells him, "They will love you." If only this masturbation-consequencesdramedy had stopped trying so hard and squeezing so tight. BRIAN GIBSON

BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

FILM 19


FILM REVUE // ACTION

Homefront M

atters are handled a little all transpires in a shoot-em-up-style differently in Rayville, LA. A opening sequence to get the adrenschoolyard altercation between two aline pumping before the stark conchildren can launch an all-out battle trast of life in the sleepy rural town. over pride and Broker appears getting even—or Now playing to be a simple, blue-collar single at least that's Homefront what happened Directed by Gary Fleder dad caring for his young daughter, in the case of Phil  Maddy (Izabela Broker. The former DEA Vidovic). All is agent has started a new life in the well until Maddy decides to take bayou community following an un- her father's self-defence advice and dercover drug bust where his team decks the school bully after askgunned down the son of a biker- ing him nicely to quit picking on gang kingpin—who swore up and her. The boy's mother, Cassie, (a down Broker (Jason Statham) was haggard-looking Kate Bosworth) is dead, along with his family—which a loose cannon who seeks to exact

justice when her deadbeat husband can't lay down the law. Enter Gator Bodine (James Franco), Cassie's brother and one of the most prolific meth dealers in the area, who also happens to be an asset if you need someone scared straight. Things quickly spiral out of control when Gator discovers Broker's past and as it turns out, his girlfriend Sheryl (Winona Ryder) has connections to the man who wants Broker's head on a platter. Homefront, based on the novel by Chuck Logan with a screenplay penned by Sylvester Stallone leaves no doubt from the outset as to where things are headed. The

dialogue is often trite, with Stallone weaving in flat macho one-liners as Broker takes out the Gator's goons one by one. Once things leave behind the slow-moving early scenes and shift into gear, there is no shortage of action—gunfire, car chases, fist fights, you name it. However, these scenes are often sloppily shot, with the camera panning so rapidly between things that it's difficult to keep up, visually speaking, that is.

While Homefront is a fairly typi-

cal good guys-versus-bad guys scenario, its cast has its moments of strength. Statham, despite struggling to decide what type of accent

Broker's going to stick with, is just as convincing as a doting father as he is as a badass former agent, although he somehow remains quite deadpan as hell breaks loose on his house during the film's climax. Franco, who brings a new take to the whole Breaking Bad meth lab deal, embodies Gator's smarmy, good-fornothing demeanour with panache. However, Ryder, whose character gets unwillfully roped into the overblown chaos, has her moments of redemption, but ultimately feels underused in her role as a one-dimensional biker groupie.

MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // DRAMA

N TIO

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Philomena T

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he story comes from Martin Six- miliated and desperate to revive his smith's 2009 nonfiction book The career as a journalist, Sixsmith learns Lost Child of Philomena Lee, which pre- of Lee's story and opts to cash in on sumably kept its focus firmly on Lee, what seems like a straightforward human interest who, in the early 1950s, got pregpiece—precisely nant out of wed- Opens Friday the sort of journallock and was sent Directed by Stephen Frears ism he looks down to an Irish abbey  upon. Of course, where such "waythe piece turns out ward girls" were to be anything but held captive against their will, used as straightforward, allowing Philomena, slave labour, and endured gruelling, which mainly concerns Sixsmith and sometimes fatal births, only to have Lee's belated search for her son, to their children taken from them and in incorporate elements of the oddsome cases sold for 1000 quid each to couple buddy movie, the road movie and the detective story into what is Americans seeking easy adoptions. The movie version has winnowed fundamentally a tale of forgiveness. the title down to Philomena, though Which is where things get sticky. It's its protagonist—the character who one thing for Philomena, a stubborn begins the story in limbo, who's true believer, to hold no grudges charged with leading an unexpected against the lying, sadistic nuns who quest, who's faced with a moral chal- shamelessly exploited her ostensible lenge, who gets the most screen-time erotic folly for cash, and another for and has the most to learn—is in fact the movie, or us, to do the same. Sixsmith. When our story begins it's been 50 years since Lee's lost child Judi Dench plays Philomena, was born, though her longing to re- while Sixsmith is embodied by Steve connect with him remains unabated. Coogan, who also co-wrote the script Sixsmith meanwhile has just gotten with Jeff Pope. The film was directed the boot from his position as a La- by Stephen Frears, one of the cinema's bour Party spin-doctor. Publicly hu- great journeymen, the sort of smart,

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

no-bullshit director who is loathe to leave an authorial imprint on a film when he can simply tell the story and highlight the acting—which means his films are generally only as good as the script and the performances. In the case of the latter, Philomena found Frears in excellent company, with the great Dame exerting the utmost discretion when doling out her character's cutesyisms—she'll prattle on about her romance novels at the drop of a hat—and Coogan treading lightly with his trademark cynical gags in favour of getting to the heart of the ethical conflicts between Sixsmith and Lee. In the case of the former, Frears is forced to make the best of what is sometimes very baggy, overly tidy writing, laden with pushy, needless, awkwardly inserted flashbacks and a phoney climax. Alexandre Desplat's twinkly fairy-tale score does not help the film's many tricky tonal transitions. So watch Philomena with the caveat that its narration is wobbly and its politics are dulled by sentiment, but the historical facts it relays are important, and the performances are near perfect. JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM


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FILM REVUE // DRAMA

“AMAZING! STUNNING! MIND-BLOWING!” –Jami Philbrick, I Am Rogue

“A WILD, DISTURBING, AND UNPREDICTABLE RIDE.” –Jonathan Robbins, filmcomment

Literary lifting

The Book Thief B

ased on the bestselling Markus the ploy will work. Unless we talk exclusively about Zusak young adult novel of the Sophie Nélisse, the same name, The exceedingly talentBook Thief is a coming of age tale Now playing ed young Québécoise who plays that awkwardly Directed by Brian Percival Liesel, the little girl melds a certain  who gets adopted tidy storybook by an older, childcuteness with the horrors of Nazi Germany. It also less couple (kindly Geoffrey Rush and awkwardly forces its international nagging Emily Watson) on the eve cast to speak English with heavy Ger- of the Second World War. Nélisse's man accents, replacing the occasional ability to embody the film's heroine "and" with "und" or "no" with "nein." as both child and adolescent is truly The overall effect is a large group of remarkable, and none of her scenes characters that live in the same city with adults feel as though the actors yet don't seem to share a mother onscreen are not on equal footing. If tongue. This is, of course, the least of anyone deserves to have her career the film's problems, but it's indicative boosted by The Book Thief, it's her— of a sort of confused deployment of though her performance in Monsieur conventions that speak to the film- Lazhar is far more worth seeking out. makers' blatant desire to make The Book Thief an explicitly "prestige" pic- Liesel's story is one of life-altering ture: beatific children + Holocaust + discoveries both literary and realpoesteemed elder actors + no subtitles litik. She learns to read first by steal= Oscars, please. Though I don't think ing a gravedigger's guidebook from

her brother's gravesite and, later, by furtively "borrowing" handsomely bound volumes of great classics from the home of a local Nazi aristocrat scumbag. Meanwhile, her guardians wind up hiding a blandly noble Jewish man in the same basement where Liesel records her burgeoning vocabulary on the walls. Michael Petroni's screenplay seems to prize faithfulness to the source material above all, which means that, like the novel, the film is intermittently narrated by Death (Roger Allam), who ultimately has an uneasy way of making atrocities and genocide feel cozy. The jokes are limp, the music pure schmaltz, the Nazis hazy fiends and there's a bully character so lazily drawn as to be laughable. Perhaps those who love the book will be happy to see that so much of it has survived adaptation, but such blind respect for source material rarely yields successful results.

ASK NOT WHY YOU WERE IMPRISONED ASK WHY YOU WERE SET FREE J O S H

JOSEF BRAUN

B R O L I N

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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FILM 31


FILM

WEEKLY

Fri, Nov 29-Thu, Dec 5, 2013 CHABA THEATRE–JASPER 6094 Connaught Dr Jasper, 780.852.4749

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) FRI-SAT 6:45, 9:25; SUN-THU 8:00 ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) FRI-SAT 7:00, 9:25; SUN-THU 8:00 MUSEUM HOURS (STC) THU 7:30 DUGGAN CINEMA–CAMROSE 6601-48 Ave Camrose, 780.608.2144

FROZEN (G) DAILY 7:00, 9:05; SAT & SUN 1:00, 3:10 THU 1:00 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) DAILY 6:30, 9:30; SAT-SUN & THU 1:30 HOMEFRONT(14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) DAILY 7:15, 9:25; SAT-SUN & THU 2:15 DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) DAILY 7:20, 9:35; SAT-SUN & THU 2:00 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) DAILY 6:45, 9:10; SAT-SUN & THU 1:45 THE IMPOSSIBLE (14A violence) SAT 10:00 CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 5074-130 Ave 780.472.9779

DESPICABLE ME 2 (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN,TUE 1:00; 3D Closed Captioned DAILY 3:50, 7:15, 9:40 PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS (PG frightening scenes) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:25 PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS 3D (PG frightening scenes) Closed Captioned DAILY 3:45, 6:40, 9:15 CARRIE (14a gory violence, disturbing content) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:20, 4:10, 7:25, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 4:10, 7:25, 9:50 RUSH (14a coarse language) Closed Captioned FRISUN, TUE 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55; MON, WED-THU 4:20, 7:10, 9:55

WE'RE THE MILLERS (14a sexual content, crude coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 10:00; MON, WED-THU 4:25, 7:20, 10:00 THE FIFTH ESTATE (14a) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:05, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45; MON, WED-THU 3:55, 6:50, 9:45

PLANES (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE 1:50; 3D Closed Captioned DAILY 4:40, 7:00, 9:10 BULLETT RAJA (STC) No Passes, Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, Tue 1:15, 4:30, 8:00; MON, WED-THU 4:30, 8:00 GORI TERE PYAAR MEIN (PG) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 12:55, 4:15, 7:30; MON, WED-THU 4:15, 7:30

matter) Closed Captioned FRI, MON-TUE, THU 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; SAT-SUN 2:30, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; WED 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; Star & Strollers Screening WED 1:00

FREE BIRDS (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 1:40, 4:00; MON-THU 1:40, 4:20 THE BOOK THIEF (PG) Closed Captioned FRI 12:20, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50; SAT-SUN 12:20, 3:30, 6:45, 9:50; MONTHU 12:30, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50 HOMEFRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) FRI 12:40, 3:10, 5:50, 8:20, 10:50; SAT 12:40, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10, 10:50; SUN 12:40, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10, 10:45; MON-THU 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:30

FROZEN (G) No Passes FRI, SUN-WED 1:35, 4:15, 6:50; SAT 11:00, 1:35, 4:15, 6:50; THU 3:55, 6:15; Star & Strollers Screening, No Passes THU 1:00; 3D: Closed Captioned, No Passes DAILY 11:55, 2:35, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25

FROZEN (G) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI 1:30, 4:20, 5:45, 7:10; SAT-SUN 11:45, 3:10, 7:10; MON-WED 1:30, 4:15, 5:50, 7:10; THU 1:30, 4:15, 7:10; No Passes SAT-SUN 11:00, 1:30, 4:20 FROZEN 3D (G) Closed Captioned, No Passes DAILY 12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00, 10:35

THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI, SUN 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30; SAT 11:10, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30; MON-THU 2:00, 4:50, 7:35, 10:30 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI-SAT 1:05, 3:30, 5:50, 8:05, 10:20; SUN 3:30, 5:50, 8:05, 10:20; MON-WED 1:05, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:20; THU 12:15, 2:40, 4:55, 10:20

DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) FRI-SAT 12:10, 2:45, 5:25, 8:00, 10:40; SUN 12:10, 2:45, 5:25, 8:00, 10:35; MON-WED 1:45, 4:15, 7:15, 10:00; THU 1:45, 4:15, 7:40, 10:00 FREE BIRDS (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:15; 3D: Closed Captioned FRI-WED 3:25, 5:35, 7:45; THU 3:25, 5:35, 7:50

DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject

32 FILM

FROZEN (G) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital, No Passes, Stadium Seating, Dts Digital DAILY 3:50, 10:10; 3D: Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital 3d, Dts Digital, No Passes, Stadium Seating FRI-SUN, TUE 12:40, 7:30; MON, WED-THU 7:30 LANDMARK CINEMAS 10 CLAREVIEW 4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI, MON-THU 7:10, 9:40; SAT-SUN 12:20, 2:45, 7:10, 9:40 LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating DAILY 9:50

12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing content)Closed Captioned FRI-WED 9:55; THU 10:05

ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating DAILY 10:00

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) FRISUN,TUE-WED 12:45, 3:05, 5:30, 7:55, 10:10; MON 7:55, 10:10; THU 12:35, 2:50, 5:05, 9:50

THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital 3d, Digital Presentation, Stadium Seating FRI,MON-THU 6:35, 9:25; SAT-SUN 3:00, 6:35, 9:25

PIPES & STICKS ON ROUTE 66 (STC) SUN 12:30

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) No Passes, On 3 Screens, Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15; SAT 12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 3:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15; SUN 12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 3:15, 3:45, 4:15, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:45; MON-THU 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:45

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG violence) SAT 11:00

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) Closed Captioned DAILY 6:30, 9:10

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dts Digital, Stadium Seating FRI-SUN, TUE 12:55; 3D: Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital 3d, Dts Stereo, Stadium Seating, Closed Captioned DAILY 3:45, 7:15, 9:55

OLDBOY (18A disturbing content, brutal violence) Closed Captioned FRI-SAT 12:15, 2:50, 5:30, 8:10, 10:50; SUN 12:15, 2:50, 5:30, 8:10, 10:40; MON-THU 12:05, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:25

THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 4:40, 7:40, 10:30

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Ultraavx, No Passes FRI 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15; SAT-SUN 1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 10:45; MON-THU 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30

DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital, Dts Digital, Stadium Seating FRI-SUN, TUE 12:50, 3:25, 6:35, 9:30; MON, WED-THU 3:25, 6:35, 9:30

OLDBOY (18A disturbing content, brutal violence) Bargain Matinee, Closed Captioned, Digital, Child Admission Price, Dts Digital, Stadium Seating FRI-SUN, TUE 12:45, 3:50, 6:45, 9:20; MON, WED-THU 3:50, 6:45, 9:20

ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 9:40

PHILOMENA (PG language may offend) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00; MON-THU 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:55

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI 11:50, 1:00, 3:00, 4:15, 6:15, 7:30, 9:30, 10:45; SAT-SUN 10:50, 11:50, 12:30, 2:00, 3:00, 3:45, 5:15, 6:15, 8:30, 9:30; MON-THU 12:00, 2:00, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 9:00, 10:00

THE BOOK THIEF (PG) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Closed Captioned, Digital, Dts Stereo, Stadium Seating, No Passes FRI-SUN, TUE 12:05, 3:15, 6:50, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 3:15, 6:50, 9:50

HOMEFRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital, Dts Stereo, Closed Captioned, Stadium Seating FRI-SUN, TUE 12:10, 3:10, 7:25, 10:05; MON, WED-THU 3:10, 7:25, 10:05

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) No Passes FRI-SUN 12:00, 12:30, 2:00, 3:15, 3:45, 5:15, 6:30, 7:00, 8:30, 9:45, 10:15; MON-THU 12:00, 12:30, 2:45, 3:15, 3:45, 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 9:15, 9:45, 10:15; Ultraavx, No Passes FRI-SUN 1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 10:45; MON-THU 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:50, 9:45

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) No Passes FRI 1:45, 5:00, 8:30; SAT-SUN 7:00, 10:15; MON-THU 1:15, 4:45, 8:15

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB (18a) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital, Dts Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 12:15, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40; MON, WED-THU 3:40, 6:40, 9:40

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 10:00

HOMEFRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) FRI-SAT 12:40, 3:10, 5:45, 8:20, 10:55; SUN 12:40, 4:25, 6:55, 9:35; MON-WED 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 9:50; THU 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 10:10

14231-137 Ave 780.732.2236

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Closed Captioned, Digital, Dts Stereo, No Passes, Stadium Seating, On 2 Screens FRI-SUN, TUE 12:00, 12:30, 3:30, 4:00, 7:00, 8:00, 10:00; MON, WED-THU 3:30, 4:00, 7:00, 8:00, 10:00

1525-99 St 780.436.8585

SINGH SAAB THE GREAT (14a violence) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 1:55, 5:00, 9:00; MON, WED-THU 5:00, 9:00 CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH

10200-102 Ave, 780.421.7018

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG violence) SAT 11:00 CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: THE NOSE - ENCORE (Classification not available) SAT 10:55

FROZEN (G) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI 4:20, 7:00; SAT-SUN 11:00, 1:40, 4:20, 7:00; MON-THU 6:50; 3D: Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI 5:00, 7:40, 10:20; SAT-SUN 11:40, 2:20, 5:00, 7:40, 10:20; MON-THU 7:30, 10:10

PHILOMENA (PG language may offend) Closed Captioned FRI 3:30, 6:00, 8:30, 10:55; SAT 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:40; SUN 12:50, 3:20, 5:40, 8:20; MON-THU 6:30, 9:00 LANDMARK CINEMAS 9 CITY CENTRE

PHILOMENA (PG language may offend) Closed Captioned FRI,SUN-TUE,THU 1:20, 4:10, 6:40, 9:00; SAT 11:15, 1:20, 4:10, 6:40, 9:00; WED 4:10, 6:40, 9:00; Star & Strollers Screening WED 1:00

RAM-LEELA (14A) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 1:40, 5:10, 8:50; MON, WED-THU 5:10, 8:50

DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) Closed Captioned FRI 3:50, 6:30, 9:10; SAT 12:35, 3:10, 5:50, 8:20, 10:55; SUN 12:30, 3:10, 5:50, 8:30; MON-THU 7:00, 9:40

12 YEARS A SLAVE (14a disturbing content, brutal violence) Closed Captioned FRI 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; SAT 12:50, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00; SUN 3:30, 6:40, 10:00; MONWED 6:40, 9:50; THU 9:50

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) Closed Captioned FRI 1:10, 3:30, 8:15, 10:40; SAT-SUN 1:10, 5:50, 8:20, 10:40; MON-WED 1:00, 3:30, 8:20, 10:40; THU 1:00, 4:10, 10:40

BHAJI IN PROBLEM (PG) Punjabi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30; MON, WED-THU 4:00, 6:45, 9:30

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating SAT-SUN 12:15

THE BOOK THIEF (PG) Closed Captioned FRI 3:40, 6:50, 10:00; SAT-SUN 12:40, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00; MON-THU 6:50, 10:00; Vip 18+ FRI 4:15, 8:00; SAT 2:00, 5:30, 9:30; SUN 12:40, 4:00, 8:30; MON-WED 7:10, 10:20; THU 6:30, 10:00

12 YEARS A SLAVE (14a disturbing content, brutal violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 12:50, 3:50, 7:05, 10:05

THE BOOK THIEF (PG) Closed Captioned FRI-WED 12:35, 3:40, 7:05, 10:05; THU 3:55, 7:05, 10:05; Star & Strollers Screening THU 1:00

11:00; Vip 18+, No Passes SUN 2:00, 6:00, 10:05; Vip 18+, No Passes MON-WED 6:30, 10:00; Closed Captioned, No Passes THU 6:30, 9:40; Ultraavx, No Passes FRI 3:50, 7:15, 10:40; SAT 12:45, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30; SUN 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15; MON-THU 6:40, 10:00; Closed Captioned, No Passes SAT 2:00, 6:30, 9:50; SUN 1:10, 4:40, 8:00; MON-WED 7:00, 10:15

DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI, MON-THU 6:50, 9:35; SAT-SUN 12:40, 3:20, 6:50, 9:35

DIE HARD (14a brutal violence, coarse language) THU 7:00 CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS Cineplex Odeon Windermere, Vip Cinemas, 6151 Currents Dr, 780.822.4250

FROZEN 3D (G) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI-SUN 3:30, 6:15, 9:00; MON-THU 6:30, 9:20; Closed Captioned, No Passes SAT-SUN 12:40 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI 3:40, 6:45, 9:40; SAT-SUN 3:50, 6:40, 9:40; MON-THU 6:50, 9:40; VIP 18+: FRI 5:00, 9:00; SAT 1:15, 4:45, 8:30; SUN 1:20, 5:00, 9:20; MON-WED 8:30; THU 8:00; Closed Captioned SAT-SUN 1:00 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Vip 18+, No Passes FRI 3:30, 7:00, 10:45; Vip 18+, No Passes SAT 12:30, 4:00, 7:30,

FROZEN (G) No Passes, Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI, MON-THU 7:15; SAT-SUN 12:10, 2:50, 7:15; 3D: No Passes, Closed Captioned, Digital 3d, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI, MON-THU 6:45, 9:15; SATSUN 12:45, 3:25, 6:45, 9:15 HOMEFRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI, MON-THU 7:05, 9:55; SAT-SUN 12:25, 2:55, 7:05, 9:55 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG violence) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI, MON-THU 6:40; SAT-SUN 12:05, 3:10, 6:40

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK 2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150

THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) SAT-SUN 11:00, 1:50 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) FRI-SUN 4:40, 7:30, 10:25; MON-THU 7:25, 10:15 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned, No FRI 3:50, 4:30, 6:30, 7:10, 7:50, 9:50, Passes 10:30; SAT-SUN 11:50, 12:30, 1:10, 3:10, 3:50, 4:30, 6:30, 7:10, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30; MON-THU 6:30, 7:00, 7:40, 9:50, 10:15 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 3:45, 9:20; MON-THU 9:15 ABOUT TIME (14A coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 9:35; MON-THU 9:25 LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) Closed Captioned FRI, MON-THU 6:40; SAT-SUN 1:05, 6:40 DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) Closed Captioned FRI 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; SAT-SUN 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; MON-THU 6:45, 9:20 FREE BIRDS 3D (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 4:55, 7:15; MON-THU 7:10 FREE BIRDS (G) Closed Captioned SAT-SUN 12:15, 2:35 HOMEFRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) FRI 4:45, 7:20, 9:55; SAT-SUN 11:30, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55; MON-THU 7:15, 9:45 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) Closed FRI-SUN 9:45; MON-THU 9:30 Captioned HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG violence) SAT 11:00 GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.458.9822 Date of Issue: Nov 29, 2013

LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) NOV 29, 2013: 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 FREE BIRDS (G) NOV 29, 2013: 1:05, 3:00, 4:50, 6:45 ENDER'S GAME (PG violence, not rec for young children) NOV 29, 2013: 8:35 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) NOV 29, 2013: 7:45 9:40 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G) NOV 29, 2013: 1:15, 3:45, 5:45

THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) NOV 29, 2013: 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:15, 9:35 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) No passes NOV 29, 2013: 12:45, 3:25, 6:15, 9:00 FROZEN (G) No passes NOV 29, 2013: 1:00, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20, 9:25 METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212

CUTIE & THE BOXER (14A) FRI 7:00; SAT 4:00, 9:00; SUN 2:00; WED 9:30 VIC + FLOW SAW A BEAR (14A) FRI 9:00; SAT 2:00, 7:00; SUN 9:30; MON 7:00; TUE 9:00 THE VISITOR (STC) FRI 11:00; MON 9:00 DESIGN IS THE ONE: THE VIGNELLIS (G) SUN 4:00 BLOOD BROTHERS - GLOBAL VISIONS FF (STC) SUN 6:45 APOCALYPSE: A BILL CALLAHAN TOUR FILM (STC) TUE 7:30 EDWARD SCISSORHANDS (PG violence, not recommended for young children) WED 7:00; students free TED-X: LANDSCAPE: CHANGING WOMEN (STC) THU 7:00 LANDMARK 7–SPRUCE GROVE 130 Century Crossing, Spruce Grove 780.962.2332

DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) Digital FRI 6:40, 9:20; SAT-SUN 12:45, 3:30, 6:40, 9:20; MON, WED-THU 5:30, 8:00; Tue 2:40, 5:30, 8:00 HOME FRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) Digital FRI 6:10, 8:50; SAT-SUN 11:40, 2:30, 6:10, 8:50; MON, WED-THU 5:10, 7:50; TUE 2:20, 5:10, 7:50 THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Digital SAT-SUN 11:50; 3D: Reald 3d FRI 6:20, 9:00; SAT-SUN 3:20, 6:20, 9:00; MON, WED-THU 5:00, 7:40; TUE 2:10, 5:00, 7:40 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Digital FRI 6:00, 6:30, 7:30, 9:10, 9:40; SAT-SUN 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 2:40, 3:10,

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

4:00, 6:00, 6:30, 7:30, 9:10, 9:40; MON, WED-THU 6:00, 6:45, 7:30; TUE 1:50, 2:30, 3:00, 6:00, 6:45, 7:30

FROZEN (G) Digital FRI 9:30; SAT-SUN 3:00, 9:30; MON, WED-THU 8:10; TUE 2:00, 8:10; 3D: Reald 3d FRI 6:50; SAT-SUN 12:15, 6:50; MON-THU 5:40 PRINCESS 10337-82 Ave, 780.433.0728

PHILOMENA (PG language may offend) FRI 7:00, 9:00; SAT-SUN 2:00, 7:00, 9:00; MON-THU 7:00, 9:00 12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing content) FRI 6:45; SAT-SUN 1:00, 6:45; MON-THU 6:45 ALL IS LOST (PG coarse language) FRI 9:20; SAT-SUN 3:30, 9:20; MON-THU 9:20 THE IMPOSSIBLE (14A violence) SAT, NOV 30: 11:30am; admission by donation ($10) proceeds to Canadian Red Cross for the Philippines disaster relief SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400

FROZEN (G) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video, No Passes FRI-SUN 1:15, 4:00, 6:50; MON-THU 1:10, 4:00, 6:50; 3D Cc/Dvs, No Passes FRI-SUN 11:50, 2:25, 5:00, 7:45, 10:20; MON-THU 1:50, 4:45, 7:25, 10:00 THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) DAILY 1:40; Closed Caption & Descriptive Video DAILY 9:40 THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) Daily 4:40, 7:35, 10:30 GRAVITY 3D (PG coarse language) Cc/Dvs DAILY 12:35, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) No Passes FRI-SUN 12:00, 3:15, 6:30, 9:45; MON-TUE, THU 2:00, 5:15, 8:30; WED 5:15, 8:30 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video, No Passes FRI-SUN 2:00, 5:15, 8:30; MON-THU 2:45, 6:30, 9:45 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) Ultraavx, No Passes DAILY 1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 10:45; Star & Strollers Screening, No Passes WED 1:00 LAST VEGAS (PG crude content, course language) Closed Captioned DAILY 7:10, 9:50 OLDBOY (18A disturbing content, brutal violence) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN 12:10, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00, 10:40; MONTHU 2:10, 4:50, 8:00, 10:40 DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-SUN 11:55, 2:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:25; MON-THU 2:20, 5:00, 7:40, 10:25 FREE BIRDS (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:30, 4:30 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE – THE IMAX EXPERIENCE (PG violence, not rec for young children)No Passes DAILY 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 HOMEFRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) FRI-TUE, THU 12:40, 3:10, 5:45, 8:15, 10:45; WED 3:20, 5:45, 8:15, 10:45; Star & Strollers Screening WED 1:00 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (14A crude content, coarse language, not rec for children) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-WED 12:50, 3:20, 5:40, 8:10, 10:35; THU 12:50, 3:20, 10:35 DIE HARD (14a brutal violence, coarse language) THU 7:00 NEW FORT CINEMA 9922-100 St, Fort Saskatchewan, 780.992.1707; Office: 780.992.1878

FROZEN (G) SAT-SUN, TUE 1:00, 3:15; DAILY 7:00, 9:15 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) SAT-SUN, TUE 1:30; DAILY 7:30 THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young children) SAT-SUN, TUE 1:45; DAILY 7:15, 9:30 LEDUC CINEMAS 4702-50 St Leduc, 780.986-2728

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) DAILY 6:30, 7:30, 9:40; SATSUN 12:30, 1:30, 3:40 DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) DAILY 7:00, 9:30; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:30 FROZEN (G) 3D: DAILY 6:50, 9:25; TUE 2D: 6:50; SAT-SUN 2D 12:50; 3D 3:25 WETASKIWIN CINEMAS Wetaskiwin 780.352.3922

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence, not rec for young children) DAILY 6:30, 9:40; SAT, SUN 12:30, 3:40 DELIVERY MAN (PG coarse language, mature subject matter) DAILY 7:00, 9:30; SAT, SUN 1:00, 3:30 FROZEN (G) DAILY 3D 6:50, 9:25; TUE 2D 6:50; SAT, SUN 2D 12:50, 3D 3:25 HOME FRONT (14A coarse language, brutal violence, substance abuse) DAILY 7:05, 9:35; SAT & SUN 1:05, 3:35


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VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

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FILM 33


SNOW ZONE // SNOWSHOE

SNOW ZONE T

A quieter way to explore the mountains

// Jared Bernard

he snow is falling and Jasper National Park beckons. The beauty of Jasper's mountains is dramatically augmented in the winter, for every ridge and crevice is enhanced by an outline of snowy frost, and one of the best ways to get out there and take advantage of it is by snowshoe. Every year millions of people visit Jasper National Park in the summer for hiking or sightseeing, and many visit Marmot Basin in the winter, but fewer think of snowshoeing once they arrive. If you're tired of the crowds and costs associated with skiing, scared of the reports of snowmobilers getting in accidents or even if you just want to spice up your winter repertoire, consider adding snowshoes to your gear. This is the time for solitude and peace. Yet, go to Marmot Basin and you might wonder where all the solitude went. Much like the summer season, solitude does not await in the easily accessible venues, but only in Jasper's back country and the only way to see it is to get in there by either cross-country ski or snowshoe. One obstacle that may prevent you from getting out your wallet to buy some snowshoes is money, but just compare that to the costs associated with major winter sports in Jasper. If you want to rent downhill skis, you're looking at $20 – $56 per day, plus a lift pass that will cost ap-

EDITOR : MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

proximately $80 per day. Of course you also need that lift pass for snowboarding, and the board itself rents at $30 a day. If you choose to buy, those downhill skis will run $200 – $800 while snowboards cost $500 – $930. Snowmobiles are not allowed in Jasper National Park, but you can go snowmobiling in some areas just outside of Jasper, where you can rent for $253 a day. If you want to buy one of these, you might as well buy a car. Don't forget that each 10.8-gallon tank of gas will cost you about $47 around Jasper. All told, you're spending at least $100 a day to ski, $110 to snowboard or $300 to snowmobile and none of it grants serenity. Conversely, snowshoes sell at $90 – $305, and merely $10 a day to rent. No extra costs. Now you might suppose that snowshoeing won't give you the same intense exercise as skiing or snowboarding. After all, downhill skiing burns between 408 and 594 calories (kcal) per hour and snowboarding is also 340 – 571 per hour. Cross-country skiing burns 476 – 600 calories per hour. These are ranges for a person weighing 150 lbs, based on information from University of Vermont physiologist Declan Connolly, Fitness magazine, self.com, healthstatus.com, and Calorie Count (caloriecount.about. com). The ranges here do not reflect

Inuvik Sunrise Festival INUVIK • N.W.T • CANADA

January 10-12, 2014

Flight, accommodation and tour for just $1,200 pp + taxes Book now at destinationinuvik.com or call 1.867.777.8618 34 SNOW ZONE

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

varying weight, but rigour of exercise. In contrast, snowshoeing burns 500 – 1046 calories per hour. This is because snowshoeing is a cardiovascular workout similar to being on an elliptical training machine. Designed to prevent your legs from "post-holing" through deep snow, the snowshoe provides a wide surface area that not only makes you take wide steps, but you also must lift your snowshoe straight up when you begin to step. The pivoting foot plate on most snowshoes means your ankle can still rotate as you lift your foot straight up. The result is a low-impact cardiovascular exercise that targets your calves and quadriceps while going uphill, and your hamstrings while heading downhill. Using snowshoe poles also works your triceps, biceps and pectoral muscles. And when you are breaking trail as the leader in a single-file group, you employ your hip flexors as well as your quadriceps to get through that deep untouched snow. For this reason, some marathon runners and other athletes snowshoe to keep themselves in shape through the winter months. Sometimes we natural-born hikers forget about snowshoes. We see the short number of daylight hours and the hibernated appearance of Jasper's forests and mountains and we just figure that we're snowed in for another year, wallowing in


Bald Hills: Bald Hills exemplifies the rolling terrain of the park's eastern mountains, gentle enough to allow for good snow accumulation. Located at the end of Maligne Road, this is a great destination for higher elevation snowshoeing. At 10.4 km round trip and moderate difficulty, this trail has been groomed for cross-country skiers, so be mindful not to walk on their tracks. The ascent is somewhat steep in sections. At about 2170 metres of elevation, you'll reach a horse hitch with a great panorama of Maligne Lake and Samson Peak. The trail beyond here to the northernmost of the Bald Hills will likely be much less trodden than the way up, so if you venture this way you'll need your navigational skills. You'll also need to exercise extreme caution due to avalanche zones. Do not approach steep snowy parts or go near or under overhanging ridges of snow. At the 2300-metre summit of the North Bald Hill, you'll be granted a superb wintery vista of the Maligne Range to the south and mounts Kerkeslin and Hardisty to the west. Geraldine Lookout: Depending on recent snowfall, this difficult 19-km roundtrip trek can be done without snowshoes for most of the way. That's because you have to walk so far along the closed Geraldine Fire Road—seven kilometres each way. Geraldine Fire Road can be reached by heading south from Jasper for nearly seven kilometres on Highway 93, turning right onto 93A, and then right onto Geraldine Fire Road after 23 km. This road is also groomed for skis, so be mindful and don't disturb the tracks. Here you're at the icy cascade of Athabasca Falls, where torrents frozen in motion plunge over the quartz formations into the sandstone gorge below. When you at last reach the trail head to Geraldine Lakes, you'll find another trailhead to the right

Wilcox Pass: This eight kilometre roundtrip trek is nice and easy in the summer, but spectacular and moderately difficult in the winter. The trailhead is 3.1 km south of the Columbia Icefield Visitor Centre on Highway 93, in the same parking lot as the Wilcox Creek Campground. Here you'll get an ethereal panorama of Mount Athabasca, Mount Andromeda and Athabasca Glacier. You'll need all your navigational skills here to find the way as it may be buried under snow. For an even greater adventure, keep going through the silent serenity of Wilcox Pass at an elevation of 2370 metres to Tangle Falls, where you should have a buddy drop off a car to make this an 11.2km one-way through-route. Definitely be aware of avalanche risks when heading into this terrain. Big Bend: Here is a relatively easy 13km round trip that you could turn into an over-nighter if you want a winter camping experience. Starting at Sunwapta Falls located at kilometre 55 along Highway 93, cross the bridge over the stunningly beautiful icy limestone canyon—with your snowshoes off, of course—and follow the signs toward Fortress Lake. After 6.5 km, you'll reach the campground at Big Bend, so named because it is on the edge of a great curve in the Athabasca River. If you are prepared and want to make this a more elaborate trip, continue to Athabasca Crossing, a campground nine kilometres further upstream. Either way, I recommend staying the night in Big Bend in the tranquil frosty shadows of Dragon Peak and Mount Quincy because snowshoeing is very slow going. Always check trail conditions and ensure you have a topography map, navigational skills, first aid kit, a lighter, the means to call for help and sunglasses to protect your eyes from glare off the snow. Avoid higher elevations or walking under unsupported bluffs of snow because you can get caught in an avalanche. Always give yourself plenty of time for day hikes by starting very early and remember that the sun sets early in the winter—and even earlier over the peaks of the mountains.

JARED BERNARD

Nov 4 - Dec 15 #UC_Holidays

29 SPORTS & EXPERT STAFF

WE HAVE IT!

JARED@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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Pyramid Bench: This hike can be as long and as difficult as you'd like because there is a network of trails here. Therefore, you can choose between a number of trail heads at intervals along Pyramid Lake Fire Road: one right in town behind the pool and activity centre, one for the Cottonwood Slough at kilometre marker two, another at the Pyramid Stables at 3.5 km and one at the end of the fire road. This can be a great place to take your kids if you hike the easy 4.6-km round trip hike along Trails 6 and 6c to Patricia Lake from the trail head at the stables, or go two kilometres one way along Trail 8 to Mina Lake. Those looking for more of a challenge can get some exercise by snowshoeing up and down the more difficult hillsides along Trail 2. Although close to town, you are likely to spot some fresh tracks of cougars and wolves. These are generally secretive animals and will normally hide from you instead of attacking you. To give these animals their space, the park asks that you don't stray from the trails.

Wabasso Lake: This trail to Wabasso Lake is easy and about 6.2-km round trip. To get here, drive 14.6 km south along Highway 93 from the town. You'll travel through forest and up an icy trickling stream to emerge on the shore of Wabasso Lake, onto which you can walk and explore if the lake is frozen. This trip is great for getting your feet wet (not literally, the lake should be frozen), for doing more adventuresome trips or just a great place to spend a day snowshoeing.

leading just 2.5 km one way to Geraldine Lookout. In the summer, this is just a short trail used by mountain bikers, but in the winter, this trail really gets snowed in. You'll only be able to snowshoe about a quarter of the speed at which you can hike, and that's beside the steep 225 metre elevation gain on the way to the lookout. What makes it all worthwhile is the breathtaking view of Edith Cavell's south face crisp with snow, as well as Needle Peak and lower Whirlpool Valley to the west.

Address Store Hours

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When you drive into Jasper National Park in the winter, you may look around and find yourself asking where all the snow went. If you're here for winter fun, this may be like a slap in the face. But, there are strong westerly trade winds that whisk through the mountains and basically clean out most of the snow along the major highways in Jasper. Along the Yellowhead Highway, the Athabasca River is flanked by sand dunes that are deposited by these winds. As powdery snow is much lighter than sand, the same winds make short work of any wintery look to the scenery. Yet all you have to do is get off the highways and venture back into the forests to find all the deeper snow you'll need for a great snowshoeing experience. When you look at the maps of Jasper in the winter, you'll see myriad roads and trails that have been groomed for crosscountry skiers, and in fact, may be offlimits to snowshoers. However, in some cases you can still snowshoe on these trails if you simply walk alongside the groomed tracks. Plus, there are other great spots to snowshoe to where no one else can go. Below are a handful of snowshoe locations to explore in Jasper National Park.

4.2-km round-trip trail suitable for a family outing. The trail head is located nine kilometres south of the start of Highway 93 on the south end of town. This quaint little trail will take you over a mixed forested hill and down past a frozen streambed cloaked in frosted willows. The path continues around the lakes, which should be easy enough even for your little snowshoers.

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seasonal depression. Yet snowshoeing is essentially just hiking on top of a layer of snow, allowing you to continue to explore Jasper's beautiful back country. It requires virtually no lessons because it's almost as simple as walking, unlike skiing or skating. Even trails you know well appear newly transformed under a delicate blanket of white. If you think Jasper is lifeless in the winter, maybe you simply haven't tried the right activity. To see gray jays fluttering through a canopy of fir, or elk moving silently through a stand of spruce, you need to be quiet. The crowds at Marmot Basin or the roar of a snowmobile engine will drive away most wildlife, but activities like snowshoeing and cross-country skiing will enable you to stealthily get into the back country. Once you are away from all the din and back among the crystallized mountains and streams, you'll find a peaceful crisp world cloaked in winter.

A N E N I V

R

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// Jared Bernard

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Valley of the Five Lakes: Here is an easy

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

SNOW ZONE 35


SNOW ZONE

ADVERTORIAL

SNOW ZONE // WORLD CUP

JASPER’S COOLEST WINTER ADVENTURES The list of amazing winter adventures in Jasper is endless which is why getting in touch with the passionate team of tour specialists at SunDog Tour Co. is the best way to get started in planning your Canadian Rocky Mountain getaway. Based in Jasper, Alberta, SunDog Tour Co.’s team of dedicated travel experts and knowledgeable interpretive guides live, work and play in this beautiful mountain community and once you visit the town, it will be easy to see why they call it home. If you are a family seeking an affordable outing, a couple looking for a romantic escape or a group of friends seeking an exciting adventure, our team specialize in crafting a customized tour packages based on your interests and activity levels. Our services also include organizing your accommodation in Jasper and transportation by luxury bus or private vehicle to and from the Calgary or Edmonton International Airports. To whet your appetite for adventure, imagine journeying to the deepest accessible canyon in Jasper National Park in our Maligne Valley Ice Walk Tour. You will be surrounded by towering frozen waterfalls and stunning ice formations as our guides escort you along the frozen surface of the Maligne River as it winds through the Maligne Canyon. You will be dazzled and amazed as you take in breathtaking scenery and learn about the Maligne Valley. If a more relaxed sightseeing tour with plenty of opportunity for taking in beautiful scenery is more your speed, we strongly suggest our popular HalfDay Train Journey. You can sit back and enjoy the majestic views of the Canadian Rockies on Via Rail’s Skeena train which will transport you from Jasper along the shores of the mighty Fraser River and into British Columbia’s Robson Valley. Upon arrival in Dunster, British Columbia you will be greeted by your guide and embark into a waiting bus for your return journey to Jasper. On this portion of the tour, you will visit Rearguard Falls, famous for being the easternmost waterfall which the salmon ascend during their journey from the Pacific Ocean to their spawning grounds; and Mount Robson, the tallest mountain in the Canadian Rockies at 3954 metres (12,970 feet). Each stops offers incredible

36 SNOW ZONE

photo opportunities and your guide will provide information on the local history, geology, and ecology of the region. Our Dog Sledding Adventure Tour is one of our most popular winter excursions and if you have ever dreamed of driving a team of sled-dogs in a pristine alpine valley, you don’t need to wait a moment longer. Your adventure begins with a scenic, 90-minute drive through the Yellowhead pass en route to your dog sled experience. You have the opportunity of driving your own team of 6 to 8 dogs, or you can opt to keep warm in a blanket and allow someone else to do the driving. Wildlife abounds in Jasper National Park – in the town of Jasper, elk roam the streets! – and there is no better opportunity for viewing animals in their natural habitat than joining our Wildlife Discovery Tour. Prior to the commencement of the tour your guide will be in contact with the wardens at Jasper National Park to determine the optimal locations for spotting wildlife. Be sure to bring your camera as you embark in a comfortable vehicle and search for bear, elk, deer, moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, wolves, coyote and eagles. The Snowshoeing Tour offer an exciting way to discover Jasper National Park in winter. Your guide will offer instruction on snowshoeing techniques and will provide narration as you explore the wilderness, search for animal tracks and listen for the winter song of the chickadee. Make SunDog Tour Co. your choice for adventure and travel when visiting Jasper. We are the only transportation and sightseeing tour company in Jasper National Park that offers daily service between Edmonton and Jasper, as well as between Calgary and Jasper with stops in Lake Louise and Banff along the way. We also offer shuttle service from your accommodation in Jasper to the local ski hills – contact our travel specialists who can assist with accommodation and ski packages. Let the experts at SunDog Tour Co. help you organize every detail of your adventure in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Don’t miss out on any of the exciting adventures we have planned for you in Jasper this winter! www.sundogtours.com

The road to Sochi Jan Hudec takes his races one at a time

Y

ou might say alpine ski so close to the start of the cirracer Jan Hudec has be- cuit, since it sets a good preccome the poster boy for the edent for the rest of the races to come. Lake Louise World Cup. "For me, it's always been reFor the Calgary native, who defected from Czechoslovakia ally important to do well [at to Canada with his parents as a Lake Louise], just kind of set child, the event marks a yearly the mood for the rest of the homecoming where he can be season," Hudec says. "You kind of feel the reunited pressure to with the Until Sun, Dec 8 do somefamily and Lake Louise, AB thing there, friends he's winterstartevents.com and for me grown up with. This year, it also means it would be huge because I've he's able to check in on his got a lot on the line and I've recently opened eyeglass and put a lot of work into the busioptometrist store, Bankers ness and into skiing this year, Vision, for the first time. And and it would be nice to have a perhaps most importantly, little icing on the cake." it's the place he's experienced As he progresses onto some of his best career mo- more difficult tracks in Beaver ments: the 32-year-old has ex- Creek, Colorado next week, perienced three Top 10 World Hudec has another major race Cup finishes at Lake Louise on the horizon beyond the in the past nine years—more World Cup, as he prepares to than any other stop on the cir- travel to Sochi, Russia for the cuit. In 2007, he even became Olympics in 2014. Juggling the first Canadian to win the preparations for two major downhill event at the Lake races, as well as the work asLouise World Cup. sociated of his new store, has With so much going for him been all consuming for the skihere, it's understandable that er, who says he has little time Lake Louise is Hudec's favou- for anything else. rite stop on the FIS Alpine Ski "It's definitely kept me out of World Cup circuit. In a way, trouble, but kept me out of a he's fortunate to have the race lot of fun, too. I haven't really

had the most enjoyable summer," he says with a chuckle. "It's been just busy and stressful, but I got to spend lots of time with my son and it was nice to be home."

While many might assume the Olympics would take centre stage for an athlete, Hudec maintains he's taking things one race at a time. It's a good mindset for someone like him, whose history with injuries have often upset his plans for the season. Thankfully, although he admits his knees are often a bit sore since he's "definitely older," Hudec is feeling good this year and is confident about returning to Lake Louise. "The Olympics [are] always on the radar, but it's a pretty small blip on the radar right now," he says. "I think for me, the most important thing is focusing from race to race, and that's kind of how I've always been. I have to focus basically day by day and make sure everything is set for that day and just put down the best performance I can and then start worrying about the next day." ALANA WILLERTON

ALANA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

HART GOLBECK // HART@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Resort deals are in the cards

The marketing staff at mountain resorts have been busy tweaking deals over the summer months and trying to increase the number of visitors on the slopes this winter. The result of this is better deals for skiers and boarders as well as easier access to lift passes. A new My Marmot Card is free and really simplifies your lift access. Lift tickets can be purchased online at 10 percent off and are directly linked to your card. When you arrive at the resort, go to the lift, get scanned and you are good to go for the day. If you head to the hills more than once each season, then a ski-pass card is definitely the way to go. All that's left to decide is which resort, or group of resorts, you prefer to frequent this winter. Considering fullday adult passes are generally

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

$80 and up, these cards really make sense. The Sunshine Marmot Card is $84.95—plus, your first, fourth and seventh days are free after purchase. There are many more savings with this card, including $25 off Tuesdays and Thursdays for the entire season, except holidays. The card can now be purchased online through skibanff.com. The RCR Rockies Card represents four resorts including Fernie, Kimberley, Nakiska and Kicking Horse. It costs $89.95 and has many additional savings attached, including $30 off every time you go and discounts at local hills like Snow Valley and Rabbit Hill. The Lake Louise Plus Card costs a little more at $99, but it is good at five resorts: Lake Louise, Castle Mountain, Panorama, Revelstoke Mountain Resort and Schweitzer Mountain down south just

across the Idaho border. This card has many other specials such as daily $30 discounts at four cat-skiing and heli-skiing operations. Purchasing any of these cards can be done online on each resort's individual website. You must be a Western Canadian resident to qualify. If you're just planning to go for a few days this year your best bet may be getting a hotel package deal. At the Sawridge Inn in Jasper you can get a room, breakfast and a lift ticket for $132 on weekdays. There is a similar deal at the Marmot Lodge, including lunch on the hill, but this deal expires on December 19. Your best bet is to go online and check out all of the hotels because all the specials are uniquely different and you should be able to find one that's made to fit for your schedule and wallet.


COVER // ART BERGMANN

MUSIC

MUSIC EDITOR : EDEN MUNRO EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

What the future holds

Art Bergmann's plan to get back on the political soundstage

Fri, Nov 29 (8 pm) With A Bunch of Marys, Ben Disaster Pawn Shop, $15

"There's a man that you should see/A Generation X Bukowski/Who knows about life/The life imitating art." -Lowest of the Low, "Life Imitates Art"

B

y the time Ron Hawkins of Lowest of the Low wrote those lines to his Art Bergmann tribute in 1996, the Vancouver singer-songwriter was already a bona fide legend to a large group of Canadian musicians and fellow travellers. He was also on his way down, laid low by substance-abuse issues and a brutal throat-cutting by a vicious music industry. This despite Bergmann having just won a Juno Award Best Alternative Rock Album for his Sony debut, What Fresh Hell Is This, plus glowing acclaim for a series of smart, scabrous and often hilarious singles that made the Can-rock indie bands of the time look like hopeless amateurs. In a just world that's not how the story should have gone, but in retrospect you have to wonder what any of us were thinking, that a man who not only wrote but lived out songs like "Crawl With Me" and "Guns & Heroin" was ever going to make it in the Top 10. This is an old story, after all, and Bergmann isn't the only one to live it out. Now 60 years old, Bergmann and his wife Sherri live on a farm about 20 minutes outside of Calgary. It's a decent deal for the couple, who have little in the way of resources beyond a monthly disability check. Rent is dirt cheap and they're able to get by on very little. "Winter's coming up, though, and propane is expensive," Bergmann

/// Alex Waterhouse-Hayward

sighs. "It's strange; a friend I hadn't seen in 20 years recently pulled up out of the blue with his wife and three kids. They live in a school bus and they've been off the grid for 10 years. They're very self-sufficient, and their kids are so strong and smart. I'm kinda embarrassed at how useless I am at functioning without the power grid." An odd thing to hear from someone who has not only lived on the margins but has celebrated it in song. For those of you just dialing into the story, Bergmann was among the most revered in the early Canadian punk scene. His band the Young Canadians (formerly the K-Tels; you can guess why they had to change it) didn't stick around long, but its effect was galvanizing on kids looking for something outside the twin monoliths of classic rock and disco in the late '70s, early '80s. There were two EPs and a single ("Hawaii") that still resonates, later collected on the No Escape compilation from 1996. Bergmann went on to play in a few other Vancouver bands, but really made his mark in the mid '80s when his band Poisoned decided to nip potential legal trouble in the bud by releasing its first album, Crawl With Me, under Bergmann's name. "Bound for Vegas," from 1990's

Sexual Roulette, gave Bergmann his first Canadian hit, which led to a record deal with Polygram. An album later and he skipped over to Sony for 1995's What Fresh Hell Is This, but while Bergmann had decent sales, it wasn't enough; the record company turfed him, and from there the singer went into what we'll call the Wilderness Years.

Oh sure, there were gigs and the occasional re-release, an acoustic album re-recording songs from his three solo albums (1998's Design Flaw), even some reunions with Poisoned, but Bergmann had, for many, become the ghost on the road that Hawkins had written about. Hard years living the life he wrote about had taken its toll. He's been bothered by arthritis so fierce that he has trouble standing up. His most recent "comeback" was kick-started when Bergmann and his wife travelled to Vancouver last summer to see her ailing father. In order to make some money for the return trip back home, Bergmann assented to a Canada Day show at the WISE Hall with members of his old touring band: drummer Adam Drake and bassist Kevin Lucks, alongside ex-Odds guitarist Steven Drake.

Check out the YouTube videos online; the band is tight, and while Bergmann's fragility was such that at points he needed to make use of a stool, he's still playing guitar and wisecracking like old. "It sold out," says Bergmann with some gratification. "The one we did after also sold out, so it's obvious that there are people who still want to see me. I figure I'm going to do this instead of being bored to death, as Leonard Cohen said when he saw the paperwork showing that he was ripped off and broke. I have to go out and sing. It's hard on me, but the response has been great." Bergmann remains a very sharp guy with an excellent sense of humour. He's spent the past 10 years reading, mostly on radical politics, and keeping up on world events. His conversation is sprinkled with astute insights, and he especially comes alive when discussing history. He barely drinks now, saying that just a couple will knock him out. The two shows he's played in the past six months have galvanized him to try more. "It would be nice to supplement our earnings with these gigs, but the problem is how do you find your people? I have a small name

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

and I can probably play across Canada, but I would like to go farther," Bergmann adds. He hopes to do some recording in the next little while, even though he has zero budget. Bergmann has a lot of fans among musicians, though, and a lot of favours to call in. "I've got a bunch of new material which addresses what I've been talking about—radical politics," he says. "I've been writing notes and lists on the margins of books I've been reading over the last decade. I've got a lot of collating and editing to do, but I figure there are at least five or six world anthems in them." The short Western Canadian tour he'll be embarking on could be considered a test run of sorts. Bergmann wants to make this a habit, but he also knows he has to pace himself. "I probably won't be able to play again by winter, and I want to work on demos. I've got some great ideas for songs," he says mischievously. "One is called 'Drones of Democracy;' you can guess what that's about." He sings. "'My name is nobody, but you can call me the enemy. Kill my home and family, I'm asleep in your democracy, waiting to be told when to explode."

TOM MURRAY

TOM@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MUSIC 37


MUSIC PREVUE // JAZZ

PREVUE // PSYCH-GARAGE-ROCK-SOUL

The Lad Mags

Sandro Dominelli I

Band on the run // Fish Griwkowsky

'S

omeone played me a record- degree made the time commitment ing that they weren't sup- impossible. She hand-picked her posed to," Amelia Aspen recalls, "of successor, Ashley Hollands.) this beautiful old-timey heartbreak torch song that Roz [Christian] At the very least, most bands less wrote and recorded in her bed- than a year old don't have this sort room. And I went mental, I loved it of bustle. The Lad Mags are releasing a two-song EP on the heels of so much." a month-earlier At that point two-song EP, in 2012, neither Sat, Nov 30 (9 pm) Aspen nor Chris- With the Famines, Haunted which itself was tian were making Souls coming on the Wunderbar, $10 heels of a jaunt music. down to New "We started talkYork, which, uning about starting something incorporating some of expectedly, came on the heels of a our shared musical interests; Mo- western tour. "We actually found out days betown, '60s girl groups and scrappy garage rock," Aspen explains via fore our tour with Betrayers that we had been accepted to showcase email. The pair drew up a list of their ide- at CMJ in New York, which was al bandmates, and all of those peo- pretty incredible," Aspen says. "The ple said yes. Now assembled into timing was nuts, though. We basithe Lad Mags, the group seems to cally finished our last show of the be slipping into a particular psyche- tour in Victoria and immediately delic, soul-group-meets-monster- headed to the opposite side of the mash groove. (Though that said, continent to just barely make it to Christian's no longer in the band; our showcase in time. The airline the demands of pursuing a musical also lost all our instruments. That

38 MUSIC

was neat." The instrument hassle ultimately cost the band only sleep, thanks to a baggage-claim employee willing to get sassy with the people in Seattle. And while in NY, the band had the chance to record at MetroSonic studios, the results of which have already been released on the band's Halloween EP. "The Black Lips record there," Aspen writes. "And also, like, Chromeo and Moby and other people, but ... the Black Lips!" All the running around's earned the band some notice across the pond, too: a few days ago, the band posted a studio shot of them singing backup vocals in a studio for a "surprise UK band." Aspen's tightlipped about the details, though. She doesn't want to jinx anything. "When I got the email asking us to collaborate I thought it was a joke," she says. "I still think it is too good to be true, and I don't want to blow it, so my lips are sealed."

PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

f you caught the Sandro Dominelli Trio Rudresh Mahanthappa and Vijay Iyer, back in 2010 when it celebrated the fronts his own bands, produces other release of its award-winning album The artists and works extensively with his Alvo Sessions at the Yardbird Suite, you wife, award-winning singer Kiran Ahluwalia. In this light, might have wondered subsequently Fri, Nov 29 and Sat, Nov 30 (8 pm) the trio's convergence on the Yardwhen you would Yardbird Suite bird stage borders get to see the group $20 (members), $24 (guests) on the miraculous. again in a live set"I could have ting. So has Sandro booked myself a gig with anyone, but Dominelli. Not that the Edmonton-based band the Yardbird really wanted us to come leader and composer has been sitting back. They didn't have to twist my arm around waiting for his phone to ring, too hard," Dominelli says. "There's good being the first-call drummer for local communication between us as a group, and touring jazzers here in town and a on a musical level and on a personal sought-after session player nationally. level. We're all at the same place in our It just took three years to get back in lives. We share a lot of music experithe same room with his acclaimed col- ences, even though we've lived in difleagues, guitarist Rez Abbasi and bass- ferent places, I think all of that is presist Chris Tarry, who are both based in ent when we play together." Dominelli says the gigs will draw on New York. But it shall finally come to pass that the trio will reunite for two material from The Alvo Sessions, with some new songs and contributions nights at the Yardbird Suite. "The Yardbird is a pretty in-demand from Tarry and Abbasi's songbooks to place. To get a gig there, you have to round out the repertoire. Whatever really book in advance. We might have they play, the trio's astonishing chops been working on this for the last two and telepathic rapport will be on full years," Dominelli says. "To be honest, display. Expect the gently impressioniswe were planning to do another re- tic and the downright groovy but, most cord. Then all this other stuff started of all, expect the unexpected. "In a trio setting, you have to work in to happen, so the recording is not going to pan out, but we are going to be a different way—there's a lot of openness," Dominelli says. "I find you're able to play." Other stuff that happened includes not so much an accompanist as a lead Dominelli and his wife having a child voice, even on the drums. There's lots and, a year ago, opening the Dominelli of room to explore." If that's not quite enough Sandro School of Music in north Edmonton. On top of his busy playing schedule, Domi- Dominelli for you, he'll also man the nelli works as a recording engineer and skins at the Yardbird the following teaches at MacEwan University. Bass- weekend, December 6 and 7, for an ist Tarry, known to many for his work all-star tribute to the music of Joe Henwith Canadian fusion powerhouse derson, featuring Craig and Jim Brenan Metalwood, topped up his calendar by on trombone and sax respectively, completing his MFA in Creative Writing trumpeter Bob Tildesley, pianist Chris at UBC and publishing short fiction on Andrew and bassist Josh McHan. the side. Guitarist Abbasi, noted for his SCOTT LINGLEY SCOTT@VUEWEEKLY.COM alliance with American Indo-Pak jazzers

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


PREVUE // SONGWRITER

PREVUE // ROCK

Basia Bulat

Rick Reid T

he last time Rick Reid was in town pressing question. "We'll likely be rethings didn't quite pan out as they cording with Jesse Gander, and we have plans to play a show here in early 2014, were supposed to. The singer for Eternal Husbands— whenever Matt can get here." and immediate antecedents City Streets—was stoked on showing off Kicking the demon booze has made Reid healthier, haphis latest band pier, and raring to with bassist and Fri, Nov 29 (9 pm) get back at playing constant collabora- With Catgut, Morals music again. tor Matt Leddy at Wunderbar, $7 "It wasn't an evWunderbar to his eryday thing, it was Edmonton friends in late September. Living in Montréal, like a touring thing, and it just caught where they had moved from Edmon- up with us," he admits. "I have no idea ton a few years ago, they had accumu- how much longer we could have kept lated a batch of new songs after City up that lifestyle, including sleeping on Streets drummer Mark Chmilar left to floors. The money we save from not drinking will help us buy hotel rooms." go back to school. While Leddy is finishing up school in The gig never happened, however, due to Reid suffering a nervous break- Montréal Reid will be gigging as much as possible, so watch for him in as many down. Leddy went back to Montréal, where musical permutations as he can put tohe signed on to work at a volunteer or- gether. The Wunderbar show will be ganization, while Reid sought out help, half solo, half as a duo with drummer removing himself from the late-night Steven James of Whiskeyface, and Reid party milieu. It was the last anyone assures that it won't be the standard expected to hear from either for some solo turn with acoustic. "It'll be electric, it will definitely rock. time, except that suddenly, there's Rick Reid walking the streets of Edmonton, And don't worry," he hastily assures. "I once again making it his homebase for won't be drinking, but everyone else is invited to." the next while. "Eternal Husbands is still a going con- TOM MURRAY TOM@VUEWEEKLY.COM cern," says Reid, addressing the most

Nary a shadow to be seen // Caroline Desilets

he cover of Tall Tall Shadow about that a lot these days." Tall Tall Shadow was recorded presents Basia Bulat's face in profile, cast in whites and greys in the wake of large personal loss. against a stark, encircling dark- In its aftermath, Bulat notes, "the ness. Eyes closed songs I was and mouth firmly Sat, Nov 30 (8 pm) working on drawn, her face is With Evening Hymns didn't feel right difficult to read, Avenue Theatre, $20 (advance), at that time. letting the lighting $24 (door) And I just wantpull focus instead. It ed to start over suggests the chiarand see what oscuro contrast at play throughout might happen, if I was writing from the songwriter's third album: the a place where I wasn't thinking." The precise results of that process, swells and crests of emotion that carry lows within them, and vice she notes, are difficult to pin down. versa. Some songs seem like they're Shadow's shift in style from Bulat's raging, mournfully, against a dying previous albums is subtle, not tectonic. light; others are "It just feels joyful eruptions I think the whole record like the way of celebrations, in spite of it all. is really about light and I'm singing them and "I chose Tall Tall shadow, and has these the way I'm Shadow as the moments [of the two] writing," she title track," Bulat says, "and put co-existing together, and continues, "I wasn't really that song on the album, because contrasting each other, all writing in the same way as the whole rethe time. sit down and cord, little pieces try to work of the record, are in that song. And I think the whole something out on paper. It was play record is really about light and an instrument, and as you're playshadow, and has these moments [of ing, see what you might start singthe two] co-existing together, and ing. It was that kind of thing. Just contrasting each other, all the time. have the tape recorder on and see It can be like that in the lyrics. I'm re- what happens. alizing that now, as I'm talking about it: sometimes I can repeat the same Bulat also found herself searchline—I think I did, anyways—and ing for "a room with character" just the way that you sing some- to record parts of the album in, thing, you can see it from two very somewhere in Toronto. Something different places. I think I'm thinking outside a traditional studio en-

vironment, which she eventually found in an old Legion building. "I probably visited every legion in the city," she laughs. "Other kinds of halls, churches, cabins, all sorts of different kinds of rooms. But when I walked in the Beaches Legion, there was already a jazz band playing on the stage, sort of a lunch-time jazz concert, and it sounded so great in that room."

PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

(780) 441-3666

T

MUSIC 39


MUSIC PREVUE // EXPERIMENTAL

Death By Robot

Exterminate! Exterminate!

L

ocal music collective Death By but the band will still receive the Robot is feeling the effects of its odd message when a fan hears the newfound notosong on air. "I had riety since being Fri, Nov 29 (9 pm) people calling me named Band of With Sister Grey, the Fronts, going, 'Oh my God, the Month by lo- the Unfortunates I heard you on the cal radio station Starlite Room radio. Is this really SONiC 102.9. Inhappening?'" terviews have been stacking up and Death By Robot has been around the band's single "Blue Skies" has since 2010, when multi-instrumenbeen receiving steady radio play. talist and graphic artist Jeremy Pud"The first day when they announced lowski sought an outlet to combine it, it was just crazy," recalls lead gui- his interests in music and digital tarist Colton Pudlowski, noting the design. He eventually added Colton texts have slowed down a little bit, and Greg Tkach to the roster, and

the trio released three recordings before officially adopting the moniker Death By Robot prior to releasing Silently They Came in November 2011. The album marked the beginning of the band's direction towards sci-fi subject matter and style as it worked to defy genre constraints, creating music it felt relied more on feeling and narrative than sonic style. The Life Machine, an EP released in April, is Death By Robot's first professionally recorded disc and is an observation of the excess, loneliness and frustration present in Western society. It is also the first recording to include bassist Nathan Woodward, and trumpet player and vocalist Raine Radke recently joined the group as well. "I'm not going to lie, in the beginning I didn't think it would work out as well as it has. The style of music was totally foreign to me," Woodward says, adding the band had originally been more folk based than its current experimental rock form. "I was always in punk bands and stuff like that, but it worked out really well because the whole point of Death By Robot, especially with Jeremy, is just making songs that sound good, so it doesn't really matter if I'm folky or not. As

long as I can make something that sounds good, that's kind of like the modus operandi of our band." Death By Robot has plans in the works to release a new full-length album in 2014. For now, fans have a video game to keep them entertained. Jeremy teaches at Guru Digital Arts college and designed the classic Super Mario-esque project during his involvement with the video game course offered there. "Each of the five levels is supposed to tie into the five tracks on The Life Machine EP, so as you go through the levels you can see the theme changes a little bit," Colton explains, noting it's incredibly difficult—he's only mastered the first two levels. A project such as this is also a reflection of Death By Robot's drive to bring another element to listeners, whether it be through recorded music or live performances. "We really try, especially live, to bring in a little more theatrical elements, " he adds. "We never play a show and just think we'll play the music and that'll be good enough. We always try to take it to another level."

MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Om Unit / Thu, Nov 28 (7:30 pm) Electronic artist Jim Coles has produced under numerous aliases throughout the years: Phillip D Kick, 2tall, the Dream Continuum and now Om Unit, a reflection of the spiritual symbol attached to ambient compositions. (Twist Ultra Lounge)

Bardic Form / Fri, Nov 29 (7:30 pm) An acoustic duo mixing classical, flamenco, traditional western and European folk and metal—you know you’re intrigued. (Shell Theatre, $31 – $34)

MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Barney Bentall / Fri, Nov 29 (8 pm) A night of good old roots music from Barney Bentall & The Grand Cariboo Opry, plus a chance to help out the Edmonton Food Bank. (Avenue Theatre, $20 advance, $25 at the door)

Display of Decay / Fri, Nov 29 (9 pm) The local metalheads are releasing a new album, Outbreak of Destruction—and really want you to hear it. (Rendezvous Pub, $10)

10425 Whyte Ave.

40 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

David Myles / Fri, Nov 29 (8 pm) He lands somewhere on the stylistic spectrum between James Taylor and Justin Timberlake, which means a night of vintage pop meets modern beats. (St Basil’s Cultural Centre, $18 advance, $22 at the door)


PREVUE // METAL

High on Fire 'W

e're still here; we're ready to kick which wraps up on December 12 in Los ass again," laughs Jeff Matz, bass Angeles, and while a new album is a ways player for the metal trio High on Fire—ex- off at this point, High on Fire has a couple cept he's completely serious. of releases to tide fans over: a limited-ediHe's talking about "Slave to the Hive," tion seven-inch, along with Spitting Fire the band's latest single and first new Live, the band's first official live recording. That is, aside from release since De Wed, Dec 4 (8 pm) Vermis Mysteriis in Live From the ReWith Kvelertak 2012. lapse Contamination Starlite Room, $22 Festival in 2005, but "There's been a lot of stuff going on in Matz doesn't feel it the last year, so it was a good reason for was the best representation of the band us to come together and get the creative or its aggressive live show. juices flowing again," adds Matz, as he waits for a train in New Jersey during the Spitting Fire Live was recorded during a band's first day off on its current tour. "It's two-evening headlining stint at New York a pretty balls-out, aggressive, very High on City's Bowery Ballroom and Music Hall of Fire sort of song." Williamsburg and includes a smattering of Right now the band's focus is the tour, tracks from High on Fire's previous releas-

es. The intent was to capture the ferocity of the band's energetic live performances rather than a calculated studio album. "The goal is to try to be as natural about it as possible, but when you know that your performance is going to be on record and be released, you can't help but approach it a little bit differently," Matz says, admitting his go-to solution for calming nerves used to be alcohol, but he and band mate Matt Pike are laying off the sauce these days. Now he turns to meditation and breathing exercises to get him into a more mellow head space before going on stage. "I think I play a lot better now. You know, I don't go on stage with a buzz on anymore. Between Matt and I not drinking anymore the performances were a lot tighter and it's just generally easier to get shit done when you don't wake up feeling like garbage all the time."

NOV. 29 & 30 • DOUG STROUD SUNDAY CELTIC MUSIC 5 - 8PM DEC. 2 • JAY GILDAY WEDNESDAY • OPEN STAGE W/ DUFF ROBISON

MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

LIVE MUSIC AT “THE ROSE”

ANDREW SCOTT NOVEMBER 29 & 30

LYLE HOBBS DECEMBER 6 & 7

In Sutton Place Hotel #195, 10235 101 Street, EDMONTONPUBS.COM

DOWNTOWN

Nov 28 - Nov 30 ROB TAYLOR Dec 3 - Dec 7 ANDREW SCOTT

WEM

Nov 28 - Nov 30 STU BENDALL Dec 3 - Dec 7 JOANNE JANZEN SUNDAY NIGHT KARAOKE

NOW OPEN

CAMPUS

Nov 28 - Nov 30 JOANNE JANZEN Dec 4 - Dec 7 MIKE LETTO

EDMONTONPUBS.COM Colleen’s Amber Ale now available at all pub locations. $0.50 from each pint sold will be donated to Ovarian Cancer Research in memory of Colleen Tomchuk.

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

MUSIC 41


3.75” wide version WHAT ARE THEY GOOD FOR? ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING.

Motörhead Aftershock (UDR)

12345 Customizable and secure. From storage to workspace. Steel containers from 8' to 53'. 20' & 40' skids with optional 4' landings available. Mount with twist locks.

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Rocking full bore into geriatrics, Motörhead can still blow you off the floor with its everything-louder-than-everything-else sound, but the mainstream stopped caring long ago about Lemmy and those two other guys, and Aftershock feels just like its title: not the house-rattling force that changed your life, but a rumbling reminder. This band will never change. So like every one of its releases for the past 20 years, the songs either stand as mirror images of the classics or are utterly forget-

Black Sabbath Live ... Gathered In Their Masses (Universal) 

Four of the tracks on the three-quarter-reunited Black Sabbath's new live album—a companion that arrives alongside a concert film—come from 13, the

table. Luckily, this album leans more towards the former. "End of Time" has the speed and power to make you wish you could survive solely on Marlboros and Jack Daniel's, but at this point, Lemmy could just repeat the phrase "Motörhead song, Motörhead song" and we'd be happy. Sometimes doing the same thing for 30 years is sad, but when it's as honest and consistent as Motörhead, there's no reason to beef. Despite having heard it all before, there's a slow-burning satisfaction to this record. Lemmy is the main attraction, but it's Phil Campell's riffs that keep it afloat and Mikkey Dee is a flat-out amazing drummer. "Lost Woman Blues" is a paint-by-numbers chord progression and "Silence" could possibly be the most irrelevant song you've ever heard, yet numbers like "Paralyzed" double kick their way into your heart. Awesome simply for existing in 2013, this, the band's 21st studio album, might pull in a couple of the youngsters who never knew any better, but for the most part it's a fansonly banger. LEE BOYES

LEE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

group's first studio album in several decades, and in some ways those songs are the highlights on this concert set. Where the studio record was overlong and suffered from a sameness in sound, here the chosen new songs assert themselves impressively, with the band showing off a muscular sound—it's singer Ozzy Osbourne who is the weak link, though he sounds more by-the-numbers than bad. Beyond those four songs, though, the album features a roundup of the same Sabbath classics that always seem to make appearances— "Iron Man," "Paranoid," "Black Sabbath" and more (the video version includes a few more as well, though it's still slim on deep cuts)—so there's not much in the way of surprises or excitement to be found here.

Raleigh Sun Grenades & Grenadine Skies (Independent) 

Raleigh is a warm blast of fresh air, like a chinook wind pushing out the cold and grey in the band's native Calgary. The group's second LP, Sun Grenades & Grenadine Skies is gorgeously arranged and musically complex, best exemplified by Clea Anaïs' sweeping cello and Brock Geiger's tight rock 'n' roll guitar on the standout track "Pen That." Raleigh, formed by the Dudes' bassist Geiger, Anaïs and Axis of Conversation drummer Matt Doherty, is a rare kind of folk-pop outfit. Anaïs's cello adds layers of texture and complexity on meditative tracks like "Fresco" and "Puritan" and brightens up what would be traditional rock songs like "China Flowers." Raleigh straddles so many lines— between rock, folk, pop with just a hint of jazz-like experimentation underneath—and the music the band makes is alternately optimistic and melancholic, but it's always cinematic. JORDYN MARCELLUS

JORDYN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Raleigh plays Wunderbar Wednesday, December 4.

on

EDEN MUNRO

EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Four IN 140 Nashboro, I Heard the Angels Singing (Nashboro) @VueWeekly: If the pieces of this I've heard say anything, it is: there is some serious power in this gospel label. Timeless.

Milosh, Jetlag (Deadly) @VueWeekly: So intimate & alluring it nearly feels awkward to be dropping in. Cloudy R&B for your winter.

Shearwater, Fellow Travelers (Sub Pop) @VueWeekly: Nice enough dedication to touring friends, Shearwater really hits the spot when it strum its own song.

Billie Joe + Norah, Foreverly (Warner) @VueWeekly: A tender recreation of should-be classics. Beautiful melodies & lovely harmonies all over this throwback album.

42 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


MUSIC

WEEKLY

EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

THU NOV 28 ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE Live Music every

Thu; this week: River City Hustlers

ARTERY Jon Bryant with

Sykamore; 7:30pm

AVENUE THEATRE Shane

Philip, guests

BAILEY THEATRE –

RED PIANO Every Thu: Dueling pianos at 8pm

CASINO EDMONTON LA

RENDEZVOUS No More Moments/Abuse Of Substance/After The Prophet/Puzzled Minds

CASINO YELLOWHEAD

RICHARDS’S PUB The

Normals

Kabaret Burlesk: The Lake Of Fire; 9:30pm

RIC’S GRILL Peter Belec

DV8 Tighten Up! Club

(jazz); most Thursdays; 7-10pm

THE RIG Every Thu Jam

THE BOWER Thu: Back to

Mine: Hip hop, funk, soul, rare groove, disco and more with Junior Brown and DJ Mumps

BRIXX Hosted by Christian

and Justin of the Canyon Rose Outfit: The Ultimate open stage, open jam, open turntables E: kevin@ starliteroom.ca for info BRIXX BAR Last minute

show: Rykka and Shane Phillips

CAFÉ HAVEN Music

every Thu: this week with Rebecca Lappa, Jake Ian; 7pm CARROT COFFEEHOUSE

Zoomers Thu afternoon open mic; 1-4pm THE COMMON Russ

Dawson, East Pacific Rise

COOK COUNTY Pony

Up Thu: Country, Rock Anthems and Top 40 Classics with Mourning Wood

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

every Thu at 9pm

EARLY STAGE SALOON– Stony Plain Open Jam

Nights; no cover

EXPRESSIONZ CAFE

Suzuki Flute & Recorder Society Concert; 6-8pm

STARLITE ROOM Said

Open stage with Micheal Gress (fr Self Evolution); every Thu; 9pm-2am WUNDERBAR Triple

KELLY’S PUB Jameoke

Night, karaoke with band the Nervous Flirts; every Thu, 8pm-12am

L.B.’S PUB Thu open

stage: the New Big Time with Rocko Vaugeois, friends; 8-12

MYER HOROWITZ New

Edmonton Wind Sinfonia; 7:30pm

NAKED CYBERCAFÉ Thu

open stage; 8pm; all ages (15+)

NEW WEST HOTEL

Canadian Country Hall of Fame Guest host Bev Munro NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by Wild Rose

Old Time Fiddlers every Thu; contact John Malka 780.447.5111

OLD STRATHCONA PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE rEvolve CD

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: wtft w djwtf–

rock ‘n’ roll, blues, indie; Wooftop: The Night with No Name featuring DJs Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests playing tasteful, eclectic selections CENTURY ROOM Lucky 7:

ON THE ROCKS Mustard

Smile; 9pm

OVERTIME Sherwood Park Dueling Pianos, all

request live; 9pm-2am every Fri and Sat; no cover

PAWN SHOP Art

THE COMMON The

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

RED PIANO BAR Hottest dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Fri; 9pm-2am

Common Uncommon Thursday: Rotating Guests each week!

every Thu; 9pm

ELECTRIC RODEO– Spruce Grove DJ every

Thu

FILTHY MCNASTY’S

Taking Back Thursdays KRUSH ULTRA LOUNGE

Open stage; 7pm; no cover

RENDEZVOUS PUB

Display Of Decay “Outbreak of Infection” CD Release Extravaganza ROSE AND CROWN

hop and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Fri

LUCKY 13 Every Fri and

Sat with resident DJ Chad Cook

RED STAR Movin’ on Up:

indie, rock, funk, soul, hip hop with DJ Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson; every Fri

STARLITE ROOM KLUB

OMFG

Dubstep, house, trance, electro, hip hop breaks with DJ Aeiou, DJ Loose Beats, DJ Poindexter; 9:30pm (door)

SUITE 69 Release Your

Inner Beast: Retro and Top 40 beats with DJ Suco; every Fri

Y AFTERHOURS

Foundation Fridays

SAT NOV 30

RENDEZVOUS Metal night

UNION HALL 3 Four All Thursdays: rock, dance, retro, top 40 with DJ Johnny Infamous

FRI NOV 29 ARTERY Leina Deboer with

Lisa Marie, Jerry; 8pm

ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Dirty Seas AVENUE THEATRE Barney

Bentall’s Grand Caribbo Opry, Gold Rush All Stars, guests BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ The

THE RIG Duel Xhaust

GILL Dirty Seas

STARLITE ROOM

AVENUE THEATRE Basia

CAMPUS Joanne Janzen

BLUES ON WHYTE Every

Sat afternoon: Jam with Back Door Dan; Jk & The Static

“B” STREET BAR Rockin

Big Blues and Roots Open Jam: Every Sat afternoon, 2-6pm BOURBON ROOM Live

OVERTIME Sherwood

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE

Live music every Fri; Justine Vandergrift;all ages; 7:30pm; $5 (door)

of Many, One Music Tour; 9pm WUNDERBAR The

Famines with The Lad Mags and Haunted Souls

YARDBIRD SUITE Sandro Dominelli Trio; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $20 (member)/$24 (guest) at Ticketmaster.ca

Classical WINSPEAR Scheherazade;

8pm

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

BRIXX BAR Zodiac Series;

Hear’s to Your Health Concerts; 5-6pm; Free

18+; 9pm

WUNDERBAR Rick Reid,

Sat Open mic; 7pm; $2

Morals, Catgut

YARDBIRD SUITE Sandro

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE CASINO EDMONTON LA

Express; 9pm

WINSPEAR The Salvation

music every Fri

UNION HALL Shaggy - Out

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Smoked Folk; 9pm

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE

Damned: Goth/Industrial with DJs Siborg, Nightroad; 9pm

Strategy, with Eye of Horus and Kryosphere and with Netherland; 8pm; $15 (door)

DJs

Kabaret Burlesk: The Lake Of Fire; 9:30pm

BRIXX Silence Be

FOUNDATION Exit

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE

Classical

BRIXX BAR Five Years Further, Burning Daisy, Dirrrty Show and Electric Revival

STUDIO MUSIC

Sexyfine Return of Tomas Marsh

THE TAVERN The Glorious,

The Static

River City Review Student Showcase; 8pm; $10

Movember Canada Wrap up Party; 18+; 9pm

Music every Saturday Night: The Dryland Band Live; 8pm

CASINO YELLOWHEAD

BLUES ON WHYTE Jk &

RENDEZVOUS PUB

Dead Red Pine; 8pm

Dominelli Trio; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $20 (member)/$24 (guest) at Ticketmaster.ca

Carolines with Chloe Albert, Lesley Pelletier, and Katie Perman; 8:30pm-10:30pm

PAWN SHOP Christian

ATLANTIC TRAP AND

SHERLOCK HOLMES –

FOUNDATION Kingsland, Undertaker, Master Splinter, Snakepit, Higher & Higher & Guests; 18+ (no minors); $10; 8pm

request live; 9pm-2am every Fri and Sat; no cover

R.C.D.P With Sea Of Dead Serpents, With Guests TBA; 8pm-1:30am

Heath with Alfie Zappacosta & Braden Gates; 8:30pm10:30pm

THE STUDIO MUSIC

Park Dueling Pianos, all

ARTERY Trevor Tchir and

WEM Amie Weymes

every Thu

8pm

OVERTIME Sherwood

RED PIANO BAR Hottest dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Sat; 9pm2am

ON THE ROCKS Salsa

ft. Death By Robot w/ Sister Grey, The Fronts and The Unfortunates; 9pm

Booms; 9pm

ORTONA ROOM BEAMS;

UNION HALL Ladies Night

every Fri

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Rob

Wild Life Thursdays

O’BYRNE’S Live band

Hansen with Bleachers and Verttigo; 8pm

SHERLOCK HOLMES –

STARLITE ROOM B.O.T.M

Country jam every Sat; 3-6pm

TEMPLE Rapture–Goth/ Ind/alt; every Fri 9pm

DWNT Rob Taylor

SHERLOCK HOLMES –

NEW WEST HOTEL

ON THE ROCKS The Boom

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

LUCKY 13 Industry Night

Hawkers Market: Jaycie Jayce and Nik 7 of Shout Out Out Out Out and Normals Welcome; 5pm; $10 (adv), $15 (door)

LOUNGE Amplified Fridays:

every Fri

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Funk

MERCER WAREHOUSE

every Sat, 3-7pm; DJ every Sat, 9:30pm

CENTRE Full Moon Folk

Bunker Thursdays

Suchy Sister Saturdays: Amber, Renee or Stephanie with accompaniment; 9:30-11:30pm; no cover

SOU KAWAII ZEN

ST BASIL’S CULTURAL

Club: David Myles; 8pm

LEAF BAR AND GRILL

LOUISIANA PURCHASE

Bulat, Evening Hymns, guests; 8pm; $20 (adv)/$24 (day-of-show)

Andrew Scott

JEFFREY’S CAFÉ Carrie Day; 9pm; $10 LB’S Cold Tie Walker; 9pm

FANDANGO’S DJs night

Hair of the Dog: Revenge of The Trees (live acoustic music every Sat); 4-6pm; no cover

release with special guests

blues, jazz, Top 40); 9pm2am every Thu; no cover

UNIVERSITY–RM 6-258

Bergmann ... Canada’s Legendary Punk Rock Laureate w/ A Bunch Of Marys & Ben Disaster

Retro ‘80s with house DJ every Thu; 7pm-close

CAFÉ TIRAMISU Live

Park Jesse Peters (R&B,

‘n’ roll open mic every Fri; 8:30pm; no cover

DJs

OUTLAWS ROADHOUSE

JEFFREY’S CAFÉ Andrea

LIZARD LOUNGE Rock

Faculty Showcase: Marco Katz

FIDDLER’S ROOST

Willson; 8pm; $10

Willson, 8pm, $10; Marco Claveria, 9pm, $15

MACEWAN

Thu Rock Jam

Jam Thu; 9pm

JEFFREY’S CAFÉ Andrea

Music Video Release with Cayley Thomas, Doug Hoyer and Diamond Mind

Rocks: every Thu; dance lessons at 8pm; Cuban Salsa DJ to follow

J R BAR AND GRILL Live

Acoustic Open mic every Fri, 10-15 mins to perform; 5:30-8:30pm, no cover; Late show: Every Friday: Headwind (vintage rock ‘n’ roll), friends, 9:30pm, no minors, no cover

HILLTOP PUB Open Stage, Jam every Sat; 3:30-7pm

Spruce Grove DJ every Fri

FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip

Blues every Thur: rotating guests; 7-11pm

Homemade Jam: Mike Chenoweth

Sat jam with Terry Evans, and featured guests; host Mark Ammar

ELECTRIC RODEO–

J+H PUB Early show:

FANDANGO’S Rock out

Thursday Nights acoustic circle jam; only acoustic instruments; 7:30pm; $3 cover

FESTIVAL PLACE Big

every Fri; 9pm

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Live

TAVERN ON WHYTE

Markets

Reggae and Soul Night

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

every Fri and Sat with DJ Stouffer

BLUES ON WHYTE JK &

The Static

CLUB AT THE CITADEL

Fridays: nu disco, hip hop, indie, electro, dance with weekly local and visiting DJs on rotation plus residents Echo and Justin Foosh

hosted by Loren Burnstick; 8:30pm-1am; Later: NSS

8-10pm; $20 (adult), $10 (student)

BOHEMIA Mindil Beach

Shannon Smith (country); 9pm

THE COMMON Good

Hank & A Fist Full of Blues Play A Bluesy Christmas; 7:30pm

the Whale, Escondido, the Dojo Workhorse; 5:30pm (doors, all ages); 9pm (doors, 18+)

CAMROSE David Myles;

Express; 9pm

Army’s Festival of Carols; 7:30pm

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Shannon Smith (country); 9pm CLUB AT THE CITADEL

Main Floor: The Menace

Sessions: Alt Rock/Electro/ Trash with Miss Mannered; Wooftop: Sound It Up!: classic hip-hop and reggae with DJ Sonny Grimezz; Underdog: Dr Erick THE BOWER For Those

Who Know...: House and disco with Junior Brown, David Stone, Austin, and guests

THE COMMON Get Down

DV8 Hardcore for

Humanity; 10pm

It’s Saturday Night: House and disco and everything in between with resident Dane

IRISH SPORTS & SOCIAL

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

SOCIETY Eric Martin

every Sat; 9pm

FESTIVAL PLACE A Charlie

ENCORE–WEM Every Sat:

Every Friday DJs on all three levels

Brown Christmas with David Benoit; 7:30pm

Sound and Light show; We are Saturdays: Kindergarten

THE BOWER Zukunft: Indie

FILTHY MCNASTY’S Free

FANDANGO’S DJs night every Fri and Sat with DJ Stouffer

and alternative with Dusty Grooves, Fraser Olsen, Taz, and Josh Johnson

CHICAGO JOES Colossal

Flows: Live Hip Hop and open mic every Fri with DJs Xaolin, Dirty Needlz, guests; 8:30pm-2am; no cover

Afternoon Concerts: this week with Longshadows & Celeigh Cardinal; 4pm

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Freedom is in our

Hands; 7:30pm

GAS PUMP Saturday

FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip

NOV/28 SAID THE WHALE UNION EVENTS PRESENTS

TWO SHOWS BACK TO BACK - 5:30PM (ALL AGES) 9PM (18+)

NOV/29

STARLITE ROOM AND SONIC 102.9FM PRESENT BAND OF THE MONTH FEAT W/ SISTER GVREY, THE FRONTS AND THE UNFORTUNATES

DEC/4

UNION EVENTS PRESENTS

DEATH BY ROBOT

HIGH ON FIRE & KVELERTAK

DEC/6&7 MONSTER TRUCK - 2 NIGHTS! 13 FT MORTILLERY, FEAR OF CITY DEC/13 METAL & MAJOR CHAOS LIVE NATION PRESENTS

STARLITE ROOM PRESENTS

AND GUESTS

DEC/14 DEC/20 DEC/21

UBK PRESENTS

DEC/31

NYE FEATURING

TWERK NATION: MAD DECENT END OF THE WEAK PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

DJ HIGH MAINTENANCE FROM VEGAS

IO PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

AUDIOFLY

(UK) AND GUESTS GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!

SHOUT OUT OUT OUT OUT

WITH GUESTS WET SECRETS, CADENCE WEAPON (DJ SET) AND MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED THIS WEEK!

FEB/28 PACK A.D. MAR/15 ELECTRIC SIX THE UNION PRESENTS

AND THE MOHRS AND GUESTS

APR/4 BOY AND BEAR THE UNION PRESENTS

AND GUESTS

NOV/28 SHANE PHILIP WITH GUEST RYKKA YEARS FURTHER, BURNING DAISY, NOV/29 FIVE DIRRRTY SHOW & ELECTRIC REVIVAL NOV/30 ZODIAC SERIES DEC/5 SHANE CONNERY VOLK DEC/6 BASS BABES DEC/7 HER ALIBI KNIGHTS FINISH LAST, THE MIGHTY STEEDS, GOOD FRIDAY BRAWL, DEC/13 WHITE JOED D, ROBBIE (OLD TOWNS) LAST MINUTE SHOW!

(OF ONE BAD SON)

D ‘ERROL L’HIRONDELLE OF SEPTEMBER STONE AND VICTORIA BALDWIN

!MPULSE PRESENTS

W/ AARON VINCENT, SANGSARA

DEC/14 JOËL COSSETTE DEC/16 JOEY STYLES, DJ CREEASIAN DEC/20 WHITEMUD XMAS PARTY BADGER DEC/21 HONEY W/ DIRTY BOOTS & DRAKES THEORY THREADS DEC/27 THE ATOMIC ALICE AND GUESTS W/ SPECIAL GUESTS PARIS AND THE ENGLISH, COLIN CLOSE, ATTACKED BY RAPTORS, & JUSTIN WIESINGER

AND GUESTS

EVERY RUBY TUESDAY TUESDAY LIKE RUBY TUESDAY ON FACEBOOK FOR DETAILS

EVERY EATS AND BEATS WEDNESDAY EVERY WEDNESDAY, $0.35 WINGS

EVERY THE ULTIMATE OPEN STAGE THURSDAY EVERY THURSDAY, OPEN TURNTABLES, OPEN STAGE

NOW HIRING PORTERS, BUSSERS AND SECURITY

hop and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Sat

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Collective Saturdays underground: House and Techno

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

MUSIC 43


LUCKY 13 Every Fri and

Sat with resident DJ Chad Cook

NEWCASTLE PUB Top 40

requests every Sat with DJ Sheri

RED STAR Indie rock, hip

FRI NOV 29

ART BERGMANN CANADAS PUNK ROCK LAUREATE W/ A BUNCH OF MARYS & BEN DISASTER SAT NOV 30

CHRISTIAN HANSEN W/ BLEACHERS & VERTTIGO FRI DEC 6

DEAR ROUGE

WITH REND & AXE & SMASH TUE DEC 10

BAM MARGERA AS FUCKFACE UNSTOPPABLE

W/ WILSON AND GUEST RYAN STOCK - COMEDY DAREDEVIL

WED DEC 31

THE MENZINGERS (ONLY CANADIAN DATE) W/GUESTS AUDIO ROCKETRY

FOR TICKETS- PLEASE VISIT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA

Celtic Music with Duggan’s House Band 5-8pm FANDANGO’S Sun

Industry Night: House mix with DJ JEZ LF; Show and Shine/open stage every Sun: hosted by Marshall Lawrence; 6-11pm

hop, and electro every Sat with DJ Hot Philly and guests

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

ROUGE LOUNGE Rouge

CHURCH The King’s

Saturdays: global sound and Cosmopolitan Style Lounging with DJ Mkhai

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE Your

Famous Saturday with Crewshtopher, Tyler M

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM Swing Dance

Party: Sugar Swing Dance Club every Sat, 8-12; no experience or partner needed, beginner lesson followed by social dance; sugarswing.com

SUITE 69 Stella Saturday:

retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests

TAVERN ON WHYTE

Soul, Motown, Funk, R&B and more with DJs Ben and Mitch; every Sat; 9pm-2am TEMPLE Step’d Up

Saturdays with Lolcatz, Yaznil, Badman Crooks, Ootz

UNION HALL Celebrity

***NEW YEARS EVE ***

DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous

Y AFTERHOURS Release

Saturdays

SUN DEC 1 ARTERY The Red Cannons, Short of Able, guests; 8pm (door); adv tickets at Blackbyrd BLACKJACK’S ROADHOUSE–Nisku

University College Concert Choir, Chamber Choir, and Community Chorus present Peace; 7:30pm

HOG’S DEN PUB Rockin’

the Hog Jam: Hosted by Tony Ruffo; every Sun, 3:30-7pm NEWCASTLE PUB Sun

Soul Service (acoustic jam): Willy James and Crawdad Cantera; 3-6:30pm

O’BYRNE’S Open mic

every Sun; 9:30pm-1am

REXALL PLACE Drake, Miguel and Future; all ages; 6pm (door), 7pm (show); $49.75, $69.75, $99.75 RICHARD’S PUB Sun

Jam hosted by Andrew White and the Joint Chiefs; 4-8pm

THE RIG Every Sun Jam

hosted by Better Us than Strangers; 5-9pm

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ

Hair of the Dog acoustic Sun Jam with Bonedog and Bearcat; every Sun; 2-6pm

Classical JUBILEE AUDITORIUM

Too Cool for Christmas; 6:30pm MUTTART HALL TIME

Vocal Ensemble’s Winter TIME Concert; 2-4pm; $16 (adults), $13 (students)

SAINT ANDREW’S UNITED CHURCH Gloria!;

Open mic every Sun hosted by Tim Lovett

3:30pm & 7pm

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ

TRINITY LUTHERAN

Sunday Brunch: Cramer Brothers; 9am-3pm; Donations accepted BLUES ON WHYTE Jk &

CHURCH Concordia

Concert Choir Christmas Concert; 3pm

The Static

DJs

BONNIE DOON

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

COMMUNITY HALL Nova

Musica presents: Music, Naturally; 2-4pm

CHA ISLAND TEA CO

Live on the Island: Rhea March hosts open mic and Songwriter’s stage; starts with a jam session; every Sun, 7pm CONFECTIONERY Jim

Serediak CD Release; 2-3pm; Admission by donation

Main Floor: Soul Sundays:

A fantastic voyage through ‘60s and ‘70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Stylus Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky, Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am

MON DEC 2

monthly; no cover BLUES ON WHYTE

Boogie Patrol

DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

Singer/songwriter open stage every Mon; 8pm; host changes weekly FIDDLER’S ROOST

Monday Nights Open stage hosted by Norm Sliter’s Capital City Jammers; all styles and skill levels welcome; 7:30pm; $3 cover OVERTIME–Sherwood Park Monday Open Stage PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm; contact Vi Kallio 780.456.8510 ROUGE RESTO-LOUNGE

Open Mic Night with Darrek Anderson from the Guaranteed; every Mon; 9pm

Classical JOHN L. HAAR THEATRE

Big Band Winter Concert (jazz); 7:30pm WINSPEAR Festival of

Nine Lessons & Carols; 7:30pm; $15

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: Blue Jay’s Messy Nest: mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay

DV8 T.F.W.O. Mondays:

Roots industrial,Classic Punk, Rock, Electronic with Hair of the Dave

TAVERN ON WHYTE

Classic Hip hop with DJ Creeazn every Mon; 9pm-2am

TUE DEC 3 BLUES ON WHYTE

Boogie Patrol

DRUID IRISH PUB

Jamhouse Tues hosted by Chris Wynters, guest FESTIVAL PLACE Bev

Facey Music Presents: Hollywood Tribute; 7:30pm

FIDDLER’S ROOST

LEAF BAR AND GRILL

Tuesday Moosehead/ Barsnbands open stage hosted by Mark Ammar; every Tue; 7:30-11:30pm

FANDANGO’S Wed open stage hosted by Michael Gress and Cody Noula; Original artist showcase at 9pm

O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam

FESTIVAL PLACE Susan

every Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm

OVERTIME Sherwood Park The Campfire Heros

(acoustic rock, country, top 40); 9pm-2am every Tue; no cover

RED PIANO Jamoeke with

the Nervous Flirts: Sing with the band; no cover

YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday

Session: Marc Beaudin; 7:30pm (doors), 8pm (show)

Classical WINSPEAR CENTRE

Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols; 7:30pm

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: alternative retro and not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail; Wooftop: The Night with No Name featuring DJs Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests playing tasteful, eclectic selections

DV8 Creepy Tombsday:

Psychobilly, Hallowe’en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

RED STAR Experimental

Indie rock, hip hop, electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue

SUITE 69 Rockstar

Tuesdays: Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

WED DEC 4 ALBERTA BEACH HOTEL

Open stage Wed with Trace Jordan; 8pm-12 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Glitter Gulch:

live music once a month; On the Patio: Funk and Soul with Doktor Erick every Wed; 9pm BLUES ON WHYTE

Boogie Patrol

Aglukark; 7:30pm

FIDDLER’S ROOST

Wednesday Nights Folk and Roots Open Stage: amateur and professional musicians welcome; 7:30pm; $3 J+H PUB Acoustic open

mic night hosted by Lorin Lynne

LEAF BAR AND GRILL

Wed variety night: with guitarist, Gord Matthews; every Wed, 8pm MERCURY ROOM Little Flower Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12 NEW WEST HOTEL Free classic country dance lessons every Wed, 7-9pm OVERTIME Sherwood Park Jason Greeley

(acoustic rock, country, Top 40); 9pm-2am every Wed; no cover

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic Bluegrass jam presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; every Wed, 6:3011pm; $2 (member)/$4 (non-member) RED PIANO BAR Wed Night Live: hosted by dueling piano players; 8pm-1am; $5 THE RIG Open jam every

Wed hosted by Will Cole; 8pm -12am

STARLITE ROOM High on Fire; 18+; 8pm (doors) ZEN LOUNGE Jazz

Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: RetroActive Radio: Alternative ‘80s and ‘90s, post punk, new wave, garage, Brit, mod, rock and roll with LL Cool Joe

BRIXX BAR Really Good...

Eats and Beats: every Wed with DJ Degree and Friends

Tuesday Nights fiddle circle jam; all levels of musicians welcome; 7:30pm; $3 cover

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE PJ

J+H PUB Acoustic open

Wed open mic with host Duff Robison

NIKKI DIAMONDS Punk and ‘80s metal every Wed

ELEPHANT AND

RED STAR Guest DJs

mic night every Tue hosted by Lorin Lynne; Everyone will have 10-15 minutes to play

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Sleeman Mon: live music

L.B.’S PUB Tue Variety Night Open stage with Darrell Barr; 7-11pm

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE 9351118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-153 St, 780.424 9467 CENTRAL SENIOR LIONS CENTRE 11113-113 St CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 CHICAGO JOES 9604 -111 Ave COMMON 9910-109 St DUGGAN'S IRISH PUB 901388 Ave, 780.465.4834 DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 780.474.5554 DV8 8130 Gateway Blvd EARLY STAGE SALOON– Stony Plain 4911-52 Ave, Stony Plain ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove 121-1 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.1411 ELEPHANT AND CASTLE– Whyte Ave 10314 Whyte Ave ENCORE–WEM 2687, 8882170 St FANDANGO'S 12912-50 St, fandangoslive.com FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park,

780.449.3378 FIDDLER'S ROOST 7308-76 Ave FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 FLUID LOUNGE 10888 Jasper Ave, 780.429.0700 HILLTOP PUB 8220 106 Ave HOGS DEN PUB Yellow Head Tr, 142 St ISBE EDMONTON 9529 Jasper Ave, 587.521.7788; isbeedmonton.com J+H PUB 1919-105 St J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JAVA XPRESS 110, 4300 South Park Dr, Stony Plain, 780.968.1860 JEFFREY’S CAFÉ 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890 L.B.’S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEAF BAR AND GRILL 9016132 Ave, 780.757.2121 LEGENDS SPORTS BAR AND TAP HOUSE 9221-34 Ave, 780.988.2599 LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 LIT ITALIAN WINE BAR 10132-104 St LIZARD LOUNGE 13160-118 Ave

Perry every Wed; 8-11pm; $10

DUGGAN’S IRISH PUB

CASTLE–Whyte Ave Open

mic every Wed (unless there’s an Oilers game); no cover

THE COMMON The Wed Experience: Classics on Vinyl with Dane

every Wed

TEMPLE Wild Style Wed:

Hip hop open mic hosted by Kaz and Orv; $5

VENUEGUIDE ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179 ALE YARD TAP 13310-137 Ave ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 "B" STREET BAR 11818111 St BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE– Nisku 2110 Sparrow Dr, Nisku, 780.986.8522 BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BOURBON ROOM 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert THE BOWER 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.425; info@ thebower.ca BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 1022597 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca CAFÉ TIRAMISU 10750124 St

44 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

MERCURY ROOM 10575114 St NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303108 St, 780.425.9730 NEWCASTLE PUB 6108-90 Ave, 780.490.1999 NOORISH CAFÉ 8440-109 St NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535-109A Ave O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 O2'S–West 11066-156 St, 780.448.2255 OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK 100 Granada Blvd, Sherwood Park, 790.570.5588 PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780.457.3118 RIC’S GRILL 24 Perron Street, St Albert, 780.460.6602 THE RIG 15203 Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.0869 ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE

10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235101 St SET NIGHTCLUB Next to Bourban St, 8882-170 St, WEM, Ph III, setnightclub.ca SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810124 St, 587.521.6328 SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St, 780.758.5924 SPORTSMAN'S LOUNGE 8170-50 St STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave SUITE 69 2 Fl, 8232 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6969 VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO– St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 Y AFTERHOURS 10028102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours.com YARDBIRD SUITE 11 Tommy Banks Way, 780.432.0428 YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert, 780.459.0295 ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St


3.75” wide version a div. of Kokotilo Holdings Inc.

FRI, NOV 29, AVENUE THEATRE

Funded in part by the Government of Canada.

12345FOR A CAREER IN PREPARE FIREFIGHTING & POLICING

MÉTIS EMERGENCY SERVICES PREPARATION 1-888-48-MÉTIS

BARNEY BENTALL’S GRAND CARIBOO OPRY

W/ THE GOLD RUSH ALL STARS

SAT, NOV 30, AVENUE THEATRE

BASIA BULAT

W/ EVENING HYMNS

THU, DEC 5, AVENUE THEATRE

DUSTIN BENTALL & THE SMOKES AND THE MATINEE

W/ THE GIVE ‘EM HELL BOYS, AND THE MISERY MOUNTAIN BOYS FRI, DEC 6, AVENUE THEATRE

PAUL LANGLOIS OF THE TRAGICALLY HIP

W/ GUESTS PETE MURRAY & GREG BALL

SAT, DEC 7, AVENUE THEATRE

DANIEL WESLEY

W/ STONE IRIS, & MAYDAY AND THE BEATCREEPS

THU, MAY 15, MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH, ALL AGES JCL AND EDM FOLK FEST PRESENTS

THE MILK CARTON KIDS

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

MUSIC 45


HOLIDAY SURVIVAL GUIDE Secret Santa gift ideas for the hard-to-buy-for people in the office

HOLIDAY // SECRET SANTA

d e r e v o c u o y t Santa’s go The Re Connoist ro eur

G

ot someone on your Secret Santa shopping list you have no idea what to buy? Don't just settle on a boring mug or a vanilla-scented candle, get them something a tad more creative. And just in case you're not one of those creative types, we've done all the work for you. You can thank us with some homemade Ninjabread cookies.

The Iron i

Nostalgia rules ev e rything ar ound th em.

The Techy

ogy addicTheir techn ol ed on ly by tion is match ffeine. a need fo r ca

c One

This los es its ir ony if we have to expla in it to you.

Th e

To p - K n o tte d H ip s te r

eve r No toque need sy bun. touch this mes

Your Bo s

Th e Star War s Fa n a ti c At least one, eve ry office has.

The Old G

uy

Loves c la s s ic r id e s a n d li v e s on me at a n d p o ta toes.

46 HOLIDAY SURVIVAL GUIDE

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

s

Fair t re at m e n t fo r all is alway s a good , if n ot sublimin al, mes sage. to send.


Th e Tr e a Ma k e r t

Their Pin te rest is a hitlist o f confec tione rs.

Th e A rt is te

Nothing beats a new print of art arriving of eve ry month, courtesy . sse ma pir Pa Montréal’s

ART SALE IN HIGHLANDS Visual Artist WILLIAM G. PRETTIE dESIGNER Architect SHERRI SHORTEN

original art, gifts, prints, ornaments

r The Organize

NOV 30 to DEC 21, 2013 11208 - 65 Street

alkboard This sticke r ch to-do lists will make all cool. look old-school

open 12-5pm Tues-Sun (Thurs & Fri open ‘til 8pm)

stuff your socks with JOY! { cookies & cider Nov 30 12-5 }

William 780.432.6678 www.williamprettie.com

Th e B r o

Has a n ot ma n cr -so-secret ush on Tom S e ll e c k an Burgun d Ron dy.

NIL ee r Th e Bu s i a s t Enth liday Th e Te a Drinke

ho s om e B r i n g i t h s om e w chee r l b ee r. na o s a se

r

One ca n neve r h ave too muc h tea.

The Ca ndy Love r e. It’ s su ga r- hig h tim

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

HOLIDAY SURVIVAL GUIDE 47


HOLIDAY SURVIVAL GUIDE HOLIDAY // LOW INCOME

No funds for Christmas

Making it through the holidays for low-income earners is one more difficulty to endure

S

urviving the holidays for a number of Edmontonians has nothing to do with relatives overstaying their welcome or finding yourself laying on the couch after having too much spiked eggnog and Quality Street chocolates. When trying to get enough food for each day and scrounging up cash to pay all the bills on time is a daily reality, splurging on any extras during the holidays just isn't an option. The Christmas Bureau's executive director Wendy Batty says each year the organization consistently delivers food hampers, toys and gift cards to just under 10 percent of Edmonton's population. The goal this year is to raise $1.8 million. "As the city grows, so does the diversity," Batty says, adding that both immigration and cross-Canada migration drive many people to move to Edmonton. "What happens to a family who migrates here from across Canada is they had to have a stake— a lump of money to get them here. Then they need to get into an apartment of some sort." Batty says the Christmas Bureau's clients are not in a position to buy a home, so if they can't find a place to rent they might end up couch surfing

with friends. "Any stake that they had in terms of cash or resources when they came is used up paying a deposit, first month's rent, utility hookups, maybe getting the kids into school, transferring of licence plates—there's just huge costs associated with relocating. By the time Christmas comes, they may not have found that job yet or they've found an early entry job below their skill set and abilities, but that's all they can find and their bills are piling up." Many immigrants face these same challenges along with adapting to a new culture, so the Christmas Bureau offers an option to families who might not be familiar with the traditional Canadian foods found in the hampers. "Many of our new Canadians have not seen a turkey, they don't know how to cook it; it's not their food," Batty says. "But it's not about what you eat or when you eat it, it's about having the opportunity to have a celebration with your family and food on the table. So for many of our families we send Sobeys gift cards and allow them to make their own choices." The majority of clients served by the Christmas Bureau are working-

poor families. Batty says it's a degrading thing for someone to have to say they're part of the working poor. "When you stop into the gas station to pay and see the person working there, they're working probably just above minimum wage," she says. "They may have a spouse and two kids at home to support, or even just kids. They're working, yes, but when you think of the cost of utilities that have gone up in Edmonton the last couple of years, the cost of food, the cost of rent—we're now on the verge of the next boom in the province and you just know that people will migrate here from across Canada and it's the old supply and demand, it will push the rent prices up. Everything they earn goes into everyday survival. Most often they won't have a car and will be bussing, and bussing is really expensive and time-consuming. I can almost guarantee they don't have a benefit plan, so if someone's sick, they're paying for that. They're probably in the hole every month and then along comes Christmas." Asking for help has to come from the client. Low-income families and individuals might have an application form sent to them from other

organizations they have worked with, but their information is not given to the Christmas Bureau, so many end up not applying for help. Batty says they average between 60 000 and 64 000 people each year—this works out to 22 000 client units ranging from one person to families of 10. Many of the clients are retired and living alone. "I think the second group we're seeing a lot of is seniors who are outliving their pensions, outliving their income and they're now at a case where they may own their home, but all of the income that is coming in from the pension is just to pay for the upkeep of the home," says the Christmas Bureau's campaign director Darlene Kowalchuk. Twelve percent of the people the organization helps are seniors, but many seniors won't ask for help as Batty says they've grown up with a "makedo" attitude. As the outreach manager at the Edmonton Seniors Centre, Shirley Kilsdonk works with a lot of low-income seniors and has seen the depression that comes from being isolated and poor.

The Alberta Legislature O P E N

F O R

Y O U

T O

D I S C O V E R

• Free guided tours – 362 days a year!

CELEBRATE THE SEASON

• Celebrate the Season – Throughout December enjoy free hot chocolate, choir performances, free skating and the spectacular, festive lights. • Find your perfect gift at the Legislative Assembly Gift Shop. Choose from a selection of works for purchase from Alberta-based authors and artists. Extended holiday hours!

VISITOR SERVICES 10820 - 98 Avenue Edmonton, Alberta visitorinfo@assembly.ab.ca 780.427.7362

www.assembly.ab.ca S e e t he Vi si

48 HOLIDAY SURVIVAL GUIDE

t o r S e r v i ce s se c t i o n o

f our website for choir schedule an

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

d G if t S ho p

h o ur s .

"The thing with the Christmas Bureau, the food bank, things like that, sometimes with their pride they won't even apply for it," she says. "We have a lot of low-income seniors and they always say 'No, no. Somebody else could need it.' But they need it. "I had a lady that had so much pride that she wouldn't even tell that she had mice in her house until we found out that she was actually sleeping and—she was telling me this story that they would crawl across her. But because of the pride she wasn't willing to get help." Pride keeps many seniors from asking for help, but as everyday costs keep going up and their pensions remain the same, making ends meet and buying gifts and food at Christmas time will continue to be a heavy burden. And as the baby-boom generation heads into old age, it won't become any easier to be a senior. Lending a helping hand to Edmonton's low-income earners at Christmas time shows compassion exists, but consistently helping just under 10 percent of the city's population shows there is a level of poverty that has not gone anywhere. REBECCA MEDEL

REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

COMEDY Black Dog Freehouse • Underdog Comedy

show: Alternating hosts • Every Thu, 8-11pm • No cover

CENTURY CASINO • 13103 Fort Rd • 780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:309pm COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment

Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Thu: 8:30pm; Fri: 8:30pm; Sat: 8pm and 10:30pm • Steven Juliano Moore; Nov 28-30 • Darryl Littleton; Dec 5-7 • Gif Skyving; Dec 12-14 • Gary Keshner; Dec 19-21 • Bob Angeli; Dec 27-28

COMIC STRIP • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999

• Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm • Hit or Miss Mondays: Amateurs and Professionals every Mon, 7:30pm • Battle to the Funny Bone; last Tue each month, 7:30pm • Rhys Darby; Nov 28-30 • Colin Moulton; Dec 4-8 • Guy Torry; Dec 11 - 15 • Godfrey; Dec 18 - 22 • JR Brow; Dec 26-29 • New Years Eve 2013; Dec 31 • Ralph Harris; Jan 2-5 • Jay Pharoah Soecial Presentation; Jan 9-11 • Hannibal Buress Special; Jan 16-18 • Jake Johannsen; Jan 22-26

DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • 780.710.2119 •

Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm

FILTHY MCNASTY'S • 10511-82 Ave • 780.996.1778 • Stand Up Sundays: Stand-up comedy night every Sun with a different headliner every week; 9-11pm; no cover JUBILEE AUDITORIUM • 11455-87 Ave • MythBusters: Behind the Myths Tour: Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage • Nov 29, 7:30pm • Tickets at TicketMaster

FERTILITY AWARENESS CHARTING CIRCLE • Justisse-Healthworks for Women, 10145-81 Ave • justisse.ca • Meeting • Dec 2, 6:30-8:30pm • $10 (donation) Repeating dates: Feb 3, March 3, April 7.

1 - INTRODUCTION) • King Edward Community

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY IS BUILDING AT NEUFELD LANDING • Neufeld Landing, 11403-17

GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOODS AND

8424-95 Ave • 780.465.2019, 780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm

Ave • 1st Tue each month until Dec 2014; hfh.org and register as a volunteer • Dec 3, 8:30-4pm

HOME–Energizing Spiritual Community for Passionate Living • Garneau/Ashbourne Assisted Living Place, 11148-84 Ave • Home: Blends music, drama, creativity and reflection on sacred texts to energize you for passionate living • Every Sun, 3-5pm

LOTUS QIGONG • 780.477.0683 • Downtown • Practice group meets every Thu MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION • Faculté

VAULT PUB • 8214-175 St • Comedy with Liam Creswick and Steve Schulte • Every Thu, at 9:30pm X-WRECKS • 9303-50 St • Travelling Com-

edy Open Mic with co-host Danny Martinello; call 780.914.8966 to get on roster • Nov 29, 8pm

ZEN LOUNGE • 12923-97 St • The Ca$h Prize

comedy contest hosted by Matt Alaeddine and Andrew Iwanyk • Every Tue, 8pm • No cover

GROUPS/CLUBS/MEETINGS AIKIKAI AIKIDO CLUB • 10139-87 Ave, Old

Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL EDMONTON • 8307-109 St • edmontonamnesty.org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug) E: amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org for more info • Free ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE AT FOOT NOTES STUDIO • Foot Notes Dance Studio (South side), 9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pm-midnight • $15

BRAIN TUMOUR PEER SUPPORT GROUP • Mount Zion Lutheran Church, 11533-135 St NW • braintumour.ca • 1.800.265.5106 ext. 234 • Support group for brain tumour survivors and their families and caregivers. Must be 18 or over • 3rd Mon every month; 7-8:45pm • Free CANADIAN INJURED WORKERS ASSOCIATION OF ALBERTA (CIWAA) • Augustana Lu-

theran Church, 107 St, 99 Ave • canadianinjuredworkers.com • Meeting every 3rd Sat, 1-4pm • Injured Workers in Pursuit of Justice denied by WCB

EDMONTON NATURE CLUB • The King’s

University College Atrium, 9125-50 St • Speakers this month will be club members Steve Knight and Gerald Romanchuk. Presenting stories and photos of adventures in chasing birds in Alberta, B.C., and Ontario • Dec 13, 7pm • Admission by donation

EDMONTON NEEDLECRAFT GUILD •

Avonmore United Church Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm

EDMONTON UKULELE CIRCLE • Bogani Café,

2023-111 St • 780.440.3528 • 3rd Sun each month; 2:30-4pm • $5

University of Alberta, Telus Centre (87 Ave, 111 St) • Dr. Shiv Chopra and Dr. Thierry Vrain discuss genetically engineered foods • Dec 10, 7pm • Free (donations accepted)

GLOBAL HEALTH FILM SERIES • globaled.

ualberta.ca/events • ECHA 2-420, U of A • A Walk to Beautiful • Nov 28

GREAT EXPEDITIONS • St Luke’s Anglican-

Church, 8424-95 Ave • 780.469.3270 • 1st Mon every month, 7:30pm • Suggested donation of $3 • Christmas Potluck: Bring drinks, potluck dish and favourite photos or slides – for others to guess location; Dec 2, 6:30pm

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY’S VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION AND BASIC TOOL TRAINING

Ave • 780.973.5311 • nashvillesongwriters.com • NSAI (Nashville Songwriters Association International) meet the 2nd Mon each month, 7-9pm

NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-106 St • 780.435.0845 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

ORGANIZATION FOR BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm

0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

SAWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP • Braeside

Presbyterian Church bsmt, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon, 7:30pm

SHERWOOD PARK WALKING GROUP + 50

• Every Thu Neon Lights and Laughter with host Sterling Scott and five comedians and live DJ TNT; 8:30pm

HUMAN HEALTH: A SPEAKER’S TOUR •

SONGWRITERS GROUP • The Carrot, 9351-118

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • Sterling Scott RUMORS ULTRA LOUNGE • 8230 Gateway Blvd

League, Small Hall, Corner of 81 St, 8102 - 80 Ave • Sampling to a variety of fermented foods and discussing why such foods are important to ones health and the planet's, as well as the basics of safe fermenting and how to adapt recipes. Please bring one-cup mason jar with lid • Dec 4, 7-9pm

St Jean, Rm 3-18 • 780.490.7332 • madeleinesanam.org/en • Program for HIV-AID’S prevention, treatment and harm reduction in French, English and other African languages • 3rd and 4th Sat, 9am-5pm each month • Free (member)/$10 (membership); pre-register

edy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free

every Wed, 9pm

FERMENTED FOODS WORKSHOP (LEVEL

FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church,

SEVENTIES FOREVER MUSIC SOCIETY • Call 587.520.3833 for location • deepsoul.ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm

OVERTIME PUB • 4211-106 St • Open mic com-

helps you identify and correct the most common problems in writing; with Jim Taylor, presented by EAC-PPB • Nov 29, 9am-4:30pm • Pre-register at eacppb8stepediting.eventbrite.ca

SESSION • Habitat for Humanity, 13044 Yellowhead

Trail • hfh.org • A tool training and information session for new volunteers - or not-new volunteers - who would like to gain some basic knowledge of tools and learn more about how the organization works • Dec 7, 8:30am-4pm

HEALTHY, RAW AND VEGAN FOR THE HOLIDAYS WORKSHOP • King Edward Community

League - Small Hall, 8008 - 81 St • Jennifer Ly as she shows you how to transform your favourite recipes into vegan, gluten free and even raw deliciousness • Dec 17, 7-9pm

HOW WE LEAD: CANADA IN A CENTURY OF CHANGE • McLennan Ross Hall, Rms 231/237,

Faculty of Law, 111 St, 89 Ave, U of A • U of A, Faculty of Law Visiting Speakers Series talk: featuring speaker, former Prime Minister, Rt Hon Joe Clark • Nov 28, 12:30-1:30pm • Free

SEEING IS ABOVE ALL • Acacia Hall, 10433-83 Ave, upstairs • 780.554.6133 • Free instruction into the meditation on the Inner Light • Every Sun, 5pm

• Meet inside Millennium Place, Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10-min discussion, followed by a 30 to 40-min walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta)

SENIORS CARE PROVINCIAL SPEAKING TOUR • Lions Seniors Centre, 111 Ave, 113 St • To

SOCIETY OF EDMONTON ATHEISTS • Stanley

• Stanley Milner Library, Stanley Milner Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Square • A lecture for women in learning more about municipal, provincial, or federal campaigns • Nov 30, 9am-5:30pm • $20 (members), $30 (non-members)

A. Milner Library, Centennial Rm (bsmt); edmontonatheists.ca; E: info@edmontonatheists.ca; Monthly roundtable 1st Tue each month

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave • 780.604.7572 • Swing Dance at Sugar Foot Stomp: beginner lesson followed by dance every Sat, 8pm (door) THOUGHTFUL TUESDAY • King Edward Com-

munity Small Hall, 8102-80 Ave • Movie Monday: How to Boil a Frog; Dec 2, 7-9pm • Movie Monday: Urbanized; Dec 9, 7-9pm • Free; pre-register

TOASTMASTERS • Fabulous Facilitators

Toastmasters Club: 2nd Fl, Canada Place, 9700 Jasper Ave; 780.467.6013, l.witzke@shaw.ca; fabulousfacilitators.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 12:05-1pm • Power Speakers Toastmasters Club: Jasper Park Community League, 8751-153 St (top fl); Meet every Wed, 7-9pm; Contact: VP Ed, 780.720.2277 • Y Toastmasters Club: Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); Meet every Tue, 7-9pm except last Tue ea month; Contact: Antonio Balce, 780.463.5331

VEGANS/VEGETARIANS OF ALBERTA • Riverdale Rinkhouse (beside main hall) • vofa.ca/event • Raw Vegan Edmonton joint potluck • Dec 8

WILD ROSE ANTIQUE COLLECTORS SOCIETY • Delwood Community Hall, 7515 Delwood

Rd • wildroseantiquecollectors.ca • Collecting and researching items from various periods in the history of Edmonton. Presentations after club business. Visitors welcome • Meets the 4th Mon of every month (except Jul & Dec), 7:30pm

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of the Old

Strathcona Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence

LECTURES/PRESENTATIONS CAREER PATHWAYS IN RENEWABLES Making a living oF the green DreaM • Grant MacEwan University, CN Theatre, Rm 5-142 • Moderated by Srindar Singh. Discussing the options to the path to a meaningful green employment • Dec 4, 7pm (refreshments at 6:30pm) • Free

EIGHT-STEP EDITING • Expressionz Café, 9938-70 Ave • A step-by-step process that

raise awareness about the concerns on seniors care in Alberta • Dec 11, 7-9pm

"WOMEN IN POLITICS" CAMPAIGN SCHOOL

QUEER AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sun-

nybrook United Church, Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month

BEERS FOR QUEERS • Empress Ale House, 9912

Whyte Ave • Meet the last Thu each month

BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP • A social group for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo.com/ group/bwedmonton BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725 Jasper Ave •

780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

EPLC FELLOWSHIP PAGAN STUDY GROUP

• Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • eplc.webs.com • Free year long course; Family circle 3rd Sat each month • Everyone welcome

EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE • 10220-103 St • 780.424.0077 • yourgaybar.com • Community Tue: partner with various local GLBT groups for different events; see online for details • Happy Hour Wed-Fri: 4-8pm • Wed Karaoke: with the Mystery Song Contest; 7pm-2am • Fri: DJ Evictor • Sat: DJ Jazzy • Sun: Beer Bash G.L.B.T. SPORTS AND RECREATION •

teamedmonton.ca • Blazin' Bootcamp: Garneau Elementary School Gym, 10925-87 Ave; Every Mon and Thu, 7pm; $30/$15 (low income/student); E: bootcamp@teamedmonton.ca • Mindful Meditation: Pride Centre: Every Thu, 6pm; free weekly drop-in • Progressive Core Stability and Abdominal Training with Barb Turner: Parkallen Community League Hall; Every Thu, Sep-Dec 19, 6pm (beginner/intermediate), 7:15pm (advance); $50 (month), $200 (season) • Swimming–Making Waves: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; E: swimming@ teamedmonton.c; makingwavesswimclub.ca • Bowl-

ing: Bonnie Doon Bowling Lanes: Every Tue, 6:30pm; until Apr 1, 2014; $15/week • Volleyball: St Matthew Elementary School (NE): Tue, Dec 3-Mar 11, 8-10pm; Stratford Junior-Senior High School (west end): every Tue, Mar 18-Apr 29, 7-9pm, $65 (season), $35 (Half season), $5 (drop-in) • Curling: Granite Curling Club: Every Tue, until Mar 25, 7pm • Martial Arts–Kung Fu and Kick Boxing: Every Tue and Thu, 6-7pm; GLBTQ inclusive adult classes at Sil-Lum Kung Fu; kungfu@teamedmonton.ca, kickboxing@teamedmonton.ca, sillum.ca

gently used clothing • Nov 30

CHRISTMAS ON THE SQUARE • Santa Claus

Parade: City Centre Mall, 100 St, 102A Ave; Dec 1, 10am-noon

DEEPSOUL.CA • 587.520.3833; text to:

780.530.1283 for location • Classic Covers Shindig Fundraiser • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins on Les Paul Standard guitars: upcoming Century Casino show as well; Twilight Zone Razamanaz Tour; all ages • Fundraising for local Canadian Disaster Relief, the hungry (world-wide through the Canadian Food Grains Bank)

G.L.B.T.Q SENIORS GROUP • S.A.G.E Bldg, Craftroom, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: tuff @ shaw.ca

EDMONTON CHRISTMAS SHOW • Edmonton

ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB • Pride Centre, 10608-

EDMONTON FESTIVAL OF TREES • Shaw

105 Ave • 780.387.3343 • edmontonillusions.ca • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7:30-9pm

INSIDE/OUT • U of A Campus • Campus-based

organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, academic, straight allies and support staff • 3rd Thu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. E: kwells@ualberta.ca

LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB •

geocities.com/makingwaves_edm • Recreational/ competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu

PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON • Pride Centre

of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • A safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental drop-in space, support programs and resources offered for members of the GLBTQ community, their families and friends • Daily: Community drop-in; support and resources. Queer library: borrowing privileges: Tue-Fri 12-9pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, closed Sun-Mon; Queer HangOUT (a.k.a. QH) youth drop-in: Tue-Fri 3-8pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, youth@pridecentreofedmonton. org • Counselling: Free, short-term by registered counsellors every Wed, 5:30-8:30pm, info/bookings: 780.488.3234 • Knotty Knitters: Knit and socialize in safe, accepting environment, all skill levels welcome; every Wed 6-8pm • QH Game Night: Meet people through board game fun; every Thu 6-8pm • QH Craft Night: every Wed, 6-8pm • QH Anime Night: Watch anime; every Fri, 6-8pm • Movie Night: Open to everyone; 2nd and 4th Fri each month, 6-9pm • Women’s Social Circle: Social support group for female-identified persons +18 years in the GLBT community; new members welcome; 2nd and 4th Thu, 7-9pm each month; andrea@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Men Talking with Pride: Support and social group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; every Sun 7-9pm; robwells780@ hotmail.com • TTIQ: a support and information group for all those who fall under the transgender umbrella and their family/supporters; 3rd Mon, 7-9pm, each month • HIV Support Group: Support and discussion group for gay men; 2nd Mon, 7-9pm, each month; huges@shaw.ca

PRIMETIMERS/SAGE GAMES • Unitarian Church, 10804-119 St • 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH • 11526-76 Ave •

780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

WOMONSPACE • 780.482.1794 • womonspace. ca, womonspace@gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured WOODYS VIDEO BAR • 11723 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

SPECIAL EVENTS AGA'S THE HOLLY BALL • Art Gallery of Alberta, 2 Sir Winston Churchill Square • Featuring a menu created by David Omar, the executive chef at Zinc Restaurant, and featuring live music from the A/B Trio • Dec 1, 6-10pm

a get closer christMas • Edmonton Valley Zoo, 13315 Buena Vista Road • The zoo's newest exhibit, The Wander • Dec 7, 12-4pm BETHLEHEM WALK EDMONTON • West

Edmonton Christian Assembly, 6315-199 St • bwedm.com • Recreating the town of Bethlehem • Dec 5-9 • Free

CELEBRATE THE SEASON AT ALBERTA LEGISLATURE • Legislature Building, 10800-97 Ave • Dec 5-24 • Free

CITY MARKET DOWNTOWN AT CITY HALL

• City Room, City Hall • Vendors for the popular City Market Downtown will be selling their wares • Nov 30, 10am-3pm

CHRISTMAS FASHION TEA AND BAZAAR

• Freemason's Hall Edmonton, 10318-100 Ave • Includes shopping, food, and a progressive auction for

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

Expo Centre • The first annual Christmas show, includes celebrity guests, magic shows, music, food, face painting, photos with Santa, exhibitors and oneof-a-kind gift ideas • Nov 28-Dec 1 • edmontonchristmasshow.com

Conference Centre • Dec 1

ETS CHRISTMAS LIGHTS TOURS • North

Side of City Hall • See fabulous Christmas lights • Dec 6-8, Dec 13-15 • $5

HAWKERS MARKET • Mercer Warehouse • Gives Local Food Entrepreneurs A Place To Conduct Commerce, Rapidly Test Ideas And Meet Their Customers Face To Face. There Is Always A Selection Of Local Wine And Craft Beers. Includes live music • Nov 30, 5pm • $10 (adv), $15 (door) HAY RIDES & PHOTOS WITH SANTA •

Marketplace at Callingwood, 69 Ave & 178 St • callingwoodmarketplace.com • Get your photo taken with Santa Claus followed with a free horse drawn hay ride. Includes face painting, festive colouring for kids, and more • Dec 14, 11am-4pm

IRENE KLAR STUDIO ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE • Irene Klar Studio, 15904-116 Ave.

(east side door, Seagate Building) • ireneklar. com • Annual open house and sale of Irene Klar art, gifts and art wear; Nov 28, 10am-4pm

IRENE KLAR STUDIO WINTER SALE •

Irene Klar Studio, 15904-116 Ave. (east side door, Seagate Building) • ireneklar.com • Studio Winter Sale; Nov 30-Dec 1, 10am-4pm

JACK FROST HOLIDAY • Muttart Conservatory, 9626 96A St • Start your holidays with crafts, tours, and a Christmas cactus planting • Dec 8, 12-4pm JINGLE ON INDOOR SANTA CLAUS PARADE • Commerce Place, Manulife Place, City

Centre Mall • edmontondowntown.com • Floats, mascots, music, and Santa • Dec 1, 10am-noon

LIGHTS UP! • City Center Square, Downtown

Fort Saskatchewan • Getting together to kick-off Christmas with lighting up Fort Saskatchewan's tree. Join the mayor for hot chocolate and cookies, lighting of the tree, local choirs, Santa Claus and Moonlight Madness • Nov 29, 6pm

LUMINARIA • Devonian Gardens, Kurimoto Japanese Garden • Stroll through the candle-lit pathways, visitors can sip hot apple cider beside the bonfires, enjoy the seasonal sounds of strolling a capella singers and catch a glimpse of the magical “snow sprites” and glittering ice sculptures. A special Memory Lane • Dec 7-8, 5-9pm MACLACHLAN AND MITCHELL HOMES PRESENT SNOWFLAKE GALA 2013 •

Shaw Conference Centre, 9797 Jasper Ave • A fundraising dinner to support the Stollery Children's Hospial. Join Dorothy, along with her friends like the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion, and Toto, for an evening like no other • Dec 9, 6pm

MINECRAFT TOURNAMENT • Abbottsfield - Penny McKee Branch, Edmonton Public Library • With Minecraft's ability of build and explore, creativity can run wild as guests can explore together in this multiplayer game. EPL brings the awards and and laptops while guests bring their best game • Dec 7, 1-4pm MINKHA SWEATER SALE • Windsor Park Hall, 11840-87 Ave • Selling stunning hand-knit sweaters, vests, coats, ponchos, scarves and more • Dec 7, 9am-3pm SENIORS CANDY CANE TEA • Edmonton

Valley Zoo, 13315 Buena Vista Road (87 Ave) • A Christmas celebration for seniors with performances by the children of Zoo School, animal encounters, tasty treats and warm beverages • Dec 3, 1-3pm • $10 (per senior)

SPORTS DAY IN CANADA • Kinsmen Sports Centre, 9100 Walterdale Hill NW • A variety of fun sports programs and activities for families • Nov 30, 10am-6pm • Free 'TWAS THE NIGHT: ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL'S 16TH ANNUAL FUNDRAISER NIGHT •

Alberta Craft Council, 10186 - 106 St • albertacraft. ab.ca/acc-events • An exciting night of mingling, fun and culture with live music by Terry McDade’s Harpe Jazz. Includes discounts, door prizes and more • Nov 29, 7-10pm

ZUMBA FOR CHARITY • Griesbach School, 304 Griesbach School Rd • A family oriented zumba class to help raise funds for the Stollery Childrens Hospital Music Therapy Program • Dec 7, 2:15-3:35pm

IN THE BACK 49


CLASSIFIEDS

1600.

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous

To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com 3100. Appliances/Furniture Old Appliance Removal Removal of unwanted appliances. Must be outside or in your garage. Rates start as low as $30. Call James @780.231.7511 for details

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Are You Looking for a Great Volunteer Experience? Habitat for Humanity’s On-Tap volunteer program allows busy people to get out and volunteer when they can This is a new volunteer program designed for busy volunteers who need to schedule shifts with very short notice. If you would like to volunteer but struggle to commit to a shift until the last minute because your schedule is so hectic, contact us to get more information about the On-Tap program. angela@hfh.org or 780-451-3416 ext 223. HFH.org Are You Looking for a Great Volunteer Experience? Habitat for Humanity’s On-Tap volunteer program allows busy people to get out and volunteer when they can ON-TAP VOLUNTEERS This is a new volunteer program designed for busy volunteers who need to schedule shifts with very short notice. If you would like to volunteer but struggle to commit to a shift until the last minute because your schedule is so hectic, contact us to get more information about the On-Tap program. angela@hfh.org or 780-451-3416 ext 223. HFH.org Bells will be ringing November 14th - December 24th for the 2013 Christmas Kettle Campaign We are looking for volunteers to come out and ring in Christmas to help us reach our goal of $500,000. We have 9000 volunteer hours to fill. If you have a few hours we would love to have you join us. Call 780-423-2111 ext 241 to sign up or email:

edmonton_kettles@can.salvation army.org or online

http://www.salvationarmy.ca/ volunteer/

If you can’t make it out to a kettle but would still like to give visit: www.fillthekettle.com Can You Read This? Help someone Who can’t! Volunteer 2 hours a week and help someone improve their Reading, Writing, Math or English Speaking Skills. Call Valerie at P.A.L.S 780-424-5514 or email palsvol@shaw.ca Growing Facilitators Volunteer Opportunity Sustainable Food Edmonton offers a Little Green Thumbs indoor gardening program to schools and childcare agencies and we are looking for volunteers. A green thumb is not a pre-requisite. However, gardening experience and a passion for children and youth are an asset. For info and volunteer application form: www.sustainablefoodedmonton.o rg

50 IN THE BACK

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Habitat For Humanity is building a pool of volunteers to help us with renovations at our newest ReStore. Flexible hours, no experience necessary If interested, please contact Evan at ehammer@hfh.org or call (780) 451-3416 Habitat for Humanity is building at Neufeld Landing! We are actively scheduling individuals and groups of volunteers for Canada’s largest project located in South Edmonton’s Rutherford area. To get involved, go to www.hfh.org and register as a volunteer. Questions? Contact Kim. Beginners to trades people welcome. We provide all tools, equipment and lunch. All volunteers participate in onsite safety orientation/training. No minimum number of shifts required. Contact for more info about the event: Kim Sherwood 780-451-3416 ksherwood@hfh.org Habitat for Humanity requires volunteers for our prefab shop. We are now booking 10 – 15 volunteers per day Beginners to trades people welcome to help us build walls for our build projects. We provide all tools and equipment. All volunteers participate in onsite safety orientation/training. No minimum number of shifts required. Contact for more info about the event: Kim Sherwood 780-451-3416 ksherwood@hfh.org Habitat for Humanity requires volunteers for our ReStores We are recruiting customer service volunteers to help us at least one shift per week at store locations in north, south or west Edmonton. Customer service volunteers at our new and used building supplies stores help customers, load vehicles, clean items, stock shelves and many other tasks. Help our community to recycle everything from furniture to building supplies! Contact for more info about the event: Evan Hammer 780-451-3416 ehammer@hfh.org Help someone in crisis take that first step towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation create a future without breast cancer through volunteerism. Contact 1-866-302-2223 or ivolunteer@cbcf.org for current volunteer opportunities

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteers Wanted

Needed for our Long Term Care residence, daytime volunteers for various activities or just for a friendly visit! Please contact Janice at Extendicare Eaux Claires for more details jgraff@extendicare.com (780) 472 - 1106 Room to Read is changing children’s lives in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our work, and spread the word about our amazing results. Edmonton@roomtoread.org www.roomtoread.org Strathcona County Victim Services Unit Become a Volunteer Advocate and work in conjunction with the RCMP to provide assistance, support, information and referrals to victims of crime and trauma in Strathcona County Advocates must live in the area, complete an RCMP Security Clearance and Alberta Solicitor General Training prior to volunteering. On-going professional development and training sessions are available and are provided at no cost to volunteers. The opportunity to attend conferences, seminars and workshops are also available. If you have an interest in helping people within your community, and want to engage in challenging work in a team environment.......contact Stacey @ 780-410-4331 or stacey.grilo@strathcona.ca for more information. Volunteering - Does your employer have a Day of Caring program? We invite you to come and spend some time with us at Habitat for Humanity! It’s easy to sign up a group of volunteers to work on one of our builds. Volunteers from beginners to garage “putterers”, to trades people come out and help us to build homes for families in our community. We provide all tools, equipment, safety gear and lunch. Volunteers work in small crews under the direction of our site supervisors. Our primary focus is safety and we have a fun, welcoming environment that’s great for an employee group to experience giving back to community together. For more information, go to our website at www.hfh.org or contact Kim at 780-451-3416 ext 232. Volunteering - Improve the Lives of Children in the Developing World Room to Read is changing the lives of children in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our programs, and spread the word about the fantastic results we are achieving. Skills in event planning, PR, marketing, graphic design are needed, but not essential. We welcome all volunteers. If this sounds interesting, email us at Edmonton@roomtoread.org

CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we are looking for people to volunteer as 50/50 Ticket Sellers at two hockey games at Rexall place. Oil Kings Game - Friday, December 6th. This will be a very exciting game as Santas volunteers will not only be selling the 50/50 tickets, we will also be selling Chuck Pucks and there will be a Teddy Bear Toss. At the first Oil Kings goal there will be a cascade of teddy bears as fans toss stuffed toys onto the ice. Time commitment will be from 5pm to around 9pm, Dec 6th. Oilers Game - Saturday, December 21st. Because it is so close to Christmas this is a great date for Santas volunteers to be selling 50/50s at an Oiler Game. The public will be responding very positively to our presence making for a very exciting event.Time commitment will be from 4:30pm to about 9:30pm Dec 21st. For more information, visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca , email

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or call Janet at 780 428-8697. Thank You!

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we are looking for people to volunteer as Greeters welcoming and signing in our warehouse volunteers. Our warehouse is located at 12345 121ST, inside Northgate Industries. Shifts available are: Saturday afternoons from 2pm to 5pm on Nov 16, Nov 23, Nov 30 and Dec7. Sunday afternoons from 1pm to 3pm on Nov 17, Nov 24, Dec 1 and Dec 8. Tuesday daytime hours available on Nov 19, Nov 26, Dec 3 and Dec 10. Thursday afternoons from 3pm to 5pm on Nov 21. For more information, visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca , email

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or call Janet at 780 428-8697.

We’re Seeking Volunteers for Our Casino! Workshop West We are holding our casino on January 1 and 2, 2014 at the Palace Casino, located at West Edmonton Mall. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Natalia at tickets@workshopwest.org Volunteering for Workshop West Theatre is a great opportunity for independent theatre artists who are looking for affordable rehearsal space. For every hour that you volunteer at our casino, you get three hours of free rehearsal space at EPIC Underground. For more information on EPIC Underground, email tickets@workshopwest.org

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we are looking for people to volunteer as Toy Pickup Drivers collecting our toy donations from various locations around the city. To be eligible for this work, you must have a vehicle, show us your valid driver’s license and insurance and be willing to undergo a police check. You will need your vehicle for two or three trips a week to your location, where you will fill up the supplied bags with toy donations and bring them to our warehouse at Northgate Industries (12345 121 ST). For more information, visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca , email volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or call Janet at 780 428-8697

Toy Pickup Drivers for CHED Santas Anonymous are needed at these locations: CHED RADIO STATION (5204 84 ST) - We need four volunteers for this location; one person for each day of the week, Tue-Frid. Pickups must be done before 5pm. COSTCO SOUTH (2616 91 ST NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). MILLWOODS TOWN CENTER (2331 66 ST NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). SOUTHGATE MALL (5015 111 ST NW) WEEKDAYS - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). WALMART WINDEMERE (6110 Currents DR NW) - We would like to see two teams share this location (alternate days). ON CALL DRIVERS sometimes a location driver cannot make a trip and the location will call us asking for a pickup as their box is full. We need people who are available either morning or afternoons in all sections of town. Volunteers needed at CHED Santas Anonymous CHED Santas Anonymous has been delivering the spirit of Christmas to the less fortunate children for 59 years in the City of Edmonton. To help with this work, we have been granted a booth at the Edmonton Christmas Show 2013 which runs from Nov 28 to Dec 1st. We are looking for volunteers to help us man the booth. Shifts are mornings, afternoons and evenings. We will be setting up a silent auction table and a table with information on CHED Santas Anonymous. Please visit our website at http://santasanonymous.ca for more information on CHED Santas Anonymous and the Edmonton Christmas Show 2013 event. Interested people may contact Janet at

volunteer@santasanonymous.ca

or 780-428-8697.

2005.

Artist to Artist

ARTIST requires agent/manager to assist in selling ART. Commission is generous percentage % . Contact BDC at monkeywrench@live.ca

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

2005.

Artist to Artist

2013 Palaeo Arts Contest at the Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, AB. This year, our scientists have selected a Stygimoloch skull to discover and interpret through art. Our annual Palaeo Arts Contest is open to all grade levels, has prizes for every winner, including two $500 draw prizes that are awarded to schools, and offers the chance to have students’ winning artwork displayed at the Museum. For more information, including topics for each grade level, visit: http://www.tyrrellmuseum.com/ Palaeo_Arts_Contest.htm.

Art Gallery of St Albert (AGSA), a contemporary public art gallery, seeks submissions from artists working in all styles and mediums for exhibition in the 2015 calendar year. Submissions are adjudicated by a panel of visual art professionals who represent a spectrum of expertise in the visual arts. The artists chosen to exhibit receive CARFAC fees. Deadline for submissions: Saturday, March 1, 2014, 5 pm For more information: Jenny Willson-McGrath, Exhibition Curator 780.651.5741 I jennyw@artsheritage.ca

Botanical Artists of Canada (BAC) – Juried Exhibition, The Four Seasons, March 26 – April 6, 2014, Paper Mill Gallery, Toronto. Entry deadline: Friday, January 10, 2014. Open to all BAC members in good standing; non-members may join prior to entering exhibition

www.botanicalartistsofcanada.org/ join.

Submission fee $45 for up to three works. Awards: Best in show – $350 and three other awards – $150 each. To download the call for entries: http://www.botanicalartistsofca nada.org/exhibitions/calls-forentries For more information or questions, email exhibition coordinator Gerry Jenkison, gerry@jenkisonnetwork.com

Call for Submissions : FAVA FEST FILM AND VIDEO ARTS FESTIVAL MARCH 25 – 29, 2014 FAVA FEST exposes the larger community to the artistic work of membership, stimulates new work, rewards past success and just generally makes a bigger noise about FAVA. Hosting a media art gear expo and BBQ, screen 30-40 films directed by Northern Alberta filmmakers, hold an Artist Talk or Panel ( 2013-brought in noted Art Director Todd Cherniawsky) and give away $20,000 worth of awards at FAVA GALA – a celebration of excellence in media arts and FAVA’s big fundraiser for the year. Festival details and schedule to come in early 2014.

2005.

Artist to Artist

Call for Submissions 2014/15 Gallery Exhibition Programming Submission Deadline: November 30, 2013 Harcourt House Arts Centre is currently accepting submissions for our 2014/2015 gallery exhibition programming for the Main Gallery and Front Room Gallery exhibition spaces. For full submission details please visit www.harcourthouse.ab.ca

STAGE STRUCK 2014! CALL FOR ENTRANTS Submissions for ADFA/Edmonton one-act adult play festival on February 21/22, accepted until December 15, 2013. Information and registration package from Mary-Ellen at 780-481-3716 or mperley@shaw.ca

STUDENT POSTCARD EXCHANGE CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS, THEME: MAPPING Create a postcard that follows the theme of MAPPING. Here are some ideas to get you thinking about mapping, these are only to start thinking about your piece and in no way are meant to be restrictive. Maps can direct you where to go; they can chart both physical places and ideas. Technology has changed the way that we understand mapping. Maps are no longer a static representation of space but change as quickly as the place that they represent. They can record public knowledge or a private understanding of an environment; they can be clear or cryptic. For this exhibition artists can make up to 2 original postcards. Postcards must be 2-dimensional, 4 x 6 inch postcards. Artists are encouraged to use any media (drawing, print media, painting, collage, etc.). Submission Deadline (postmarked by): Friday, December 13, 2013 Please contact Brittney Roy for more details. harcourtexhibit@shaw.ca 780.426.4180

The Art Gallery of Alberta (AGA) is pleased to announce the 2015 Alberta Biennial of Contemporary Art Call for Submissions is now open to resident Alberta artists. Details of the call, which closes at 4 pm on Friday, December 13, 2013, can be found at youraga.ca. The exhibition will be on view at the AGA in early 2015 All resident Alberta artists are eligible to submit works for consideration. Submissions should include: a curriculum vitae; a brief artist’s statement; a CD with a maximum of 20 images formatted as a PowerPoint presentation of recent work (with artist’s name, title, media and date of work clearly indicated for each image) or a maximum of three videos or DVDs for media or time-based work; and a self-addressed envelope with appropriate postage for return delivery if required. Submissions should be sent directly to the Art Gallery of Alberta by Friday, December 13, 2013 by 4 pm. Please visit youraga.ca for more information


2005.

Artist to Artist

The EAC’s annual Community Investment Program Arts Operating Grant is fast approaching. If you are running an non-profit in Edmonton, and primarily support the production of artwork, you could be eligible for this grant. The deadline for submission is December 1st. Application guidelines can be found through Art Rubicon: http://artrubicon.com/2322/eaccip-arts-operating-grantsorganizations-closesdec-1-annually/ The Paint Spot, Edmonton would like to extend an invitation to your organization, club, society, school or association to make use of the many exhibition opportunities we offer to members of the Alberta art community. We encourage individuals and curators, particularly those who are emerging, as well as groups, to make exhibition proposals to our galleries: Naess, Gallery, Artisan Nook, and the Vertical Space. For further information on these three show spaces, please visit our website, www.paintspot.ca

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•• AUcTions •• WARD’S AUCTIONS Antiques/ Estate Auction, Dec. 1st and 2nd 11802-145 St Edmonton; 780-4514549 Taking Consignments now for Feb 8th Firearms and Related Auction, Online Bidding and Pictures at www.wardsauctions.com. UNRESERVED PUBLIC AUCTION. Truck, snowmobiles, power tools, hardware surplus, antiques, saddle and much more. Saturday, November 30 starting 10 a.m. Scribner Auction. Wainwright, Alberta. 780-842-5666; www.scribnernet.com.

•• AUTo pArTs •• WRECKING AUTO-TRUCKS. Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. (Lloydminster). Reply 780-875-0270. North-East Recyclers truck up to 3 tons.

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The Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Northern Italy Call for literary arts / visual arts residencies

GET FREE vending machines. Can earn $100,000.00 + per year. All cash-retire in just 3 years. Protected territories. Full details call now 1-866668-6629. Website: www.tcvend.com.

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Through residencies and conferences, the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Northern Italy supports innovations that change the way we address complex global issues. Here, people of diverse expertise and backgrounds come together in a thoughtprovoking, creative, collegial environment that helps create change and have impact on a wide range of world issues. Applications for Academic Writing as well as Arts & Literary Arts residencies are due by December 3, 2013. Applications from practitioners and for conferences are accepted on a rolling basis. http://www.rockefellerfoundatio n.org/bellagio-center The Writers’ Guild of Alberta Gears Up for the 2014 Alberta Literary Awards! The Writers’ Guild of Alberta (WGA) is preparing to celebrate another successful year with the 2014 Alberta Literary Awards. Writers from across Alberta and their publishers are invited to check out and submit to this year’s award categories. The deadline for submissions to the Alberta Literary Awards is December 31, 2013. For more information and submission guidelines, please visit www.writersguild.ab.ca

2010.

Musicians Available

Old shuffle blues drummer available for gigs. Influences: B.B. King, Freddy King, etc. 780-462-6291

2020.

Musicians Wanted

Guitarists, bassists, vocalists, pianists and drummers needed for good paying teaching jobs. Please call 780-901-7677

ROCKY MOUNTAIN Dodge and RV is now accepting resumes for the following positions: Product Advisors, Inventory Control Manager, Service Advisor. Please send resume to: salesmanager@rmdrv.com. WINCH TRACTOR OPERATORS. Must have experience operating a winch. To apply fax, email or drop off resume at the office. Phone 780-842-6444. Fax 780-842-6581. Email: rigmove@telus.net. Mail: H&E Oilfield Services Ltd., 2202 - 1 Ave., Wainwright, AB, T9W 1L7. For more employment information see our webpage: www.heoil.com. SEEKING A CAREER in the Community Newspaper business? Post your resume for FREE right where the publishers are looking. Visit: www.awna.com/resumes_add.php. INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT Operator School. No Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. Sign up online! iheschool.com. 1-866-399-3853. HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC. Experienced in hydraulics, diesel engines, prime movers, tracked vehicles as well as spray equipment. This is an opportunity for field work and shop. Please send resume to: acemail@acevegetation.com or fax 780-955-9426 or mail to: Ace, 2001 - 8 St., Nisku, AB, T9E 7Z1. FIRST CHOICE COLLISION seeking Journeyman Technician for our car and light truck division. Successful candidate must have Canadian Red Seal and/or Alberta Completion of Apprenticeship Certificate. Starting flat rate wage $29/hour plus monthly bonus available. Blue Cross benefit package after 3 months successful employment. Fax resume 403-3432160 or drop in person, Red Deer. TJ LOGGING of Whitecourt, Alberta is now taking resumes for 2013 - 2014 logging season. Experienced buncher/skidder/ limber/process operators required. Please fax resume to 780-778-2428. HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE Class 1 or 3 Operators. Full-time and part-time positions available. Openings in several Alberta areas. Fax resume to Carillion Canada 780-449-0574 or email: mcroft@carillionalberta.ca. Positions to

start Oct. 15, 2103. Please state what position and location you are interested in. Want to see the country? Semi retired? We are looking for 1 ton O/O to transport RVs throughout North America. 1-800-8676233; www.roadexservices.com. THE TOWN of Sylvan Lake, Alberta requires a full-time permanent Equipment Operator 2 to operate Grader, Backhoe, Skid Steer, etc. We offer a great work environment along with competitive wage and benefit package. Please send your resume to dscott@sylvanlake.ca.

•• for sALe •• METAL ROOFING & SIDING. Very competitive prices! Largest colour selection in Western Canada. Available at over 25 Alberta Distribution Locations. 40 Year Warranty. Call 1-888-263-8254. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100, sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-4572206; www.crownsteelbuildings.ca. MOVIE THEATRE with attached suite in Provost, Alberta. 100 seats. New digital Real 3-D projection equipment. Selling for health reasons. Call Bruc 780-753-4703 or 780-753-0189. CURLING EQUIPMENT HEADQUARTERS! Great Christmas Gifts. Shoes, brushes, jackets, timers, gloves, sticks, crutches, Hardline Icepad2, etc. Pro Shop, Red Deer Curling Centre. Phone 1-403-346-3777. Email: proshop@reddeercurling.ca. DISCONNECTED PHONE? Phone Factory Home Phone Service. No one refused! Low monthly rate! Calling features and unlimited long distance available. Call Phone Factory today! 1-877336-2274; www.phonefactory.ca. STEEL BUILDING. “The Big Year End Clear Out!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422; www.pioneersteel.ca. EVERY WATER WELL on earth should have the patented “Kontinuous Shok” Chlorinator from Big Iron Drilling! Why? Save thousands of lives every year. www.1-800bigiron.com. Phone 1-800-BIG-IRON.

•• mAnUfAcTUred •• homes SHOWHOME SPECTACULAR! We want you to own a wonderful former showhome at a fantastic price. 1672 sq. ft., too many features to list! $169,000. Ready for immediate delivery; www.unitedhomescanada.com. 148 Eastlake Blvd., Airdrie. 1-800-461-7632.

•• personALs •• TRUE PSYCHICS! For Answers call now 24/7 Toll Free 1-877-342-3036; Mobile: # 4486; http://www.truepsychics.ca. DATING SERVICE. Long-term/ short-term relationships. Free to try! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call #7878 or 1-888534-6984. Live adult 1on1 Call 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet local single ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+).

•• reAL esTATe •• CUSTOM LOG HOMES and Log Specialties - M&H Wood Specialties 1-888-991-5700 or email: sales@ mhwood.com; www.mhwood.com.

•• services •• CRIMINAL RECORD? Think: Canadian pardon. U.S. travel waiver. (24 hour record check). Divorce? Simple. Fast. Inexpensive. Debt recovery? Alberta collection to $25,000. Calgary 403-228-1300/1-800-347-2540; www.accesslegalresearch.com.

FREEWILLASTROLOGY

ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): Thinking inside the box will be a crime against your nature in the coming weeks. The last place you want to be is in a pigeonhole. I advise you to stay far away from tight squeezes, claustrophobic "sanctuaries" and "convenient" confinements. If you're in a one-size-fitsall situation, you simply won't be able to access your highest intelligence. So then where should you be? I am rooting for you to wander into the wild frontiers where unsanctioned wonders and marvels await you. I'd love for you to find virgin terrain and uncharted territories where the boring old rules don't apply. TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): Mike Finnigan is a veteran keyboardist and blues vocalist who has toured with more than 20 major acts, including Jimi Hendrix, Etta James, Leonard Cohen and Los Lonely Boys. There's a primal quality to his singing. It's gritty and fluid and tempestuous, almost feral at times. I understand perfectly why Bonnie Raitt has called him a "tall drink of bacon." The sound he makes with his voice is that lush and tasty. Can you guess his astrological sign? It's Taurus, of course. I'm naming him your patron saint this week because you yourself are as close as you have ever come to being a tall drink of bacon. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): French painter Henri Matisse thought highly of his own work. He tended to ignore critics because he didn't think they understood his art well enough to produce intelligent critiques. There was one person whose opinion he was willing to heed, though; a single colleague who he said had earned to right to evaluate and assess his art: Pablo Picasso. I encourage you, Gemini, to come up with your own short list of people whose judgment you totally trust and respect. It's a good time to seek out their feedback on how you're doing.

CANCER (Jun 21 – Jul 22): How is it possible that you have come so far and worked so diligently only to be resigned now to hanging out in limbo, waiting around for the lucky break that may or may not ever arrive? I'm here today to escort you out of this infernal place. If you resist, my assignment is to drag you out. Why am I so adamant? Because I am sure it's a mistake for you to be passive and hope for the best. You need to resume working diligently, focused for now on what's right in front of you without worrying too much about the big picture. In my opinion, that approach will lead you to unforeseen help—and a clarification of the big picture. LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): Your levels of personal magic are high. The radiance beaming out of your eyes is extra sparkly. There's an artistry to the way you are ex-

VUEWEEKLY SEP 26 – OCT 2, 2013

pressing yourself. Without even trying, you're exuding natural charisma and animal magnetism. In light of all these advantages, I suspect you will have an elevated capacity for both giving and receiving pleasure. In fact, I predict that your ability to feel really good and make other people feel really good will be at a peak. I hereby designate this the Week of Supreme Bliss. VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): The BBC reported on an expert who combs Switzerland's Risoud Forest to find the spruce trees whose wood can be made into the highest quality violins. After years of experience, Lorenzo Pellegrini knows which few trees will produce instruments with the most resonant tones. They grow slowly and have few knots. They need to have had enough water to grow strong, but not so much water that they're mushy. Your task in the coming weeks, Virgo, has a certain resemblance to the master tree-picker's work. It's time for you to start selecting and gathering the raw materials you will use to craft your own lyrical story in 2014. LIBRA (Sep 23 – Oct 22): Here's the bad news: for all of us—including you—there is a gap between our intentions and our actual effects. Here's the good news: now is your special time to narrow that gap. More bad news: all of us—you included— are periodically guilty of sending out mixed messages. We confuse people with our ambivalence; what we say is sometimes different from what we feel. More good news: now is your special time to reduce your mixed messages to as close to zero as possible. One more taste of bad news: like all of us, you are a bit hypocritical. You engage in behaviour that you criticize in others. You don't practice what you preach. One last piece of good news: now is your special time to work on being forthright, genuine and consistent. SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): "I am very fond of strawberries and cream," said author Dale Carnegie. "But I have found that for some strange reason, fish prefer worms. So when I went fishing, I didn't think about what I wanted. I thought about what they wanted. I didn't bait the hook with strawberries and cream. Rather, I dangled a worm or grasshopper in front of the fish." That's a good teaching story for you, Scorpio. In order to get your desires fulfilled by the people who have the power to do that, you should give them what they actually long for—not what you long for, nor what you wish they would long for. This is always true, of course, but it's especially applicable to what's going on in your life right now. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21): Touted as a prime source

of "kick-@ss spirituality," author Danielle LaPorte has advice that's good for you to hear. "You will always be too much of something for someone," she says. "Too big, too loud, too soft, too edgy." But that's exactly as it should be, she adds. It would be a mistake to "round out your edges," because then you would "lose your edge." And I'm here to tell you that you need all of your edge right now, Sagittarius. It's time to ignore people's mediocre expectations and push past their limits. To be true to yourself, you will probably have to be too much of something for several someones. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): Going into my spiritual mentoring session with the priestess, I had the intention of discovering truths about myself I didn't know before. That meant stirring up revelations about my ignorance as well as my potentials. I wanted assistance in facing my flaws as well as in tapping into my dormant powers. It worked. Her guidance was a potent catalyst. I was able to shed the debilitating nonsense stories I'd been telling myself about who I am. I awakened strengths that had been asleep. What I wish for you, Capricorn—indeed, what I predict for you—is a comparable experience. To expedite matters, go out in search of a person, adventure or breakthrough that can help provide you with the kind of prod I received. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): I bet people will be gossiping about you more than usual. Is there anything you can do to ensure that it's mostly benevolent gossip? Yes, there is. First, make sure that when you gossip about others, you are unfailingly positive in your comments. If you don't have anything good to say about someone, don't say it. Second, be on your best behaviour. Communicate clearly and don't even think about taking unethical shortcuts. Finally, contribute more inspirational energy than usual to every group you're part of. Be an effervescent team player. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): Maybe your ego isn't big enough. I'm serious. Is it possible that you could benefit from being more proud of yourself? Would it be healthy for you to give yourself more credit for the struggles you have weathered and the skills you have mastered and the beauty you have managed to forge out of the chaotic raw materials that life has given you? I've got a good feeling about this, Pisces. I can imagine you summoning the playful courage you will need to express more confidence. I can even picture you beginning to fantasize about embarking on certain stirring adventures you've never believed you were strong enough to try before now. V

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VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


3.75” wide version

LUSTFORLIFE

BRENDA KERBER BRENDA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

All eyes on birth control Linking glaucoma to birth control pills is a bit hyped up

It makes sense that there could be a women who had taken birth control We've all heard that masturbation link. There are estrogen receptors in pills for more than three years were will make you go blind, but now, if the eye and some researchers have twice as likely to have glaucoma than some alarmist headlines that surtheories that estrogen may have a those who had not taken the pill faced last week are to be believed, protective effect on the retina. Longas long. That sounds like a huge intaking the birth control pill will too. term use of oral contraceptives keeps crease, but what it actually means is A study presented at the American women at a relatively steady level of that 231 women in the study who had Association of Ophthalmologists estrogen in the blood rather than been on the pill for longer than three last week found a potential link begetting the spikes they would expeyears had glaucoma. The lifetime risk tween long-term use of birth control rience naturally. As well, hormonal for glaucoma in the general populapills and glaucoma, an eye disease contraceptives can that can lead have an effect on to blindness. This study saw about fi ve percent of women in blood pressure News sites this group had the disease. It's a big percentage and glaucoma is a and bloggers disease related to picked up this increase, but it's not a large number. blood pressure. small nugget However, even of research Elaine Wang, the and ran scary Sand & fiGravel Consulting lead researcher on the study, says tion for women is about 2.5 percent. headlines like 'New study nds conthere's no cause for alarm at this traceptives may lead to blindness' Exploration & Testing This study saw about five percent of point. She stressed in a press conferand 'Scary new side effect may make women in this group had the disease. ence that the study shows only a poIt's a big percentage increase, but it's women rethinkVolume the birthEstimation control pill'. 12345 tential link, not a direct cause at all. not a large number. Should you Exploration flush your pills down Does the study tell us anything? Further complicating the matter the toilet andPermit run to Applications your eye docOnly that there is a possibility that tor? Not just yet, no. Although the is the fact that the study did not Public &grabbing, Private you birth control pills may play some role divide this group of long-term pill headlines are attention Land Approvals in a slightly elevated risk of glaucoma takers as to how much longer than need to read the whole story to get and that more research is needed. V three years they had been taking at the truth. Conservation & web: aplombterra.ca The study, completed by Univer- atpc@aplombterra.ca the pill, when they started, if they Reclamation Brenda Kerber is a sexual health had 780-702-0579 stopped and for how long and sity of California, San Francisco, Duke Plans educator who has worked with lowhat types of pills they are or were University School of Medicine and cal not-for-profits since 1995. She is taking. This leaves a lot of unanThird Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang the owner of the Edmonton-based, University in China, reviewed the swered questions as to what, if anysex-positive adult toy boutique the thing, actually causes the link. medical history of just over 3400 Traveling Tickle Trunk. women over 40. They found that

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VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

IN THE BACK 53


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

DAN SAVAGE SAVAGELOVE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“Berry Good”-- be an agent of change. A SAD THING TO DO

Across

1 Composer with a clavier 5 “Grumpy Old Men” actor Davis 10 Be choosy 13 ___ & the Bunnymen 14 Dessert dipped in coffee 16 Aunt, in Avila 17 What a forceful noblewoman often does? 20 Genre for Jay-Z 21 “Magnum, P.I.” star 22 SSW, e.g. 24 Having great balance? 28 Gets on Halloween 29 Grammy winner for “Shepherd Moons” 31 Noodle or beach ball 33 Command for a sheep’s fleece to grow bigger? 35 Toy magnate Schwarz 38 Attach, as string to a package 39 Cpl. or sgt. 40 Hatch of politics 42 Normal: abbr. 43 Five knit in one day, perhaps? 46 Permit holder, often 47 Actress Fisher of Season 4 of “Arrested Development” 48 Surgery suffix 51 “Hey, what’s the big ___?” 53 Cool, daddy-o 54 Prickly bush 56 “Bang and Blame” band 58 “Yup, that’s the sound a stream makes”? 64 Pick-up capacity? 65 E.B. White output 66 Haleakala’s island 67 Players who only bat, briefly 68 Monica that raised a racket 69 Bank features

Down

1 Casino transaction 2 “___ du lieber!” 3 Bright lipstick choice 4 Jorge’s hi 5 Detective Adrian Monk’s condition 6 Retiring 7 The Red October, e.g.

54 IN THE BACK

8 401(k) relatives 9 Che Guevara’s real first name 10 “None of the above” relative 11 King or queen 12 Robot’s jobs 15 Bob Ross’s art medium 18 Tax mo. 19 Kill 22 Moneys owed 23 Nunavut native 25 Twitter’s was on November 7th, 2013 26 “Roseanne” surname 27 Start of some search engine queries 30 George Harrison’s “All Those Years ___” 32 Plundered 34 Cast often seen together 35 Newbs 36 Ring bearer’s path 37 Ready to pour 41 A grand slam gets four 44 Of a noticeably smaller amount 45 Before, to Donne 46 Bausch & ___ 48 Went out 49 Teen infatuation 50 Ball field covers 52 Exist 55 Cushiness 57 Stone on the big screen 59 ___ pal 60 “Marble” bread 61 Letter before tee 62 ___ Lock (computer key) 63 Antiquated affirmative ©2013 Jonesin' Crosswords

aney says. "He didn't assume that wrong with having a kink like mine. I recently ended a relationship that she would implode without him I had a perfectly normal childhood lasted a year and five months. around. He seems to have a man- and it's not like I suffered a diaperWhile I loved this woman, for much ageable enough ego to realize that related trauma or something. I just of the relationship she was, to vary- he's not the sun and the air and always liked diapers. Unfortunateing degrees, depressed. I tried to be the only doorway through which ly, this particular fetish creeps most as helpful and patient as possible this woman can walk to happiness; people out and is closely associated with the hope and expectation that he's merely another human being with pedophilia, even though memshe would get better. I got her into (albeit a kind one) whose happi- bers of the ABDL community have counselling. We went to couples ness has value, too. And maybe this NO interest in kids. However, the counselling together. She got on breakup will provide the jolt she idea of being into this kink when I'm medication. I encouraged her to eat needs to recalibrate her approach in my 40s really grosses me out. well (I cooked her many healthy to her depression and really get I've gone through the binge-andmeals) and exercise daily (which she better. He also showed her another purge cycle most guys go through was never able to do). I tried to get person taking care of himself. I sin- when they realize they're into diaher out into nature. I tried to listen cerely hope she develops this skill pers. But is there any way to retrain and practise strong communication herself, but as anyone who's been your brain to not get off on a parskills. I encouraged her to explore around for a while and witnessed ticular fetish? the benefits of a fulfilling and GGG trouble and had troubles of their Another Boy Diaper Lover relationship, but our sex life fal- own knows, you cannot will that tered because of the depression and behaviour into people. That does The consensus in the sex-and-sciher low libido. I kept helping and not mean you don't love them." ence research crowd is this: your waiting, but she was simply unable Not following @RobDelaney on kinks will always be your kinks—a to assert herself to make healthy Twitter? You're the only one. Go to brain cannot be retrained where changes (both kinks are conphysical and mencerned—so And while most people don’t find fucking a per- you might as tal). I felt trapped dating someone son who is pretending to be a baby dog any less well enjoy your who couldn't take But that's creepy than fucking a person who’s pretending kinks. control of her life, only if your to be a baby, there seem to be a lot more puppy kinks can be enand the patterns kept repeating. I joyed consenplayers out there than diaper fans. eventually ended sually, ABDL, the relationwhich yours ship, which was happily can be. the right decision for me, but she robdelaney.com to buy his new book. And while it's true that some people was crushed. I'm hoping we can be have taken drugs to "treat" disturbfriends in the future. Do you have RISKY BUSINESS ing kinks, these drugs—mostly SSany advice for dating someone with Setting sexually transmitted infec- RIs—suppress libido generally; they depression? Can relationships and tions aside, is it safer for a woman do not target (nor can they eradidepression work? I found it to be planning to have a one-night stand cate) one kink in particular. (Are you soul-crushing. to take the guy back to her place or willing to give up sex to get over Serious About Depression to go to his place? Does this apply diapers? I didn't think so.) if both are staying in hotels? That said, ABDL, kinks have cer"I think SAD did the right thing," Reader Is Seeking Knowledge tain narratives—kinks have broad says Rob Delaney, the comedian, themes—and figuring out your Twitter supernova, and author of When you're having sex with a kink's narratives and themes may the new book Rob Delaney: Mother. stranger, RISK, it's generally con- help you tap into and enjoy other Wife. Sister. Human. Warrior. Fal- sidered safer—some would argue kinks with similar Ns and Ts but con. Yardstick. Turban. Cabbage. only marginally so—to go back lower creep factors. If what you "And not only 'the' right thing, but to his place. The reason for this is enjoy about diapers is the helpa series of right things." kinda depressing: a stranger is less lessness and loss of control they Delaney's book is a collection of likely to murder you at his place symbolize mixed with your submispersonal essays—most of them hi- because then he has to dispose of sion to an affectionate and caring larious—in which he writes about your body, which is apparently a authority figure, you might find fehis own struggle with depression real pain in the ass. But if he mur- tish puppy play similarly arousing, so crippling, it almost took his life. ders you at your place, RISK, he can ABDL, as that kink also has themes Delaney is now the official spokes- jet in the morning and stick your of helplessness, dependence and person for all people everywhere landlord and loved ones with dis- affection. And while most people posal duties. who struggle with depression. don't find fucking a person who is "This guy went above and beyond, pretending to be a baby dog any motivated by his obvious love for DIAPER DAYS less creepy than fucking a person this woman and his decency as a I'm a 21-year-old gay male who who's pretending to be a baby, person," Delaney continues. "One loves listening to the Savage Love- there seem to be a lot more puppy might 'suck it up' for a bit longer cast as I bike to school. My ques- players out there than diaper fans. But honestly, ABDL, I think you if there are kids involved or if tion: can someone grow out of or you've been together for years and "quit" a fetish? For me, I'm an ABDL, should keep looking for a guy years and this depressive state is which stands for "adult baby/diaper who's into the same things you an anomaly, but this guy can't be lover." I get turned on by putting are. If for some reason you can't expected to weld himself to some- other guys into diapers or having date the great guy who helped you one he's been dating for less than other, usually older, guys put me mix diaper play with bondage, you a year and a half when there are in diapers. I can have normal sex should take his existence as proof people out there he'd truly enjoy and have had a few decent relation- that there are other guys like him, ships, or at least as decent as most ie, guys who will like you and like himself with." Delaney not only felt that you gay guys still in college have, with what you like. had done right by this woman, but guys I've met through kink sites that your actions could serve as a like FetLife or through the normal This week on the Savage Lovecast, template for other readers dating means of meeting guys. I've met a Dan chats with an expert about sex great guy who has helped me mix after weight-loss surgery: savagelpeople struggling with depression. "SAD was kind, patient and pro- ABDL with bondage for some REAL ovecast.com. V active and when that didn't work, fun, and I'm pretty OK with knowhe ended the relationship," Del- ing that there's nothing particularly @fakedansavage on Twitter

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013

IN THE BACK 55


56 WHAT’S UP SHINY PANTS, WHOA, WHOA, WHOA, WHOA

VUEWEEKLY NOV 28 – DEC 4, 2013


Vue Weekly: 945