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Exhibition runs until July 14, 2012 Join us Saturday, July 7 from 2 to 5pm for our free Painting for the Pint-Sized workshop. University of Alberta Museums, Gallery A Main Floor, TELUS Centre, 87 Ave & 111 St | Hours: Thu. and Fri. noon to 5pm | Sat. 2 to 5pm

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LISTINGS: EVENTS /9 FILM /13 ARTS /17 MUSIC /32 CLASSIFIEDS: GENERAL /35 ADULT /36 ISSUE: 872 JUL 5 – JUL 11, 2012

FRONT /6

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Making the Grade "Good beer cities have a handful of places where beer reigns supreme."

18 Cover illustration: Ross Vincent

8 11 27

"Regardless of the final outcome, the bottom line is that the provincial government missed its budget by over $3.4 billion." "Listen to stale fart jokes, a kitschy obsession with Flash Gordon, and trite sentiments in clichéd settings." "We basically locked ourselves in with some Ichiban and some whisky and set up a recorder and went all day and all night, passed out for a couple hours, woke up and just kept going."

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VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

UP FRONT 5


UP FRONT

VUEPOINT

SAMANTHA POWER

GRASDAL'S VUE

// SAMANTHA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

An award of merit The idea of merit can be a difficult one. Who is entitled to reward? This past Canada Day former Premier Ralph Klein was awarded the distinction of the Order of Canada. Premier for 14 years in this province and mayor of Calgary before that, Klein has certainly served his time in public office, but is he worthy of Canada's highest honour? Choosing a politician for an honour of merit is difficult. Politics is a tricky field that wins you many enemies and few friends, and decades after your time in office the results of your decisions will be analyzed as to whether they truly served the public you were elected to represent. There are few politicians who can move beyond the dichotomous party lines and win the respect of all. We saw an outpouring of respect for Jack Layton's approach to politics, Peter Lougheed will always be remembered for his respectful, well-measured approach to the province and his dedication to service even after his time in office. Pierre Trudeau leaves behind a controversial legacy, but few could argue his impact on the Canadian people. But should it be about more than simply impact and longevity in office? The Order of Canada awards the title based on "a lifetime of outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation … Their contribu-

tions are varied, yet they have all enriched the lives of others and made a difference to this country." It's the "made a difference" part that becomes problematic in the recognition of a politician. What kind of difference did they make? The impact of Klein's time in office is controversial. Throughout his 14 years he was accused of plagiarism, made fun of AISH recipients and laughed at homeless people. Beyond the simply outrageous, his cuts to public spending are still being felt today. The lack of long-term economic planning has left the province with little in the way of savings and an absurdly low corporate tax rate, especially on oil companies making millions off of our resources. In this regard, the impact of Klein's term in office is most certainly viewed differently by seniors in hospital beds and the nurses taking care of them. The recognition of Klein's term in office is about more than years served: it's also about how those years impacted a province and its people. In that regard, the rewarding of merit on this controversial premier should include the long-term implications of those 14 years in office, because when all is taken into account it's not a given that time served equals the Order of Canada's motto to "desire a better country." V

NEWSROUNDUP ON STRIKE Workers at the Devonshire Care Centre avoided a walk out this week when the provincial government imposed a disputes inquiry board in response to a labour dispute over labour practises by private care provider Park Place Seniors Living Inc. Licensed practical nurses, health care aides and other specialized staff moved to strike in order to end unfair labour practises, which have Park Place paying staff below Alberta Health Services levels. The disputes inquiry board was implemented by Human Services Minister Dave Hancock less than 24 hours before the strike was to occur, and without notification to the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees, the union of the health care workers. The inquiry implements a 30-day period, removing the legal right to strike where no strikes can occur while a mediation process is put in place. The dispute at Devonshire Care Centre is the third in a series of moves against the for-profit Park Place company, which keeps wages below the standard set by Alberta Health Ser-

6 UP FRONT

vices even though the company is provided with public funds to pay the full wage rates. In a letter to the premier, AUPE president Guy Smith called the move to implement an inquiry an “improper use of the legal mechanisms provided in the Alberta Labour Relationships Code.” The letter states the government should have implemented a “public emergency tribunal which would have imposed a binding settlement on the union and the employer.” Instead, the disputes inquiry board provides a non-binding decision, which Park Place Seniors Living has already rejected in the ruling on the Hardisty Care Centre, currently in its seventh week of a strike. Park Place Seniors Living is facing strikes not only at Hardisty, but at Revera Riverbend while workers in Calgary at Monterey Place remain locked-out. POLICING THE G20 The G20 Review completed its final report on June 29 and presented its conclusions to the Toronto Police Services

SAMANTHA POWER // SAMANTHA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Health care workers on strike at the Hardisty Care Centre on June 30.

Board. Launched on September 23, 2010 by the board, the review examined the role of the board with respect to the policing of the summer on June 25 – 27, 2010, which resulted in the largest mass arrest in Canada’s history. The report’s findings included a lack of consultation between the TPS board and the Toronto Police Service due to a rushed planning and lack of

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

// Paula Kirman

comprehensive communication. This resulted in the board working without all the information necessary and the creation of actions such as the controversial perimeter fence as well as the creation of the Eastern Avenue detention centre which was meant to be a processing centre, not a place to detain people for extended periods. The Canadian Civil Liberties Asso-

ciation points out that this report illustrates the need for greater civilian oversight of police. As well, the CCLA points to the greater need for cross-jurisdictional accountability mechanisms when cross-jurisdictional policing is occurring. The report calls for increased consultation and an open exchange of information between the Police Services Board and Toronto Police Service.


NEWS // WATER

Sustaining Alberta's rivers Water Matters report pushes for monitoring changes

W

ater is essential to every facet of life, and monitoring water supplies is an important step towards maintaining healthy water and ensuring adequate amounts for years to come. By June 30, a group of experts is required to report back to the provincial government with advice for establishing a science-based, province-wide comprehensive environmental monitoring system. "This team of scientific, regulatory and academic experts will review governance and funding options and provide recommendations to the government so that we continue making progress," Minister of Environment and Water Diana McQueen stated in a previous release. The six-member working group will focus on developing an implementation plan based on previous recommendations made by the Alberta Environmental Monitoring Panel. This means establishing a system with appropriate transparency and scientific oversight to carry out environmental monitoring, evaluation and reporting functions, along with providing a dedicated, stable revenue stream to fund monitoring, evaluation and reporting activities across the province. Meanwhile, the Water Matters Society of Alberta, an organization founded in 2007 by citizens concerned about watershed protection in the province, has been working on reports of its own. Recently, it released Sharing Our Rivers: How Albertans Can Maintain Healthy Rivers, Communities and Economies, the first of three reports aimed to provide clear, achievable recommendations for improving river and watershed management in Alberta. Bill Donahue, PhD, director of science and policy with Water Matters, says he would like to see the working group come back to the government with an arms-length governance

structure, with the organization being independently funded by industry and have it report to the legislature rather than to a minister. "I know some people have suggested that having it report to the minister will make sure the minister gets the information straight from the scientists, but, ultimately, that still falls under the realm of political control and message control and filtering, which is typically the problem," he continues. "If you report to the legislature, I think it would be sufficiently independent, much like an auditor general or something like that, because the way I see it, science is science, and I think the political shouldn't come into play then." Donahue explains that Water Matters works on the technological aspect of monitoring and investigates the failures of existing or historical monitoring plans. He adds that in 2011, Environment Canada and Alberta Environment brought experts together from across the country and outside of Canada to create a basic framework monitoring plans for water and biodiversity, land and air. "They emphasized cumulative effects and looking at fates of contaminants, how much is going into the environment, how it travels through the environment and where it ultimately ends up and impacts, with a focus on looking at regional impacts and cumulative assessment," Donahue says, adding this meant trying to figure where the environmental thresholds were and how to avoid the massive changes that would occur if they were passed. However, according to more recent updates, Donahue says this expert panel has pulled back from its regional cumulative effects mechanistic approach and formed separate silos for components of water, air biodiversity and contaminant dynamics. Donahue says the danger of this split could be

lack of communication between the groups. "My concern is they're just adding more stations rather than actually thinking about what's been wrong. We need to recreate this in a way that it actually does what it's supposed to rather than just adding on top of it," he notes. "It's like building a house that's on a weak foundation: it's still going to fall down."

allocate water or we add sewage and fluent waste, we need to figure out what those limits are scientifically," he adds. "If we don't, perhaps we overallocate them quantity-wise or we put too much waste into them." Water Matter's most recent report highlights scientific study regarding what is a sustainable amount of water withdrawl from the South Saskatchewan River basin. The study was done

It's like building a house that's on a weak foundation: it's still going to fall down.

Donahue would like to see watershed-management-planning integrated with land-use planning and water allocation, which currently isn't the case. Land-use planning happens under a legal framework, whereas watershed planning is under the Water for Life Policy. If there's a conflict between the two, land-use planning will take precedent because it has the force of law behind it. The reports published by Water Matters focus on the way water is allocated, or not allocated. The South Saskatchewan River basin is now closed to new water allocations, while the Red Deer River remains open. Donahue says a lot of the rivers in the south section of the province have been over-allocated and that most people presume because of the Water Act, which aims to protect fresh water systems and river health, and states when allocations are made, environmental factors will be considered. However, he notes that the Water Act does not state environmental factors will play a major role in deciding whether or not there's water allocations. "If we really want to figure out what's sustainable, how much our rivers can handle in terms of whether we

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

in the South Saskatchewan River basin water management framework and reported figures stating that approximately 85 percent of natural water flows have to be maintained to protect health. In contrast, Donahue says the actual plan in place for managing the South Saskatchewan River basin has defined sustainable levels as 45 percent of natural flows. Donahue notes that the Red Deer River basin does have 85 percent of natural flows, and says plans are in place to allocate it to the same levels as other rivers like the Bow and the South Saskatchewan. "What that means is we're guaranteed to have the same kinds of declines in river health in the Red Deer that are already in the other rivers of the South Saskatchewan River basin, which is really unfortunate, because the Red Deer, as it is now, does demonstrate a continuing river health downstream," he adds. "In most rivers in Alberta, if you have a big city there's all kinds of changes downstream because of a release of nutrients." In addition to over-allocation contributing to the decline of river health, Donahue says municipal waste is an obvious contributer, and with less wa-

ter in the rivers due to over-allocation, that waste can become highly concentrated. Low water flows can also contribute to a decline in the buffer of vegetation along the river, as well as the addition of dams. "In terms of risk management in Alberta, the big pillars of our economy are highly water dependent," he says, listing of irrigated agriculture as well as oil and gas development as examples. "They all use a lot of water, and if you go to say, for example, to oil sands hearings, industry and government always describe the water supply in the context of historical averages  ... they don't look at trends over time and the trends show winter low-flow periods are getting longer and they're going down. It's bad if we need to take water out of the river all year." Risk management remains important, as Donahue says Alberta is going to be the province most affected by climate change in terms of water supply impact. This is due to being situated in the rain shadow of the Rocky Mountains, which means the rest of Alberta is a dry area that relies for the most part, on rivers. Donahue adds the glaciers at the head waters of these rivers are melting more quickly, with glacier size decreasing by approximately a quarter to a third in the last two to three decades. "We really need to do the science to make informed decisions. The decisions we make on water use, ultimately, those are social and political decisions, so I think what we're advocating for is the fact that those decisions should be informed," Donahue adds of Water Matter's reports. "We can choose to do things a different way, but at least if we have the information about the risks, the benefits, we can weigh them and make better decisions." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

UP FRONT 7


COMMENT >> MEXICO

Mexico's peace

A new president will make peace in the war on drugs There's no point in talking about who back to acceptability he was one of won the Mexican presidential election the standard-bearers, winning the on July 1. What’s more interesting is governorship of the State of Mexico why Enrique Pena Nieto won. (the region surrounding the capital) in Pena Nieto, the candidate of Mexi2005. co's Institutional Revolutionary Party The standard he bore did not have (PRI), is a charming and extremely any stirring political slogan on it, howgood-looking non-entity. He speaks ever. Pena Nieto's entire political pitch, no foreign language, has travelled then and subsequently, consisted little abroad, and is so ignoof promising "projects"—a new rant that, when asked on road here, a hospital there— live television what three to every identifiable group .com in the electorate. That was books had influenced him ly k e e w e@vue gwynn most, he struggled to name all any PRI candidate could e y w G nn any books at all. Finally, he do, really, because the party Dyer came up with two: the Bible, had no serious ideological preand a Jeffrey Archer pot-boiler. tensions. He has spent his entire life in poliSandwiched between explicitly ideotics, and his timing was good. In 1990 logical rivals to the right and left, the he began working in various local conservative National Action Party branches of the PRI, the ruling single (PAN) and the socialist Party of the party that dominated every aspect of Democratic Revolution (PRD), all the Mexican life, and if democracy had old-fashioned PRI had to offer was panot come to Mexico it would probtronage and the pork barrel: poverty ably have taken him a long time to politics. That should have condemned rise to the top. However, 12 years ago, it to a long exile from power, because when he was only 34, the PRI lost Mexico has been doing very well power after 70 years in office. economically under the PAN governThe "dinosaurs" who ran the party ments that have run the country since machine realized that they needed a 2000. new approach in the newly democratic environment, and fresh young faces Mexico is the rising star among Latin like Pena Nieto's were just what they American economies, with an annual needed out front. In PRI's long march growth rate that now exceeds that of

R DYEIG HT

STRA

Brazil. And in an economy with low inflation and manageable debt, real incomes have risen as well. Per capita income in Mexico is now as much as 50 percent higher than Brazil's. So if Brazilian voters were so happy with the results of President Luiz Inacio "Lula" da Silva's eight years in power that they gratefully elected his chosen successor, Dilma Rousseff, to the presidency in 2010, why have PAN's 12 years of economic success

than a third of Venezuela's. However, the spectacular (and deliberate) savagery of the killings by the Mexican drug cartels has persuaded many Mexicans that they face an acute threat to their personal security, and they are not the least bit grateful to Felipe Calderon for unleashing this horror on the country. Back in the bad old days when the PRI ran everything, the cartels waged

President Felipe Calderon's declaration of war on Mexico's drug cartels in 2006 has embroiled the country in a bloodbath that blinds both foreigners and its own citizens to the remarkable progress that is being made on most other fronts. not entitled it to re-election too? The answer is simple: President Felipe Calderon's declaration of war on Mexico's drug cartels in 2006 has embroiled the country in a bloodbath that blinds both foreigners and its own citizens to the remarkable progress that is being made on most other fronts. At least 50  000 killed in the drug war over the past five years have persuaded Mexican citizens that the country is in an acute crisis. In fact, Mexico has a lower murder rate than Brazil or Colombia, and less

their internal wars discreetly, and they never attacked the forces of the state. There was an unwritten understanding that the government would not hinder their activities so long as they kept a low profile, except for an occasional big drug bust to keep the Americans happy. In return, the cartels paid off PRI officials at every level and helped to perpetuate the party's hold on power. It was a grubby arrangement, but not many people got killed and the public slept easily. Then came PAN, Calderon,

and the war. A significant section of the public, rightly or wrongly, now believes that the PRI can make the deals that are needed to restore the peace. It's probably a bit more complicated than that, in reality. Pena Nieto says nothing about it in public, but he has hired Oscar Naranjo, the Colombian police chief who played a major role in "decommissioning" that country’s cocaine syndicates, as his main security adviser. The impression that conveys to the voters (quite intentionally) is that as president he will make peace with the cartels, not wage a hopeless war against them. Did Pena Nieto think this up by himself? Probably not. Are the "dinosaurs" who still control the PRI behind the scenes capable of coming up with it? Of course they are; they once did business with the ancestors of the current drug lords. And would this be such a terrible thing for Mexico? Well, so long as the United States will not permit the legalization and nationalization of the drug trade, it's probably Mexico's best remaining alternative. Gwynne Dyer is a London-based independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries. His column appears each week in Vue Weekly.

COMMENT >> BUDGET

The way to run a province

Using oil prices to budget for the future is flawed planning What a ridiculous way to run a a chance to. The budget was preprovince. Albertans with a good sented as planned, the Tories headpolitical memory will remember ed into a leadership race, Wildrose the impact that the drafting of the popularity soared and the stage was 2011-2012 provincial budget had on set for a dynamic and tumultuous Alberta politics in the late winter of year in provincial politics. 2011. Premier Stelmach wanted Now it turns out all that drama to present a budget with a was for naught. Last week projected $3.4 billion defithe provincial government E cit. He was also ready to C released its annual report N E FER back-track on his promise INTER eweekly.com for the 2011-2012 fiscal @vu ricardo to balance Alberta's books year, and to everyone's o Ricard a by the year 2012, saying he surprise the deficit that ñ u c A would need a couple of more brought down a premier had years. all but disappeared. Instead of the This plan was not well received by projected $3.4 billion hole in the many in the Conservative caucus, province's books, when all was said who were already worried about the and done we finished the year with a Premier's falling popularity and the deficit of only $23 million—a minisrise of the Wildrose Party on their cule amount when you consider the right flank. They knew this was posize of the provincial budget. tentially the last budget before a provincial election, and did not want At the news conference releasing it to carry a deficit at all, never mind the annual report Finance Minister one as large as $3.4 billion. Doug Horner presented this as a The finance minister at the time, very good news story for the provTed Morton, made the decision ince. He didn't directly take credit, to resign rather than present this but it was clear he felt that at least budget in the legislature. Premier some of the kudos for the positive Stelmach caught wind of this pendfinancial outcomes should flow to ing resignation and the caucus rehis government. volt around him, and decided to In reality this should be anything pre-empt both by announcing his but a good news story. Regardless resignation before Ted Morton had of the final outcome, the bottom

CAL POLITI

8 up front

line is that the provincial government missed its budget by over $3.4 billion. This should give us no sense of comfort or reason to celebrate. These are the folks we entrust to responsibly shepherd our resources toward the goods and services

bottom line is that they got lucky. Three months into the current budget year, it looks like their luck may not hold. The price of oil right now is hovering around the $85 mark. The budget for this year, with its projected $900 million deficit, is premised on

These are the folks we entrust to responsibly shepherd our resources toward the goods and services we depend on daily. How can they do that if they have no sense from year to year of how much money will actually be coming into their coffers?

we depend on daily. How can they do that if they have no sense from year to year of how much money will actually be coming into their coffers? As always, the biggest difference was non-renewable resource revenues. The budget was based on oil averaging $89.40 for the year and the actual average price for the year was $97.33. The government also sold more land at higher prices than originally projected. In other words, contrary to the government's assertion that this was the result of "responsible decision-making," the

VUEWEEKLY July 5 – July 11, 2012

an average price of oil $99.25. We may yet get that $3.4 billion deficit, just a year late. Doug Horner defended his government's record by saying, "We have direct control over what we spend. We don't have direct control over oil prices or the royalty revenues that we're going to be bringing in." While it's true that the government doesn't control international oil prices, it's an irresponsible cop-out to suggest that the only thing they can control is spending. It also exposes an incredibly flawed style of governance. A government's responsibility is to

balance the provision of the services and infrastructure Albertans want and need with how much Albertans are willing to pay through taxes for those services and infrastructure. This government has entirely abandoned that responsibility, and instead bases its provision of services on the international price of a barrel of oil. It's time to change that paradigm and move towards proper and responsible governance and budgeting. We need to reform our tax system to ensure that we are collecting enough to pay for the goods and services we need and want, and we need to be saving our natural resource revenues to ensure that our children and grandchildren can also benefit from our common natural wealth. To do otherwise leads to volatility and an inability to determine from one year to the next what services we will be able to afford, and that's a truly ridiculous way to run a province. V Ricardo Acuña is the executive director of the Parkland Institute, a non-partisan, public policy research institute housed at the University of Alberta.


EVENTS WEEKLY FAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 780.426.2889 OR EMAIL LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3pm

COMEDY Brixx Bar • 10030-102 St • 780.428.1099 • Troubadour Tuesdays monthly with comedy and music Century Casino • 13103 Fort Rd

• 780.481.9857 • Open amateur night every Thu, 7:30pm • Rich Little starring in Jimmy Stewart: A Humorous Look At His Life; Jul 8

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway

Entertainment Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • That's Improv; Jul 6-7 • Bob Angeli; Jul 13-14

Comic Strip • Bourbon St, WEM •

780.483.5999 • Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; FriSat 10:30pm • Kelly Taylor; until Jul 8 • Nick Vatterott; Jul 11-15

DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave •

780.710.2119 • Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm

Filthy McNasty's • 10511-82

• 780.996.1778 • Stand Up Sundays: Stand-up comedy night every Sun with a different headliner every week; 9pm; no cover

Jubilee Auditorium • 11455 87

Ave • 780.427.2760 • Bill Maher • Jul 6, 8pm • $49, $75 at Ticketmaster

laugh shop–Sherwood Park • 4 Blackfoot Road, Sherwood Park • 780.417.9777 • laughinthepark.ca • Open Wed-Sat • Fri: 7:30pm, 10pm; Sat: 7:30pm and 10pm; $20 • Wednesday Amateur night: 8pm (call to be added to the line-up); free

Overtime Pub • 4211-106 St • Open

mic comedy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free

Rouge Lounge • 10111-117 St •

Sterling Scott every Wed, 9pm

Vault Pub • 8214-175 St • Comedy with Liam Creswick and Steve Schulte • Every Mon, at 9:30pm WINSPEAR CENTRE An Evening of

N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, Bishop St, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon 7:30pm

Cha Island Tea Co • 10332-81 Ave

• Games Night: Board games and card games • Every Mon, 7pm

Date Nights at the Garden

• Devonian Botonical Gardens • devonian.ualberta.ca/Events.aspx#July • Every Thu 'til dusk; until Aug 30 • Date Night admission rates: $10 (adult)/$5 (student)/$6.50 (senior) admission gates open until 8:30pm; garden open until dusk • Live music by the duo When Lovers Collide ( Jessy Mossop and Stephen Lecky)? (6:30-8:30); Jul 5 • Ahhh, Rumba… the latin dance of love. Instructors from the U of A Dance Club will give a free 1 hour lesson at 7:30pm; Jul 12

Edmonton Bike Art Nights • BikeWorks, 10047-80 Ave, back alley entrance • Art Nights • Every Wed, 6-9pm Edmonton Needlecraft Guild • Avonmore United Church

Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm

End Water Fluoridation • City Hall, 1 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • facebook.com/events/369900279730371/ • Say YES to Ending Water Fluoridation • Sun, Jul 8, 1pm FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church, 8424-95 Ave • 780.465.2019/780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm Highlands Garden Club •

11424-64 St • Historic Highlands Centennial Celebration Garden Tours • Sat, Jul 14, 12-5pm

Home–Energizing Spiritual Community for Passionate Living • Garneau/Ashbourne Assisted Living Place, 11148-84 Ave • Home: Blends music, drama, creativity and reflection on sacred texts to energize you for passionate living • Every Sun 3-5pm

Living Foods Sunday Summer Series • Earth's General Store,

9605-82 Ave • Spiralized zucchini noodles, cashew primavera, with roasted veggies; Jul 15

stand-up Comedy with Brent Butt; all ages; 8pm (show); $42.50, $36.50, $28.50 at UnionEvents.com, WinspearCentre. com

Downtown • Practice group meets every Thu

Wunderbar • 8120-101 St,

Meditation • Strathcona Li-

780.436.2286 • Comedy every 2nd Tue

Yellowhead Brewery • 10229-

105 St • Punchliners Comedy Show • Jul 7, 8:30pm-12 • $10 (adv)/$15 (door)

Zen Lounge • 12923-97 St • The Ca$h Prize comedy contest hosted by Matt Alaeddine and Andrew Iwanyk • Every Tue, 8pm • No cover

Groups/CLUBS/meetings Aikikai Aikido Club • 10139-87

Ave, Old Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm

Art Block Party • Early Bird Café, Brittany's Lounge, Bohemia • Satoreye Dreamtime • Sat, Jul 7, 8pm AWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP • Braeside Presbyterian Church bsmt,

9 up front

Lotus Qigong • 780.477.0683 •

brary • meditationedmonton.org • Weekly meditation drop-in; every Tue, 7-8:30pm

Northern Alberta Wood Carvers Association • Duggan

Community Hall, 3728-106 St • 780.458.6352, 780.467.6093 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

Organization for Bipolar Affective Disorder (OBAD)

• Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm 0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu 7-9pm • Free

Potluck Picnics at Kinsmen Park • Kinsmen Park, next to play-

ground, location sign at park • Bring: a vegan, vegetarian or raw vegan dish to serve at least 6 people plus your own plate, cup, cutlery and serving spoon • Jul 8, 5:30pm • Free

River Valley Vixen • Glenora stairs • All girls outdoor bootcamp every Mon, and Wed: 6:30pm • Until end Jul •

Info: E: rivervalleyvixen@gmail.com

Sherwood Park Walking Group + 50 • Meet inside

Millennium Place, Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10 min discussion, followed by a 30-40 minute walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta)

STRATHCONA COUNTY GARDEN TOUR • 780.410.8612 • Self-guided tour of ten of the most beautiful gardens in Sherwood Park, rural Strathcona County, and NE Edmonton. Organized by the Friends of Strathcona County Library • Sun, Jul 8, 10am-4:30pm • $12/ free (child 12 and under) tickets at the Strathcona County Library, Aqualine Aquatic Plants & Water Features, ABC Tree Farms, Country Roads Greenhouses, Salisbury Greenhouse

Sugarswing Dance Club •

Orange Hall, 10335-84 Ave or Pleasantview Hall, 10860-57 Ave • 780.604.7572 • Swing Dance at Sugar Foot Stomp: beginner lesson followed by dance every Sat, 8pm (door) at Orange Hall or Pleasantview Hall

Walk Alberta • Multicultural Heritage Centre, 5411-51 St, Stony Plain; Fox Creek Wilderness Volkssport Club: walk in Stony Plain, stroller friendly, 5km, 10km; Jul 7, 9:30am-12; Evelyn Rogers, 780.622.3578, riclyn@telus.net • Dawson Park, 10213-92 St: St Albert Trekkers Volkssport Club River and Ravine Series: walks on mostly paved paths, 5km, 10km; Jul 10, 6:30-9pm • Blackfoot Recreation Area, Washahegan Staging Area, Cooking Lake: Devon Discovery Walkers, 5km, 12km; Jul 14, 8:30am-12; Robert Duncan, 780.963.4145, duncanra@shaw.ca

Vegetarians of Alberta • Bon-

nie Doon Community Hall, 9240-93 St • vofa.ca/category/events • Monthly Potluck and book sale: bring a vegan dish to serve 8 people, your own plate, cup, cutlery, serving spoon • $3 (member)/$5 (non-member)

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of

the Old Strathcona Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 1011am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence

Y Toastmasters Club • Strathcona Legion, 9020-51 Ave • Meet every Tue, 7-9pm; helps members develop confidence in public speaking and leadership • Info: T: Antonio Balce at 780.463.5331

QUEER AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sunnybrook United Church,

Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month

Bisexual Women's Coffee Group • A social group for bi-

curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo. com/group/bwedmonton

BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725B Jasper Ave • 780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) • Unitarian Church of EdmonVUEWEEKLY July 5 – July 11, 2012

ton, 10804-119 St • A group of older gay men who have common interests meet the 2nd Sun, 2:30pm, for a social period, short meeting and guest speaker, discussion panel or potluck supper. Special interest groups meet for other social activities throughout the month. E: edmontonpt@yahoo.ca

FLASH Night Club • 10018-105 St

• 780.969.9965 • Thu Goth + Industrial Night: Indust:real Assembly with DJ Nanuck; 10pm (door); no cover • Triple Threat Fridays: DJ Thunder, Femcee DJ Eden Lixx • DJ Suco beats every Sat • E: vip@flashnightclub.com

G.L.B.T.Q Sage bowling club • 780.474.8240, E: Tuff@shaw.ca • Every Wed, 1:30-3:30pm

GLBT sports and recreation • teamedmonton.ca • Co-ed Bellydancing: bellydancing@teamedmonton. ca • Bootcamp: Garneau Elementary, 10925-87 Ave. at 7pm; bootcamp@ teamedmonton.ca • Bowling: Ed's Rec Centre, West Edmonton Mall, Tue 6:45pm; bowling@teamedmonton. ca • Curling: Granite Curling Club; 780.463.5942 • Running: Kinsmen; running@teamedmonton.ca • Spinning: MacEwan Centre, 109 Street and 104 Ave; spin@teamedmonton. ca • Swimming: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; swimming@teamedmonton.ca • Volleyball: every Tue, 7-9pm; St. Catherine School, 10915-110 St; every Thu, 7:30-9:30pm at Amiskiwiciy Academy, 101 Airport Rd

G.L.B.T.Q Seniors Group

• S.A.G.E Bldg, Craftroom, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: T: Jeff Bovee 780.488.3234, E: tuff @shaw.ca

Illusions Social Club • The Junction, 10242-106 St • groups.yahoo. com/group/edmonton_illusions • 780.387.3343 • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri every month, 8:30pm Junction Bar and Eatery

• 10242-106 St • 780.756.5667 • junctionedmonton.com • Open Tues-Sat: Community bar with seasonal patio • Beat the clock Tue • WINGSANITY Wed, 5-10pm • Free pool Tue and Wed • Karaoke Wed, 9-12pm • Fri Steak Night, 5-9pm • Frequent special events: drag shows, leather nights, bear bashes, girls nights • DJs every Fri and Sat, 10pm

LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-

124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling

MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB • geocities.com/making-

waves_edm • Recreational/competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu

Pride Centre of Edmonton •

Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • Daily: YouthSpace (Youth Drop-in): Tue-Fri: 3-7pm; Sat: 2-6:30pm; jess@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Men Talking with Pride: Support group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; Sun: 7-9pm; robwells780@hotmail.com • HIV Support Group: for people living with HIV/AIDS; 2nd Mon each month, 7-9pm; huges@shaw.ca • TTIQ: Education and support group for transgender, transsexual, intersexed and questioning people, their friends, families and allies; 2nd Tue each month, 7:30-9:30pm; admin@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Counselling: Free, short-term, solution-focused counselling, provided by professionally trained counsellors; every Wed, 6-9pm; admin@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Youth Movie: Every Thu, 6:30-8:30pm; jess@pridecentreofedmonton.org

PrimeTimers/sage Games

• Unitarian Church, 10804-119 St • 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm

St Paul's United Church • 11526-76 Ave • 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship) WOMONSPACE • 780.482.1794

• womonspace.ca, womonspace@ gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured

Woodys Video Bar • 11723 Jas-

per Ave • 780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

SPECIAL EVENTS Beulah Alliance Church •

West parking lot 178 St • Communitywide fun day for the greater community of Edmonton for a BBQ, a petting zoo, bouncy castles and some live music • Jul 14 • $2 (cost of food),

Doors Open Edmonton •

780.439.2797 • historicedmonton.ca • Historic Festival presented by the Edmonton and District Historical Society of Alberta, a chapter of the Historical Society of Alberta. Doors Open Edmonton is a celebration of our built heritage and features free tours of architecturally significant places and information seminars • Until Jul 8

Edmonton Indy • Jul 20-22 MIDSUMMER CELEBRATION

• Wye Community Hall, 151 Bailey Estates, hwy 21, Wye Rd • Live music, dance and potluck • Jul 13, 6-10pm • Donation to Food Bank; info: Marie 780.464.2854

Mini Spec–Night of the Living Spec • Stanley A Milner Library,

Centennial Rm, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • Fundraiser for the Pure Speculation Festival in November, and for Crystal Kids with panels, games, fun contests and silent auction Featuring guests Mike Perschon speaking on Godzille and author Allan Mott • Jul 14, 12:304pm • $10 (door)

Race Week Edmonton • Jul 14-22 • Go Kit Derby Test and Tune: Alberta Aviation Museum: Jul 8, 124pm • Lap the Track: United Cycle, unitedcycle.com/lapthetrack; 107 St, 123 Ave: Sun, Jul 15, 9am • Mustang Madness/T-Bird Tour: 11140 Kingsway Ave: Sun, Jul 15 • Capital Power Go Kit Derby: Sat, Jul 14 Show and Shine • Marketplace at Callingwood • Refurbished and custom cars and boats, plus enjoy many other family-friendly activities in support of the Edmonton Humane Society • Sat, Jul 14, 12:30-4:30pm sourdough raft race • Terwil-

ligar Park to Rafter's Landing, down the North Saskatchewan River • sourdoughraftrace.com • Jul 14-15

Street Performers Festival

• Sir Winston Churchill Sq • edmontonstreetfest.com • Featuring musicians, jugglers, acrobats, unicyclists–over 1500 outdoor performances. Indoor Late Night Madness performances, daily Troupe du Jour group shows, face-painters, Be Your Own Busker workshops, and Kids’ World activities • Jul 6-15


FILM

PREVUE // HISTORY

Capturing the world

Filmmaker attempts a comprehensive history of cinema of interconnectivity, Cousins finds peculiar yet compelling connections between a deleted scene from Chaplin's City Lights to a moment in Nicolas Roeg's Bad Timing.

Director Mark Cousins films a Bruce Lee statue for The Story of Film

Sun, Jul 8 – Wed, Jul 11 Directed by Mark Cousins

T

he history of cinema most commonly chronicled is one dictated by commerce; it favours Hollywood, rarely looks farther abroad than Western Europe, with nods to Russia and Japan for good measure, and leads one to believe that the Third World doesn't even place on the map. This history, declares Irish film critic and filmmaker Mark Cousins at the start of his 15-part series The Story of Film:

An Odyssey, is inaccurate and racist by omission. Indeed, try to imagine a history of painting that favours Robert Bateman over Mark Rothko, or a history of literature devoted to the likes of John Grisham and Danielle Steel while ignoring Gabriel García Márquez and Chinua Achebe. The history Cousins sets out to convey in this ambitious, captivating series, based on his terrific 2004 book, purports that what drives movies is passion and innovation. He's thus sculpted The Story of Film as "a global road movie to find

the innovators, the people and films that give life to the sublime, ineffable art form of cinema." Our friends at Metro Cinema are going to be screening the series in its entirety over the course of the summer, which means cinephiles are in for a long and nourishing treat, beginning this week with episodes one and two. Cousins' sense of how cinema lives, how it speaks to the world and to itself, is vast and sprawling, his appetite voracious. In episode one's first minutes he shifts between the storm-

PREVUE // BIO PIC

Marina Abramović Fri, Jul 13 – Thu, Jul 19 Directed by Matthew Akers Metro Cinema at the Garneau



T

here are artists that heighten our awareness of time to the point where the veneer of civilized time/ drudgery time/channel-surfing time falls away and you feel your own organs at work, the thoughts of those around you, and the breath of every leaf on every tree. Serbian performance artist Marina Abramović holds a place on that list of artists, which might also include Andrei Tarkovsky, Hiroshi Sugimoto and Jorge Luis Borges. But those artists work in cinema, photography and literature respectively. Abramović is a performance artist, and Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present, Matthew Akers' documentary on Abramović's recent MoMA Ret-

10 FILM

rospective and work of the same name, is partly about legitimizing performance as a serious form. It isn't theatre, it isn't sculpture (though one could argue that it's kinda both) and there's nothing you can buy; it's people doing stuff, stuff that at a glance might seem absurd or merely provocative. But, with Abramović's work, a glance won't suffice. You need to be present, to pass time. Or you can watch Akers' film, which, made very much from the inside of Abramović's cultivated mythology, goes a long way toward getting a sense of being there. After spending much of her career existing rather marginally (the retrospective includes the van she lived in for years with her former partner and collaborator Ulay), Abramović reached a point where legitimacy became important. "I'm 63," she says early in the film, "I don't want to be alternative anymore."

I think she got her wish. During the 700 hours she spent in a chair staring at people in MoMA's atrium in 2010 (she sat, without ever rising, every hour the museum was open for three months), an estimated 750 000 visitors sat with her. What could be read as a self-portrait or a stunt (much of Abramović's work has pushed and punished her body) actually functions as a mirror—The Artist Is Present is about the audience. And watching it happen in Akers' film makes for an incredibly moving experience. Art can be just this: presence, an invitation, a reflection, a way of being still, of feeling your entire life happen all at once, there, in a public space, surrounded by others, as this crazy, courageous, radiantly charismatic woman sits before you and lets it all be. JOSEF BRAUN

// JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

ing of the beach in Normandy in Saving Private Ryan ("This is filmmaking: the art of making us feel we were there.") to a moment in Three Colors: Blue ("This is filmmaking: cinema as empathy machine."). He traces the image of bubbles in a glass through Odd Man Out to 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her to Taxi Driver. In episode two he'll hopscotch nimbly from Nanook of the North to Sans Soleil to the films of Erich Von Stroheim, "the Zola of cinema." A rigorous associationalist, with a generous view

But he is also, of course, a meticulous historian. Though he continually slides back and forth in time, he does so as a way of ensuring that we understand how the past changes the present. These first episodes take us to Edison's factory, to the places first filmed by the Lumiere brothers, to the parking lot where Buster Keaton lived in a trailer after falling from grace with the studio. Cousins describes Florence Lawrence, the world's first movie star, who when she died on screen and then reappeared the audience was reported to have tore off her clothing. He describes the birth of the close-up, the innovations of DW Griffith, who first showed us wind in the trees, and CT Dreyer, who made reduction into poetry. Cousins also reports some facts that may surprise you, such as the overwhelming dominance of women in the early days of screenwriting, or Australia's claim on the world's first feature. Moment by moment The Story of Film fascinates. So far my only complaint is with Cousins' own voice-over narration. He sounds like he needs a glass of water, and his cadence almost never changes. Perhaps he'll have hydrated himself by episode three. JOSEF BRAUN

// JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The Forgiveness of Blood

Fri, Jul 6 – Tue, Jul 10 Directed by Joshua Marston Metro Cinema at the Garneau

The screener for The Forgiveness of Blood did not arrive before press time. Look for Bryan Gibson's review online at vueweekly.com.


REVUE // STICKY SUPER HERO

The Amazing Spider-Man

Your friendly neighbourhood ... ah, you know it.

Now playing Directed by Marc Webb



C

oming to your friendly neighbourhood multiplex a mere five years after the termination of the successful Sam Raimi-helmed trilogy, this reboot of the Spider-Man franchise, while sporting a new star (Andrew Garfield), new origin story, new villain and new director (a guy named, I kid you not, Marc Webb), feels above all overwhelmingly unnecessary. It also feels about 136 minutes long—which it is. Yet again we get one of these superhero movies that feels obliged to include the protagonist's origin story, the development of

his social conscience, the introduction of a love interest, the introduction of a villain, the villain's origin story, the villain's plot to destroy New York/the US/ the planet, and the villain's undoing, all in one five-act mega-movie—the exact opposite of the experience of reading a fleet, diverting comic book. Though it has its moments of energy and excitement, The Amazing Spider-Man is ultimately an exhausting experience, one of diminishing returns, simultaneously over-stuffed with incident and far too compressed to satisfyingly resolve half of the narrative threads it spins. The element that's always struck me as novel about Spider-Man was the fact that before becoming a superhero

Peter Parker was basically an ordinary, somewhat nerdy teenager, a character most comic readers could easily identify with. This Spider-Man, written by a trio of scenarists led by James Vanderbilt (whose wildly variable filmography includes Darkness Falls and Zodiac), divests Peter of any such quotidian roots. Peter's background is indeed more amazing: before he disappeared Peter's dad (Campbell Scott) was involved in some secret project to splice various genes to "create a world without weakness." By the time that Peter, a talented photographer and, we soon realize, a scientific genius, becomes a high school senior he discovers dad's hidden files and tracks down Dr Curt

Connors (Rhys Ifans), dad's old partner, who just happens to be the mentor of Gwen Stacey (Emma Stone), the girl Peter's in love with. Such amazing coincidences abound: Gwen's dad (Dennis Leary) just happens to be the chief of police, and, in a risibly contrived rehash of that already risible turning point in the Spider-Man legend, Peter's Uncle Ben (Martin Sheen) is accidentally killed by the very convenience store robber Peter failed to apprehend about 30 seconds earlier. (Vanderbilt and company refrain from regurgitating the "With great power comes great responsibility" line.) Peter discovers his superpowers after he sneaks into Connors' high security laboratory (the words "BIOCABLE DEVELOPMENT UNIT" appear ominously beside the door) and gets bitten by that fateful radioactive arachnid.

Go for a preview). Stone is a welcome presence, and not only because of her thigh-highlighting outfits. Neither looks much like a teenager, but we are in the realm of myth here. Not mythical enough however to forgive James Horner's overbearing score or such silly, extraneous detours such as the bit where, despite the evacuation of Manhattan, city workers unite to help Spider-Man more easily access stuff to attach his webs to. Or to keep us from wondering why the Lizard (née Connors) decides to set up his laboratory in a sewer. Though, oddly enough, Spidey's nemesis is finally the movie's most sympathetic character, a sort of simplified version of Jeff Goldblum in The Fly. Connors' ingestion of a super-serum gives him back his missing arm and grants him the strength of 10 men, but in return makes him crazy, turns him into a lizard and takes away his penis. Talk about cold(-blooded) comforts.

Garfield's fine so long as he refrains from excess emoting (see Never Let Me

JOSEF BRAUN

// JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // DIFFERENT SORT OF TOY STORY

Ted

A man and his magical teddy bear

Now playing Directed by Seth MacFarlane

T

ed, which begins in the '80s but continually scores lower on the script IQ scale, takes an old idea—toy comes alive—and crawls nowhere

with it. This Boston-set tale of John Bennett's talking teddy bear is writerdirector Seth MacFarlane's pet project, padded out to feature-length, bromance-meets-romance predictability. Listen to stale fart jokes, a kitschy obsession with Flash Gordon, and trite sentiments in clichéd settings.

See the celebrities MacFarlane can get for cameos. Look at the bongs/ toplessness/cocaine the Family Guy creator can show on the big screen. Hear the straw-piñata targets (Jews, prostitutes, Asians, Muslims, Mexicans, the "retarded") of cheap jokes get whacked by an oh-so-edgy, entitled white guy (via the jaded voice of a stuffed animal). Yawn. A talky picture whose story beats are so obvious they seem tapped out on a telegraph (man-child must choose between best buddy and girl, but ends up getting both back), Ted is also visually disappointing. Only a fight between John (Mark Wahlberg) and Ted (voiced by MacFarlane) is shot intelligently and offers some dark comedy. John's beau Lori (Mila Kunis) is a character stuffed full of lifelessness even as Ted turns out to be a not entirely care-less bear. But if you want to see a Boston bruin who was truly interesting, watch a documentary about Bobby Orr, not this flat comedy about a slobby bore. BRIAN GIBSON

// BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

FILM 11


FILM WEEKLY FRI, JUL 6 - THU, JUL 12, 2012

CHABA THEATRE–JASPER 6094 Connaught Dr Jasper 780.852.4749

BRAVE (G) DAILY 1:30, 7:00, 9:10 THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) DAILY 1:30, 6:40, 9:10

DUGGAN CINEMA–CAMROSE 6601-48 Ave Camrose 780.608.2144

ALL NEW STATE OF THE ART DIGITAL

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) DAILY 6:40 9:20; SAT-SUN, TUE-THU 12:30 3:05

MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content, nudity, substance abuse) DAILY 6:50 9:05; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 1:50

TED (18A crude content, substance abuse) DAILY 7:20 9:25; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 2:20

BRAVE (G) DAILY 7:00, 9:00; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 2:00

CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 5074-130 Ave 780.472.9779

DR. SEUSS' THE LORAX (G) DAILY 1:00 DR. SEUSS' THE LORAX 3D (G) DAILY 3:00, 5:00, 7:15

(G) DAILY 7:10; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 2:10

ABRAHAM LINCOLN : VAMPIRE HUNTER (14A gory violence, not recommended for children) DAILY 9:10

BATTLESHIP (14A violence, not recommended for young children) DAILY 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:50

THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (G) DAILY 12:50 THE PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS 3D (G) DAILY 2:55, 5:00, 7:10, 9:15

EPIC

BOL BACHCHAN (STC) No passes, Hindi W/E.S.T.

PEOPLE LIKE US (PG coarse language, substance

DAILY 1:00, 4:20, 7:45

abuse) Closed Captioned, Digital, Dolby Stereo Digital DAILY 1:00, 4:05, 7:00

CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital, Ultraavx, No passes FRI-SUN 1:20, 4:30, 7:40, 10:50; MON-THU 12:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20

THE SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS MOVIE (G) SAT 11:00

21 JUMP STREET (14A crude language, coarse language, substance abuse, violence) DAILY 9:45

THE DICTATOR (14A crude content, language may offend, not recommended for children) DAILY 1:40, 4:35, 7:25, 9:40

CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 1525-99 St 780.436.8585

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frighten-

4:05, 7:05, 10:05

ing scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital, No passes FRI-WED 11:30, 12:10, 2:40, 3:20, 5:50, 6:30, 9:00, 9:40; THU 11:30, 2:40, 4:05, 5:50, 7:10, 9:00, 10:20; Star & Strollers Screening: THU 1:00

CHIMPANZEE (G) DAILY 1:15, 3:10, 5:05, 7:00, 9:00

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence, fright-

DARK SHADOWS (14A) DAILY 1:35, 4:30, 7:05, 9:25

ening scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital, No passes FRI-WED 12:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; THU 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 9:40

THE HUNGER GAMES (14A violence) DAILY 12:50,

THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (14A coarse lanTHE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT (14A coarse language, sexual content) DAILY 1:05, 3:55, 6:40, 9:30

TERI MERI KAHAANI (14A) Hindi W/E.S.T. DAILY 1:10, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20

A BRILLIANT REIMAGINING

FRANCHISE.

Digital, Dolby Stereo Digital DAILY 10:10

MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG) Digital Presentation, DTS Digital DAILY 12:40, 3:50, 6:40, 10:05

MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content, nudity, substance abuse) Closed Captioned, Digital, Dolby Stereo Digital, No passes DAILY 1:10, 4:10, 7:15, 10:15

SAVAGES (18A sexual content,brutal violence,substance abuse) Digital Presentation, DTS Digital, No passes DAILY 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (PG) Closed Captioned,

WED 9:15

THE MUPPET MOVIE (1979) (STC) Reel Family Cinema: kids free SAT 12:00

CLAREVIEW 10

THE STORY OF FILM; AN ODYSSEY–PARTS 1 AND

4211-139 Ave 780.472.7600

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (G)

2 (STC) SUN 4:30; WED 7:00

BRAVE (G) Digital DAILY 1:40, 4:15, 7:15

DAILY 12:20

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE'S MOST WANTED 3D (G) DAILY 2:50, 5:25, 7:55, 10:25

BRAVE (G) DAILY 11:30, 2:00, 4:30 BRAVE 3D (G) DAILY 11:50, 2:20, 4:55, 7:30, 10:00

BRAVE 3D (G) Digital 3d DAILY 1:10, 3:50, 6:45, 9:10 ABRAHAM LINCOLN : VAMPIRE HUNTER (14A gory violence, not recommended for children) Digital DAILY 9:45

MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content, nudity, substance abuse) Digital Presentation DAILY 1:15, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25

EMPIRE THEATRES–SPRUCE GROVE 130 Century Crossing Spruce Grove 780.962.2332

SAVAGES (18A sexual content, brutal violence, substance abuse) Digital DAILY 12:20, 3:10, 6:30, 9:45

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (G) Digital DAILY 12:00, 2:50, 6:15

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital DAILY 8:50

SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG violence,

TED (18A crude content, substance abuse) Digital Presentation DAILY 1:20, 4:00, 7:10, 9:40

frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) DAILY 1:20, 4:35, 7:35, 10:40

PEOPLE LIKE US (PG coarse language, substance

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3D (PG) Digital DAILY

abuse) Digital Presentation DAILY 1:05, 3:55, 6:55, 9:35

3:00, 6:50, 9:20

PROMETHEUS 3D (14A gory scenes, disturbing content) DAILY 10:45

ABRAHAM LINCOLN : VAMPIRE HUNTER 3D (14A gory violence, not recommended for children) FRI-SAT, MON-THU 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:00; SUN 12:35, 3:10, 5:40, 8:15

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital, No passes DAILY 1:00, 4:10, 8:10

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence,

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (PG) Digital DAILY 12:40

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital DAILY 12:10 THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Reald 3d DAILY 3:30, 6:40, 9:40

10:35

frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital 3d, No passes DAILY 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30

TED (18A crude content, substance abuse) No passes

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (PG) Digital Presenta-

DAILY 11:55, 2:30, 5:20, 8:10, 10:55

tion DAILY 1:45

SAVAGES (18A sexual content, brutal violence, substance abuse) No passes DAILY 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:05

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3D (PG) Digital 3d DAILY 4:20, 7:00, 9:20

BRAVE (G) Digital DAILY 12:50

MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG violence) FRI, SUN-THU 1:15, 4:35, 7:25; SAT 1:15, 4:20, 7:20

THE AVENGERS 3D (PG violence, not recommended for young children) Digital 3d DAILY 9:00

BRAVE 3D (G) Reald 3d DAILY 3:40, 6:50, 9:10

MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content,

SAVAGES (18A sexual content, brutal violence,

nudity, substance abuse) FRI, SUN-THU 11:35, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30; SAT 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30

substance abuse) Digital Presentation, No passes DAILY 12:45, 3:45, 6:40, 9:35

THAT’S MY BOY (18A crude sexual content) DAILY

EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY Royal Alberta Museum Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave

MY SISTER EILEEN (PG) 1955, colour; MON 8:00

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK 2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150

7:05, 9:55

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frighten-

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (PG) No passes FRI-SAT,

ing scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital, No passes DAILY 1:00, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30

Cineplex Odeon Windermere & Vip Cinemas, 6151 Currents Dr Nw Edmonton 780.822.4250

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Ultraavx, No passes DAILY 1:00, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30

CITY CENTRE 9 10200-102 Ave 780.421.7020

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital, Dolby Stereo Digital, No passes DAILY 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence,

, 3D AND 2D

MARLEY (PG substance abuse) SAT 6:45; SUN, MON,

THE AVENGERS (PG violence, not recommended for young children) DAILY 12:05, 3:25, 6:40, 10:15

CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS

,

THE ROOM (14A nudity, sexual content) FRI  11:15

PRAIRIE TALES 13 (14A) THU 7:00

not available) SUN 7:00

NOW PLAYING

9:00; SAT 2:15, 9:30; SUN, MON 7:00; TUE 9:15

3D (G) Digital 3d DAILY 3:40, 6:35

WIMBLEDON 2012 3D: MEN'S FINAL (Classification

Check Theatre Directory or SonyPicturesReleasing.ca for Locations and Showtimes

Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212

THE FORGIVENESS OF BLOOD (STC) Sub-titled FRI

AGA (14A nudity, violence) TUE 7:00

MON-THU 11:45, 2:35, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10; SUN 12:15, 2:35, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10

VIOLENCE, FRIGHTENING SCENES, NOT RECOMMENDED FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED

TAKE THIS WALTZ (18A nudity, sexual content) DAILY

MARLOW STERN

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) 3D: THU, JUL 5 3:45, 9:45; 2D: THU, JUL 5: 12:55

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Digital, Ultraavx, No passes DAILY 1:30, 4:40, 7:50, 11:00

SAT 11:00

SEE IT AGAIN.”

MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content, nudity, substance abuse) THU, JUL 5: 1:00, 3:35, 7:00, 9:35

Digital 3d Reald 3d DAILY 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:45

THE SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS MOVIE (G)

I CAN’T WAIT TO

frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital 3d, Dolby Stereo Digital, No passes DAILY 12:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20

TED (18A crude content, substance abuse) Closed Captioned, Digital, Dolby Stereo Digital DAILY 1:20, 4:20, 7:15, 7:20, 9:55, 10:25

BRAVE (G) Digital Presentation, DTS Digital, No passes DAILY 12:45 MST12007_SONY_ASM.0705.VUE · EDMONTON VUE · 1/4 PAGE · THUR JULY 5

12 FILM

TAKE THIS WALTZ (18A nudity, sexual content)

BRAVE (G) 2D: THU, JUL 5: 1:10; 3D: THU, JUL 5: 3:30, 7:10, 9:30

MARINA ABRAMOVIC: THE ARTIST IS PRESENT–

PEOPLE LIKE US (PG coarse language, substance abuse) DAILY 1:00, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45

IN THEATRES IN

DAILY 3:45, 6:30, 9:40

Digital DAILY 12:50

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE'S MOST WANTED (G)

“IT’S THE BEST SPIDER-MAN YET. OF AN

BRAVE 3D (G) Digital 3d, DTS Digital, No passes

14231-137 Ave 780.732.2236

guage, sexual content) DAILY 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 9:55

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED

JATT AND JULIET (PG mature subject matter) Punjabi W/E.S.T. DAILY 12:55, 4:00, 6:55, 9:50

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave St Albert 780.458.9822

MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content, nudity, substance abuse) Digital DAILY 1:00, 3:50, 7:00, 9:30

TED (18A crude content, substance abuse) Digital DAILY 12:30, 3:20, 6:20, 9:00

PRINCESS 10337-82 Ave 780.433.0728

THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG coarse language) FRI 6:50, 9:10; SAT-SUN 2:00, 6:50, 9:10; MONTHU 6:50, 9:10 BERNIE (PG coarse language) FRI 7:00, 9:00; SAT-SUN 2:30, 7:00, 9:00; MON-THU 7:00, 9:00

SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Ultraavx, No passes DAILY 1:30, 4:40, 7:50, 11:00

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN–AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) No passes DAILY 1:00, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30

TED (18A crude content, substance abuse) No passes DAILY 12:50, 2:50, 5:00, 7:15, 9:25

12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:45, 10:10

MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content,

PETER GABRIEL SECRET WORLD LIVE (Classifica-

nudity, substance abuse) DAILY 1:00, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20, 9:30

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3D (PG) No passes DAILY 12:55, 4:45, 6:45, 8:45

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (G) DAILY 2:55

BRAVE (G) DAILY 1:05, 3:05, 5:00, 7:05, 9:10 THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) No passes DAILY 1:15, 4:00, 6:40, 9:15

LEDUC CINEMAS 4702-50 St Leduc 780.986-2728

DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, JUL 5

ABRAHAM LINCOLN : VAMPIRE HUNTER (14A gory violence, not recommended for children) 2D : THU, JUL 5: 12:55; 3D: 3:40, 9:40

KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (PG) No passes DAILY

tion not available) One Night Only: WED 7:30

WIMBLEDON 2012 3D: MEN'S FINAL (Classification not available) SUN 7:00

WETASKIWIN CINEMAS Wetaskiwin 780.352.3922

DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, JUL 5

ABRAHAM LINCOLN : VAMPIRE HUNTER (14A gory violence, not recommended for children) 2D: THU, JUL 5: 12:55; 3D: 3:40, 9:40

BRAVE (G) 2D: THU, JUL 5: 1:00; 3D: THU, JUL 5: 3:25, 7:00, 9:25 MAGIC MIKE (14A coarse language, sexual content, nudity, substance abuse) THU, JUL 5: 1:00, 3:35; 7:00, 9:35 THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) 3D: THU, JUL 5: 3:45, 9:45; 2D: THU, JUL 5: 12:55


ARTS

REVUE // STORM'S A BREWING

REVUE // EH TU, BRUTE?

The Tempest

Julius Caesar Until Sun, Jul 22 (8 pm, even dates) Heritage Amphitheatre, Hawrelak Park, $17 – $25, $40 festival pass

Not much freewill for The Tempest's characters

S

Until Sun, Jul 22 (8 pm, odd dates) Sat and Sun matinees (2 pm except Jul 8) Heritage Amphitheatre, Hawrelak Park, $17 – $25, $40 festival pass

O

h what a tangled web we weave when ... wait, wrong play. But regardless of the script, ye good ol’ Bard sure liked his tangled webs, especially when it comes to comedies. In The Tempest, this year’s comedic offering at the Freewill Shakespeare Festival, he interjects magic into the turmoil, engineering quite a silly snare for his characters, who remain unaware. The only person who has any control of the situation is Prospero, the former Duke of Milan, who was banished from his dukedom for dipping into the dark arts. Twelve years later Prospero gets his chance for revenge, when his brother, Antonio, who had him exiled, happens to be sailing by

the mysterious island where Prospero long ago found refuge. Whipping up a storm with the help of his spritely servant, Ariel—a spirit of the air—he shipwrecks his brother and the rest of the crew. The magical elements make this script a challenge to bring to the stage but director John Kirkpatrick and his team do a fantastical job of manipulating light, smoke and sound to enact the spells that hold the story together. The shipwreck itself is particularly well executed, with Ariel (Amber Borotsik) at the helm casting the ship to-and-fro on a sea of fog. The mystical atmosphere is held together by Matthew Skopyk’s impressive sound design. Composing haunting songs for the spirits of the island to sing, they echo in the amphitheatre, creating a tingling sense of the supernatural.

Though this production handles the difficulties of a magic-based play with whimsy, compared to the heft and emotional compass of the rest of Shakespeare’s work, it feels like Bill phoned this one in. (Yeah, that’s right. I just called out Shakespeare). There’s not a lot of freewill in this play, with Prospero playing puppet master, and with a sorcerer moving his pawns about, the outcome seems pre-ordained, which makes the whole event feel somewhat tedious. And while Troy O’Donnell and Kevin Corey do manage to loosen up the crowd and get them chuckling as the jester and jester’s butler respectively, this fanciful little play never really sweeps up the crowd in it’s own tempest of laughter or emotion. It sails along much cute, but calmer seas.

hakespeare's tragedy Julius Caesar did not have a co-conspirator in nature this weekend. With the sun shining and the multitude of birds singing their hearts out, my initial thought was that it might be a little difficult to get down to serious business. However, with the first scene came a passionate energy that didn't leave the stage until the show had ended. The cast members of this production of Julius Caesar maintained a degree of conviction in their characters—and indeed, in the play—that was thoroughly refreshing to experience. Aside from one tacky murder scene that momentarily kills the intensity, this production does the tragedy justice in the way that it represents the debate about patriotism and political murder with depth and authority. Julius Caesar has been the source of debate for Bard lovers for some time. Who, truly, is the protagonist, the villain, the tragic hero? Directing and acting choices shine in this respect, as most actors do a superb job at delivering a nuanced performance that ensures the audience sees a bit of each

of these archetypes in each of them. Chris Bullough as Brutus portrays conflicted and complicated well, and achieves an eerie calming effect on the otherwise urgent energy of the happenings on stage. One performance in particular—where Portia (Belinda Cornish) begs Brutus to tell her of the plot that has taken him over—shines as a should-be yardstick for portrayals of certain Shakespearean female characters. There are a select few scenes in the production that should have weighed heavy on the hearts of audience members but missed their mark due to some rather rushed deliveries. On the whole, however, it is clear that the cast had a sharp grasp on what they wanted to convey—both individually and as a group—and this definitely comes across to the audience. Artistic choices in makeup and set were puzzling but at times esthetically intriguing, and Dave Clarke's sound design was fantastic. In all, though Julius Caesar will never find a place on my list of favourite Shakespearean plays, the skillful performances in this production make it a captivating watch. SALIHA CHATTOO

// SALIHA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Definitely not William Shatner's Julius Caesar

KATHLEEN BELL

// KATHLEEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // STREET SKILLS

StreetFest Taking audience participation to a new level

Edmonton International Street Performers Festival Fri, Jul 6 – Sun, Jul 15 Sir Winston Churchill Square edmntonstreetfest.com

F

or the 28th year, Edmonton welcomes street performers from at home and around the globe for a packed program of top-notch entertainment featuring more than 1500 performances. "It means a lot, not just for us in Edmonton, being 28 years old, but also on the world street as opposed to the world stage," says artistic producer Shelley Switzer, who has held the position since 2000, and was a volunteer prior to that. "This festival was actually the first of its kind in North America." The festival runs rain or shine, and incorporates a variety of new acts, including Bendy Em, a contortionist from

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

Australia; the clowning skills of Grant Goldie, Lords of Strut, who Switzer says will definitely be entertaining for the ladies and Spandy Andy, who will be keeping things tight and bright, along with a host of jugglers, unicyclists and acrobats. "It's one of the most unique art forms, really, that is showcased in a festival situation," Switzer notes of street performing. "It's a very different business model, if you will, because it's all about access. It's about gathering people for a good time and they get to choose the value of the performance at the end. It's not charged in advance." Jacqueline van de Geer, also known as DJ Groovy Jacks, has been a DJ for 25 years and will be manning the turntables at the silent disco, which offers party goers a whole new way to get

their groove on. Each participant gets their own set of headphones and tunes into a variety of music, which can't be heard without the headset. "You can totally be in our own bubble," she says over the phone from Montréal, adding that at the same time it allows people to easily interact with one another, since they're not shouting over loud music. "It gives you a lot of freedom how you're dancing, even though you're all dancing to the same music. It gives you a lot of freedom how to express yourself with your own body because nobody on the side knows what music you're listening to anyway." Geer plans to keep the all-ages event entertaining with a music mix that incorporates everything from '20s Charleston to modern hits. MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FILM 13


REVUE // VISUAL ARTS

I regard the theatre as

THE GREATEST OF ALL ART FORMS, the most immediate way in which a human being can share with another the sense of what it is to be a

human being.

Automatiste Revolution: Montreal 1941 – 1960 age making was also accompanied by an exploration of abstraction and the unique materiality of paint. Of note are Riopelle's small watercolours—bright flashes of colour under patches of ink wash and layered short lines—work less common than his heavy, layered, and busy oil paintings.

- Oscar Wilde

Until Sun, Oct 14 Curated by Roald Nasgaard Art Gallery of Alberta

I

t was common practice in Europe during the 20th century's World Wars for artist groups to write somewhat inflammatory declarative statements about their politics, and to call for a new way of art making. Artists are great social barometers, and this inclination spoke to a need for widescale change, often being the canaries in the coal mine for what is to come. This was a less common phenomenon in Canada, which makes the accomplishments of the Automatiset movement in Montreal in the mid1900s that much more notable. The Automatiste Revolution: Montreal 1941 – 1960, now on the AGA's second floor, gives a glimpse into how a creative community visually responded to a need for change in Quebec that predates the Quiet Revolution of the 1960s. Led by Paul-Émile Bourduas and the manifesto he wrote for the group, Le Refuse Global, the painting

THE JUGGLER

generated from the collective was less an overt political statement about church and state, and more a rejection of an academic, figurative approach to painting through the tenets of surrealism and abstraction. For his leadership in the movement, Bourduas sacrificed his career and his marriage to speak out against the control of the Catholic Church over life in Quebec, the art academy and the political climate of the province. This also resulted in the dissemination of new, radical ideas to young artists, thirsting for something outside the traditional Quebec art academies, whose work is in this exhibition. Rejecting the traditional, it is clear through the 60 featured artworks that Bourduas imparted the use of tools, such as automatic drawing and more chance-based drip painting, to activate the subconscious in the generation of artwork. Works including those by Jean-Paul Riopelle—the artist of the group who did gain some international notoriety—convey how this turn to subconscious guided im-

One room in the exhibition is dedicated to illustrating how the Automatistes were more than just painters. Jean-Paul Mousseau and Madeleine Arber's diminutive collages that riff off of the subconscious-inspired Dada artists from Berlin earlier on in the century are accompanied by video and photo documentation of dance performances, as well as Bourduas' prolific writing and the literary component of the movement. Although it is interesting to get a thorough look at Automatiste painting, the artists featured were thoroughly involved in a wide variety of creative production including in theatre, music and television. The interdisciplinary nature of this movement is acknowledged in text, though it is equally telling that the non-painting works are put in a back room, and the exhibition does not state that it is a painting show. This is notable also considering Le Refuse Global focuses on total social revolution and only briefly speaks directly about painting. The social context of this exhibition, not to mention the opportunity to learn about a way modernist painting broke into Canada, makes it a worthwhile visit. However, just remember painting is only a slice of the Automatiste cultural production pie. CAROLYN JERVIS

// CAROLYN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ARTIFACTS MEAGHAN BAXTER

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// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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A bike from Revolution Cycle

MEC bike-commuter messenger bags

Bikram Yoga West Edmonton passes

JASPERGATES.COM 14 ARTS

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10140 150th Street One block north of Stony Plain Road

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

Arts for Literacy / Sun, Jul 8 (2:30 pm) The afternoon combines a lineup of films, art, vendors and exhibitors, as well as concerts bringing together dozens of local artists to showcase their work, a commitment to the arts in Edmonton and as a fundraising initiative for the Bassma Primary School in Morocco. The artists and entertainers will be assembled in the format of a traditional Moroccan bazaar, coupled with a silent auction featuring items from locally-owned businesses. The Bassma Primary School opened its doors last year in the rural village of El Attaouia, partly thanks to funds raised by Edmonton resident Nakita Valerio, as an initiative to promote literacy, fight poverty and provide the area's youth with educational opportunities. (Art Gallery of Alberta) V


REVUE // BOOKS

Almost Never

Now available By Daniel Sada Translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver Graywolf 320 pp, $17.95

E

ven when it's not explicitly about sex, Daniel Sada's Almost Never has such a constant, manic, libidinous energy running through it that even the day-to-day scenes of its hero cityhopping around Mexico in the 1940s feel like a sneaky kind of foreplay. The novel is a dispatch straight from Sada's id. And thanks to its singular

narrative voice, as well as some stellar translation by Katherine Silver, it makes for a bold first impression that English-language audiences won't soon forget. Sada's hero is an agronomist named Demetrio Sordo, whose affections, mainly carnal, are torn between two very different women: a prostitute named Mireya, who Demetrio sleeps with as often and as passionately as her profession will allow, and an upstanding small-town girl named Renata. The latter has marriage material written all over her, but to get there, Demetrio would have to delicately court her over many months and possibly years—and he's having trouble seeing the benefits of doing so, considering how much sex he's already getting on the side. If this is a love triangle, it's about as scalene as you can get. The best parts of Almost Never dismantle old-fashioned notions of romance by laying bare all of their tediousness and empty ceremony on the page. Both Demetrio and Renata feel the pressures of overbearing, overly traditional maternal figures behind the scenes; only Demetrio, thanks to his covert sexual awakening, is bold enough to rebel and state his desires plainly. This gets him publicly shunned on more than one occa-

sion—even from Renata herself, who has been trained to subordinate her own pleasure at all costs. And if Mexican society in the novel frowns upon the openly erotic, Sada's narration scores major points for honestly depicting—celebrating, in fact— how shot through our everyday lives are with the dogged pursuit of our next orgasm. Even his punctuation follows suit. Look how breathlessly Sada describes Demetrio bathing in preparation for a meeting with Mireya: "Further delays, but that's what Demetrio did the third time and thereafter: quite a chore this coming and going with buckets: four in all: slow considering what preceded and followed: stealing an hour from the workday—indeed!"

I don't know that I've ever seen such a gleeful misuse of colons. You've got to know the rules to break the rules. (And that's not even the end of the sentence.) I've also decided to avoid revealing which woman Demetrio chooses, even though it's decided well before the novel's midway point. Suffice it to say that he has to settle down and forge an adult life for himself either way. Yet the downside to this inevitability is that Sada's project becomes much smaller. His lunatic narrative style, which made a lot of sense when seen through the prism of constant horniness, feels lost for the long stretch when Demetrio gives up sex and instead saves up to buy supplies for his new billiard hall. The eventual buildup to his wedding night feels similarly

underwhelming, given what's already come to pass. Yet there are rumblings that Almost Never isn't even Sada's best work (he died in late 2011, while this book was nearing completion), and that the remainder of his collected works may yield even sweeter fruit. This raises a very exciting thought. Almost Never was most likely chosen as Sada's most accessible book, the one that might be the most palatable to the English-speaking market. And if that's true, what degree of literary insanity—in the form of eight other novels, as well as a whole whack of short stories and poetry—is on the horizon? MICHAEL HINGSTON

// MICHAEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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Visit concordia.ab.ca 7128 Ada Boulevard Edmonton, AB T: 780.479.9220 TF: 1.866.479.5200 VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

ARTS 15


PREVUE // MIDLIFE TRIALS

Nine

Wed, Jul 4 - Sat, Jul 14, 8 pm (2 pm matinee Sun, Jul 8) Directed by Kristen M Finlay Walterdale Playhouse $14 – $18

T

he personal and professional struggles of life can be difficult territory to navigate. Famed Italian filmmaker Guido Contini is no exception to life's complexities as he faces writer's block and essentially a midlife crisis. In his time of struggle, Contini turns to the many women in his life, alive or dead, past and present, to help him overcome adversity. The women, from his beloved wife Luisa, to his mistress Carla Albanese, to his muse Claudia Nardi, each play a pivotol role in Contini's life and are vying for

his devoted affection. Weaving in the past, present and imagination posed a challenge for director Kristen M Finlay, but it's one she tackled right from the start with Nine. She immediately got to work with each actor to ensure they understood the shifts between reality, imagination and memory. "You've got to keep up, but it's an exciting ride," Finlay notes. The story has caught a great deal of attention through numerous Broadway revivals and a feature film version released in 2009 starring an A-list cast. Finlay says its popularity not only has to do with the enticing musical score, but also with delving into the fascinating idea of artistic genius.

"I think we're all fascinated by that in pop culture—how does that mind work?—so that's the drawing force," she adds. The relationship with the women has also been an element that Finlay says struck a chord with audiences. Each is very different from the next, both physically and in their personality. Even though Contini sees each as a "type," Finlay strived to make each actress get in touch with who their character is beneath the surface. One such woman is Albanese, whose relationship with Contini is built on a purely sexual foundation. Actress Erika Noot, who describes herself as more modest than Albanese, says it was a chance for her to explore a personality very different from her own, which included learning how to pole dance over the past three months of rehearsals. "Some of the characters I've played in the past have been kind of cartoony and silly, and there's a realness to Carla that wasn't in any of the other characters I've played. It's been really cool to explore just her natural instincts and the heartbreaking things that happen to her," Noot says, adding men can also relate through Guido's need to have different women in his life. "He wants that woman who can be the wife, who can also be the lover, who can also be his inspiration, so I think guys relate to that concept. They want the whole package." Cory Christensen, who plays Contini, says while his character makes choices that are frowned upon, such as having a mistress, he views each of the women in his life with love and adoration. He adds part of his charm is in the fact that when he's with each of them, he's completely in the moment, not thinking for a second of anyone else. "I'm starting to find there's a fine line between a reason and an excuse, and I think Guido, he makes some bad choices, but he's honest, and I think that's the thing that's endearing about him," he continues. "Maybe it's just a cliché for men, but we have sort of this middle age crisis, there's less years ahead of us than behind, have we contributed? Is my life worth anything? And Guido is starting to look at that too." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

16 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012


ARTS WEEKLY FAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 780.426.2889 OR EMAIL LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3pm

DANCE

FEATS–FESTIVAL OF DANCE • Various Venues • 780.422.8107 • abdancealliance.ab.ca • A multi-disciplinary dance festival to celebrate and present everything from traditional folk and contemporary works to unusual and brilliant movement performances • Until Jul 14

FILM BAILEY THEATRE–Camrose • The Bailey

Theatre Classic Movie Series: Dirty Harry (R); Jul 9, 7pm; $5 (door) • Black Beauty (1994, G); Jul 16, 7pm; $5 (door)

EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave • royalalbertamuseum.ca • $6 (adult)/$5 (senior 65 and over/student)/$3 (child) • My Sister Eileen (1955, 108 min, colour, PG); Mon, Jul 9, 8pm FILM FORUM • Stanley A. Milner Library • Series of film screenings followed by facilitated discussions. Join us this summer for another round of intriguing films and guest speakers • Edmonton Room: Barton Fink, 14A; Sat, Jul 14, 1:30pm FROM BOOKS TO FILM SERIES • Stanley A. Milner Library, Main Fl, Audio Visual Rm • 780.944.5383 • Screenings of films adapted from books • Hugo (2011, PG); Jul 6, 2pm • Coraline (2009, PG); Fri, Jul 13, 2pm

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY

• 10186-106 St • 780.488.6611 • albertacraft. ab.ca • Discovery Gallery: COMING UP NEXT: ACC exhibition of contemporary fine craft by emerging artists; until Jul 28 • Feature Gallery: PULP PAPER PAGES: Featuring contemporary Albertan book + paper arts; until Jul 7 • SHIFT: a transformative state of mind: Artwork by the ACAD fourth year metal program students • NEGOTIATING TRADITIONS–SIX APPROACHES TO TAPESTRY: by former students of Jane Kidd • JANE KIDD: a sample of tapestries by prominent fibre artist, Jane Kidd; Jul 14-Sep 29

ALBERTA SOCIETY OF ARTISTS •

Walterdale Playhouse, 10322-83 Ave • 780.426.0072 • NINE: Artworks by Ross Bradley, Verne Busby, Carney Oudendag, Jean Richards, Barbara Shore and Glenys Switzer; an exploration of the imagery and themes in Fredrico Fillini's films • Until Jul 14; runs in conjunction with Walterdale's production, Nine; and on Sat, Jul 7-14, 10am-3pm

ART FROM THE STREETS–Red Deer • 4935-51 St • New artworks new artists • Reception: Fri, Jul 6, 6-8pm

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) •

2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.422.6223 • youraga.ca • ALEX JANVIER: LIFE'S WORK: until Aug 19 • BMO Work of Creativity: METHOD AND MADNESS: Family-focused interactive exhibition created by Gabe Wong; until Dec 31 • LOUISE BOURGEOIS 1911-2010; until Sep 23 • 7 YEARS IN THE CITY: Artworks from the AGA Collection; until Sep 30 • THE AUTOMATISTE REVOLUTION: MONTREAL 1941-1960: Until Oct 14 • ABSENCE/PRESENCE: Catherine Burgess; Jul 14-Oct 14 • BEHIND THIS LIES MY TRUE DESIRE FOR YOU: Mark Clintberg; Jul 14-Dec 30 • Women in Art Film Series: Marina Abramovi; The Artist is Present; Jul 10 • Tuesdays on the Terrace: Every Tue, 4-8pm, Jul and Aug; AGA admission includes an art-inspired signature cocktail from ZINC Restaurant, served up with live musical stylings on the AGA 3rd floor Terrace; Jul 3 and 10: Music provided by local DJ group GirlsClub • One Evening/Two Artists: More art, more insight; Conversation with the Artists: Mark Clintberg: Behind this lies my true desire for you, 6pm; Catherine Burgess: Absence/Presence, 7pm; Party on the Terrace, 7:30pm; Fri, Jul 13; free with gallery admission

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA)

• 19 Perron St, St Albert, 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert.ca • WHAT KIND OF AN ANIMAL AM I?: Bekk Wells' textile based installations wittily examine the relationship between human culture and the rest of the world; Jul 5-28; opening/ArtWalk: Thu, Jul 5, 6-9pm • What Kind of Animal am I?: Artworks by Bekk Wells • Jul 5-28

ARTWALK–St Albert • Perron District,

downtown St Albert • artwalkstalbert.com • The 1st Thu each month, exhibits run all month • Venues: WARES (Hosting SAPVAC), Musée Héritage Museum, St Albert Library, Gemport, Art Beat Gallery, Art Gallery of St Albert

(AGSA) and Rental & Sales Gallery (AGSA), Satellite Studio (AGSA), Bookstore on Perron, Crimson Quill, St Albert Constituency, Concept Jewellery, VASA • Thu, Jul 5

ART WALK–WHYTE AVE • Along Whyte

Ave between 100 St to 108 St • Outdoor studio and gallery featuring working artists • Jul 13-15

BLUE CURVE GALLERY • Glenrose

Rehabilitation Hospital, 10230-111 Ave • REFLECTIVITY: Dark paintings constructed with paint, found objects and clear resin, by William G. Prettie • Jul 5-Aug 30

CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTA (CAVA) • 9103-95 Ave •

780.461.3427 • HARMONY: Artworks by Elaine Berglund, Claire Chauvet, Valerie Solash, Danielle Morency • Jul 6-17 • Reception: Jul 6, 7-8:30pm

CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain • 780.963.9573 • BOWLS: An Artful Study of a Simple Form • Until Jul 31

DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St •

780.760.1278 • daffodilgallery.ca • SOMEWHERE IN THE HILLS: Abstract impressionist landscapes by Samantha Williams-Chapelsky • Jul 5-19 • Reception: Thu, Jul 12, 5-8pm

DOUGLAS UDELL • 10332-124 St •

780.488.4445 • SYLVAIN VOYER SEEING ALBERTA, LATITUDE 50 TO LATITUDE 53: Paintings by Sylvain Voyer • Extended to Jul 7

ENTERPRISE SQUARE GALLERY • 10230

Jasper Ave • SAM STEELE: THE JOURNEY OF A CANADIAN HERO: Experience the untold story of Sam Steele, Canadian leader and hero. Records of his life unseen until repatriation in 2008. An exhibition over three years in the making • Until Sep 30 • $7 (adult)/$5 (child/ student/senior)/$20 (family) • Street Performers Festival Special Daily tours; Jul 6-15, 12:30pm with admission

EXTENSION GALLERY–ATRIUM • Enterprise Sq, 10230 Jasper Ave • WHERE WE STAND: Artworks by Boyle Street Commnity Services' artist and artist in residence Anna Gaby-Trotz • Until Sep 5 FAB GALLERY • Department of Art and

Design, U of A, Rm 3-98 Fine Arts Bldg • 780.492.2081 • QUOTATIONALISM EXHIBITION: Work that questions, meditates on and reworks the problem of visual quotation. A response to and redefinition of objects from the U of A's Mactaggart Art Collection to compliment the exhibit China's Imperial Modern: The Painter's Craft, at TELUS Centre, Gallery A. Guest curators: Lisa Claypool and Maria Whiteman • Until Jul 14

GALLERIE PAVA • 9524-87 St, 780.461.3427

• ALTÉRITÉ: Featuring the ART 5 Group (Diane Plasse, Doris Charest, Stephen Fouquet, Shoko César and Yves Caron) • Until Jul 25

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner

Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.944.5383 • epl.ca/art-gallery • THE WORKS FESTIVAL: until Jul 5 • Celebrating the History of Edmonton: Photo Exhibit by Mike Moruzi; until Jul 31

HAPPY HARBOR COMICS V1 • 10729-

104 Ave • COMIC JAM: Improv comic art making every 1st and 3rd Thu each month, 7pm • Open Door: Collective of independent comic creators meet the 2nd & 4th Thu each month, 7 am • Comics Artist-in-Residence program is proud to extend Paul Lavellee’s term. Visit him every Friday (12-6) and Sat (12-5); until Aug 18

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112 St • SYMBIOSIS: 24th Annual Members’ Exhibition; until Jul 21

ILLUMINATE • Harcourt House, SNAP, FAVA, Nina Haggerty • Free day-long event with different workshops and events at each of the locations ending with the after-arty at Harcourt (6-10pm) • Sat, Jul 21 HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY–Red Deer

• Sunworks Home and Garden Store, Ross St, Red Deer • 403.346.8937 • harriswarkegallery. com • LITTLE TO WISH FOR: Installation by Alysse Bowd; Until Jul 28; reception and performance of My Lemonade Stand: Fri, Jul 6, 6-8pm; part of Red Deer’s First Fridays

HUB ON ROSS–Red Deer • 4936 Ross

St, Red Deer • 403.340.4869 • hubpdd.com • ART FROM THE INSIDE: Works by Wanda Cassidy • Until Jul 31 • Reception: Fri, Jul 6, 4:30-6:30pm• Concert: Justine Vandergrift (CD release); 7-9pm

JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY • Strathcona Place Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave • 780.433.5807 • FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE: Paintings by Teresa Stieben • Until Jul 25 • Reception: Wed, Jul 11, 6:30-8:30pm

JURASSIC FOREST/LEARNING CENTRE

• 15 mins N of Edmonton off Hwy 28A, Township Rd 564 • Education-rich entertainment facility for all ages

KIWANIS GALLERY–Red Deer • Red Deer Public Library • FLOWER SCAPES: Works by Elaine Tweedy • Until Aug 19 • Reception: Fri, Jul 6, 6:30-8:30pm

LATITUDE 53 • 10248-106 St • 780.423.5353

• latitude53.org • Main Space: I HAVE THIS DREAM: An exploration of contemporary surrealism works by Turner Prize* ( Jason Cawood, Blair Fornwald, and John G. Hampton), Craig Francis Power, curated by Todd Janes • Jul 5-Aug 4 • Opening: Thu, Jul 5, 7pm (with a Rooftop Patio party from 5-9pm) • Rooftop Patio Series: Art, food, sunshine, cocktails and camaraderie: guest patio host: CityTV; Jul 12 • Incubator Artists: Grace Law; until Jul 7; Dana Holst: Jul 9-14

MARJORIE WOOD GALLERY–Red Deer • Kerry Wood Nature Centre • INSECT PORTRAITS: Artworks by Charity Briere • Until Jul 27 • Reception: Fri, Jul 6, 5-7pm

VELVET OLIVE LOUNGE–Red Deer • Artworks by Elyse Szabo • Until Jul 31

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St • 780.407.7152 • NEW TERRAIN: LANDSCAPES IN PASTEL: Works by David Shkolny, Judy Martin, and Catharine Compston; until Aug 26 MICHIF CULTURAL AND MÉTIS RESOURCE INSTITUTE • 9 Mission Ave, St

Albert • 780.651.817∂6 • Aboriginal Veterans Display • Gift Shop • Finger weaving and sash display by Celina Loyer • Ongoing

MILDWOOD GALLERY • 426, 6655-178

St • Mel Heath, Joan Healey, Fran Heath, Larraine Oberg, Terry Kehoe, Darlene Adams, Sandy Cross and Victoria, Pottery by Naboro Kubo and Victor Harrison • Ongoing

MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain

• 5411-51 St, Stony Plain • 780.963.9935 • Drawings and paintings by John Zyp; until Jul 11 • Fabric hangings by Rachelle Le Blanc; Jul 14-Aug 15; opening reception: Sun, Jul 15 • Paintings by Detra Powney; Aug 17-Sep 19; opening reception: Sun, Sep 9

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM–St Albert • 5 St Anne St, St Albert • 780.459.1528

• St Albert History Gallery: Artifacts dating back 5,000 years • IN FOCUS: Photographing the Alberta and Montana Frontier, 18701930; Blood, Blackfoot, Northwest Mounted Police and ranching artifacts from the Royal Alberta Museum and Musée Héritage Museum will be featured with the photographs • Until Aug 19

NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81

Ave • 780.432.0240 • paintspot.ca • EXPLORING LANDSCAPES: Oil landscape paintings by Greg Doherty • Jul 6-31 • Reception: Jul 21, 2-4pm

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304

Jasper Ave • 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery.com • SUMMER GROUP SHOWS: New artworks by gallery artists; through to Aug

PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA

• 8555 Roper Rd • 780.427.1750 • culture. alberta.ca/archives • WE SIMPLY TURNED TO THE WOMEN: 100 YEARS OF THE CATHOLIC WOMEN'S LEAGUE, Edmonton Archdiocese 1912-2012; until Aug 31 • Historic Festival and Doors Open Edmonton: Behind the Scenes Tours of the Provincial Archives of Alberta; Jul 7, 10am-3pm

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102

Ave • 780.453.9100 • Maskwacîs (Bear Hills): Art works and cultural artifacts by the community of Maskwacîs, Hobbema, Alberta. The images tell a story. Curated by Myra Saskatchewan; until Sep 3 • WINGED TAPESTRIES: MOTHS AT LARGE: until Sep 3 • FASHIONING FEATHERS: Dead Birds, Millinery Craft and the Plumage Trade; curated by Merle Patchett and Liz Gomez, show examines the effect of fashion's demand for beautiful feathers on bird populations at the beginning of the twentieth century; until Jan 6 • WOLF TO WOOF: until Sep 16 • THE ART OF SEATING: Two Hundred Years of American Design: until Oct 6 • THE TSARS' CABINET: Two Hundred Years of Russian Decorative Arts under the Romanovs: Oct 6-Jan 2 • Behind-the-Scenes Tours: Western Canadian History Collection: French language tour: Domestic Collection: Fine and Decorative Arts Collection: Wed, Jul 4, 2-3:30pm; Medical Collection: Fine and Decorative Arts Collection: Jul 3, 5-6, 10:30am-12; Tours for age 12+; walking and standing for 90 mins; Pre-register: T: Cathy Roy 780.453.9123; E: cathy.roy@gov.ab.ca

• WITNESS: Recent works by Sherri Chaba and Lyndal Osborne • Jul 3-Aug 19 • Opening/Catalogue Launch: Jul 6, 7pm; artists in attendance

SUEDE ULTRA-LOUNGE • Jasper Ave, 119 St • NVSart • Until Jul 12

TELUS CENTRE • U of A Museums, Gallery

A, Main Fl, 87 Ave, 111 St • 780.492.5834 • Open: Thu-Fri 12-5pm; Sat 2-5pm • CHINA'S IMPERIAL MODERN: THE PAINTER'S CRAFT: Curated by Lisa Claypool • Until Jul 14

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-

142 St • 780.452.9100 • edmontonscience. com • IMAX: Hubble: Through the summer • ROBOTS–THE INTERACTIVE EXHIBITION: Until Sep 9

U OF A MUSEUMS–TELUS Centre •

Gallery A, Main Fl, 87 Ave, 111 St, U of A • 780.492.5834 • museums.ualberta.ca • CHINA'S IMPERIAL MODERN: THE PAINTER'S CRAFT: How did modern ways of making paintings and prints emerge from the ink painter’s studio, enter the public sphere, and help shape people’s lives in China during the late imperial era? • Until Jul 14; Thu-Fri, 12-5pm, Sat 2-5pm

VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St • 780.421.1731 • COMING OF AGE: THE GRADUATES: Artworks by 10 graduating artists from five different communities in Alberta. 2D, 3D and video/installation works by: Derrick Hoekstra and Nicole Lalonde (Lethbridge), Jean Day and Gillian Mitchell (Calgary), Thomas Sidwell and Joseph P. LaGrange (Red Deer), Lucille Frost and Megan Warkentin (Edmonton) and Naomi Deutekom & Callista MacLennan (Grand Prairie) during Nextfest and the Works Festival • Until Jul 14, 12-4pm • WATER MEDIA–THE WORKS FESTIVAL 2012: Artworks by VAAA's membership; until Jul 21 WEST END GALLERY • 12308 Jasper Ave • 780.488.4892 • westendgalleryltd.com • Group show • Through the summer

LITERARY BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ • 9624-76 Ave •

780.469.8755 • Story Slam: 2nd Wed each month; last story slam for the summer: Wed, Jul 11

EDMONTON MUNICIPAL CEMETERY • By the Mausoleum, 118 St, 107 Ave • 780.489.9621 • More Chilling Stories at the Edmonton Cemetery: with four of Alberta's professional storytellers, and puppet master Dave Tyler, presented by T.A.L.E.S. for teens (14yrs+, adults) • $20 (gate) • Fri, Jul 6, 8:3010pm

FROM BOOKS TO FILM SERIES • Stanley A. Milner Library, Main Fl, Audio Visual Rm • 780.944.5383 • Hugo (2011, PG); Jul 6, 2pm • Coraline (2009, PG); Fri, Jul 13, 2pm HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB • 15120 Stony

Plain Rd • 780.915.8869 • Edmonton Story Slam: writers share their original, 5-minute stories; followed by a music jam • 3rd Wed every month: 7pm (sign-up); 7:30pm (show) • $5 (registration from writers to support the Society)

RIVERDALE • 9917-87 St • Creative Word Jam • Every 3rd Sun of the month, 6-10pm • facebook.com/group.php?gid=264777964410 E: creative.word.jam@gmail.com ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St •

780.902.5900 • Poetry every Tue with Edmon-

ton's local poets

T.A.L.E.S.–STRATHCONA • New Strath-

cona Library, 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • 780.400.3547 • Monthly Tellaround: 4th Wed each month 7pm • Free

T.A.L.E.S. TELLAROUND • Bogani Café, 2023-111 St • Come to share a story, or just come to listen; hosted by Dawn Blue; 7-9pm; free; 2nd Wed each month WUNDERBAR ON WHYTE • 8120-101

St • 780.436.2286 • The poets of Nothing, For Now: poetry workshop and jam every Sun • No minors

THEATRE CHIMPROV • Varscona Theatre, 10329-

83 Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • First three Sat every month, 11pm, until Jul • $10/$5 (high school student)/$8 (RFT member at the door only)

CONFESSIONS OF A BABY BOOMER BOMBSHELL • Stanley A Milner Library

Theatre, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • Comedy featuring Zandra Bell. Part of Edmonton International Street Performers Festival Sat, Jul 7, 8pm • $15 (adv)/$17 (door)

EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL STREET PERFORMERS FESTIVAL • Sir Winston

Churchill Sq • edmontonstreetfest.com • Outdoor performances by an international cast of street artists and ndoor Late Night Maness shows • Jul 5-15

FREEWILL SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL-2012 • Heritage Amphitheatre, Haw-

relak Park • 780.425.8086 • freewillshakespeare. com • Julius Caesar: guest director John Kirkpatrick • The Tempest: artistic director Marianne Copithorne • Until Jul 22; Tue-Sun at 8pm; SatSun at 2pm; Julius Caesar: even dates (evenings only); The Tempest: odd dates and all matinées • $25 (adult)/$40 (festival passes)/$17 (student/ senior); at TIX on the Square. Tue nights and Sat matinées are Pay-What-You-Will

A GRAND TIME IN THE RAPIDS • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • Set in Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1959. Thalia Cumberland, a sleek and comely widow from across the pond enlists the aid of etiquette expert Ted Todd in finessing a potentially indecorous encounter with her new paramour Boyd Mayhew • Jul 5-21, Tue-Sat: 8pm; Sat: 2pm • Wed-Sat: $27 (adult)/$22 (student/senior); Sat afternoon: $15; Tue evening: Pay-What-You-Can OH SUSANNA! • Varscona Theatre • 1032983 Ave • 780.433.3399 • varsconatheatre.com/ ohsusanna • The Euro-style variety spectacle with Susanna Patchouli and her divine co-host Eros, God of Love! Laughs! Music! Cocktails! • Runs the last Sat each month, until Jul, 11pm (subject to occasional change) SYLVIA • Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615-

109 Ave • Tickets: 780.483.4051 • mayfieldtheatre.ca • Starring Cindy Williams and Eddie Mekka (from TV’s Laverne & Shirley) • The classic love triangle-husband, wife, and...dog? A witty, intelligently comedic and tender tale about life and love in the middle years. Mature content, not suitable for children • Until Aug 19

THEATRESPORTS • Varscona Theatre,

10329-83 Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Improv runs every Fri, until Jul, 11pm (subject to occasional change) • $10/$8 (member)

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • 780.488.3619 • JULY GROUP SHOW: Artworks by: Arlene Wasylynchuk ( just won the 1st ever Foote Prize for Visual Arts), Douglas Haynes, Gerald Faulder and Peter Hide (all featured in the AGA's new exhibition "7 Years In The City"). Featuring other Scott Gallery artists • Until Jul 20 SNAP GALLERY • Society Of Northern Alberta Print-Artists, 10123-121 St • 780.423.1492 • snapartists.com • LOCATING SPIRITUALITY/FROM OBJECTS TO ICONS: SNAP opens ups its archives for a show curated by Tess Hawkins • Jul 7-Aug 8 • Opening: Jul 7 STRATHCONA COUNTY GALLERY@501 • 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood

Park • 780.410.8585 • strathcona.ca/artgallery

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

ARTS 17


How does Edmonton stack up as a beer town?

T

here are certain places that clearly excel at beer. They have reputations for interesting pubs, quality local beer and a passion for craft beer. If you have travelled at all, you may have experienced some of them. Vancouver has an impressive array of local craft brewers. Montréal exudes good beer in every location. Denver and Portland seem to live and breathe beer. Brussels has cafes with 1000 beer on the

I

would argue there are five dimensions to being a quality beer city. The first is being home to a number of quality craft breweries. All good beer places have a sizeable roster of local beer. Take Vancouver, for example, who has 12 craft breweries (not including Granville) in the lower mainland metropolitan area. Local breweries are a good signal that craft beer is accepted and that people are willing to seek out good beer. On this score, Edmonton is doing soso. We have three established breweries – Alley Kat, Amber's and Yellowhead – each of whom has established a solid niche in town. But we could use with at least two or three more to fill out the roster. For that to happen, we need to make gains on the second dimension. In good beer towns it is easy to find locally-produced beer in pubs and restaurants. Pub owners realize the need to offer their customers something made in their backyard, because consumers are demanding it. In Portland you can't walk into a bar without finding at least one or two local beer on tap. In that city, local craft beer is the default; you give yourself away as an outsider if you order a macro-beer. In Portland craft beer captures 30 percent of the beer market – one in three beer sold. As a comparison, in Alberta, less than three percent of beer sales are craft. On this measure Edmonton lags behind badly. Most bars are loyally tied to Molson and Labatt and you are lucky to even find a Big Rock or two. A long way to go here, beer fans. The third dimension is a variety of beer-specialized pubs/restaurants. Good beer cities have a handful of places where beer reigns supreme. Montréal has Vices et Versa, which has 36 Quebec beer on tap and a commitment to beer culture. Vancouver has

18 DISH

the Alibi Room and Toronto Bar Volo. And then there is Brussels, which has beer cafés that list hundreds of amazing beer to offer and make a religion out of serving them properly. Up until recently, Edmonton didn't rate on this measure, but things are getting better. For the last few years, the Sugar Bowl, with 18 craft taps and hundreds on the beer menu was the closest thing we had to a Belgian beer café. We also have a number of pubs trying to make beer a key element of their image, including Next Act, Wunderbar, Accent, Ale Yard, Pour House, and Local Pub, but they have not yet made the jump to being "beer destinations". However, in coming months we have, and will see, a couple of new pubs open up that are endeavouring to put beer first. The most impressive might be the looming launch of Underground (Jasper and 100 Street) which plans to have 72 taps, mostly craft, and a solid commitment to making the place a beer fan go-to. Time will tell whether they succeed, but it is clearly a step up for Edmonton. There is also confirmed talk that two Calgary beer destinations—Craft Beer Market, which has over 100 taps, and Beer Revolution, who have the most innovative model with only rotating taps (after one keg that beer is replaced by a different one)—will soon be opening Edmonton locations. Things are about to get a lot better on the beer location scene. Strong beer cities also have a selection of brewpubs on offer. Brewpubs only brew beer for on-site sale and they are a fantastic way to get fresh, original beer not available anywhere else. In a way, brewpubs are the epitome of local beer. Dieu Du Ciel, now a nationally distributed brewer, started as a brewpub and the pub continues to be an anchor for Montréal's beer scene. Denver, a city smaller than Ed-

monton, boasts eight different brewpubs. Here in Edmonton we have a few locations of the Brewster's chain. Brewster's makes some good beer, but having only them seems inadequate to me. I can't understand why we don't have competitors for it. Edmonton should have at least three or four different brewpubs pushing each other to make better beer. This is one area where Edmonton fails miserably. The final piece of the good beer town puzzle are beer events. Beer cities have a variety of beer-themed events to attend, some large, some small. Victoria has a huge annual beer festival, called the Great Canadian Beer Festival. Montréal has Mondial de la Biere. Denver hosts one of the largest beer festivals on the planet. Common among them is the throngs of people devoted to sampling original, creative beer, as opposed to getting smashed as quickly as possible. Beer cities also have beer-themed dinners, cask nights, beer tastings and beer workshops. Beer becomes a part of the social life as much as theatre, wine or music. Edmonton has some of this going on, but we have further to go. We do have a handful of cask nights (when a single keg of beer processed in a traditional fashion is tapped and served until it is gone, usually within an hour),

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

menu. London can pull a pint that has links to beer of the 1700s. What would it take for Edmonton to rate a mention in such an illustrious list? More broadly, what are the elements of a good beer town? There are a few dimensions. Allow me to walk through them and offer some thoughts on where Edmonton sits on the scale, and what it needs to do to advance on it.

and the occasional restaurant offers beer dinners (Continental Treat deserves a particular mention for their monthly beer dinners). But at the moment it still feels sporadic and rare, rather than a regular feature of our nightlife. Plus we need a real beer festival, one where beer fans, rather than frat boys, can feel comfortable to sample beer from around the province and around the world. So, where does Edmonton fit? To be honest, at the moment we are a second tier beer city, but we have potential. The last couple of years have seen rapid progress on most of the five dimensions. I am hopeful that in a decade or so other people will speak of Edmonton they way the speak today of Vancouver, Montréal or Denver. It may or may not happen, but I can dream, can't I? V JASON FOSTER // TOTHEPINT@VUEWEEKLY.COM


Chef Sean O’Connor of Red Ox Inn has a passion for roasted Pork loin with confit potato salad and sprout hash. Get the recipe, enter to win dinner out and fall in love at passionforpork.com. Brought to you by Alberta pork producers.

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BEERNOTES

JASON FOSTER // TOTHEPINT@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Who is Thomas Ireland? Thomas William Ireland was Alberta’s

the South Saskatchewan river and we

are way more famous than Ireland).

first commercial brewer. Born in Lon-

were just the Northwest Territories at

Flint currently has a beer named after

don, England, he emigrated to the

the time. The brewery didn’t last long,

him, made by Alley Kat.

harsh prairies, like thousands before

closing in 1887, but Ireland remained in

Thomas Ireland is a name worth re-

him, in hope of creating a better future

the Hat and raised nine children with

membering (and tossing out at parties

for his family. In the late 1870s he was

his wife Amelia.

to look smart) because he was one of

an accountant for the CPR and was

Ireland has mostly drifted into histori-

the early pioneers of Alberta’s beer

transferred to Medicine Hat. For rea-

cal obscurity, overshadowed by Alber-

scene, reflecting the hardy prairie spirit

sons unknown to most of us, in 1882

ta’s longer lasting early beer players,

that made our region what it is. Be-

he launched Alberta’s first brewery,

like Fritz Sick, Alfred Cross and Charlie

sides, aren’t you floored that Alberta’s

called Saskatchewan Brewery. It got

Flint (yes, I know most of you don’t

first brewery was in Medicine Hat, of

that name because Medicine Hat is on

know them, either, but trust me, they

all places? I sure am.

Ale vs.

Lager When I run beer education sessions, the most frequent question I get is: what is the difference between ale and lager? I can understand the confusion. First let me say that colour, bitterness, flavour and aroma do not distinguish the families. You can just as easily have a dark lager as a blonde ale, and characteristics like hop bitterness, malt sweetness and alcohol content are shared by both. The difference comes down to one key thing, but that thing has significant consequences. The main distinction is that ales are fermented at ap-

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dacapocaffe.com VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

proximately room temperature, while lagers require cooler fermentation (10 – 12 degrees) and an even cooler aging period. The first big consequence of this difference is that each requires a different species of yeast. Ale yeasts would go to sleep at the temperature needed for lagers, so a different species, accustomed to lower fermentations, is used. These yeasts tend to produce a cleaner, crisper beer, while ale yeasts create fruity esters and other complex compounds. The second consequence is flavour. Ales, due to their process, are fruitier,

fuller and seem more complex. In contrast, lagers are cleaner and crisper. The extended cold storage time that lagers undergo (at close to zero degrees) emphasizes their cleanliness and crispness. The third consequence is serving temperature. Ales like to be served a little warmer than lagers—although neither likes ice-cold. Ales should be served about 15 degrees, while lagers can be seven or eight degrees to maximize flavour. Feel free to enjoy either, wherever your palate takes you. It is just good to know the difference. V


JULY 13

341ml/$5.99

BIG KAHUNA When we first started to count the number of beers we carried, we only had a little over 200. Since then (and it hasn’t been all that long) the number has grown by leaps and bounds, and has now reached 1000. To celebrate this, we asked our friends at Alley Kat to do something special for us to mark the occasion. The result is this: A Special Edition Sour Ale on Cherries. We hope you enjoy it, as we begin working on carrying 2000 Different Brands of Beer! (Our 10’th Anniversary is next year, do you think we can do it?)

JULY 27

HANS

ACROSS THE

WATER

Imperial Coffee Vanilla Porter. For our first ever International Beer, we went with an International Incident. Two years in the making, we feel that the result has been well worth that wait.

1500ml/$25.99

II

JULY 6

We Bring The World To You!

WESTVLETEREN XII

$6X330ML/$74.99 The best beer in the world is coming to Alberta in the next two weeks. Please visit our website to learn more about his literally once in a lifetime opportunity. The Latin title stands for “I helped to build an abbey”. The proceeds of these special “brew-to-build-boxes” will go entirely to the reconstruction of the Trappist abbey.

JULY 20

Join us in July, as The Best Beer Store In Canada brings you: The Best Beer In The World, Our 1000th Beer, Our First international beer & the third in our Beer Gods Series. (And lots more we don't have room to talk about!)

1000 Different Brands of Beer!

11819 St. St Albert Tr. sherbrookeliquor.com VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

YASIGI:

$4.50/355ml

The third in our Gods Series, the African Goddess Yasigi has been honoured as an Hibiscus Red.

(Don’t know what that means? You’ll have to try one to find out…)

Show Your Colours! Drink Green & Gold! Cab Merlot & Pinot Grigio.

750ml/$15.99

DISH 23


BEER

JASON FOSTER // TOTHEPINT@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Lightweight marketing Insulting ads and embarrassing beer won't entice female beer drinkers

I

will admit one of the things that most frustrates me about beer marketing is how it talks down to women. The bulk of beer ads likely piss women off, with all their bouncy bikini babes and sports-centric themes. To make things worse, lately the big boy breweries have been releasing beer designed to appeal specifically to women. Which would be fine, if the beer were anything other than an embarrassment. It is not news that men drink more beer than women, making the lessbeer-bellied sex an elusive target for beer companies. Consequently they try to make beer for women, but on the whole don’t do a very good job of it. Case in point: the new release from Molson-Coors, Coors Light Iced Tea. It is supposed to be a blend of beer and tea for a quenching summer beverage. Except that someone forgot the beer. The aroma is tea with lemon and honey. The flavour blends a tannin-y tea, hints of lemon and an overall sweetness. It tastes more like a carbonated iced tea than a beer, quite frankly. How does this attract women to beer? Then there is Uptown Girl, a recent arrival to Alberta brewed at a Wisconsin discount beer brewery. Fruit-flavoured beer in small bottles (207 ml) marketed

24 DISH

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

directly at women using the most sexist stereotypes possible. It presents images fixated with make-up and slinky dresses, girls partying in a night club and an aversion to anything with real beer flavour. I am insulted and I am not even a woman.

It finds a way to blend tea and beer without scrimping on either. Very summery. Many women like fruit beer, which is fair. But to my mind most are sweet and boring. However, there are some good examples out there. Alley Kat’s latest seasonal is Brewberry Blueber-

Lately the big boy breweries have been releasing beer designed to appeal specifically to women. Which would be fine, if the beer were anything other than an embarrassment. The reality is that women can like every kind of beer. But I am well aware that there is a significant population of women who require some persuasion to enter the world of beer. So allow me to try some good alternatives—beer that might appeal to the unsure but not embarrass even the most ardent beer geek. Think iced tea might actually work with beer? Well it can. If that combination interests you pick up a can of Mill Street Lemon Tea Beer (which I reviewed last year: bit.ly/teabeer).

ry Ale. It holds on to its beer credentials while still offering a light, fruity quality. If they want something a little darker, Cannery’s Blackberry Porter does a wonderful job of accenting the earthy sharpness of blackberry. I have turned many a wine-accented woman onto beer by offering a glass of Duchess de Bourgogne. Duchess is a rare Belgian beer called Flanders Red, which is a tart amber ale that reminds many of red wine. It is un-beerlike enough to spark interest yet still appeal to a guy like me. My instinct is that there is a beer out there for every beer-skeptical person, male or female. But I am quite certain that the way to win them over is not with insulting and sexist advertising, but to offer decent beer to drink. V


VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

DISH 25


BEER

Six (plus four) things about beer WOMEN'S WORK

NOT THE MOST HYGENIC METHOD

The phrase "rule of thumb" can also be credited to beer. Before thermometers were invented, brewers would stick their thumbs into beer vats to see if it was time for yeast to be added. If it was too hot, the yeast would die.

DON'T LET IT GO TO WASTE

DON'T TRY THIS TODAY

Centuries ago, pub patrons in England summoned a barmaid by blowing into a whistle crafted into the rim of beer mugs. It's suggested this is where the phrase "wet your whistle" originated.

Store beer upright to minimize oxidation and contamination from the cap.

ALMOST NO. 1

OFFICIAL TITLE

Love beer? The term for a beer enthusiast is a cerevisaphile cerevisaphile.

In the Middle Ages, women were in charge of brewing beer. It was considered a daily task in some countries, but in others, it was reserved only for "goodlooking" women and was considered an honour. Monks also knew how to brew beer.

The ancient Babylonians were the first to brew beer. It's been said that if someone brewed a bad batch, they were drowned in it as punishment.

OH CANADA

Beer is the second most popular beverage in the world, right behind tea.

The first brewery in Canada was established by Jean Talon in Quebec City in 1668. John Molson founded a brewery in MontrĂŠal in 1786 and Alexander Keith followed in Halifax in 1820. John Kinder Labatt established his brewery in London in 1847.

WATER IS ESSENTIAL

Beer is predominantly composed of water, and certain regions were originally better suited to making different types of beer. For example, Dublin's mineral-rich hard water was ideal for stouts.

26 DISH

SERIOUS ABOUT BEER

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

BEER, BEER AND MORE BEER

Belgium has been crowned as the country with the most individual beer brands at 400.


MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

JULY 6-7 DOUG STROUD JULY 9 AJ GOODVIN JULY 11 DUFF ROBINSON JULY 13-14 LYLE HOBBS edmontonpubs.com

PREVUE // STREET FIGHTING MEN

The City Streets DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE DAY OF THE WEEK? SATURDAY & SUNDAY, BREAKFAST UNTIL 4PM SUNDAY, CELTIC MUSIC MONDAY, SINGER SONG WRITER TUESDAY, WING NIGHT WEDNESDAY, OPEN STAGE, PIZZA w/ JUG NIGHT THURSDAY, CHEAP JUG NIGHT

Sat, Jul 7 (9 pm) The City Streets With Whiskeyface and guests Starlite Room

A

fter making the move east to Montréal in 2009, the City Streets are heading back home to Edmonton to celebrate the release of not one, but two new full-length albums. The band had enough songs recorded to release two discs, so rather than releasing one, doing promo and waiting to release the second, the decision was made to get them both out to audiences together. Sawdust & Rum and Winter Lightning are being released at once, but couldn't be more different. Sawdust & Rum was inspired by singer and guitar player Rick Reid's grandfather, who passed away two years ago. Reid describes him as an individualistic, libertarian, unique man, and his death inspired him to put the pen to paper. This is the first time he's addressed personal subject matter in such a direct manner, but he believes that in spite of the lyrics being about a certain person, they can resonate with any listener.

"Everyone has someone like that in their life, you know, someone they can look up to ... it's just a human experience to go through losing someone you love," Reid notes, adding that writing helped him get through the situation, and he wanted it to be about celebrating life in general, rather than a self-indulgant endeavour. "Sometimes you've got to capture that moment in life where you feel certain things." The entire album was recorded over the course of a week at a secluded cabin owned by Reid's uncle on the Northumberland Strait in Nova Scotia. The isolated environment allowed the band to record around the clock without any interruptions or complaints about the noise. "We knew it was going to have a certain rawness and rough sound to it because we're not trained engineers or producers, but that was sort of what we were going for and it was more of the spirit of the thing," he says. "We basically locked ourselves in with some Ichiban and some whisky and set up a recorder and went all day and all night, passed out for a couple hours, woke up and just kept going."

In contrast to the melancholic sentimentality of Sawdust & Rum, Winter Lightning offers Motown-charged power-pop tunes that were recorded in Montréal by Howard Bilerman at his Hotel2Tango studio. There was no thematic element to Winter Lightning and Reid says while some of its lyrics are influenced by friendships and relationships, it was more so a chance to delve further into the pop genre. Winter Lightning was recorded on two-inch tape, which Reid says he'd do all the time, for drums in particular, if he could because of the richness in sound that's produced. "There's a reason why guys like Jack White are obsessed with it," he says of the format. Both discs have been released on the City Street's independent label Clamour Records and the trio already has plans to head back into the studio to start recording another album, although it won't be released for another year. Reid says that during this tour they'll make a stop in Vancouver to record the new tracks with Jesse Gander at the Hive Creative Labs.

DOWNTOWN

July 5-7, JASON HOWARD • July 10-14, STAN GALLANT

WEM

July 5-7, ALESHA & BRENDON • July 10-11, ANDREW SCOTT July 12-14, AJ GOODVIN • SUNDAY NIGHT KARAOKE EDMONTONPUBS.COM

MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

City boys return home with two new albums

JULY 6 & 7

Jerrett Bordian

JULY 13 & 14

The Salesmen

In Sutton Place Hotel #195, 10235 101 Street, EDMONTONPUBS.COM

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

MUSIC 27


PREVUE // METAL THERAPY

PREVUE // ROCKIN' THE '80s AND '90s

My Own Chaos Metal therapy

Fri, Jul 6 (7 pm) With Jezibelle, Tribal Garage, Hamiko Deathnoize DV8

B

reak-ups suck, but let's be honest, they make for some great writing material.

28 MUSIC

My Own Chaos, led by front woman Connie Chaos, is touring in support of its self-titled debut album, penned by Connie in the wake of her divorce. However, this is no ordinary cliche break-up album. Rather than sappy ballads spinning tales of woe, My Own Chaos unleashes a powerful fusion of traditional metal, thrash and hard rock. Connie, who was drawn to metal when she discovered Ozzy Osbourne at age 13, says being able to let her emotions out through songwriting is like a cheap form of therapy. The lyrics poured out effortlessly and inspiration would strike at any time, whether she was intentionally sitting down to write or not. It doesn't hurt that the genre lends itself well to letting out the full arsenal of her vocal abilities, which range from typical metal elements like low growls to more melodic moments.

The Perms "There were definitely times where it was difficult to get the words out, but other times it was definitely a release," says Connie, who also shows off her vocal talents in the tribute bands Sister Sabbath and Zeppelina. "It was good to be able to go through that and get everything off my chest and let the healing begin." If there was any message amidst the outpour of emotion, Connie says it would be that a breakdown can also be a breakthrough. The tone of the album ends on a high note with an amped-up metal cover of No Doubt's "Hella Good." "At the of the day, you've just got to take the positive in life," she adds. "Life is hella good, so you have to live it." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

Fri, Jul 6 (8 pm) Brixx

I

nspiration can strike in the must unexpected ways, as pop-rock trio the Perms found out during a stop in Bulgaria on its European tour. Sofia, the country's capital, became the namesake of the band's latest album, Sofia Nights, which continues the group's stick-in-your-head melodies and shared interest in making music that matters. "It was such an amazing time over there and it sort of really sparked each band member's interest in being in a band again and making music and playing live," vocalist/bassist Shane Smith says. The band, which calls Winnipeg home, was particularly shocked to see members of the audience in Bulgaria singing along to its singles. Plans are already in the works for another visit to Bulgaria this fall when the Perms play a radio festival in Germany, where the band has a record deal with Revolver Records. The band took a much more collaborative approach to Sofia Nights than past releases, with each band member contributing extensively to the writing process. Smith says the change in approach was done in an effort to keep everyone interested in the project, which meant spending hours in

the jam room making sure everyone's opinion was heard. "I think in some bands it's tough because sometimes there's sort of one head writer and the rest sort of do whatever that person wants," Smith adds. "I think it's important to have a collaborative effort instead of someone calling all the shots." Adding more opinions can be a challenge, but Smith says the writing process for Sofia Nights has been the most relaxing one yet. Having more ideas allowed the band to push its songwriting boundaries outside the formula of conventional pop and incorporate instrumental elements that hadn't been used on previous releases, like synthesizers and more varied percussion elements. Lyrically and stylistically, the '80s and '90s get a nod once again. The decades hold special significance for Smith as they reflect a much freer time in music. The video for the first single, "High School High" even pays homage to hair bands of the time like Poison. "We've had references to our music that we sound like we're a band from the early '90s," Smith adds. "I don't know if that's an insult or not. I don't think it is." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


PREVUE // SPACE AND PLACE

Brock Tyler Fri, Jul 6 (8 pm) With Alex Vissia, the Young Albertans Elevation Room, $10

T

he culmination of late nights and multi-instrumental work came together for local singer-songwriter Brock Tyler, who's celebrating the release of his latest EP, You Can't Keep the Sun Down. Tyler did a soft release for the EP last summer, but now that he has physical copies in his hands, he wants to get them out to the masses. The six tracks, which just scrape the 15-minute mark, get right to the point through concise, simplistic songwriting that offers a glimpse into what Tyler's musical world is like. "It's pretty varied. I find myself working on lots of different kinds of music," he notes of this landscape. "The stuff on the EP, those are songs that I think are a really good sample of songs I like to write." Each song tells its own story, from sleeping under the stars on "June" to regaining perspective on "Saturday, Maybe." Aside from nature and daily life, Tyler also finds inspiration within history, which can be heard on "Just Like Chester Munday," which tells the story of a distant relative whom he'd never met, but received a copy of his obituary in his email. "One of the lines that stuck out to me was that he was a military man until the end and a prairie boy forever," Tyler recalls. "I realized I related to one of those things. History and nature are big things for me."

A prairie boy forever

The songs were recorded independently by Tyler over the course of about 24 hours in the dead of night at Central Baptist Church, where he's also a congregation member. The night-time recording sessions, which involved Tyler manning numerous different instruments, were done mostly because of logistics, but the time also helped the atmosphere of the record. "There's something about it, too. Everything's quiet, and I work best at night," Tyler adds. "I stay up way too late working on music all the time, so it's my time to really get to work." The church became a part of the recording through its natural reverb, creating a large, open sound for the EP. Tyler says he's always been a fan of Stax records from the '60s, where a large part of the sound was due to being recorded in large, echoey spaces. "You can hear it all over the recordings of Otis Redding, Booker T & the MGs," he says. "That was part of what inspired me to record in a church, to introduce a sense of space and place to the songs. I wanted the listener to feel they were in the corner of the room listening in." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

MUSIC 29


NEWSOUNDS Bend Sinister Small Fame (FU:M) 

100 YEARS OF THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL (COLLECTOR'S EDITION)

The Celebration of the Century

EXTRA! EXTRA!

100 THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL TURNS

Commemorating the

CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY of the AMALGAMATION of

OLD STRATHCONA and the

wishes to Congratulate the Commercial Hotel on their Centennial Celebration!

Check out the Celebration of the Century! here:

CITY OF EDMONTON

Bend Sinister does almost everything right on its latest record. Tapping into the sounds of the '70s—mainly in the band's addictive, melodic vocals and the sounds of its keyboards—without sounding like a hoaky throwback, the group sings its songs about broken people, wrapping them up in the healing cloak of rock 'n' roll. Bend Sinister comes at the songs as though this is the band's last chance at life, starting out with a wave of keys and choppy guitar on "She Don't Give It Up," working through the rising, repeated chorus of "We know better" and lamenting lost souls on "She Lost Her Rock and Roll." These are songs about regular folks, the same sort that Bruce Springsteen has made a career out of documenting, and Bend Sinister tells their tales in the most epic of ways for most of Small Fame. But deep into the album, somewhere around track nine—OK, exactly on track nine—the ride starts getting a little shakey. "Hot Blooded Man" is an amped-up bar-room stomp, with some "Frankenstein"-ed keys mixing it up with the guitar, but it probably works better live than it does on re-

cord. It's not a disaster, but the frantic riffing just doesn't hold up next to the eight songs that come before this one, with only the band's energy carrying the song through to its end. Then the next track derails the album completely. "Black Magic Woman" grinds slowly as Bend Sinister slips into full-on blues-rock mode and wails a slow, tedious tune. The notes are all in the right spots, but the band sounds too studied here, losing the freshness of the bulk of Small Fame. Where the rest of the album tears along on the edge of a musical cliff, this one song veers straight back for safer roads and it throws the flow off. It's tough to rip Small Fame apart for those couple of misses, though, because everything else comes in just right, and the final two tracks do a fine job of picking the record back up again—in fact, "Quest For Love" closes the album on a pretty much perfect—and epic—run of notes. There's a sense of exhaustion as the song ends and the record closes up, calling for a moment to catch your breath. But the melodies have also sunk deep by this point, so it doesn't take long before Small Fame becons for another listen. EDEN MUNRO

// EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Mnemic Mnemesis (Nuclear Blast) 

FEATURING: EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS WITH CURRENT AND FORMER STAFF — BLUES LEGENDS SHARE THEIR MEMORIES OF BLUES ON WHYTE

http://bit.ly/Commie2012

Mnemic describes itself as future fusion metal. Metallica says its one of their favourite bands. Mnemic’s fifth album integrates vocalists Guillaume Bideau’s soaring melodic vocals, which can become grating at times, with alternating, more engaging deep growls. As Mnemesis is the band’s fifth album, despite several lineup changes the band demonstrates that it knows what it’s doing when it comes to creating a heavy, technically precise album. Mnemesis manages to appeal to two different types of metal: the heavy, growly vocal lovers and those looking for epic, melodic vocals. The technical skill and a driving return to a heavier sound, makes it hard to ignore this album. SAMANTHA POWER

// SAMANTHA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Odyssey Abysmal Despair (Transubstans)

 "Without the intergalactic journey, the legacy of rock music dies," reads Mothership's online description. Try to resist a band that plays blues-laden metal with heavy guitar riffs that is also hoping for intergalactic travel. Mothership is a three piece from Dallas that alternates between an almost AC/DC-like sound on a track like "City Nights" and a broader, heavier and more epic sound on tracks like "Cosmic Rain," "Angel of Death" and the opener, "Hallucination," which manages to set up the transition from slow and steady tempos into the riff-heavy guitar of later tracks. If this is the soundtrack of the mothership, beam me aboard. SAMANTHA POWER

// SAMANTHA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Cody Gamracy Where is the Ground? (SoccerMom)  The debut solo release from Cody Gamracy, the lead guitarist of Jason Plumb & the Willing, is a brief collection of rock-infused tunes that while enjoyable enough, leaves something to be desired. Gamracy's voice is solid and the album showcases its strengths, but the song composition plays it a little too safe. One song leads seamlessly into the next, making each song feel much longer than it actually is. The pop-rock instrumentation is simple and keeps a similar mellow feel throughout, with only a few variances in tempo and mood with the addition of strings or synth on certain tracks. Overall, though, it feels like more of the same with something thrown in the mix to distract listeners. MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Carly Maicher Hiding (Independent) 

The opening track to Abysmal Despair is a good signal for the heavy journey Odyssey is about to take you on. An echoing guitar riff sets up the anticipation for the roughly yelled vocals that carry through a sludgy, well-paced track. The album is a compilation of sludge and stoner rock from this Swedish band, but contains an unexpected vocal style, yelled, not growled or melodic, just shouting out from an abyss: "Wicked witch, don't put your spell on me." While the bass fuzz and guitar hooks maintain a sludgy, stoner-rock feel, the surprising vocals and a faster drum pace give the band a more garage or alternative-rock feel. Instead of feeling disjointed, the album works cohesively to deliver some worthy heavy tracks.

Carly Maicher's debut album is a tranquil yet enticing collection of country-tinged folk that puts her crystal clear vocals centre stage. The songs are simplistic, but it's a case of less is more. Maicher's strong vocals shine on their own, and when accompanied by back-up harmonies and are showcased through introspective lyrics that conjure some intriguing imagery and stories for the listener.

SAMANTHA POWER

MEAGHAN BAXTER



// SAMANTHA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

30 MUSIC

Mothership Mothership (Independent)

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


MUSICNOTES

MEAGHAN BAXTER // MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM Wild T pities the fool

10442 whyte ave 439.127310442 whyte ave 439.1273

HOT WATER MUSIC

CD/ LP

EXISTER

bblackbyrd lackbyrd MM YY OO OO ZZ II K K ww ww ww . b . bl la ac ck kbb yy r r dd .. cc a SEE MAG: Jan 3, 1c x 2”/ 28 AG RB: BLACKBYRD MYOOZIK SALES:Samantha H S01367

Commercial Hotel's 100th anniversary Sun, Jul 8 (10 am – 10 pm outside, 10 pm – 2 am inside) Toronto-based blues-rock group Wild T & the Spirit will be joined by EC Scott, Kymyra, Tim Vaughn, JK & the Static and a host of other musical talent to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Commercial Hotel. The City of Edmonton is closing off Whyte Ave from 102 St to 104 St to celebrate the centennial, which will include two entertainment stages, a pancake breakfast, face painting for the kids, street performers, vendor tables and beer gardens. (Free)

Handbell Extravaganza: From Jazz to Opera / Sun, Jul 8 (4 pm) The closing performance of Classic Bronze 2012, the only advanced handbell festival in the country, brings together ringers from across the country to perform old favourites with a contemporary twist. The performance will be directed by Edmonton's own Dr John Hooper, founder of the handbell ensemble JUBILOSO! and professor of music at Concordia University College. (Concordia University College Robert Tegler Student Centre, $12 adults, $10 students and seniors, $25 per family. Advance only)

Connections Concert Sun, Jul 8 The Alberta College Conservatory of Music will host the third and final performance of this series, which was developed in an effort to build support for classical music. Connections features student, alumni and faculty performances with a repertoire of Felix Mendelssohn, Carl Maria von Weber, Franz Liszt, Richard Strauss and Robert Schumann. Proceeds from ticket sales are used directly to support student scholarships. (Muttart Hall, $20 adults, $10 youth, free 12 and under) V

Hot Summer Guide.com

Everything to do in Edmonton Ever!* *Ever = This Summer VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

MUSIC 31


THU JUL 5

Thu and Fri; 10pmclose

ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE Etoroma

WUNDERBAR

Trio (R&B/soul), guest; 9:30pm-11:30pm; no minors; no cover

BLUES ON WHYTE

Honhee Honhee (Montreal), Consilience, Calvin Love; 9pm

DJs

Wild T and the Spirit

BLACK DOG

BOHEMIA

FREEHOUSE Main

Experimental music: Chris Riggs, Bent Spoon Duo, Zebra Pulse, Dada Centurai, Pigeon Breeders; 8pm; $5

BRITTANYS LOUNGE Kenny Hillaby hosts a jazz session night every Thu with Shadow Dancers, Maura and Jeanelle; no cover

CAFÉ HAVEN Jessie

Lee Robb; 7pm

CARROT CAFÉ

Zoomers Thu afternoon open mic; 1-4pm

Floor: wtft w djwtf - rock 'n' roll, blues, indie; Wooftop Lounge: Musical flavas incl funk, indie, dance/nu disco, breaks, drum and bass, house with DJ Gundam

BRIXX High Fidelity

Thu: Open turntables; E: kevin@starliteroom.ca to book 30-min set

CENTURY ROOM

Lucky 7: Retro '80s with house DJ every Thu; 7pm-close

THE COMMON

every Thu at 9pm

Uncommon Thursday: Indie with new DJ each week with resident

EDDIE SHORTS Good

CROWN PUB Break

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

Time Jamboree with Charlie Scream every Thu

J R BAR AND GRILL Live Jam Thu; 9pm

JEFFREY'S CAFÉ

Kayla Hotte and her Rodeo Pals (country); $10

KRUSH ULTRA LOUNGE Open stage; 7pm; no cover

L.B.'S PUB Open jam

with Kenny Skoreyko, Fred LaRose and Gordy Mathews (Shaved Posse) every Thu; 9pm-1am

MARYBETH'S COFFEE HOUSE– Beaumont Open mic every Thu; 7pm

NAKED CYBERCAFE & ESPRESSO BAR Open stage Thu; all ages; 9pm-close; no cover

NEW CITY

Strugglefucks, Shotgun Dolls, Gurls, Action News Team; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $5 (door)

NEW WEST HOTEL

Canadian Country Hall of Fame Guest host Bev Munro; Tradewinds

NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by Wild

Rose Old Time Fiddlers every Thu

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK

Jesse Peters (R&B, blues, jazz, Top 40); 9pm-2am every Thu; no cover

RICHARD'S PUB

Moscow Dynamo; 8pm

RIC’S GRILL Peter

Belec ( jazz); most Thursdays; 7-10pm

Down Thu at the Crown: D&B with DJ Kaplmplx, DJ Atomik with guests

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ every Thu; 9pm

ELECTRIC RODEO– Spruce Grove DJ every Thu

FILTHY MCNASTY’S

Something Diffrent every Thursday with DJ Ryan Kill

FLASH NIGHT CLUB

Indust:real Assembly: Goth and Industrial Night with DJ Nanuck; no minors; 10pm (door); no cover

FLUID LOUNGE Take

Over Thursdays: Industry Night; 9pm

FUNKY BUDDHA– Whyte Ave Requests every Thu with DJ Damian

HALO Fo Sho: every

Thu with Allout DJs DJ Degree, Junior Brown

HILLTOP PUB The

Sinder Sparks Show; every Thu and Fri; 9:30pm-close

KAS BAR Urban House:

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ

Howard

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

BLUES ON WHYTE

Capital City Burlesque– Best by request; 9pm; $10 (adv at primeboxoffice. com, Blackbyrd, BRIXX)/$15 (door)

Wild T and the Spirit

BRIXX BAR Early

Show: Absurd Heroes, the Perms, Bailey Sutton and the Momentous Events, 9pm; Late Show: XoXo to follow (every Fri)

CARROT Live music

every Fri; all ages; 7pm; $5 (door)

CASINO EDMONTON The Rojo's Band (pop/ rock)

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Colleen Rae and Cornerstone (country/rock)

COAST TO COAST Open stage every Fri; 9:30pm

DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Doug Stroud DV8 My Own Chaos,

Jezibelle, Tribal Garage, Hamiko deathnoize

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

UNION HALL 3 Four All

TAPHOUSE–St Albert

Thursdays: rock, dance, retro, top 40 with DJ Johnny Infamous

WILD BILL’S–Red Deer TJ the DJ every Thu and Fri; 10pm-close

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

Famous Last Words, Chomp Chomp Attack, Submerge the Sky; 8-11:59pm

WILD BILL’S–Red Deer TJ the DJ every Thu and Fri; 10pm-close WUNDERBAR Wilder Than We (CD release), Catgut, Girl Meats Bear; 9pm DJs BAR-B-BAR DJ James; every Fri; no cover BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Every

Friday DJs on all three levels

BLACKSHEEP PUB

BISTRO live music every GOOD NEIGHBOR

HOUSE The Rock Mash-up: DJ NAK spins videos every Fri; 9pm; no cover

Fri; 7-10pm; $10

PUB T.K. and the Honey Badgers every friday; 8:30-midnight; no cover

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB Raptors (punk/

rock), Distant Calm, Strange Plains; 8pm; $8 (adv)/$10 (door)

BUDDY’S DJ Arrow

Chaser every Fri; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

BUFFALO UNDERGROUND R U

NEWCASTLE PUB

House, dance mix every Fri with DJ Donovan

O2'S TAPHOUSE AND GRILL DJs every Fri and Sat

O2'S ON WHYTE DJ Jay every Fri and Sat

OVERTIME– Downtown Fridays at Eleven: Rock hip hop, country, top forty, techno REDNEX–Morinville DJ Gravy from the Source 98.5 every Fri

RED STAR Movin’ on

Up: indie, rock, funk, soul, hip hop with DJ Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson; every Fri

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE

Fuzzion Friday: with Crewshtopher, Tyler M, guests; no cover

STARLITE–TEMPLE Silence Be Damned Launch Party: with DJs Gotthavok, Siborg, Nightroad; $5

SUEDE LOUNGE

House, electro, Top40, R'n'B with DJ Melo-D every Fri

SUITE 69 Release Your Inner Beast: Retro and Top 40 beats with DJ Suco; every Fri TREASURY In Style Fri: DJ Tyco and Ernest Ledi; no line no cover for ladies all night long UNION HALL Ladies Night every Fri

VINYL DANCE LOUNGE Connected Las Vegas Fridays

Y AFTERHOURS

Foundation Fridays

SAT JUL 7 ALBERTA BEACH

Aware Friday: Featuring Neon Nights

HOTEL Open stage with Trace Jordan 1st and 3rd Sat; 7pm-12

session every Fri; 8pm; no cover

CHROME LOUNGE

ARTERY The f-Holes

JEFFREY'S CAFÉ Mike Letto (acoustic pop rock); $15

THE COMMON

IRISH CLUB Jam

pop/rock); every Fri; 9pm; no cover

OVERTIME–

RENDEZVOUS Metal

STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION

BONEYARD ALE

NEW CITY Speed Control, Warning to Avoid, Very Dangerous Animals; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $8 (door)

at Eleven: Electronic Techno and Dub Step

STARLITE ROOM

Bash: DJ spinning retro to rock classics to current

ON THE ROCKS

Downtown Thursdays

Alesha and Brendon;

FRESH START

Rock 'n' roll open mic every Fri; 8:30pm; no cover

Salsaholic: every Thu; dance lessons at 8pm; salsa DJ to follow

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Jason

Hillary's Ride: Bill Werthmann and Friends; 8:30pm; donations, fundraiser for mental health

LIZARD LOUNGE

Deer TJ the DJ every

32 MUSIC

Jerrett Bordian

LUCKY 13 Sin Thu with DJ Mike Tomas

Eclectic mix every Thu with DJ Dusty Grooves

WILD BILL’S–Red

ROSE AND CROWN

Blues: every Friday Night hosted by The Dr Blu Band; 8pm (music); drblu.ca

PUB Headwind (classic

Howard

Petunia, Sean Conway; 8pm

BISTRO LA PERSAUD

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

night every Thu

THE VAT–Red Deer

Sherry Lee Wisor; 8pm (door); $15 (adv)

ARTERY Andy White,

JEKYLL AND HYDE

Funk Bunker Thursdays

RENDEZVOUS PUB Torn From Flames, Dahlmers Realm, Lest We Fail, Viral Fucking State; $10

every Thu with DJ Mark Stevens; 9pm

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Jason

Alesha and Brendon;

FRI JUL 6

NEW WEST HOTEL Tradewinds

ON THE ROCKS Love

Junk

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK

Dueling Piano's, all request live; 9pm-2am every Fri and Sat; no cover

RED PIANO BAR

Hottest dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Fri; 9pm-2am

Platinum VIP every Fri

with Sean Burns, Nadine Kellman; no minors; 8pm; $8 (adv)

Boom The Box: every Fri; nu disco, hip hop, indie, electro, dance with weekly local and visiting DJs on rotation plus residents Echo and Shortround

the Dog: Tanyss Nixi (live acoustic music every Sat); 4-6pm; no cover

THE DRUID IRISH

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair of

PUB DJ every Fri; 9pm

Tzadeka, Jay Gilday; 8:30pm; $10

ELECTRIC RODEO– Spruce Grove DJ

BLUES ON WHYTE

every Fri

FILTHY MCNASTY'S Shake yo ass every Fri with DJ SAWG

FLUID LOUNGE Hip hop and dancehall; every Fri

FUNKY BUDDHA– Whyte Ave Top tracks,

rock, retro with DJ Damian; every Fri

HILLTOP PUB The

Every Sat afternoon: Jam with Back Door Dan; Evening: Wild T and the Spirit

BRIXX BAR Brendan Kelly Band, guests; 9pm CAFÉ CORAL DE CUBA Cafe Coral De Cuba Marco Claveria's open mic (music, poetry, jokes); every Sat, 6pm; $5 CARROT CAFÉ Sat Open mic; 7pm; $2

Sinder Sparks Show; every Thu and Fri; 9:30pm-close

CASINO EDMONTON

JUNCTION BAR AND EATERY LGBT Com-

CASINO

munity: Rotating DJs Fri and Sat; 10pm

The Rojo's Band (pop/ rock)

YELLOWHEAD

Colleen Rae and Cornerstone (country/


rock)

COAST TO COAST Live bands every Sat; 9:30pm

CROWN PUB Acoustic

blues open stage with Marshall Lawrence, every Sat, 2-6pm; every Sat, 12-2am

DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Doug Stroud THE DISH NEK Trio (jazz); every Sat, 6pm

EDMONTON EVENT CENTRE Tyga; 9pm

(door); tickets at TicketMaster

FILTHY MCNASTY'S Cadence and Nathan, Adam Finley; 4pm; no cover

L.B.'S PUB Sat afternoon Jam with Gator and Friends, 5-9pm; Late show: Coaster 44, 9:30pm-2am LOUISIANA PURCHASE Suchy

Sister Saturdays: Amber, Renee or Stephanie with accompaniment; 9:3011:30pm; no cover

NEW CITY A Bunch of Marys, Bom Chan, the Switchmen; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $8

NEW WEST HOTEL Country jam every Sat, 3-6pm; evening: Tradewinds

O’BYRNE’S Live band

Venue Boogie Knights and the Spazmatics ('80s disco-revival show); $10 ROSE AND CROWN Jerrett Bordian

ROSSDALE BREWERY DJ

Diamond, guest DJs; all ages; 8pm (door); $10 (adv)/$15 (door)/ $20 (before 12am)

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE

A Night at the Museum: KingDoom (metal), Madelina Horn, Face First

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Jason

every Sat, 3-7pm; DJ every Sat, 9:30pm

Howard

GAS PUMP Saturday

ON THE ROCKS Love

open stage; 3-7pm

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK

Homemade Jam: Mike Chenoweth

Junk

Edmonton Burlesque: Ms Judith Stein (dance/ theatre); 8pm; $12 (adv)/$15 (door)

Dueling Piano's, all request live; 9pm-2am every Fri and Sat; no cover

HILLTOP PUB Sat

PAWN SHOP Gorgon

afternoon roots jam with Pascal, Simon and Dan, 3:30-6:30pm; evening

Horde (rock), The Press Gang, AMNW; 7pm (door); $8 (adv)

HOOLIGANZ Live

RED PIANO BAR

music every Sat

HYDEAWAY Marleigh

and Mueller (classic pop/ jazz/musical theatre); 8pm; 3rd Sat each month; $10

IRON BOAR PUB Jazz

in Wetaskiwin featuring jazz trios the 1st Sat each month; $10

JEFFREY'S CAFÉ Calan and Cole (country rock, blues); $15

Hottest dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Sat; 9pm-2am

RENDEZVOUS PUB

Leave the Living, Weapons of Mass Distraction, Dethnoizz, Sledgehammer Deathface, Kevin Maimann; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $11 (door)

RIVER CREE–The

SIDELINERS PUB Sat STARLITE ROOM

The City Streets (double album release party), Whiskeyface; 9pm

STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION The

Spins, The Greys, Lucky and Stoned; 8pm

WUNDERBAR Steve

Brockley (Montreal), Picture The Ocean; 9pm

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

BONEYARD ALE HOUSE DJ Sinistra Saturdays: 9pm BUDDY'S Feel the

rhythm every Sat with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

BUFFALO UNDERGROUND Head Mashed In Saturday: Mashup Night

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ every Sat; 9pm

ELECTRIC RODEO– Spruce Grove DJ every Sat

FILTHY MCNASTY'S

Fire up your night every Saturday with DJ SAWG

FLUID LOUNGE Scene Saturday's Relaunch: Party; hip-hop, R&B and Dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali FUNKY BUDDHA– Whyte Ave Top tracks,

rock, retro every Sat with DJ Damian

HALO For Those Who Know: house every Sat with DJ Junior Brown, Luke Morrison, Nestor Delano, Ari Rhodes

JUNCTION BAR AND EATERY LGBT

Community: Rotating DJs Fri and Sat; 10pm

Floor: The Menace Sessions: Alt Rock/ Electro/Trash with Miss Mannered; Wooftop: Sound It Up!: classic hip-hop and reggae with DJ Sonny Grimezz; Underdog: Dr. Erick

Fri and Sat

BLACKSHEEP PUB DJ

O2'S ON WHYTE

every Sat

NEWCASTLE PUB

Top 40 requests every Sat with DJ Sheri

O2'S TAPHOUSE AND GRILL DJs every

DJ Jay every Fri and Sat OVERTIME–

Downtown Saturdays at Eleven: R'n'B, hip hop, reggae, Old School PALACE CASINO

Show Lounge DJ every Sat

PAWN SHOP

Transmission Saturdays: Indie rock, new wave, classic punk with DJ Blue Jay and Eddie Lunchpail; 9pm (door); free (before 10pm)/$5 (after 10pm)

RED STAR Indie rock, hip hop, and electro every Sat with DJ Hot Philly and guests

ROUGE LOUNGE

Rouge Saturdays: global sound and Cosmopolitan Style Lounging with DJ Rezzo, DJ Mkhai

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE Your

Famous Saturday with Crewshtopher, Tyler M

SUEDE LOUNGE

House, electro, Top40, R'n'B with DJ Melo-D every Fri

SUITE 69 Stella

Saturday: retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests

TEMPLE Oh Snap! Oh

Snap with Degree, Cool Beans, Specialist, Spenny B and Mr. Nice Guy and Ten 0; every Sat 9pm

UNION HALL Celebrity Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous VINYL DANCE LOUNGE Signature Saturdays

VENUE GUIDE ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179 ALE YARD TAP 13310-137 Ave ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave BISTRO LA PERSAUD 861791 St, 780.758.6686 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE–Nisku 2110 Sparrow Drive, Nisku, 780.986.8522 BLACKSHEEP PUB 11026 Jasper Ave, 780.420.0448 BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT 10643-123 St, 780.482.7178 BLUES ON WHYTE 1032982 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BONEYARD ALE HOUSE 9216-34 Ave, 780.437.2663 BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 CAFÉ CORAL DE CUBA 10816 Whyte Ave CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca CAMPUS SAINT-JEAN 8406 rue Marie-Anne-Gaboury, 91 St CARROT CAFÉ 9351-118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-153 St, 780 424 9467 CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 CHROME LOUNGE 132 Ave, Victoria Trail COAST TO COAST 5552 Calgary Tr, 780.439.8675 COMMON 9910-109 St CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY

College Robert Tegler Student Centre CROWN PUB 10709-109 St, 780.428.5618 DIESEL ULTRA LOUNGE 11845 Wayne Gretzky Drive, 780.704.CLUB DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834 THE DISH 12417 Stony Plain Rd, 780.488.6641 DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 780.474.5554 DV8 8307-99 St EARLY STAGE SALOON– Stony Plain 4911-52 Ave, Stony Plain EDDIE SHORTS 10713-124 St, 780.453.3663 EDMONTON EVENTS CENTRE WEM Phase III, 780.489.SHOW ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove 121-1 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.1411 ELEPHANT AND CASTLE– Whyte Ave 10314 Whyte Ave EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ 993870 Ave, 780.437.3667 FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 FIDDLER’S ROOST 890699 St FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 FLASH NIGHT CLUB 10018105 St, 780.996.1778 FLOW LOUNGE 11815 Wayne Gretzky Dr, 780.604. CLUB FLUID LOUNGE 10888 Jasper Ave, 780.429.0700 FUNKY BUDDHA 10341-82 Ave, 780.433.9676 GOOD EARTH COFFEE HOUSE AND BAKERY 9942-108 St GOOD NEIGHBOR PUB 11824-103 St HALO 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.HALO HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB

15120A (basement), Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.6010 HILLTOP PUB 8220-106 Ave, 780.490.7359 HOGS DEN PUB 9, 14220 Yellowhead Tr HOOLIGANZ 10704-124 St, 780.995.7110 HYDEAWAY 10209-100 Ave, 780.426.5381 IRON BOAR PUB 4911-51st St, Wetaskiwin J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JEFFREY’S CAFÉ 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890 JEKYLL AND HYDE 10209100 Ave, 780.426.5381 JUNCTION BAR AND EATERY 10242-106 St, 780.756.5667 KAS BAR 10444-82 Ave, 780.433.6768 L.B.’S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEGENDS PUB 6104-172 St, 780.481.2786 LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 LIT ITALIAN WINE BAR 10132-104 St LIZARD LOUNGE 13160118 Ave MARYBETH'S COFFEE HOUSE–Beaumont 5001-30 Ave, Beaumont, 780.929.2203 MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 10025-101 St MUTTART HALL 10050 MacDonald Dr NAKED CYBERCAFE & ESPRESSO BAR 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEWCASTLE PUB 6108-90 Ave, 780.490.1999 NEW CITY 8130 Gateway Boulevard (Red Door) NISKU INN 1101-4 St NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535-109A Ave O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766

ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 O2'S ON WHYTE 780.454.0203 O2'S TAPHOUSE AND GRILL 13509-127 St, 780.454.0203 OVERTIME–Downtown 10304-111 St, 780.465.6800 OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK 100 Granada Blvd, Sherwood Park, 790.570.5588 PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 PLAYBACK PUB 594 Hermitage Rd, 130 Ave, 40 St PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 1086057 Ave REDNEX BAR–Morinville 10413-100 Ave, Morinville, 780.939.6955 RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882170 St, 780.486.7722 RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 RENDEZVOUS 10108149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780-457-3117 RIC’S GRILL 24 Perron Street, St Albert, 780.460.6602 ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235101 St ROSSDALE BREWERY 9843-100 St R PUB 16753-100 St, 780.457.1266 ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE 12845-102 Ave SECOND CUP–89 AVE 8906-149 St SECOND CUP– Sherwood Park 4005 Cloverbar Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.988.1929 • Summerwood Summerwood Centre, Sherwood Park, 780.988.1929 SIDELINERS PUB 11018-

127 St, 780.453.6006 SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St, 780.758.5924 SPORTSMAN'S LOUNGE 8170-50 St STARLITE ROOM 10030102 St, 780.428.1099 STEEPS TEA LOUNGE– Whyte Ave 11116-82 Ave ST THOMAS D'AQUIN CHURCH 8410-89 St STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION 10940166A St SUEDE LOUNGE 11806 Jasper Ave, 780.482.0707 SUITE 69 2 Fl, 8232 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6969 TAPHOUSE 9020 McKenney Ave, St Albert, 780.458.0860 TREASURY 10004 Jasper Ave, 7870.990.1255, thetreasurey.ca TWO ROOMS 10324 Whyte Ave, 780.439.8386 THE VAT–RED DEER 101-5301 43 St, Red Deer, 403.346.5636 VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO–St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 VINYL DANCE LOUNGE 10740 Jasper Ave, 780.428.8655, vinylretrolounge.com WILD BILL’S–Red Deer Quality Inn North Hill, 7150-50 Ave, Red Deer, 403.343.8800 WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 Y AFTERHOURS 10028102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours.com YELLOWHEAD BREWERY 10229-105 St, 780.423.3333 YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert, 780.459.0295 ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

FRI JULY 6

L.A.M.S

WITH CHAINS OF LOVE, THE GIVE ‘EM HELL BOYS & SNAKEBITE MON JULY 9

JORDAN COOK AKA REIGNWOLF WITH BOMBCHAN & LONGSHADOWS WED JULY 11

THIS IS HELL WITH WASTER XERXES & RANDY GRAVES

FRI JULY 13 A DOUBLE CD RELEASE PARTY FROM

SILENT LINE & THESE COLOURS DON’T RUN!!

WITH FOR REASONS LOST, EYE OF HORUS & STALLORD WED JULY 18

LIVING WITH LIONS WITH DAYTRADER, MAJOR LEAGUE & STRONG HEARTS SAT JULY 21 THE RETURN OF

JAR

W/ HOLLYWOOD ASSASYN FOR TICKETS- PLEASE VISIT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA

SAT JULY 7 FREE SATURDAY SHOW

CADENCE & NATHAN WITH ADAM FINLEY

STAND UP COMEDY

SUNDAYS

MUSIC 33


Y AFTERHOURS Release Saturdays

SUN JUL 8 BEER HUNTER–St Albert Open stage/jam

every Sun; 2-6pm

BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE–Nisku Open mic every Sun hosted by Tim Lovett

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ

Sunday Brunch: PM Bossa; 10:30am-2:30pm; donations

BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT Jazz

on the Side Sun: Don Berner-Saxophone; 5:308:30pm; $25 if not dining

BLUES ON WHYTE

Block Party: 103-104 Street, 1am-10pm outside; 10pm-2am inside; Street: Tim Vaughn, 10am, Celtic Fusion, Illusion, Kymara, Boogie Patrol , EC Scott, Wild T and the Spirit; Beer tent: King Muskafa, Funkafeelia 1:45pm, Fist Full of Blues, JK and the Static; Inside: EC Scott 10:30, Wild T and the Spirit 11:45-1am

CAFFREY'S– Sherwood Park The

Sunday Blues Jam: hosted by Kevin and Rita McDade and the Grey Cats Blues Band, guests every week; 5-9pm; no cover

CENTURY CASINO Rich Little

CHA ISLAND TEA CO

WUNDERBAR Rusty Water (London), Guests Event Details YELLOWHEAD BREWERY Open

Stage: Every Sun, 8pm

Classical CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Classic

Bronze 2012–handbell festival closing concert: bells and choir, John Hooper (director); 4pm; $12/$10; $25 (family) at TIX on the Square, door; classicbronze.org

MUTTART HALL

Alberta College Conservatory of Music Connections Concert Series: Emerging student musicians and faculty; 2pm; $20 (adult)/$10 (student/ senior) at TIX on the Square

WINSPEAR CENTRE Les Choralies Internationales Edmonton: Toi, moi, tout un monde! (You, Me, Quite a World!) with Pro Coro Canada, Le Choeur dechambre (Quebec); 8:30pm; $25 (adult)/$15 (student/ senior)

DJs BACKSTAGE TAP AND GRILL Industry

Night: every Sun with Atomic Improv, Jameoki and DJ Tim

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

Live on the Island: Rhea March hosts open mic and Songwriter's stage; starts with a jam session; 7pm

Floor: Soul Sundays: A fantastic voyage through '60s and '70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy

DEVANEY’S IRISH

FLOW LOUNGE Stylus

PUB Celtic open stage

every Sun with KeriLynne Zwicker; 5:30pm; no cover

DOUBLE D'S Open jam

every Sun; 3-8pm

EDDIE SHORTS Open stage with Dan Daniels every Sun

FILTHY MCNASTY'S Rock and Soul Sundays with DJ Sadeeq

HOGS DEN PUB Open Jam: hosted; open jam every Sun, all styles welcome; 3-7pm

NEWCASTLE PUB Sun Soul Service (acoustic jam): Willy James and Crawdad Cantera; 3-6:30pm

O’BYRNE’S Open mic

every Sun; 9:30pm-1am

ON THE ROCKS Chronic Rock

O2'S TAP HOUSE AND GRILL Open

Sun

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Stylus Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky, Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am

SAVOY MARTINI LOUNGE Reggae on

Whyte: RnR Sun with DJ IceMan; no minors; 9pm; no cover

MON JUL 9 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Sleeman

Mon: live music monthly; no cover

BLUES ON WHYTE E.C. Scott

DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Singer/songwriter open stage every Mon; 8pm NEW WEST HOTEL Silverado

stage hosted by the Vindicators; 4-8pm every Sun

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK

PAWN SHOP Jordan

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Cook (rock), Bombchan, Longshadows; 8pm (door); $15 (adv)

RICHARD'S PUB Sun

Live Jam hosted by Carson Cole; 4pm

TWO ROOMS Live Jam every Sun with Jeremiah; 5-9pm; no cover; $10 (dinner)

34 MUSIC

Monday Open Stage

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm

ROSE BOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE Acoustic open stage every Mon; 9pm

WUNDERBAR Dr Jokes; 8:30pm

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Blue Jay’s Messy Nest: mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay CROWN PUB

Mixmashitup Mon Industry Night: with DJ Fuzze, J Plunder (DJs to bring their music and mix mash it up)

FILTHY MCNASTY'S Metal Mondays with DJ Tyson

LUCKY 13 Industry

Night every Mon with DJ Chad Cook

TUE JUL 10 BLUES ON WHYTE E.C. Scott

BRIXX BAR Ruby Tuesdays guest Mr Meister and the Shyster, MurTor, Budiman, with host Mark Feduk; $5 after 8pm DRUID IRISH PUB

Open stage every Tue; with Chris Wynters; 9pm

L.B.’S Tue Blues Jam

with Ammar; 9pm-1am

NEW WEST HOTEL

Chaser every

8pm; $12 (adv)

CROWN PUB Live Hip Hop Tue: freestyle hip hop with DJ Xaolin and Mc Touch

PLAYBACK PUB Open

DV8 Creepy Tombsday:

Psychobilly, Hallowe'en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

RED STAR

Experimental Indie Rock, Hip Hop, Electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue

RED PIANO All

Request Band Tuesdays: Classic rock, soul and R&B with Joint Chiefs; 8pm; $5

SUITE 69 Rockstar Tuesdays: Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

WED JUL 11 ARTERY Arrow to Knee Canadian Tour: Silence Theory, The Body Politic, Bring Us Your Dead; 7:30pm

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

Floor: Glitter Gulch: live music once a month

BLUES ON WHYTE E.C. Scott

Silverado

CHA ISLAND TEA

O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam every Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm

CO Whyte Noise Drum Circle: Join local drummers for a few hours of beats and fun; 6pm

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK

CROWN PUB The

The Campfire Hero's (acoustic rock, country, top 40); 9pm-2am every Tue; no cover

D.A.M.M Jam: Open stage/original plugged in jam with Dan, Miguel and friends every Wed

DV8 White Lung,

PADMANADI Open stage every Tue; with Mark Davis; all ages; 7:30-10:30pm

Rhythm of Cruelty, Mariah, Burn Collector, Banshee

R PUB Open stage

Electric open jam with Steven Johnson Experience every Wed

jam every Tue; hosted by Gary and the Facemakers; 8pm

RED PIANO All request band Tuesdays: Joint Chiefs (classic rock, soul, R&B) every Tue

SECOND CUP– Summerwood Open

stage/open mic every Tue; 7:30pm; no cover

WUNDERBAR Audio, Rocketry; 8pm

Classical CAMPUS SAINTJEAN Choralies Festival: 4-7pm

ST THOMAS D'AQUIN CHURCH

Choralies Festival: L'Ensemble vocal Au Choeur (Montreal), Voix Des Rocheuses (Calgary), Les Chantamis (Edmonton); 8pm; ; $15 (adult)/$10 (senior/ student)

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

Floor: alternative retro and not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail; Wooftop: It’s One Too Many Tuesdays: Reggae, funk, soul, boogie and disco with Rootbeard

BUDDYS DJ Arrow

EDDIE SHORTS

ELEPHANT AND CASTLE–Whyte Ave Open mic every Wed (unless there's an Oilers game); no cover

FESTIVAL PLACE

Qualico Patio Series every Wed: Shane Howard and the Dead Stringers; 7:30pm; $8

FIDDLER'S ROOST

Little Flower Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12

GOOD EARTH COFFEE HOUSE AND BAKERY Breezy

Brian Gregg; every Wed; 12-1pm

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB

Stage every Wed hosted by JTB; 9pm-1am

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

RICHARD'S PUB Live Latin Band Salsabor every Wed; 9pm SECOND CUP–149 St Open stage with Alex Boudreau; 7:30pm

WUNDERBAR Mitten

Claps, Federal Lights; 9pm

ZEN LOUNGE Jazz

Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

Classical MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH

Choralies Festival: Traditional African Music directed by Scott Leithead (choral conductor); 8pm; $15 (adult)/$10 (senior/ student)

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HOOLIGANZ Open

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Free classic country dance lessons every Wed, 7-9pm; Silverado

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Jason Greeley (acoustic rock, country, Top 40); 9pm-2am every Wed; no cover

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Hip hop/R&B with DJ Spincycle

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VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

Across 1 "Unbelievable" band of 1991 4 Wallflowers lead singer Dylan 9 Like much medicine 13 DiCaprio, to fans 14 Puget Sound city 15 Stupor 16 Writing assignment that, through complete luck, got an A? 18 Vowels that look like an H 19 Did away with Homer's neighbor for good? 21 He was joined on stage by a Tupac hologram in 2012 23 ___ out a living 24 Item rolled by gaming geeks 25 Axton of "Gremlins" 26 Exhale like a dog 29 "Bionic ___" (2007 NBC remake) 31 ___-Tzu (Chinese philosopher) 32 Song played on a sitar 33 Detergent brand 34 Band of John Wayne-loving computer programmers? 39 Come up short 40 It's good to hear after a spill 41 Freddy's street 43 Big bone 46 ___-rock 47 Popeye's kid ___'Pea 48 That, in Spanish 49 "Call Me Maybe" singer Carly ___ Jepsen 51 Stair part 52 Completely fooled one of the Beverly Hillbillies? 57 Color of un zafiro 58 Bumper sticker slogan for Stooges fans? 61 ___ and void 62 Fixed sock holes 63 56, in old Rome 64 "___ does that star-spangled banner..." 65 ___-Hawley Tariff 66 Have some havarti

Down 1 "The Santaland Diaries" occupation 2 "Spaceballs" director Brooks 3 Seeker's cry to the hider 4 Mock 5 Mil. school 6 Head of Germany?

7 Folded breakfast dish 8 Former Israeli prime minister 9 Took way too much 10 Warning on video games with lots of gore 11 Hank who voices Chief Wiggum 12 Take down a notch 14 Precocious kid 17 MTV mainstay Loder 20 City where Whitney Houston's funeral was held 21 Rival of UPS and FedEx 22 Word before hog or rage 26 Rate 27 In the past 28 Lowest point 30 ___-Wan Kenobi 32 Wanted poster word 33 Leaping creature 35 Pond fish 36 Punk offshoot 37 Song from "Licensed to Ill," with "The" 38 Show whose fans are named by adding "ks" to the title 42 Debussy's "La ___" 43 Selena's music genre 44 Rodeos and Troopers, e.g. 45 Actor Scott of "Quantum Leap" 46 Train in a 1974 movie title, or its 2009 remake 47 ___ Spin (classic toy) 50 Heartburn causes, maybe 51 No longer working: abbr. 53 Pocoyo's pachyderm friend 54 Prefix before space 55 Fighting word that means "hand," not "person" 56 ___-‡-porter 59 Jefferson founded it 60 Model maker's need

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS


CLASSIFIEDS To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com 130.

Coming Events

Ride For Peace Ride for One Child's Village Edmonton to Ottawa (3400 km) In mid July, Peter Johnston will begin a ride from Edmonton to Ottawa to promote World Peace and to raise funds for ONE CHILD'S VILLAGE, an Edmonton foundation that builds schools and orphanages in Kenya to help children orphaned by AIDS/HIV To help sponsor Peter's journey visit onechildvillage.org

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Casino Volunteers for WIN House The Edmonton Women's Shelter is in need of volunteers for our upcoming Casino. Dates are August 4th and 5th at the Century Casino. Please email Deanna at ewsmrktg@telusplanet.net for more information and/or to get involved. Community Garden Volunteer Help maintain a small garden and landscaping outside the Meals on Wheels building. The produce and herbs from the garden will be used as part of Grow a Row for Meals on Wheels. Contact us at 780-429-2020, or sign up on our website at www.mealsonwheelsedmonton.org Environmental News Radio Needs You! Terra Informa is an environmentally themed radio news show that is syndicated across Canada. We are run by volunteers and we need more help! No experience necessary! We will provide you with all necessary training. Curious? Contact us at terra@cjsr.com, terrainforma.ca or call Steve at 780-432-5566 Needed for our Seniors residence, volunteers for various activities or just for a friendly visit! Please contact Janice at Extendicare Eaux Claires for more details jgraff@extendicare.com (780) 472 - 1106 P.A.L.S. Project Adult Literacy Society needs volunteers to work with adult students in: Literacy, English As A Second Language and Math Literacy. For more information please contact (780)424-5514 or email palsvolunteers2003@yahoo.ca

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Participate in Habitat For Humanity Edmonton's 90 Day Blitz! From June 15 - Sept 15 we are prefabricating walls and putting up 18 homes at our St. Albert site. Beginners to trades people welcome! We provide everything you need to work, including lunch! You provide your time, energy and heart. Group sizes vary from 5-25 people per day. Shifts are Tuesdays - Saturdays 8:30 to 4. No minimum number of shifts. Visit www.hfh.org & contact Louise at 780-451-3416 ext 222 or lfairley@hfh.org SACE is recruiting volunteers for our 24 hour crisis line. Contact us at: CharleneB@sace.ab.ca Volunteer Driver Deliver smiles and meals to people throughout the city. As a Meals on Wheels volunteer driver, you have the power to brighten someone's day with just a smile and a nutritious meal. Help us get our meals to homes by becoming a volunteer driver today! Contact us at 780-429-2020 or sign up on our website www.edmontonmealsonwheels.org Volunteer with Students for Cellphone Free Driving at Heritage Festival! Free food, tickets Call 780-492-0926 Volunteer with us and gain valuable Office Administration and Data Entry Skills! Volunteer your time to a great cause with the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Apply online at www.heartandstroke.ab.ca under Volunteers or send a resume to volunteer@hsf.ab.ca Volunteers needed ASAP for Boysdale Camp Clean up, deck repairs, roof repairs, insulation of cabins, electrical, dry walling, brush cleaning and much much more. Email dave@boysdalecamp.com for details Whyte Ave - Art Walk July 13 - 15. Seeking dedicated, energetic volunteers who will contribute a minimum of TWO 4-hour shifts. The Festival is an interactive outdoor art exhibition spanning over 4 km along Whyte Avenue. Volunteers will enjoy walking the assigned routes, assisting artists and orientating the public. For details visit www.art-walk.ca

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

WynterMynt Records, Edmonton's newest Indie Record Label is looking for volunteers for a couple scouting positions. These volunteers should have a love for live music, have some understanding to the Indie/Folk music scene and are willing to go out on weekends to scout new talent around the city with weekly reports back to the label on their findings Contact Stephanie Leong at

stephanie@wyntermyntrecords.com

2005.

Artist to Artist

Feats Festival A video contest for everyone, Dance Magic Dance is a chance to get moving and win some Feats Festival prizes. Go solo or gather friends and family and film your original choreography. The deadline to enter is Wednesday, July 11th. It's free to enter! To view contest rules and submit your video please visit www.abdancealliance.ca or call 780-422-8107

for more details

YOU WILL JOIN US..... The 2012 Edmonton International Fringe Festival seeks volunteers to fill positions on a variety of teams. A minimum of four shifts gets you a t-shirt, loot bag, program guide, invite to the Wrap Party and more! To apply online visit www.fringetheatre.ca or call the volunteer hotline at 780-409-1923

2001.

Acting Classes

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2005.

Artist to Artist

2012 Open Art Competition Spruce Grove Art Gallery 35 5th Avenue - Spruce Grove Competition open to all Albertans over the age of 18. Application available at www.alliedartscouncil.com Deadline is August 24th, for more info call 780-962-0664 or email alliedac@telus.net Beginning September of 2012, amiskwaciy Academy will be opening its doors to new and returning potters. Beautiful new space. Competitive guild fees. Classes to be offered. Seeking guild president. For more info please call 780-990-8487 Call for Artists: Decorate a Lampost Contest at Kaleido 2012. The 24 hour Decorate a Lampost Contest is returning to Kaleido Family Arts Festival on September 8-9, 2012! To enter, complete and sign the entry form at www.artsontheave.org and send it with a short project proposal and artist bio to kaleidoprogram@gmail.com by July 16th, 2012

HAPPY HARBOR -Call to Artists We are now accepting applications for our next Artist-inResidence position. Term begins September 1st. Please visit our website for full details. www.happyharborcomics.com

Prairie Wood Design Awards 2012 Call for nominations! The Annual Prairie Wood Design Awards celebrate excellence in wood construction in the Prairie Region and the Territories. Nomination forms and details are available online and are due August 17th,2012 wood-works.org/alberta

2020.

Exciting Opportunity for a Head Chef!

Lewis Estates Golf Course is owned and operated by Melcor Developments Ltd. and is one of Edmonton’s finest public golf courses. Located in the Lewis Estates Community, the course is known for its spectacular course conditions from spring to late fall. Head Chef - Credentials and Experience

• • • •

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Musicians Wanted

Guitarists, bassists, vocalists, pianists and drummers needed for good paying teaching jobs. Please call 780-901-7677 Looking for a rock drummer to complete 4 piece band. Gig every 3 wks. Must commit to Sunday 2-4 pm rehearsal. Kit provided. For info call/text 780-299-7503

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Exciting upcoming features in VUEWEEKLY

July 19 Musician’s Survival Guide

Aug. 09 The Season

Aug. 16 Fringe Theatre Festival

Sept. 06 The Sex Issue

Sept. 13 Harvest

For more information, or to book your ads, contact our sales department at 780.426.1996 or rob@vueweekly.com VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

BACK 35


ADULTCLASSIFIEDS

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

ROB BREZSNY // FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 FAX: 780.426.2889 / EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com

ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): Members

LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): In Norse my-

of the Nevada Republican Party have

thology, Fenrir was a big bad wolf

concocted a bizarre version of family

that the gods were eager to keep tied

values. A large majority of them are

up. In the beginning they tried to do

opposed to gay marriage and yet are

it with metal chains, but the beast

all in favor of legal brothels. My ques-

broke free. Then they commissioned

tion is, why do we let people with

the dwarves to weave a shackle out of

screwed-up priorities claim to be the

six impossible things: a bear's sinews,

prime caretakers of "family values"?

a bird's spit, a fish's breath, a moun-

In accordance with the astrological

tain's root, a woman's beard, and the

omens, I urge you to reject the con-

sound a cat's paws made as it walked.

ventional wisdom as you clarify what

This magic fetter was no thicker than

that term means to you. It's an excel-

a silk ribbon, but it worked very well.

lent time to deepen and strengthen

Fenrir couldn't escape from it. I in-

your moral foundation.

vite you to take inspiration from this story. As you deal with your current

TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): There's

dilemma, don't try to fight strength

a term for people who have the ardor

with strength. Instead, use art, craft,

of a nymphomaniac in their efforts to

subtlety, and even trickery. I doubt

gather useful information: infomaniac.

you'll need to gather as many as six

That's exactly what I think you should

impossible things. Three will probably

be in the coming week. You need data

be enough. Two might even work fine.

and evidence in abundance. What you

Meet Someone Interesting!

don't know would definitely hurt you,

VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): This is a

so make sure you find out everything

time when your personal actions will

you need to know. Be as thorough as

have more power than usual to affect

a spy, as relentless as a muckraking

the world around you. The ripples you

journalist, and as curious as a child.

set in motion could ultimately touch

PS See if you can set aside as many

people you don't even know and

of your strong opinions and emotion-

transform situations you're not part

al biases as possible. Otherwise they

of. That's a lot of responsibility! I sug-

might distort your quest for the raw

gest, therefore, that you be on your

truth. Your word of power is empiri-

best behaviour. Not necessarily your

cal.

mildest, most polite behaviour, mind you. Rather, be brave, impeccable, full

GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): Of all the

of integrity, and a little wild.

signs of the zodiac, you're the best at discovering short cuts. No one is more

LIBRA (Sep 23 – Oct 22): Goldfish

talented than you at the art of avoid-

that are confined in small aquariums

ing boredom. And you could teach a

stay small. Those that spend their

master course in how to weasel out

lives in ponds get much bigger. What

of strenuous work without looking

can we conclude from these facts?

like a weasel. None of those virtues

The size and growth rate of goldfish

will come in handy during the coming

are directly related to their environ-

week, however. You should concen-

ment. I'd like to suggest that a similar

trate very hard on not skipping any

principle will apply to you Librans in

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to the basics. (Sorry about this grind-

tential, you will be wise to put your-

it-out advice. I'm just reporting what

self in spacious situations that encour-

the planetary omens are telling me.)

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breadth of your imagination is legend-

hard to heal their wounds.

ary. Is there anyone else who can wander around the world without ever

SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): Over the

once leaving your home? Is there any-

years, you've explored some pretty

one else who can reincarnate twice in

exotic, even strange ideas about what

the span of few weeks without having

characterizes a good time. In the com-

to go through the hassle of actually

ing days, I'm guessing you will add to

dying? And yet now and then there

your colourful tradition with some

do come times when your fantasies

rather unprecedented variations on

should be set aside so that you may

the definition of "pleasure" and "hap-

soak up the teachings that flow your

piness." I don't mean to imply that this

way when you physically venture

is a problem. Not at all. To paraphrase

outside of your comfort zone. Now

the Wiccan credo, as long as it harms

is such a moment. Please don't take

no one (including yourself), anything

a merely virtual break in the action.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21):

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VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

CONTINUED ON PAGE 37 >>


COMMENT >> LGBTQ

Acceptance through capitalism Support for the queer community is about more than buying cookies Who knew the Oreo cookie was caadvocate a boycott, the controversy pable of so much? Earlier this month, ended up generating an outpouring Kraft Foods posted a deliciously simof support for the department store. ple image on its Facebook page: an Undoubtedly, Kraft is looking for Oreo cookie with six layers of more of the same. It's a brilcream sandwiched between liant marketing ploy: reach the iconic chocolate wafers. out to a community known m o Each layer of cream was for its higher-than-average .c ly eek @vuew ashley a different colour of the disposable income, wait for Ashley h rainbow. In case the public the bigots to start raising hell g r Drybu missed the significance of the and sit back as goodwill and incolours, "Pride June 25" appeared under creased sales come rolling your way. the cookie. It’s like green-washing, but cheaper The reactions thus far have been—unand requires little actual change from surprisingly—mixed. As I write this, the a company. post has over 250 000 likes and about 50 000 comments, ranging from "buy Is my cynicism showing? Let me try to all the Oreos!" to "I’m never buying Orebe optimistic: given the heated battles os again!" The latter comments are usuover gay marriage and that corporaally accompanied by reminders about tions are woven into the American the burning lake of fire that awaits socio-political fabric, it makes a strange us for our sinful ways, but luckily the sort of sense that corporations are haters are far outnumbered by people coming forward to declare their queer genuinely excited by Kraft's move. support. I imagine that for folks living Kraft's decision to come out in favour in states where discriminatory laws of gay rights follows on the heels of against queers are still on the books, a other large American companies— campaign like this must be refreshing. most recently JC Penney whose deciAfter all, a public display of support like sion to hire notable lesbian Ellen DeGethis could not have happened even five neres as a spokesperson was met with short years ago. And, let's be honest, is outrage from conservative group One anyone entirely surprised that compaMillion Moms (who, for the record, do nies are using the American queer culnot have a million members). ture wars as an opportunity to increase Although One Million Moms tried to their profit margins?

EERN Q UN TO MO

FREEWILL

<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 36

you have a sacred duty to be open to interesting tangents and creative diversions; times when it makes sense to wander around aimlessly with wonder in your eyes and be alert for unexpected clues that grab your attention. But this is not one of those times, in my opinion. Rather, you really do need to stay focused on what you promised yourself you would concentrate on. The temptation may be high to send out sprays of arrows at several different targets. But I hope that instead you stick to one target and take careful aim with your best shots. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): I've been meditating on a certain need that you have been neglecting—a need that has been chronically underestimated or ignored, by both you and others. I am hoping that this achy longing will soon be receiving some of your smart attention and tender care. One good way to get the process started is simply to acknowledge its validity and importance. Doing so will reveal a secret that will help you attend to your special need with just the right touch. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): Due to the pressure-packed influences currently coming to bear on your destiny, you have Official Cosmic Permission to fling three dishes against the wall.

I can't help but compare this campaign with one that I saw during Edmonton Pride: without any fanfare, insofar as I could tell, another national department store handed out free pride flags in the weeks leading up to Pride. Yes they were branded, but I saw no big announcement, no self-congratulatory Facebook post proclaiming their "acceptance." Perhaps the stakes are lower in Canada and that is what accounts for this difference. But what really frustrates me about Kraft's campaign and others like it is that equality becomes measured in part by how attractive queers are as consumers: buy our products, we will fight for you. Why are queers legitimized as full rights-deserving citizens when, and only when, we have wallets deep enough to buy our way in? What happens to those queers who can’t or won’t worship at the altar of consumerism? Political efficacy is watered down to a monetary exchange and people feel good about supporting gay rights without actually doing anything about it. Would I rather have large companies remain completely silent about queers? Probably not. But what I would like even more is for someone to take the five dollars they are about to spend on cookies and send it to the Edmonton Pride Centre instead. V

(But no more than three.) If you so choose, you also have clearance to hurl rocks in the direction of heaven, throw darts at photos of your nemeses, and cram a coconut cream pie into your own face. Please understand, however, that taking actions like these should be just the initial phase of your master plan for the week. In the next phase, you should capitalize on all the energy you've made available for yourself through purgative acts like the ones I mentioned. Capitalize how? For starters, you could dream and scheme about how you will liberate yourself from things that make you angry and frustrated. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): Check to see if you're having any of the following symptoms: 1. sudden eruptions of gratitude; 2. a declining fascination with conflict; 3. seemingly irrational urges that lead you to interesting discoveries; 4. yearnings to peer more deeply into the eyes of people you care about; 5. a mounting inability to tolerate boring influences that resist transformation; 6. an increasing knack for recognizing and receiving the love that's available to you. If you're experiencing at least three of the six symptoms, you are certifiably in close alignment with the cosmic flow, and should keep doing what you've been doing. If none of these symptoms have been sweeping through you, get yourself adjusted. V

VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

BACK 37


COMMENT >> SEX

Don't forget to stretch

Ball sucking is an intricate process that you shouldn't jump into cold Cremasterlocks doesn't like sperm-cell I'm a straight guy and I'm really into porridge that's too hot. Cremasterlocks having my balls sucked—it's one of doesn't like sperm-cell porridge that's my favourite things and just thinking too cold. Cremasterlocks likes spermabout it turns me on. But whenever cell porridge that's just right. I've had my balls sucked, it hurts, And here's the cruel twist, and ball pain is not a kink of E SAVAG SCROTE, the absolutely irmine! It hurts enough to refutable proof that huoverride any pleasure, and ly.c.coomm weeeekkly vu ew mans evolved over the @ I have to tell my partner to e v lo avvaaggeelo ssa eons through a completely stop. Is this normal? Does DDaann g ball sucking hurt for everySSaavvaage random and directionless process of spontaneous mutation one? Is there something I can do and natural selection: our cremaster to make it less painful?

ate balls that know when they're being

SHE CAN'T ROUGHLY OSCULATE TROUSER EGGS

that specializes in toys for men. "We

himself too hard when he beats off. I grab it pretty hard, I have to admit, and when my girlfriend uses her hand, I ask her to grab it really hard, too. So I am writing to ask if you think the reason I can't keep an erection during intercourse has something to do with how hard I have her use her hand and how hard I use my hand?

have a good selection of ball stretchers,

HAVING A REAL DILEMMA

sucked, right?) So the problem here, SCROTE, isn't ball pain, it's muscle strain. And there is

different positions that might provide you with a slightly snugger fit (girl on top, doggy style, etc). Good luck!

and soft. He should get in the tub, soak

Here is my answer for you, Mr HARD:

in warm water, and let his sack relax and

the way you grip your dick when you

muscles don't just contract when we're

sag, then gently put one ring on. Then he

beat off? And the way you allow your

cold, they also contract when we're

can play with his balls for a while, strok-

girlfriend to grip your dick? No more

I'm an 18-year-old male about to head off to college in the fall. I'm not the best-looking guy—skinny, pale, some acne—and I'm afraid that I'm going to be one of those college freshmen who aren't getting laid. What can I do to help make my potential college sex life better? I'm a smooth-talking guy in some ways, Mr Dan, but it doesn't work a majority of the time and I don't understand why.

aroused. So the better it feels to have

ing them and his dick, and if everything is

gripping your dick like that, HARD. From

COLLEGE-BOUND BOY

The next time you find yourself in an ar-

your balls sucked, the more turned on

feeling good, add another ring."

now on, whenever you masturbate,

gument with a proponent of "intelligent

you get. The more turned on you get,

At least for now, though, Lane doesn't

you're going to jerk it with a light touch

First, CBB, "it" doesn't work for a major-

design," SCROTE, lay this one on 'em ...

the more your cremaster contracts. And

recommend that you leave the ball

and few drops of lube. And if you can't

ity of the people a majority of the time.

the more your cremaster contracts, the

stretchers on when you come.

come using that lighter touch and a few

It doesn't matter how smooth a guy's

drops of lube, then you don't come. At

talk is, how tight his abs are, or how

least for now.

fat his wallet is, most of the people he

LOVE

There's this muscle called the cremas-

something you can do about that. "This guy should get himself a set of short ball stretchers," said Stephen "Ox" Lane of oxballs.com, an online sex shop

most made of silicone so they are nice

ter that attaches a man's balls to his ab-

more it hurts to have your balls sucked!

"His balls will pull up as he's getting

dominal muscles. When a man is cold,

You can call a system like that a lot of

ready to shoot, and that may cause

the cremaster contracts, lifting his balls

things—crazy painful, deeply ironic—

pain," said Lane. "For the time being, he

Basically, HARD, you gotta cut your

meets won't wanna sleep with him. I'm

toward his body so those little darlings

but it can't be called "intelligently de-

should use his ball stretchers as a warm-

dick off. Um, let me rephrase that: you

not going to lie to you: smooth talk,

stay nice and warm; when he's hot, the

signed." (In defense of the cremaster

up. Over time, his balls will get used to

gotta stop serving up the kind of stimu-

tight abs and a fat wallet improve a guy's

cremaster relaxes, dropping his balls

muscle: it's pulling your balls up toward

the feeling and his sack will stretch."

lation your dick has come to expect—

odds considerably. But for reasons that

away from his body, keeping the little

your body so they don't get hurt during

And not just your sack, SCROTE, but

the death grip—because the only way

run the gamut from religious to logistic

darlings cool. Putting this in language

intercourse—so they don't get smacked

your cremaster, too. And a slightly loos-

your dick will ever come to appreciate

to simple miscommunication, most peo-

the average "intelligent design" propo-

around too much—but if humans are

er, more elastic cremaster will mean less

the subtler and damper sensations that

ple won't want to fuck a given person,

nent can understand: your cremaster is

smart enough to create a car that knows

painful ball sucking.

vaginas provide, HARD, is if you give

however smooth, tight, fat, etc.

Goldilocks and your nuts are a delicious-

when its door is open, then an intelligent

looking bowl of sperm-cell porridge.

designer would be smart enough to cre-

Good luck!

Here is my question for you, Mr Savage: my girlfriend and I are sexually active, and I can get an erection in the beginning, a fully hard erection, but a few minutes into intercourse, I start to lose my erection. Intercourse feels amazing, it's just that after a while I start to lose my erection. I can get my erection back if I allow my girlfriend to use her hand on it for a while. And then when I penetrate her again, I lose my erection again. I heard you on TV talk about how a guy shouldn't grip

Real hook ups, real fast.

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VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

your dick no choice. Give your dick what

The trick is to keep working it—to keep

it's used to, HARD, and your dick will be

looking around—until you find someone

forever dependent on it. Drive your dick

who does want to fuck you. And there

(and yourself) to desperation, and your

will be plenty of skinny, pale and spotty

dick will find new ways to get off.

girls at your school, as well as girls who

Your dick will adapt.

can see past those things. Your odds will

You can help your dick adapt faster

be better if you can look past 'em, too.

by stirring some other forms of physi-

V

cal and mental stimulation into the mix. Talk dirty (your biggest sex organ is between your ears), do some nipple play (I'm talking about your nipples), and ex-

Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

plore different scenarios that turn you on (girlfriend calls the shots? Do it outside?), all the while experimenting with

@fakedansavage on Twitter


VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012

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VUEWEEKLY JULY 5 – JULY 11, 2012


Vue Weekly - 872 - Jul 5-11, 2012  

The Beer Issue

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