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#962 / MAR 27 – APR 2, 2014 VUEWEEKLY.COM

MARY POPPINS FOR A NEW GENERATION 12 THE WHIRLWIND OF JOE NOLAN 24


ISSUE: 962 MAR 27 - APR 2, 2014 COVER: ERIN GREENOUGH

LISTINGS

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ARTS / 13 FILM / 23 MUSIC / 31 EVENTS / 33 CLASSIFIED / 34 ADULT / 36

FRONT

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"He doesn't talk to anybody about what happened to him. He can't. It's too horrible."

ARTS 10425 Whyte Ave

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"Probably most would agree she's a witch (by modern definitions of the term), albeit a benevolent one."

DISH

14

"So we're using the land and in exchange we're going to give them some food to use in their kitchen."

FILM

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"The premise is sensational, but the execution is anything but."

MUSIC

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"I'm a fan of recording spontaneously, and only doing three takes."

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CONTRIBUTORS Chelsea Boos, Lee Boyes, Josef Braun, Rob Brezsny, Ryan Bromsgrove, James Cuming, Ashley Dryburgh, Gwynne Dyer, Jason Foster, Brian Gibson, Fish Griwkowsky, Josh Marcellin, Jordyn Marcellus, Stephen Notley, Mel Priestley, Dan Savage, Mimi Williams, Mike Winters

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UP FRONT 3


Aliens EXPOsed – a celebration of the iconic 1986 film: Aliens. This star-studded event will be an incredible opportunity for Sci-Fi and horror fans to see cast members from this ground-breaking film on stage together. For tickets and information visit:

calgaryexpo.com This is a separate ticketed event and does not grant access to the Calgary Expo show-floor. Ms. Sigourney Weaver’s appearance is presented by the Calgary Expo in conjunction with Coolwaters Productions LLC Guest line up is subject to change.

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FRONT VUEPOINT

JOSH MARCELLIN JOSH@VUEWEEKLY.COM

So long, Alison Last Wednesday, Alison Redford calmly walked down a flight of marble stairs, looked Alberta in the eye and said: I'm done. It was as graceful an exit as possible considering the circumstances. Redford's approval ratings were subterranean thanks to her inability to keep travel expenses to a comprehensible level. Her jet-setting receipts turned her into a living caricature of the much-hated "entitled elitist." For weeks the ruling PCs had been hemorrhaging credibility as the sober managers of Alberta's money. MLAs were abandoning ship to save their political hides. With the Wildrose jackals stalking their staggering herd, the Conservative government was taking no chances and leaned on Redford with all their panicky weight. They needed a sacrifice, so the PCs sent their leader to the guillotine—again. I voted for Redford after she promised in her campaign (in the 2011 leadership race triggered by Ed Stelmach's surprise resignation amid plunging approval ratings ... sound familiar?) to raise Assured Income for the Severely Handicapped payments by a sorely needed $400. I remember being impressed that she highlighted AISH, which had been mocked by Ralph Klein a decade earlier, then promptly followed through on the promise after she was elected. Redford was, and even now still is, widely regarded as brilliant. The worldly and whip-smart lawyer skewed the party left and courted nurses, teachers and unions to save the Conservatives from the farright Wildrose dragon. So what happened? Some, like the Calgary Herald, argued Alberta's first female premier was a victim of misogyny. Klein, that colourful scoundrel, racked up $250 000 in government jet expenses and abuses so flippantly blatant they made Redford's sloppily-executed $45 000 visit to South Africa for Nelson Mandela's funeral seem trifling. Klein used government jets for fishing trips, to shuttle around MLAs' wives, and also because he couldn't smoke onboard commercial flights. On 87 trips he was the only passenger on the plane. He was never asked to refund a penny. But it's much more likely that she was undone not by sexism but by burned bridges. Redford systematically destroyed the good will she'd banked during the campaigns. She argued for the value of education then slashed postsecondary funding; she promised to save Alberta's health care from the legacy of '90s-era austerity then started phasing out nursing jobs from major hospitals; then she emphasized the progressive in the Progressive Conservatives to sway unions only to try to demolish the AUPE's right to binding arbitration. The PCs want you to believe these neckbreaking about-faces were all Redford's fault and not a symptom of their wheezy, rusty old party. But either way, they look sallow, weak and confused—and likely won't survive another election. Whether Alberta has the stomach to let the Wildrose fill the void or vote in someone from another party remains to be seen. V

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NEWS EDITOR : REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

NEWS // MALARIA

The ticket to beating malaria

University of Alberta researchers are working on a vaccine to help protect women mia, jaundice, joint pain and convulsions. There are four classes of drugs used to treat malaria—quinoline-related compounds, antifolates, antimicrobials and artemisinin derivatives. The treatment will depend on the species of Plasmodium, severity of symptoms and whether the patient is pregnant. "Malaria is dangerous. But mainly dangerous for pregnant women and children," Gnidehou says. "When women become pregnant, they become more susceptible to malaria. When those women have malaria during pregnancy, it's highly dangerous because those women will have anemia, sometimes they can die. Often they have placental infection."

// Creative Commons

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here are so many people in Africa who suffer from malaria, and I know what malaria is because when I was in my country, I was infected, too." Years later, Sedami Gnidehou is at the University of Alberta working to defeat malaria, and her team recently found a surprising relation about malaria's effect on men and pregnant women. "Malaria during pregnancy is a public-health issue," Gnidehou says. "We discovered in a pilot study that men exposed to one species of malaria have antibodies that recognize another species that can be dangerous for pregnant women. So this unexpected finding is a new fascinating strategy against malaria." The discovery happened after they looked into the finding that pregnant women in Colombia exposed to malaria tended to deliver healthy babies. They found that they, as well as other pregnant women in Africa, would have one type of antibodies for a vaccine-candidate protein specifically present in malaria in pregnancy. But when examining men in Colombia exposed to a different type of malaria parasite, they found that they too have antibodies effective against that same original vaccine candidate.

"We wanted to understand why pregnant women from Colombia seem to be protected from malaria," Gnidehou says. "But in doing that work, we discovered something that could be useful for vaccine development. When we started we didn't know that we'd discover something like that." Gnidehou's goal is to develop a vaccine using this discovery that would help protect the 125 million women at risk from malaria. The team includes collaborating researchers Amanda Maestre in Colombia, and Nicaise Ndam in Benin. The next step will be confirming the finding. The team used a sample from a specific place in Colombia, so next they want to test with samples from across Latin America. The World Health Organization estimates that 3.3 billion people are at risk from malaria, with 1.2 billion of those at high risk. Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which humans contract via bites from infected mosquitoes. At least 10 individual species are capable of causing malaria in humans. Symptoms can be extreme and diverse, with things such as headaches, fever, hemolytic ane-

A vaccine works by introducing something that provokes a response within the body that the immune system can work against, without the body being in actual danger. When you get infected with something, the immune system fights it with antibodies. An antigen is something associated with the foreign matter that causes the body to produce antibodies, so if the antigen can be introduced to the body in a safe way, antibodies will be able to defeat it, and the body will be well-prepared should it ever return. This can be done in a variety of ways, such as injecting a person with a dead virus or a weakened strain. Development of a vaccine will depend on finding both an antigen and an appropriate way to get it into the body. "I believe in what I'm doing," Gnidehou says. "To get the vaccine itself? I don't know. But I'm quite sure the discovery we have is highly interesting and I think that we need to focus on that work. We need to work hard on that to identify some antigens, because we identified antibodies. We know that antibodies can recognize something. But what is the antigen that generates these antibodies?" If there are antibodies present in men infected with one species that are effective against a different species found in these pregnant women, then if the antigen that generates these antibodies can be found, it means a vaccine effective against multiple species of the parasite, and specifically able to help pregnant women, is possible. Malaria-vaccine development has been difficult, with vaccines based on single antigens that are notoriously ineffective. And the vast areas of the world at risk mean that any vaccine has the potential to prevent a lot of suffering. This unexpected discovery might result in just that prevention.

RYAN BROMSGROVE

RYAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Vue Weekly welcomes reader response, whether critical or complimentary. Send your opinion by mail (Vue Weekly, Suite 200-11230 119 St NW, Edmonton, AB, T5G 2X3), by fax (780.426.2889) or by email (letters@vueweekly.com). Preference is given to feedback about articles in Vue Weekly. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Not every letter will be published.

RE: INSIDE THE INSTITUTION (MAR 13 – MAR 19) I realize the article is based on one tour and is a snapshot of that encounter. I am at the institution regularly and so wish you could have had a more comprehensive experience so you could see some of what I see. I see women that regularly say that being at the institution was the best thing that could have ever happened to them. That the programing offered has given them

insight into themselves and brought healing to places long troubled by pain and has given them the chance to rebuild a better life when they are released. I wish you could have seen the staff that regularly go above and beyond to bring a smile, to help the women overcome barriers to their success and do their work with care and compassion. I wish you could have seen women that have a job now because they did the forklift training while they were there or that are closer to their dreams of a job in construction because

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

they did some of the safety training offered at the institution. I wish you could have been there in V&C the day the lady threw her arms around her parole officer and thanked her through tears for all her help in getting her to the next stage of her journey. It's impossible to see all of that in one tour, but please know it's there. Debbie Fawcett Women's Reintegration Chaplain Mustard Seed


NEWS // RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS

Healing comes slowly

Taking a look book at residential schools as national reconciliation event comes to town

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he Government of Canada now recognizes that it was wrong to forcibly remove children from their homes and we apologize for having done this. We now recognize that it was wrong to separate children from rich and vibrant cultures and traditions, that it created a void in many lives and communities, and we apologize for having done this," said Prime Minister Stephen Harper in 2008, in what has since been billed a "historic" address. "We now recognize that, in separating children from their families, we undermined the ability of many to adequately parent their own children and sowed the seeds for generations to follow, and we apologize for having done this," Harper said. As the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, established by the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement that triggered the Prime Minister's apology, rolls into town for its final national event this weekend, some are looking at the province's child-welfare system and wondering just how much we've learned from one of the darkest chapters of our nation's history. The TRC has travelled the country gathering testimony and providing a place for survivors to share their stories, with their final report due in June of this year. It's no coincidence that our city was selected to host its final event. From the 1870s until 1996, about 150 000 First Nations children attended ap-

While the government makes efproximately 130 residential schools non-aboriginal children. Graff noted that 2013 saw a de- forts to recruit First Nations foster across Canada, most of which were operated by churches. Alberta crease in the number of apprehen- families, the demand always exhad more schools than any other sions, but this, too, was dispropor- ceeds the supply. Joe (not his real name) is a 58-year-old father of province and the TRC estimates tionate. "While the percentage of aborigi- three who, along with his wife, has the largest proportion of survivors reside in and around Edmonton at nal children in care has decreased been a foster parent under the proby 1.4 percent, it has decreased gram since it was established. 12 000. Joe, who is intensely proud of Despite the Prime Minister's apol- by 5.1 percent for non-aboriginal ogy and the work of the TRC, cul- children," his 2013 report notes. his Cree heritage, explains that he tural assimilation is still happening, He adds that although there have escaped the residential-school system because his says First Namother risked tions elder Taz Children thinking their parents have given them i m p r i s o n m e n t Boucher. and managed to "We are witaway, parents using drugs and alcohol to deal sneak him away nessing another lost genera- with the pain of losing their children. It's a vicious to Edmonton to stay with memtion," she says. circle and the circle continues. bers of the com"Except this munity. His older time we're losing the children to apprehension by been a number of activities that brothers weren't so lucky, nor were Child Welfare instead of to residen- have been undertaken by the min- his parents, his grandparents or his istry, there is still no plan devel- wife. He acknowledges this backtial schools." Boucher describes the situation oped in partnership with aboriginal ground probably played a large stakeholders to address the issue. part in their decision to become as "another assimilation practice." The last three annual reports Calls and emails to the department foster parents. "I remember the stories of how of Del Graff, Alberta's Child and asking if a plan had been develYouth Advocate, have raised con- oped over the past year were not they used to chain him up to prevent him from running away," Joe cerns about the disproportionate returned. recalls, talking about the grandfanumber of First Nations children in care. According to Graff, although Of great concern to advocates ther who—after half a dozen atFirst Nations children account for is that not only are First Nations tempts—eventually managed to just nine percent of the children in children more likely to be placed in escape to the bush at the age of Alberta, they make up 58 percent government care, they're also more 10, never to return to the residenof children in temporary care and likely to die there. According to an tial-school system again. But the 72 percent in permanent care. In Edmonton Journal-Calgary Herald system got both of his parents and, 2013, the last year for which sta- investigative report published ear- in turn, his brothers, the oldest of tistics are available, there were lier this year, they account for 78 whom spent 10 years in the system 5769 First Nations children in the percent of children who have died Joe managed to escape. Joe says his friend, an 81-year-old province's care, compared to 2724 in foster care since 1999.

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

elder, has issues stemming from his residential-school experience that will never be resolved. "He doesn't talk to anybody about what happened to him," Joe says. "He can't. It's too horrible." "I see the situation repeating itself," he adds. "Children thinking their parents have given them away, parents using drugs and alcohol to deal with the pain of losing their children. It's a vicious circle and the circle continues." Rachel Notley, the NDP Opposition Critic for Child and Family Services, acknowledges that it's a big problem without an easy solution. "We know that the majority of children being apprehended are from indigenous homes and that they are being placed with nonindigenous families," she says. She adds that while efforts such as family-enhancement resources go a long way in keeping families together, the system itself is struggling because it is reactive in nature. "As much as a social worker might be sensitive to the broader social context at play," she notes, "there are times that we can't afford to think about the bigger picture if there's a child at risk." The TRC event will take place from March 27 – 30 at the Shaw Convention Centre. Admission is free and all are welcome to attend. MIMI WILLIAMS

MIMI@VUEWEEKLY.COM

UP FRONT 7


FRONT DYERSTRAIGHT

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Nigeria: is 100 years enough? Unification may have led to a large and dysfunctional country The reason they convened a national conference to discuss Nigeria's future last week is that it's the 100th anniversary of the unification of the northern and southern protectorates into one nation. Well, one colony, actually, since the whole place would remain under British rule for another half-century. And the one subject the delegates are banned from discussing is whether unification was really such a good idea. It was an excellent idea from the viewpoint of the British colonial administrators, of course. Not only was it tidier, but it crippled resistance to British rule. When you force 500 different ethnic groups with as many languages into a single political entity, they will spend more time fighting one another than the foreigners. (Even Nigeria's name was invented by the British.) A century later, the country is still riven by ethnic and religious divisions that distort both its politics and its economy. Nigeria is one of the world's biggest oil producers, but two-thirds of its 170 million people live on less than $2 a day and even the big cities only get electricity for four hours a day. It ranks 144th on Transparency International's Corruption

QUEERMONTON

Perceptions Index, which means in practice that most public funds are stolen. In the mainly Muslim north, an extremist Islamic insurgency by a group called Boko Haram ("Western Education is Forbidden") killed more than 1300 people in the first two months of this year. Or rather, they and the brutal and incompetent army units who respond to their attacks with indiscriminate violence together accounted for 1300 lives. And when Lamido Sanusi, the internationally respected head of Nigeria's central bank, accused the Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation of failing to repatriate $20 billion of the $67 billion received for oil sales between January 2012 and July 2013, President Goodluck Jonathan suspended him for "financial recklessness and misconduct." "Failing to repatriate" actually means that the money stayed abroad and disappeared into the foreign bank accounts of powerful Nigerians. This is normal: it has been estimated that two-thirds of the $600 billion Nigeria has earned in the past 50 years from selling its oil was lost to corruption by the political and

business elite. What was unusual was for a member of the elite to challenge the practice openly. Sanusi, who was named Central Bank Governor of the Year in 2010 by The Banker magazine, was promptly accused of links to Boko Haram in a document circulated to Nigerian websites that was traced back to Jonathan's social-media adviser. It was a typical establishment response, and it was total nonsense. But a depressing number of southern Nigerians will believe almost anything about Sanusi simply because he is a northern Muslim. He is actually a member of the northern aristocracy—his grandfather was the emir of Kano—and an Islamic scholar who condemns Wahhabist fundamentalism. He is one of Nigeria's foremost advocates of a tolerant, inclusive Islam: "Even a cursory student of Islamic history knows that all the trappings of gender inequality present in the Muslim society have socioeconomic and cultural, as opposed to religious roots," he said recently. Yet the mistrust between Muslims and Christians, northerners and south-

erners, is so great that Sanusi's whistleblowing is seen by many southerners as a political operation aimed at the Christian president. They believe this even though they also know the money really was stolen by people at the NNPC, and that Jonathan is protecting them because some of it was going to be used to finance his re-election campaign next year. And why does Jonathan need so much money? To buy the support of the northern power-brokers, who will then deliver the votes to keep him in the presidency. Then he will be able to go on protecting his friends. It's a closed system, and it's making Sanusi more radical by the moment. Recently he told The Guardian: "If the population as a whole starts protesting what is going on in our country, how many of them can they kill?" He added that the ousted leaders of Ukraine and the Arab Spring nations "never did half as much damage to their countries as our rulers have." But Sanusi is unlikely to bring the system down. That is why, at the national conference on Nigeria's future that meets in Abuja over the next three

months, some people will certainly defy the ban and start talking about re-dividing Nigeria between north and south. They will mostly be southerners, who resent the large amounts of oil income that the federal government transfers to the northern states that desperately need the money. Northerners will fiercely resist the idea of partition because they would be left running a country only slightly better off than Mali. (Despite the transfers of oil revenue, 72 percent of the population in the North lives in poverty; in the South, only 27 percent does.) And in the end, nothing will happen, because cutting off the North would spoil the game. Nigeria is unquestionably the most dysfunctional large country in the world, but it will hang together because all the elites benefit from the dysfunction, which allows them to steal massive amounts with complete impunity. Indeed, you might say that Nigeria survives because it is dysfunctional. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

ASHLEY DRYBURGH // ASHLEY@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Raise a hateful voice

At least Westboro Baptist Church's Fred Phelps didn't hide behind anonymity and a media-savvy church willing to spread his message. And though Phelps was rumoured to have been excommunicated in August 2013, everything about the WBC is indelibly marked by him.

We love figs! // unknown photographer

Fred Phelps, founder and former leader of the Westboro Baptist Church, passed away at the age of 84 on March 19. I struggled with whether or not the world needed 600 more words written about a man who was the face of a vile organization. Isn't this what the WBC and their ilk crave? Attention? The WBC, famous for picketing the funerals of AIDS victims and American soldiers killed during the recent

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wars, probably needs no introduction. Here, however, are some interesting facts I encountered during the research for this column: WBC's first picket was at Gage Park, Topeka, in 1991. The park was around the corner from their church and was rumoured to be a cruising spot. Phelps claimed that a man (presumably gay) tried to lure his five-year-old grandson into some bushes. WBC reached national attention

when they picketed the 1998 funeral of Matthew Shepard. Their slogan, "God hates fags," is also the URL for the church's website. Phelps was a democrat, running in five different Kansas primaries during the '90s. The church is comprised primarily of members of his extended family. Taken together, these facts paint a picture of a power-hungry man with a personal vendetta against queers

In an odd way, I am grateful that Phelps began this church. I don't mean to minimize the pain and suffering the church has caused countless numbers of families and individuals and I am certainly not happy they exist. But I am grateful. I am grateful because the WBC threw the curtain back on the circulation of anti-queer rhetoric in the US and illustrated so beautifully the endgame of that rhetoric. Their logic makes a certain kind of sense: queer sex offends God, the US continues to support queers, so God punishes the US (Canada, however, has managed to escape God's wrath). Thus, Hurricane Katrina or the second Iraq war or whatever else were a result of God's wrath. Now, behind every North American religious anti-queer argument lies the spectre of the WBC. To all these religious folks I would ask: if God truly hates fags, if you believe queerness is a sin, then shouldn't you be onboard with the WBC's message, if not their tactics? I'm also grateful because the WBC in-

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

advertently created the conditions for its own demise. They showcased the depths of anti-queer hate and galvanized counter-protests and resistances that helped shape the tenor of mainstream queer activism in the States. Sure, at times WBC counter-protests had little to do with defending queers directly—the KKK got involved at one point—but every "God hates figs" sign was an affirmation of queer humanity that the WBC was so desperate to erase. Ultimately, this is why I decided to write about the WBC this week. Perhaps increased exposure to their message will reaffirm homophobic beliefs in some people. In fact, I hope it does. I hope those people are inspired to write and talk about how much queers disgust them in a public fashion. Canada doesn't have an equivalent to Fred Phelps, unless you count Allan "lake of fire" Hunsperger. What we do have are anonymous, everyday people, quietly nurturing their hate and their disgust—not brave enough to come out from behind a pseudonym. Be inspired by Fred Phelps. Bravely announce to your friends, bosses, co-workers and families that you hate queers. Shout loudly so that we know who you are. We'll make sure you take your rightful place in history. V


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UP FRONT 9


ARTS

ARTS EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // THEATRE

Tying the knot

Studio Theatre's Blood Wedding explores a community-created tragedy has this sort of range," she adds. "It's so challenging, but so rewarding, just to have this kind of material to try to live up to."

Until Sat, Apr 5 (7:30 pm; 12:30 pm matinee on Thu, Apr 3) Blood Wedding Directed by Kathleen Weiss Timms Centre for the Arts, $11 – $22 Here comes The Bride // Terah Jans

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t's always scary to do a play like this," Kathleen Weiss admits, "Because this is a play that people adore." To wit: though it's eight decades old, now, there's an endurance to Federico García Lorca's Blood Wedding, written back in 1932, only four years before its author would be shot dead in the first few months of the Spanish Civil War. Over that span of time, it's seen film adaptations, operatic versions and multiple radio takes on the script, (in addition to, y'know, its theatrical stagings). That lasting ability seems tethered to certain social constructs that persist between Lorca's day and now: after so much time, we still seem un-

able to move beyond certain sorts of cultural repression that Blood Wedding roots itself in exploring. "We're still looking at situations where social oppression keeps people from realizing who they are and their dreams," Weiss, who's directing Studio Theatre's take on the script, explains. "I think that's relevant and interesting. The play also has this very, very polarized gender articulation: there's this sense of what men do, and what women do, so I think there's that kind of feminist thing for me as well: that you see very clearly how the women are disempowered in the world. And yet—it's one of the reasons I love the

play—is the women are also the most powerful characters. But in terms of having agency, they don't have a lot of agency in their own world." To explore that, Blood Wedding finds The Bride abandoning her wedding shortly after tying the knot, escaping to a forest with a man she really loves—also married to another—with most of the wedding party taking up pursuit of the rogue couple. And once they're all roaming around the foliage, not only does the traditional conservativism of their world fall apart, the realty of the script itself goes with it: increasingly surreal turns see Death

and the Moon begin to wander the forest, too, in addition to a swath of other strange figures. "It becomes a kind of poetic expression of this passion between these two people," Weiss says. "Leonardo, who runs away with The Bride, has a line where he says it's not his fault that he's in love with her because it's the Earth's fault. You get the sense that the woods, the tree and the moon are all part of this romance. That there's an inevitability that some people are just meant to be together, and that it's the Earth's fault, that it's the fault of the blood. It's not a choice, even. "It's unusual to work on a play that

To explore that shifting world, Weiss, a Grotowski-based director, has grounded her actors in that approach, which is more body-based than traditional Stanislavski-style method acting. As she explains, "With actors, you work with intentions, you work with what people want in the scene, from somebody else. So that's kind of standard—yes, I do that, but I base it in physical interactions. I get them to physicalize all of that need and all of that desire and all of the intentions toward the other actor in their bodies. " That heightened externalization reflects, in its way, what seems to be the script's deeper push: of individual desires pressing up against the restrictions of the society that they happen to find themselves in. "It's a tragedy like Romeo and Juliet," Weiss says. "Similar in the sense that it's really the community that creates the tragedy. Because the society is so repressive that the two people who should be together can't be together. And so then they run off together, and then it ends in all kinds of tragic results. But it really is the oppressive nature of the world that people live in that creates the tragedy." "I want it to be really clear that it isn't the passion of these two people that creates the tragedy. It's the fact that there's not a place for them to live out that passion in the world they inhabit." PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // MULTIDISCIPLINARY

The Legacy of Living Together T

his weekend, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada begins its seventh and final national event here in Edmonton: a gathering of statements, stories and accounts of the aboriginal experience in Canada, particularly of those who lived the horrors of the Residential School System, to document those experiences before they vanish, and are forgotten, rather than learned from. At every stop along its path through the country, there's been some measure of artistic presentation to welcome the Commission: often, it's taken the form of a competitive talent show and a cultural-exchange concert featuring musicians of a variety of backgrounds. But as it approached

10 ARTS

Edmonton, Alberta Aboriginal Arts Arts Council and the City of Edmonartistic director Christine Frederick ton—both of whom offered not just support, but actual knew those limited inclusions backing—she's wouldn't be the Thu, Mar 27 – Tue, Apr 1 now put together The Legacy of Livproper fit for the Various locations, free Details at tixonthesquare.ca community. ing Together project, a fuller, richer "They were planning some events, spread of indigebut they weren't really events that nous art, much more representative would encapsulate all of the profes- of the greater Edmonton commusional indigenous artists that we were nity's stories. There's seven events in aware of," she says. "Some of the art- total, from a pair of visual-arts instalists I know probably wouldn't submit lations—Ken Armstrong's photo exthemselves to a talent show. They hibition documenting homelessness want to contribute their art, but one in Canada and A Place To Hang Your of the best things we all do is look for Stories by Cold Lake artist Dawn Maa good fit, right?" rie Marchand, both up in City Hall— Meeting with both the Edmonton to theatre—a staged reading of the

never-before produced Bunk #7 at the CKUA radio building—to dance, music, writing and film. The importance of the arts in a conversation like this one can't be overstated, Frederick notes. "There is such capacity for the arts to reflect on experiences past, and bring an alternate voice to them," she says. "I believe very much in multiple approaches when we're dealing with the trauma, all the social ills, all the disruptions that happen to any society, and [were] certainly heaped upon aboriginal people. Art and culture and identity are intimately intertwined. "It was policy and law in Canada to strip us of our culture and our iden-

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

tity. And now comes the hard work of rebuilding that identity. Obviously it will reflect what the experiences have been, but it will also help us propel ourselves forward, into an identity that's much more rich, that's beyond that experience." These are all inclusive events, Frederick stresses, the invitation extending to people from all backgrounds: the greater conversation about culture in this country can't be one sided if real progress is to be made. "The reason it's called The Legacy of Living Together is it involves all of us," she says. "It takes all of us to make this society, to create understanding." PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM


PREVUE // THEATRE

PREVUE // THEATRE

The Invention of Romance

The Bard's Best Bits 'I

E

"We've been having great conversadmonton not only stages a wide array of theatre productions, we de- tions in rehearsals about romance and love and how we met our partners and velop them here, too. For evidence, look no further than so on," Carroll says. "And then some of Workshop West's new production, Con- the relationships that went sideways ni Massing's The Invention of Romance. and that kind of thing. It's stirred up a The script landed in the hands of direc- lot of conversations, so hopefully that tor Tracy Carroll back in 2011, while will happen with the audience as well." working as dramaturg with Massing in helping to edit, revise and sometimes Aside from the pursuit of the percompletely rewrite the script. Various fect relationship, The Invention of Roincarnations have made appearances mance should also be a good vehicle for exposing a at workshops and emerging-work fes- Fri, Mar 28 – Sun, Apr 13 (8 pm; host of incongruities and outright tivals around town Sundays at 2 pm) for the past few Directed by Tracy Carroll contradictions in years, notably the La Cité Francophone, $11 – $28 the way we view romantic love, es2012 Springboards pecially at older New Play Festival. "The inspiration for the show is [Mass- ages—getting married after retireing's] own mother, who rekindled a rela- ment isn't a common topic on stage tionship and ended up getting married (or anywhere else, really). "One thing that her mother says is in her late '70s," Carroll explains. The script juxtaposes this story with that love can be ordinary," Carroll that of Kate, a curator at a museum says. "I won't speak for anyone else, who has built a show called the Inven- but for me it's true—I think what I've tion of Romance, which delves into all discovered is those ordinary little the trappings, history and clichés of things, those day-to-day things in love and romance. But while Kate may life, teach us patience and kindness have a solid academic understanding and thoughtfulness—and that is of the subject, unlike her mother she true romance. That's true love." is decidedly unsuccessful in her own MEL PRIESTLEY MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM personal romantic endeavours.

t's a Shakespeare smorgasbord," says David Belke of the Bard's Best Bits, though it won't be Shakespeare as you may remember it. Local performers are putting their own twist on the Bard's work, be it through song, soliloquy, comedy, improvisation or the downright ridiculous. Belke is bringing back his Spell Check Shakespeare bit, where he runs a Shakespearean soliloquy through spell check to see what it comes up with, as well as Kids Answer Shakespeare; Rapid Fire Theatre will be performing an improvised set; Jason Hardwick is doing something called Brush Up Your Shakespeare; the 11 O'Clock Number will be doing a few improv performances; and Shadow Theatre artistic director John Hudson will be reading a contemporary piece in Shakespearean fashion, among numerous others. "It can be Shakespeare, it can be inspired by Shakespeare, it can be connected to Shakespeare, it can be tangentially connected in some vague, nominal way to Shakespeare," Belke says with a laugh. "As long as there's Shakespeare somewhere in the equation it can fit into the night, no question."

It's an intriguing way to approach on his legendary oeuvre. There are a body of work that is often con- the usual avenues, of course, such sidered daunting, but Belke points as the well-known passages of out that the language—often the Romeo and Juliet or Macbeth, but biggest hurdle—is understand- Belke says there are so many other able when put in an actor's hands, facets to explore, and he continues and the themes of Shakespeare's to be surprised every year by what work are essentially themes of artists come up with—one year a performer did a montage of kisses human life. "It's beautiful and human and from Shakespearean plays, for exdeeply understanding. It touches ample. "It's Shakespeare performed by in an intimate way," Belke notes, his admiration for Shakespeare people who love Shakespeare, who evident. "People tend to think of are coming here because they find Shakespeare as big and grand, but some connection with the work, so what I find remarkable about Shake- that immediately makes it very comspeare is just the pelling," he says. human moments Sun, Mar 30 (7:30 pm) "It's Shakespeare that are crafted, Varscona Theatre, $25 at a human level the humanity and at the Varscona maybe that's why Theatre where the Bard's Best Bits keeps going on you're not far away from the actors. and on and on. In a way, it's people They are speaking directly to you. expressing themselves, and finding It's an intimate experience and surthemselves and finding inspiration prising as well. You think you know Shakespeare? Well, I guarantee you in the man's work." there'll be at least one thing in the The Bard's Best Bits has been run- show that'll show you Shakespeare in ning off and on for nearly a decade, a way you never even though about and Belke says Shakespeare's laud- it before." BAXTER able canon of material ensures MEAGHAN MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM there's no shortage of ways to take

PREVUE // DANCE

Solo Studies: Translations

T

he notation of dance—how physi- now forms the very seed of Solo cal movements and steps can be Studies: Translations. In it, Chelarecorded for future instruction—has dyn's given seven dancers a numbeen an interest of Tatiana Chela- ber of written inspirations to play dyn since the beginnings of her own with: single words like "whoosh" or "electrocute," and more directed dance practice. When the Simon Fraser Univer- phrases like "lead with your toes" sity grad was first or "slice your learning the dif- Thu, Mar 27 – Mon, Mar 31 arms up over ferent ways to (7:30 pm; 2 pm matinee on Sun, your head." From chart movement, Mar 30) there, the dancshe would often C103 (formerly Catalyst Theers interpreted write it all out to atre), $15 – $20 the prompts on assist her memory. their own, with She also quickly Cheladyn acting discovered that her notes could be as mentor/guide when necessary, interpreted far beyond what she was but mostly just letting them create as they will. actually trying to record. "I remember talking to someone "It's a show that's really about these about it and showing them my dancers, their abilities and their chowords," Cheladyn recalls over the reographic explorations," she says. phone. "And the way they interpreted them was totally different than what The first version of Solo Studies, back in 2012, was just that: six dancI thought." That idea of multiple interpreta- ers, one after the other, creating sintions pulled from the same written phrasing stuck with her, and CONTINUED ON PAGE 13 >>

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

ARTS 11


ARTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LIstINGs@VueWeeKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY At 3PM

DANCE BEDOUIN BEATS BELLYDANCE • Arden Theatre, 5 St Anne St, St Albert • Groovy Bellies: Hip Twisting Through the 50s,60s,70s! • Apr 6, 7-9:30pm • $25 at bedouinbeats.com

EBDA BALLROOM DANCE • Lions Senior Recreational Centre, 11113-111 Ave • 780.893.6828 • ebda. ca • Apr 5, 8pm

SOLO STUDIES: TRANSLATIONS • C103, 8529103 St • Directed by: Tatiana Cheladyn • Mar 27-31, 7:30; Mar 30, 2pm and 7:30pm • $20 (adult)/$15 (student/senior/industry) at TIX on the Square, door

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave • 587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Friday Night Stomp!: Swing and party music dance social every Fri; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check web • $10, $2 (lesson with entry); Every Fri until Apr 25

SUGAR FOOT SWING DANCE • Sugar Swing, 10545-81 Ave • 587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Swing Dance Social every Sat; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check web • $10, $2 lesson with entry

FILM

BREAK: Installation by Andrew Frosst; Mar 29-Jun 8 • BOWERBIRD, LIFE AS ART: Works by Lyndal Osborne: until Apr 27 • STRANGE DREAM: Artworks by Jill Stanton; until Dec 31 • Conversation with the Artist: RBC New Works Gallery, 2nd fl: Andrew Frosst; Mar 28, 6pm • In-Gallery Talk: High Adventure with Ruth Burns and Mary-Beth Laviolette; Mar 29, 2pm; free (member, w/ admission) • Lecture: Jasper/Robson Lecture: Lisa Christensen; Wed, Apr 2, 7pm; $15/$8 (AGA member)

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St, St Albert • 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert.ca • FRAGILE ELEMENTS: Works by Susan Casault, Peter Ivens, and Teresa Stieben; until Apr 26 • Preschool Picasso: For ages 3-5; Beautiful Birds: Apr 12, 10:3011:30am; $10/$9 (member) • Ageless Art: Botanical Impressions: Apr 17, 1-3pm; $15/$13.50 (member) • Artventures: Drop-in art program for children aged 6-12; Leaf Prints: Apr 19, 1-4pm; $6 (per child)/$5.40 (member)

BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • 12310 Jasper Ave • 780.482.2854 • bugeramathesongallery.com • DAY TRIPPING: Works by Jane Brookes • TWO DAYS IN NEW YORK: Works by David Wilson; until Mar 28 • NOT YOUR MOTHER'S HORSE: Works by Casey Mcglynn; Reception: Fri, Apr 4, 6-9pm; Sat, Apr 5, 1-4pm CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTA (CAVA) • 9103-95 Ave • 780.461.3427 • SPRING HARVEST: Works by Ginette Valliére-D'Silva, Urmila Z. Das, Alouisia Aubin-Desrocher, SuChang Yi • Apr 4-15 • Reception: Apr 4, 7-8:30pm

CITY HALL/STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY • City Hall, City Room, Mezzanine Level, 1 Sir Winston Churchill Sq/Stanley Milner Library, 2nd Fl, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq• TODAY’S LEGACY OF LIVING SPOTLIGHT: Armstrong Photos • Mar 27-30 • Free CRESTWOOD COMMUNITY LEAGUE HALL • 14325-96 Ave • 780.686.8777 • THIS IS WHAT WE SEE: African art sale • Apr 4, 5-10pm; Apr 5 10am-5pm • Proceeds support the Chipembele Wildlife Education Trust, South Luangwa Conservation Society

ARDEN THEATRE • 780.459.1542 • Screening of The Tate Movie Project’s The Itch of the Golden Nit • Mar 30, 2pm, free pre-show activity at 1 pm • $18 (adult)/$15 (child up to 17/senior) at Arden box office

CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51

THE CAPITOL THEATRE–Fort Edmonton • fort-

780.760.1278 • JUICY: Landscape paintings by Samantha Williams-Chapelsky • Opening Apr 3, 5-8pm; music by Jessica Heine

edmontonpark.ca • The Grapes of Wrath (1940, STC) on Mar 27 Bonnie and Clyde (R, 1967); Apr 3, 7:30 • Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid; Apr 10 • $10

CHA ISLAND • The Big Lebowski Party: Movie Wii Bowling • Mar 31, 7pm-late

CINEMA AT THE CENTRE • Library Theatre, Stanley A. Milner Library basement, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • epl.ca • Centre for Reading and the Arts showcases little-known films every month • Trust (USA, 1991, 14A); Wed, Apr 2, 6:30pm • My Prairie Home (Canada, 2013, STC); Wed, Apr 9, 6:30pm • Nebraska (USA, 2013, 14A); Wed, Apr 16, 6:30pm

EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave • 780.439.5285 • How To Marry A Millionaire (1953, colour, PG); Mon, Mar 31, 8pm • $6 (adult)/$5 (senior)/$5 (student)/$3 (child 12 and under)

EducatEd REEl • Metro Cinema (Garneau Theatre), 8712 109 St • Pomegranates and Myrrh: Join the film’s composer and U of A alumna Amritha Vaz, ’97 BA, ’02 LLB, for a discussion after the film • Mar 27, 7pm • $6 (adv)/$8 (door, cash); pre-register by at alumni.ualberta.ca/events

FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley A. Milner Library Centennial Rm, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.496.7000 • epl.ca • Freedom Writers, PG; Mar 28, 2pm HARCOURT HOUSE ANNEX • 10211-112 St • Ikarie

Ave, Stony Plain • 780.963.9573 • SPRING THINGS: Local pottery • Apr 1-30 • Opening: Apr 5, 11-3pm

DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St •

DIXON GALLERY • 12310 Jasper Ave • 780.200.2711 • Richard Dixon's Studio and Gallery featuring a collection of historical Canadian artworks; antique jade sculptures and jewellery; 17th Century bronze masterworks and artworks by Richard Dixon

DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY (DUG) • 10332-124 St • douglasudellgallery.com • Represents some of Canada's leading contemporary artists as well as artists gaining recognition in the international art scene. Canadian historical art available • FIGURES: Paintings and sculptures by Erik Olson • Until Apr 5

ENTERPRISE SQUARE GALLERIES • 10230 Jasper Ave • Open: Thu-Fri, 12-6pm, Sat 12-4pm • CROSS CONTAMINATION: Artworks by the Nina Haggerty Centre for the Arts staff and artist collective; until Mar 28 • FRESH PAINT: A Snapshot of Painting in Edmonton; until Apr 12 • DUETS: Shared Ideas in Painting: until Apr 12 • VISUAL MUSIC: Five Films by John Osborne; until Mar 29

FAB GALLERY • 1-1 Fine Arts Bldg, 89 Ave, 112 St • 780.492.2081 • THE SPACE BETWEEN US: Works by Alysha Creighton CÉLÉBRONS LES LIENS: Works by Karen Blanchet; until Apr 29 Albert • 780.459.2525 • NATURE’S AWAKENING: Featuring paintings by Nathalie Shewchuk-Peré and collages by Sylvia Grist • Until Apr 26

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.944.5383 • epl. ca/art-gallery • PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG STUDENT: Student works curated by the Visual Arts Student Association, U of A • Edmonton Stamp Club Display; until Mar 31 • SLOW IT DOWN: Paintings by Meghan MacMillan; Apr 1-30

106 St • 780.488.6611 • albertacraft.ab.ca • Feature Gallery: PAYCE: Celebrating Greg Payce's 2013 Saidye Bronfman Award for Excellence in Fine Craft; until Mar 29 • Discovery Gallery: COALESCENCE: Ceramic artworks by Brenda Danbrook; Mar 29-May 3; opening: Mar 29, 2-4pm • Feature Gallery: FURNISH: Contemporary hand-crafted home furnishings and accessories; Apr 5-Jul 5; Artist reception: Sat Apr 5, 2-4pm

THE GRAY GALLERY • 9-11238, Robbins Health Learning Centre, 104 Ave, 109 St • 780.907.2816 • IN MEDIAS RES: Works by Gillian Willans, Tianna MapstoneLung, Tracy Suter • Opening: Mar 27, 6pm • Through Apr

ARTERY • 9535 Jasper Ave • 780.233.3635 • GRATI-

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112

TUDE: An Exhibition of Local Graphic Design Featuring Perry Gratton with Arrowz Featuring New Collaborative Works with Mat Simpson • Through Apr

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.422.6223 • youraga.ca • BMO World of Creativity: CABINETS OF CURIOSITY: Lyndal Osborne's curious collection; until Jun 30 • HIGH ADVENTURE: Byron Harmon on the Columbia Icefield; Mar 29-Aug 17 • LAWREN HARRIS AND A.Y. JACKSON– JASPER/ROBSON 1924: Mar 29-Aug 17 • INSTINCTIVE

12 ARTS

Place Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 109 St, 78 Ave • 780.433.5807 • FROM THE PAST TO THE FUTURE: Works by Joyce Bjerke and Ethel Gulka • Mar 28-Apr 30 • Reception: Apr 9, 6:30-8:30pm

JURASSIC FOREST/LEARNING CENTRE • 15 mins N of Edmonton off Hwy 28A, Township Rd 564 • Education-rich entertainment facility for all ages KING’S UNIVERSITY COLLEGE • 9125-50 St • LIFE2: Portrait photos of parolees; curated by Mark Power • Mar 31-May 3, Mon-Fri 8:30am-4:30pm • Opening: Mar 31, 7pm; viewing and panel discussion with subjects and photographers

KIWANIS GALLERY–Red Deer • Red Deer Public Library • OPEN AND CLOSED: Artworks by Wendy Meeres; Until Apr 27 • Reception: Fri, Apr 4, 6-8pm; literary reading by sports poet, Frank Pavlick LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St • 780.990.1161 • landogallery.com • SPRING ON 124 STREET: Mar 28-Apr 30 LATITUDE 53 • 10242-106 St • 780.423.5353 • Main Space: FALLING THROUGH THE MIRROR: Paintings by Tammy Salzl, and installation/sculpture stories by Emily Jan; until Apr 19 • Projex Room: 900: DRAWING WITH THE BRAIN: Works by Amber-Jane Grove; until Apr 19; Conversation with the artist and drawing demo: Amber-Jane Grove; Sat, Mar 29, 1pm

THE LEGACY OF LIVING TOGETHER • City Hall City Rm: A PLACE TO HANG YOUR STORIES: Visual art in-

stallation featuring an interactive art project and healing garden by Cree Metis artist Dawn Marie Marchand; Mar 27-30 • City Hall, City Rm, Mezz and stanley Milner Library, 2nd Fl: Photos by Ken Armstrong; Mar 27-30

LOFT GALLERY • AJ Ottewell Gallery, 590 Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park • 790.559.4443 • artstrathcona. com • Open: Sat-Sun 12-4pm • Art by Beth Gillard, and ASSC members • Until Apr 27

St • Front Room: THE PAST IS A FOREIGN COUNTRY and THE CHAIR TEST: Works by John Latour; until Apr 10 • Main Gallery: RE-MEMBERING UENO: Mixed media print series by Karen Dugas; until Apr 10 • Hall Project Space: EDMONTON WAYFINDING PROJECT: Until Apr 10 • HARCOuRt HOuse–ANNex: ambiARTnight: Arts happening featuring projected artworks by Glenys Switzer, Marliss Weber, Paula E. Kirman, and Stephen Sereda; art will be interpreted by musicians Bill Damur, Bong Sample, Shannon Land, and Gene Kosowan; all-ages; Sat, Apr 5, 7:30pm; $10

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-142 St • telusworldofscienceedmonton.com • HARRY POTTER: THE EXHIBITION: Peer into the wizard’s world in an interactive exhibit featuring hundreds of authentic props and costumes from the Harry Potter films; until Apr 6; tickets start: $14 • How to Make a Monster–tHe art and TECHNOLOGY OF ANIMATRONICS • IMAx theatre:

TRANSLATION: Talk and Book launch by Yukari Meldrum and Tomoko Mitani • Thu, Apr 3, 5:30-7pm • Free

VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St • 780.421.1731 • Gallery A: HOMETOWN DREAMS: Paintings by Linda Craddock; until May 3 • Gallery B: LABYRINTH OF THE ETERNAL ARCHETYPE: Installation by Shyra Desouza; until May 3

THEATRE

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert • 780.460.5990 • vasa.ca • Works by Deborah Catton; through Mar • Works by Wanda Resek and Bette Lisitza; through Apr WALTERDALE–ASA Gallery • Walterdale Playhouse, 10322-83 Ave • THE ARTIST LENS • Apr 1-May 18 WEST END GALLERY • 12308 Jasper Ave • 780.488.4892 • westendgalleryltd.com • Paintings by Michael Rozenvain; Apr 5-17l Opening: Sat, Mar 29, 105pm • Works by Annabelle Marquis; Apr 5-17 • Fraser Brinsmead; May 3-15 WORKS GALLERY • 10635-95 St • facebook.com/ TheWorksArtandDesignFestival • MEET ME IN MCCAULEY: NOVANTACINQUE 95 BENVENUTI: The McCauley Revitalization Committee, The Places 52 sculptural art banners installed on 95 St between 106A and 109A Ave. The banners feature imagery created by Dennis Lenarduzzi; through Mar • the YMCA Community Canvas Works Gallery: Don Wheaton YMCA downtown (10211 102 Ave): Jenny Keith's nature-inspired paintings; until May

LITERARY AUDREYS BOOKS • 10702 Jasper Ave • Michael Wuitchik reading from his latest novel, My Heart is Not My Own; Apr 8, 7pm • Douglas Roche launch of Peacemakers: How People Around the World are building a World Free of War; Apr 12, 2pm • Launch of Tololwa Mollel's children's book, From the Lands of the Night; Apr 13, 2pm BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ • 9624-76 Ave • 780.989.2861 • Story Slam 2nd Wed each month @ the Chair: Share your story, sign-up at 7pm, 7-10pm • $5 (suggested, donations go to winners)

MARJORIE WOOD GALLERY–Red Deer • THE

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE • 9351-118 Ave • vzenari@gmail.com • Prose Creative Writing Group • Every Tue, 7-9pm

COLOUR OF INNER PEACE: Works by Arts a la Carte • Through Mar

CKUA RADIO BUILDING • 9804 Jasper Ave •

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St • 780.407.7152 • MEASURING A YEAR: BY THE MINUTE: Knitted sculpture, installation by Margie Davidson; until May 16; reception: Mar 27, 7-9pm

CRAFT BEER MARKET • 10013 101A Ave • Launch

MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-51 St, Stony

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM–St Albert • 5 St Anne St, St Albert • 780.459.1528 • Family drop in: make a Treasure Book; Sat, Mar 29, 12-3pm • HANDS ON NATURE: DISCOVER BIODIVERSITY: Apr 1-Jun 8

GALLERY 7 • Bookstore on Perron, 7 Perron St, St

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY • 10186-

JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY (JAAG) • Strathcona

monton.com/events • CULTIVATE: Curators Tori McNish and Chelsey van Weerden, PrairieSeen, with art by Axis Mundi Artistry, Erin Greenough, and Hannah Schneider; until Mar 29 • SHELL: Works by Leanne Olson and Dara Humniski; Apr 5-26; opening: Apr 5, 3-7pm

METRO CINEMA • Metro at the Garneau Theatre, 8712-109 St • Crime Watch: 2nd Tue each month • $10 (adult)/$8 (student/senior)/$6 (child 12 and under)

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS

ANIME: Works by Deborah Torrance and Sheldon Rabbit Wheatley; until Mar 28 • A MIXTURE OF EVERYTHING: Works by Jennifer Holmes-Gohring; Apr 1-30; Reception: Fri, Apr 4, 5-7pm; First Friday Music by Soulful Noize, 7-9pm, $15 (each)/$30 (family) at door

DRAWING ROOM • 10253-97 St • drawingroomed-

GALLERIE PAVA • 9524-87 St, 780.461.3427 •

217/219 • ED South 129: Mooz-lum; Mar 27, 4pm; free

HUB ON ROSS–Red Deer • THE WONDERS OF

Plain • 780.963.9935 • multicentre.org • Video Works by Neil Fiertel; until Apr 23

XB-1 is a 1963 Czechoslovakian science fiction film with live improvisational sound artists, the Trio Latitude • Mar 29, 7pm (door), 7:30pm (show) • $10

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA • Telus Centre, Rm

HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY–Red Deer • 2nd Fl, Sunworks, 4924 Ross St • SOMEWHERE IN THE HILLS: Works by Samantha Williams-Chopelsky • Mar 30-May 3 • Reception: First Fri: Apr 4, 6-8pm

NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81 Ave • 780.432.0240 • paintspot.ca • Artisan Nook: • Vertical Space: UNFINISHED PAINTING CHALLENGE: Jointly created paintings by several artists; until Apr 17

NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS • 9225-118 Ave • thenina.ca • Community Arts Night: Learn techniques, become familiar with new mediums; Every Tue until Jun 10, 6:30-8:30pm; Pre-register at 780.474.7611 • KULU!: Celebrate the work of Slave Lake Metis artist, Justin Bergman and his appreciation of Kulu... a legendary giant bird of prey; until Mar 28

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave • 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery.com • Gregory Hardy; Mar 29-Apr 22; opening: Sat, Mar 29, 2-4pm

RED DEER MUSEUM & ART GALLERY • reddeerartscouncil.ca • TOTEMS OF THE MASCULINE: Personages in leather, wool, wood, and steel by Matt Gould • Until May 11

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102 Ave • 780.453.9100 • royalalbertamuseum.ca • CHOP SUEY ON THE PRAIRIES: Until Apr 27 • Lecture series: Museum Theatre: Questions and Collections IV: BIOGRAPHICAL OBJECTS AND HISTORICAL NARRATIVE: with Susan Berry, Curator, Ethnology; Apr 9 • WESTERN THREADS: Contemporary Fibre Art, wall art, whimsical dolls, colourful quilts, stunning wearable art and pictorial rugs; Apr 12-Aug 4

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • BENEATH THE SUN: Paintings by Richard Tosczak • Until Mar 29

SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta PrintArtists, 10123-121 St • 780.423.1492 • snapartists. com • Main Gallery: AMPLITUDES: Printworks by Robert Truszkowski • Until Apr 12 • Community Gallery: CITY IN A WAFFLE IRON: Printworks by Eva Schneider; until Apr 12

Bunk 7: By Larry Guno, readings • Mar 27, 5pm • Free; reserve seat at 780.420.1757, E: tix@tixonthesquare.ca Go Barley: Modern Recipes for an Ancient Grain; Apr 10, 5:30pm

KASBAR • 10444 82 Ave • Greg Bechtel, launch of Boundary Problems, with readers Candas Jane Dorsey, Timothy Anderson, Jasmina Odor, and Rebecca Frederickson, hosted by Mike Gravel • Sun, Mar 30, 7pm KOFFEE CAFÉ • 6120-28 Ave • Glass Door Coffee House Reading Series: With Hendrik Slegtenhorst (poet), Jay Lewis/Enochian, Writers in Exile/Borderlines Writers Group, Pushpa Raj Acharya, Rashmi Kumar, Kadrush Radogoshi, and Maitham Salman; open mic host/poet, Wendy Joy • Mar 27, 7-9pm THE LEGACY OF LIVING TOGETHER • CKuA Radio Bldg, 9804 Jasper Ave: BUNK 7: by Larry Guno,

residential school survivor: play reading, Elder Song and talk back by Porcupine Stone Productions; Mar 27, 5pm • CKuA Radio Bldg: A MUSTA BE: MASKIHKIY MASKWA ISKWEW: play reading and talk back by Jane Heather and Old Earth Productions; Mar 31, 7:30pm • Stanley Milner Library Theatre: Indigenous Writers Readings featuring Anne Marie Sewell, Naomi McIlwraith, Norma Dunning, Nola Nalugiak, Daniel Poitras, Doris Torangeau, and Marilyn Dumont. Music by Cris Derksen, and contemporary dance, Native Girl Syndrome, choreographed by Lara Kramer; Apr 1, 6:30pm • All events free; preregister at TIX on the Square

NAKED CYBER CAFÉ • 10303-1008 St • The Spoken Word: Featuring writers and an open mic for performances for short stories, book excerpts, poems • 1st Wed ea month ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • 780.902.5900 • Spoken Word Tuesdays: Weekly spoken word night presented by the Breath In Poetry Collective (BIP); info: E: breathinpoetry@gmail.com

STRATHCONA COUNTY LIBRARY • 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • 780.410.8601 • sclibrary. ab.ca • Point Of View Wrestling Match: Omniscient Vs. Third Person: Writer-in-residence Margaret Macpherson experimental writing exercises to learn how to figure out which point of view works best for which text • Pre-register at the library, or at sclibrary.ab.ca, or at 780.410.8600 • Thu, Mar 27, 7-8:30pm • Free

STRATHCONA COUNTY LIBRARY • 401 Festival

STRATHCONA COUNTY ART GALLERY@501

Lane, Sherwood Park • 780.410.8601 • sclibrary. ab.ca • Using four different artistic mediums – words, paint, voice and clay; with writer-in-residence, Margaret Macpherson

• 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • DUALITY IN A DIAPHANOUS LANDSCAPE: Works by Local glass artist Manola Borrajo; until Apr 27

TAVERN ON WHYTE • Chris Craddock launch of Public Speaking and Other Plays • Apr 7, 7pm UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA • Telus Bldg, Rm 134 •

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

UPPER CRUST CAFÉ • 10909-86 Ave • 780.422.8174 • strollofpoets.com • The Poets’ Haven Reading Series: Every Mon, presented by the Stroll of Poets Society • $5 (door)

THE 11 O'CLOCK NUMBER • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • varsconatheatre.com • An Improvised Theatre: song, dance, and comedy presented by Grindstone Theatre • Every Fri • Mar 28, Apr 4, 11

THE BARD’S BEST BITS • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • The words and the wackiness of William Shakespeare presented by Shadow Theatre hosted by John Hudson and David Belke • Sun, Mar 30, 7:30pm • $25 at TIX on the Square. Shadow Theatre box office BLOOD WEDDING • Timms Centre, 87 Ave, 112 St • By Federico Garcia Lorca, translation by Caridad Svich; presented by Studio Theatre • Mar 27-Apr 5, 7:30pm; no show Mar 30; matinee: Apr 3, 12:30pm • Evening: $11 (student)/$22 (adult)/$20 (senior); Matinee $11 (student)/$17 (adult)/$15 (senior); $5 (preview); 2-for-1 Mondays BONFIRE! FESTIVAL • Citadel Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre presents experimental long-form improv • Apr 8-12 • $10 (weekdays)/$12 (weekends)/$25 (festival pass)

CHIMPROV • Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • Every Sat, 10pm, until Jul • $12 (door or buy in adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun, 2014 DIE-NASTY • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • varsconatheatre.com • Live improvised soap opera • Runs Every Mon, 7:30pm • Until May 26

DEATH TRAP • Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615 109 Ave • mayfieldtheatre.ca • Broadway thriller, with a skillful blend of suspense and humor • Until Apr 6 • Tickets at 780.483.4051

HEY LADIES! • Roxy, 10708-124 St • 780.453.2440 • attheroxy.com • Theatre Network • The Roxy Performance Series: Womanly talkshow/gameshow/ varietyshow/sideshow starring Davina Stewart, Cathleen Rootsaert, Leona Brausen • Mar 28, 8pm • $25 at TIX on the Square THE INVENTION OF ROMANCE • La Cité Francophone, 8627-91 St • Workshop West Theatre, by Conni Massing, starring Lora Brovold, Mat Busby and Valerie Ann Pearson • Mar 28-Apr 13 • $28 (evening)/($22 (student/senior)/$14 (Sun matinees)/$11 (student/senior) at Workshop West Theatre box office THE LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA • Theatre Lab, Room 189, 10045-155 St • macewan.ca/theatrearts • By Craig Lucas, music and lyrics by Adam Guettel, directed by Farren Timoteo. Presented by MacEwan Theatre arts • Until Apr 6 • $21.75/$16.75 (adv student/senior) at TIX on the Square; $25/$20 (door, student/senior)

MARY POPPINS • Citadel Theatre • 780.425.1820 • Family Musical based on the stories of P.L. Travers and the Walt Disney Film • Until Apr 20

MUMP & SMOOT "ANYTHING" • The Roxy Theatre, 10708-124 St • Theatre Network–Live at The Roxy • World Premiere, created and performed by Michael Kennard and John Turner; directed by Karen Hines • Apr 8-27; Apr 8-9 (previews), 2-for-1 Tue, Apr 15, 22 • $23-$29 at 780.453.2440

NINO NINA SHOW • Expressionz Café • 780.450.6462 • Live monthly classic variety show • Last Sun each month, 5:30pm (door), 7:30pm (show) • $10 (door)

OVER THE EDGE WITH 4-PLAY • 780. 431.1750 • Arts Barn • Apr 11 • Tickets at TIX on the Square QUEEN LEAR • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • 780.434.5564 • By Eugene Strickland, presented by Shadow Theatre • An aging theatre actress recruits the assistance of an unruly teenage girl in a last ditch attempt to memorize her lines for an all female production of King Lear • Until Mar 30, Tue-Sat 7:30pm; Sat-Sun 2pm • $16 (Preview); $27 (Fri-Sat night opening)/$24 (student/senior, Fri-Sat night opening); $23 (Tue-Thu, Sun mat)/$21 (student/senior, Tue-Thu, Sun mat); adv tickets at TIX on the Square

SOLO STUDIES: TRANSLATIONS • C103, 8529-103 St • Punctuate! Theatre • By Entrelacement Dance, directed by Tatiana Cheladyn, featuring the work of seven different emerging Edmonton dancers • Mar 27-31, 7:30pm • $20/$15 (student/senior/industry) at TIX on the Square, door THEATRESPORTS • Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30pm and 10pm • Until June • $12/$10 (member) at TIX on the Square

THE VIP KIDS SHOW • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • 780.433.3399 • Music, comedy, art, puppets, and special guests! Watch as the V.I.P. troupe of zany scharacters celebrate the thin line between clever and silly with Kate Ryan, Davina Stewart, Donovan Workun, Dana Andersen, Cathy Derkach and friends • Apr 6, 11am • All Seats $6


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J

ulie Andrews, eat your heart out. With no disrespect to fans of the original Disney movie, Blythe Wilson is every bit as memorable in Citadel Theatre's production of Mary Poppins as Andrews was in that iconic 1964 film. In this vibrant, engrossing production, Wilson fleshes out Mary as a commanding yet still kind-hearted presence who descends upon Cherry Tree Lane carried by the wind and her parrotheaded umbrella. Once there she proceeds to make right everything that has been going wrong in the life of the Banks family, starting with the impertinent youngsters, Jane (Zasha Rabie) and Michael (Jack Forestier). And it's sure fun to watch her accomplish this task. If this particular production, a slightly edited version of the original 2004 musical, is indicative of the others, then its popularity and rampant success on Broadway and across the globe is wholly unsurprising. With

Until Sun, April 20 (7:30 pm) Directed by Michael Shamata Citadel Theatre, $35 – $109.20

vibrant musical numbers, a jubilant cast and plenty of theatrical magic, Poppins is very easy to like. For the Citadel production, Cory Sincennes has once again crafted a brilliant set design: the stage is almost fully encompassed by a circular rotating platform that renders scene transitions seamless. The set itself is richly textured and ultra-realistic, from the wroughtiron gates lining Cherry Tree Lane to the weathered brick walls and cozy, midtwentieth-century British rooms. Undoubtedly, many audience members came out debating exactly what type of creature Mary is: probably most would agree she's a witch (by modern definitions of the term), albeit a benevolent one. I hesitate to apply that or any other label here, simply because it's unnecessary; what Mary Poppins may or may not be is wholly second-

ary to the why of her: she's there to restore family bonds. (Ok, and maybe also to break the heart of a rakish chimney sweep, the ever-charming Bert, played by Andrew MacDonald-Smith.) Lucky for the audience, watching Mary go about this business is highly entertaining, and fleshed out by a wonderful set of stage tricks: pulling coat racks and potted plants out of a bottomless handbag, fixing a wrecked kitchen, bringing dolls to life, scaring off cruel nannies with a flash of fire, and simply soaring off into the sky, umbrella aloft. The performance is almost flawlessly executed, save a couple small missed cues; hardly noticeable given the delightful, rambunctious musical numbers and pitch-perfect vocal talents. Practically perfect, indeed.

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TRANSLATIONS

<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

gular choreographies from a list of starter terms Cheladyn had given them. This version of the show has them working in groups, too, as well as creating transitional pieces to give it more of a full-show feel. Studies' revamped presentation is under the banner of Cheladyn's Entrelacement Dance, a relatively new company on the scene, which in turn is being given a stage as part of the emerging Punctuate! Theatre's season. The dancers involved are all new, too: the potential future of the local scene, being given a chance to hone their abilities in front of an audience. "Most of the dancers are emerging: they're all between the ages of 17 and 19," Cheladyn says. "I guided them through with these words, but most of what they came up with is their own; I just led the process."

2013 - 2014 SEASON

JAMES EHNES, VIOLIN ANDREW ARMSTRONG, PIANO WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 2014, 8 PM MCDOUGALL CHURCH 10025 – 101 ST. | EDMONTON, AB TICKETS FROM TIX ON THE SQUARE, THE GRAMOPHONE AND AT THE DOOR.

ADULTS: $50 | SENIORS (65+): $40 | STUDENTS: $20 FOR PROGRAM DETAILS, VISIT

PAUL BLINOV

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PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

ARTS 13


DISH EDITOR : MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

// Lone Acacia Photography

COVER // URBAN FARM

DISH

T

here is no doubt the culture of food is constantly evolving in Edmonton. Consumers

are increasingly vigilant about what they are putting in their bodies and sourcing food locally is becoming the norm, a notion reflected on an individual and commercial level. With this comes the increasing prevalence of urban agriculture, and while Edmonton is not on the scale of other Canadian cities like Vancouver, which allows chickens and bees to be kept in backyards—something many Edmontonians hope to see in the future—the city is beginning to see a growing network of urban farms and community gardens to complement its numerous markets and consumer philosophy along with the continued work of Fresh, Edmonton's Food & Urban Agriculture Strategy and the Edmonton Food Council. The newest farm to pop up within city limits is Reclaim Urban Farm, a business founded by Ryan Mason and Cathryn Sprague, students at the University of Alberta in the midst of master's degrees in environmental sociology. The pair met last year and have been working on their respective thesis in the same department, with Mason's research focusing on understanding the interconnection between gender, food and food security in Tazania, while Sprague is focused on community involvement in food and agriculture on a local level.

14 DISH

Reclaim Urban Farm Ryan Mason: 780.803.2381 Cathryn Sprague: 780.239.0398 reclaimurbanfarm@gmail.com reclaimurbanfarm.com "We're both doing a lot of theoretical work around food and food security, whether it's international, domestic or local, and when we tried to find ways to apply our knowledge and our research that we've done and all the education we've gained, this seemed like a perfect opportunity to be both applying theory but also practising improved agriculture and food systems," Mason says of Reclaim, which began to take shape in the fall of 2013. "It's about seeing how urban spaces can be transformed into not only beautiful spaces to grow food, but also how much food you can grow within the city limits of Edmonton," Sprague notes, adding that on a personal level it allows

Illustration // Erin Greenough

Urban farmers Ryan Mason and Cathryn Sprague

her to get away from her computer, something she doesn't get to do often as a student. "We've both done a bit of travelling and seen, in Cuba, for instance, how much urban agriculture there is, and even in Japan, some of these cities have urban agriculture right in the middle of the city. You think of Japan with all of these skyscrapers, so I think there's a huge potential to show how much food can be produced." Reclaim focuses on taking unused spaces of land in the Whyte Avenue, Garneau, Strathcona,

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

Queen Alexandra, Bonnie Doon, King Edward Park and Pleasantview areas and reinventing them as fertile plots of land brimming with a lengthy roster of urban-friendly produce—items like greens, carrots, parsnips, small squash and herbs that don't take up space the way potatoes and grains do, which are best left to rural farms. The land is either vacant lots, front yards or backyards, and land owners are provided with fresh produce on a weekly basis in exchange for hosting a plot. AlterCONTINUED ON PAGE 16 >>


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DISH 15


DISH PROVENANCE

7th Annual

Banana Hammock Contest Tuesday, April 1st

about

microgreens Not to be confused

Microgreens are a variety of vegetable harvested for their visual and flavour appeal in dishes. Micro varieties aren't as big as "baby greens" and get harvested later than "sprouts," producing a flavour profile that ranges from sweet to spicy.

Small but mighty

Including the stem and leaves, microgreens can range in size from one to three inches. The greens have an average crop time of 10 to 14 days from planting to harvest, depending on the variety.

Relatively modern

Microgreens are increasingly common among fine-dining establishments, but they weren't noted in recipes until the '80s in San Francisco.

AMAZING

BEER

SELECTION IT’S IN THE BAG

16 DISH

Soil or alternatives like peat moss are idea for growing microgreens, which also require high light levels—preferably natural. Unlike sprouts, microgreens are planted with low-seed density and are ready to harvest one the leaves have fully expanded. Harvesting generally involves using scissors to cut the stem just above the soil surface, leaving the root behind. Microgreens must be grown properly in order to avoid the development of harmful pathogens.

Vitamin-packed veggies

Key nutrients in microgreens include ascorbic acid (vitamin C), beta-carotene (vitamin A precursor), phylloquinone (vitamin K) and tocopherols (vitamin E). V

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Loosely defined Sprouts and microgreens can be confused, and while there are no legal definitions for baby greens or micro-

greens, there are for sprouts. Sprouts are defined as germinated seeds and in most cases consumed as an entire plant, which means the roots, seed and shoot. Microgreen is widely considered a marketing term.

WHYTE AVE (82 AVE)

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014


Inset photos by Cathryn Sprague

SEEDS OF CHANGE

<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

natively, the land owner can choose to have the produce donated to a charity of their choice. "If we had to have a tag line or something like that, it's 'growing good food locally for the people in the community,'" Mason says, noting they have turned down offers on the perimeter of the city in order to keep the focus on the more densely populated Whyte Avenue area. "One of the reasons we wanted to stay local was because it's the community we both live and work in," Sprague adds. "We're going to be using our bikes for a lot of the transport between sites so that's why we're sticking close: to reduce our fuel consumption."

It's still early days for the farm, and the slowly dissipating snow has meant much of the produce is currently being grown indoors, but Reclaim has

TO THE PINT

approximately 15 plots slated for use during the upcoming season—which will run until September or October— on vacant lots and front or backyards, with its ostensible home base being situated at the St John's Institute. "They have two lots out back; two empty city lots, basically, that they are eventually going to build on, but for now there's nothing happening

with them, so they've just been sitting open," Sprague explains. "So we're using the land and in exchange we're going to give them some food to use in their kitchen because they host great Ukrainian pierogi suppers every month, and we'll also be providing a little bit of educational outreach with some of their youth camps, too." Sprague and Mason acknowledge se-

curing land—and permission from the city—was a simple task, as many of the land owners are individuals who do not have time to maintain a garden themselves but value the fresh produce that comes with it, or seniors who are no longer physically able to manage the upkeep themselves. "Our model is really focusing on community as well, so really being able to connect with the land owners and have a relationship with people who own the land as well," Mason notes, adding a shout out to the land owners, without whom Reclaim wouldn't exist. "Lots of the land owners have said, 'I'm interested in learning how to grow food,' so they'll be involved in some way, even if it's just coming and looking over our shoulder every once in a while. It creates immediate relationships and food connections." The duo is in the midst of getting farmers' market applications completed, but they will also be providing produce to local restaurants including Café Bicyclette, Vivo Ristorante and the Next Act, as well as the new space Kathryn Joel of Get Cooking is opening at Grant MacEwan this summer. "We've been blown away by how much interest there is in sourcing locally. Two of those four restaurants approached us through social media," Mason says. "So there's a movement that's still pushing for a lot of these things."

Reclaim Urban Farm is not certified

organic since Sprague and Mason do not own the land, but their practices are comparable to that of an organic farm. They install rain barrels wherever possible to cut down on water use, do not use harmful chemicals or pesticides, use reclaimed materials

whenever possible for building purposes and source seeds from their own produce each year. If they have to purchase seeds from outside sources, they come from companies who sell non-GM seeds and have taken the Safe Seed Pledge. Mason and Sprague also make their own compost using a technique called vermicomposting. The process involves using their resident pet worms in boxes or Rubbermaid tubs fitted with air holes that are layered with soil, newspaper and vegetable scraps that are added on a weekly basis. "They (the worms) eat it very quickly and it just turns into the most beautiful compost," Sprague says. "It's a nice way to compost year-round. It doesn't smell at all as long as you cover up the scraps with newspaper. I have friends who do it in their apartments, just in their kitchen." Mason adds that the ideal situation would be to produce all of Reclaim's compost themselves, potentially sourcing food scraps from local restaurants, but for now, they're making use of city compost to fill the gaps. "Which is kind of cool, because people eat here, they throw away some of their food scraps and it gets turned into compost and we're using it again to grow food right from the city," Sprague adds. Mason and Sprague are still on the lookout for new land to use, specifically vacant lots up to 2000 square feet. If you want to get your hands dirty, keep an eye out for upcoming work sessions via social media—you never know, urban agriculture might just be your thing.

MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

JASON FOSTER // JASON@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The Dragon defies capture

Elysian Brewing creates a beast that rebels against categorization A little over two years ago, a long- quick game of eeny-meeny-miny-mo I standing Seattle landmark made the chose Dragonstooth for review. jump to broader production, and the beer drinkers of Alberta are among The labelling says it is an oatmeal those who benefit. Elysian Brewing stout, but it defies easy classification. opened in 1995 Its 7.5-percent alcoas a brew pub, Dragonstooth Stout hol content is bigquickly expanding Elysian Brewing, Seattle, ger than a regular to three locations Washington stout, and many around Seattle. It $7.70 for 650-ml bottle classify it as a forsoon developed eign stout, which is a reputation for a sweeter, fruitier interesting, creative beer interpreta- version of the style. Yet, I am not contions. Alas, only the good people of vinced, so I try it for myself. Seattle could taste it for themselves. As expected, it pours a deep, opaque However, Elysian opened a full- black with a dark tan, ominous head. fledged production facility in 2011, The foam forms medium-sized bubmeaning that for the first time they bles but finds a way to create a concould ship their beer around the sistent blanket. The aroma has strong northwest US. The first shipments hints of molasses, licorice and dark started arriving in our humble prov- sugar, with a deep roast edge and a ince a few months ago and Albertans hint of edgy tartness. The latter ingot their first direct taste of this re- trigues me. nowned brewer. In the tasting, I find the front has A handful of Elysian's beer have some dark-brown sugar, molasses and crossed the border, but their two a general sweetness. The middle promost well-known beer are Immortal vides dark rum and the roastiness beIPA and Dragonstooth Stout. After a gins to rise, with the character of dark

coffee and burnt almond. The roast sticks around into the finish but becomes paired with a slight woody, soft graininess and a touch of grassy hops. Molasses works its way back into the picture and the result is a moderately sweet, yet hop-accented finish. The body is quite smooth and silky—a product of the oats, no doubt. The linger is a bit like someone added molasses to my morning coffee. An accent of smokiness is also present. That tartness in the aroma doesn't really present itself in the flavour. To my mind this beer defies easy categorization. It is bold and full bodied. It is not fruity enough for a foreign stout, not big enough for an imperial stout and too assertive for a traditional oatmeal stout. It seems to fall somewhere in between all of them. A really big oatmeal stout probably describes it best. But maybe I should just say it is really, really good. V Jason Foster is the creator of onbeer.org, a website devoted to news and views on beer from the prairies and beyond.

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

DISH 17


FILM

FILM EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // DRAMA

Like Father, Like Son a sensitive, wise study in contrasts

Well, if dad's doing it ...

A

t the heart of Hirokazu Kore-eda's Like Father, Like Son is a study in contrasts. On one side we have the upper-middle-class Nonomiya family. Father, mother and well-behaved six-year-old boy reside in a spacious apartment in a modern high-rise, every room immaculate in its tastefulness; whether donning business or casual attire, they all dress well, if blandly; when first we see them they're being interviewed for a highend school, and even the manner in which they're seated, postures erect, with just the right distance separating their chairs, exudes order and exactitude. Nonomiya patriarch Ryota (Masaharu Fukuyama) works hard, rarely takes a day off, and seems the pride of his company. The Saikis, meanwhile, mother, father and three kids, live in a set of

cramped, cluttered rooms attached humble, subtle, even somber and to their modest suburban appliance overwhelmingly favour symmetry. In store. Yudai (Rirî Furankî) seems the case of Like Father, Like Son, this perpetually disheveled, wears gar- symmetry is heightened by the use ish pattern combinations, is openly of Glenn Gould's Goldberg Variations thrifty, unabashed about looking for and other piano pieces that at times a handout and happy to avoid work. have the unfortunate effect of levelHis motto: "Put off for tomorrow ing the film's emotional spectrum. It whatever you can." The upshot is is to their enormous advantage that that he's more amiable than Ryota, several of these films, which have spends more time with his family regularly focused on families, feature and seems able to adorable, fascinatFri, Apr 4 – Sun, Apr 13 fix anything. ing, expressive children, which If directorial style Directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda either Japan has a is anything to go Metro Cinema at the Garneau on, Kore-eda clear-  surplus of or Korely relates more to eda and his casting directors have an Ryota—though he might envy Yudai. Kore-eda's films, exceptional knack for tracking down. which include After Life (1998), Nobody Knows (2004) and Still Walk- Children bring life and merry dising (2008), are clean, intelligent yet order to Kore-eda's films, and Like

Father, Like Son concerns the fates of two children: Keita (Keita Ninomiya), the Nonomiyas' boy, and Ryusei (Shogen Hwang), the Saikis'. The film begins with the belated discovery that Keita and Ryusei were switched at birth, and the central dilemma is about whether the families should swap the kids or leave them with the families who've raised them so far. From the instant resentment that Ryota feels toward his wife when the truth comes out to her growing guilt over dividing her love between two boys to the peculiar ways in which the boys adapt to their changing living arrangements, there's so much in Like Father, Like Son, in all its characterizations and individual journeys, that is observant, sensitive and wise. But the film's protagonist, the one whose capacity for change will deter-

streets, or as wild as a troupe of mimes woman in a park. The woman (Vanessa can get, anyway. We see these merry- Redgrave) demands the negatives. The making mimes flood into frame at photographer tells her she has to wait Blowup's beginning and at its end, when as he has other things on the roll. Eventhey enjoy a tennis match sans ball or tually the photographer develops the film, makes prints rackets, serving as of the images taken a reminder that Fri, Mar 28 – Wed, Apr 2 in the park, and, as the visible world Directed by Michelangelo is riddled with il- Antonioni he takes photos of lusion. Is seeing Metro Cinema at the Garneau the photos, enlarging one detail until believing, or is the Originally released: 1966 reverse true? Is a it becomes clearer and then more abphotograph a way of obscuring reality or does it reveal stract, he comes to believe that he's a reality we'd otherwise never see? photographed a crime. The script was put together by AntoThese questions haunt Blowup—and, as with L'avventura (1960), last week's nioni and Tonino Guerra, but a promiAntonioni, they're questions that will nent credit is given to a story, alternately remain dutifully unresolved. translated as "Blowup" or "The Devil's An unnamed photographer (David Drool," by the great Argentine author Hennings) takes photos of a man and a Julio Cortázar. It's a generous credit, in

that what happens in Blowup echoes its source material only in essence; its characters, setting and situation are very different. But Antonioni was an artist who appreciated just how rare a truly perfect idea is—and the idea of Cortázar's story is so good it inspired at least two more excellent movies, Coppola's The Conversation (1974) and Brian De Palma's Blow Out (1981), though both cleverly trade photography for sound recording.

mine the story's outcome, is Ryota. I won't be so presumptuous as to say that Ryota is a stand-in for Kore-eda, but I like the fact that Kore-eda is willing to invest so much in his film's least likeable character. The premise is sensational, but the execution is anything but. At times I found Kore-eda's pacing too deliberate; admirable, dutiful and a little dull. But the Saikis come along often enough to throw everything a little off-kilter, and while Kore-eda refrains from sentimentality or facile resolution, he understands what emotional pay-off will come from Ryota's gradual realization that he might be able to better his life by learning a thing or two from this family he quietly despises.

JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // ANTONIONI

Blowup T

his second film in Metro Cinema's retrospective of the films of Michelangelo Antonioni finds the Italian director at the peak of his renown, yet, rather than resting on his laurels, he was embracing all things new. Following the astonishing Red Desert (1964), Blowup (1966) was only his second film in colour, and every arresting hue feels precisely selected and shot-through with wonder. Blowup was Antonioni's first film in English, with dialogues written by playwright Edward Bond. Most notably, while Antonioni was already well into middleage, Blowup is immersed in the youth culture of its moment, its costumes colourful, scanty and modern, its London fully swinging, populated with the likes of Jane Birkin, Veruschka and the Yardbirds, and with kids running wild in the

18 FILM

It must be said that Blowup does nothing to counter Antonioni's tendency to put utterly unpleasant men at the centre of his films. Ostensibly based on photographer David Bailey, Blowup's protagonist is a prick, treating models in a way that alternately reads as sexual harassment or verbal abuse. Still, watching him work is fascinating, and

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

his lack of empathy, or rather, his overwhelming focus on his own creative work, drives the story forward in a way that a more sensitive and sociable protagonist wouldn't have managed. All he wants is the most compelling, most beautiful, most mysterious images possible, and if he has to disguise himself as a homeless person, scream at models or put himself in danger to get these images, so be it. Though on first glimpse Blowup seems locked in time, a closer examination reveals a timeless notion at its heart, something about truth and technology, and what happens when the world is broken down into frozen fragments. Which raises the question: where is the Blowup for our digital age? JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM


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Limited time 2.49% semi-monthly lease offer provided through Toyota Financial Services on approved credit, to qualified retail customers on all new 2014 Scion tC models. First semimonthly payment due at lease inception and next semi-monthly payment due approximately 15 days later and semi-monthly thereafter throughout the term. Toyota Financial Services will waive the final semi-monthly payment. Semi-monthly lease offers not open to employees of Toyota Canada, Toyota Financial Services or TMMC/TMMC Vehicle Purchase Plan. Some conditions apply. See your Toyota dealer for complete details. Example (applies across Canada, except Quebec): 2014 Scion tC 6-speed manual (JF5C7M) with a vehicle price of $22,650 (includes $500 Scion Canada Lease Assist, adjusted to reflect varying provincial tax rates, which is deducted from the negotiated selling price after taxes; $1,495 freight and PDI; and $100 air conditioning charge) leased at 2.49% over 60 months with $1,525 down payment or equivalent trade-in equals 120 semi-monthly payments of $125 with a cost of borrowing of $1,810 and a total obligation of $16,508. $0 security deposit and first semi-monthly payment due at lease inception. Price and total obligation exclude license, insurance, registration, fees and taxes. 100,000 km allowance for 60 months and a charge of $0.07/km for excess kilometres. Dealer may lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Offer subject to change or cancellation without notice. Vehicle may be shown with optional accessories.

SCI-TC020-N-10.indd 1

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

2014-03-10 11:17 AM

FILM 19


FILM ASPECTRATIO

JOSEF BRAUN // JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

This sort of movie

The borrowed fantasy feel of Ain't Them Bodies Saints

Love against the law

There are the movies you love, the movies you don't love, and the movies you can't help but feel irked by because they are trying so terribly hard to feel like the movies you love. Here is Bob (Casey Affleck) and Ruth (Rooney Mara) strolling through woods in the honey light. Ruth tells Bob she's pregnant with his child. In the next scene she's driving the getaway car while he and his partner perform a robbery. But they don't get away. They're surrounded by police in some isolated shack. The partner's shot dead and Ruth wounds a deputy (Ben Foster). Bob tells Ruth to play it like she was his captive and then he surrenders. Years pass, and Bob, who took the rap for the robbery and for shooting the deputy, goes to jail, and Ruth has the baby. Ruth gets letters from Bob, which we hear in voice-over, full of flat vernacular and charmingly naive musings. We see the letters too, and notice that Bob and Ruth have the same twiggy printing. Then Bob busts out of prison. We see him climb out of a swamp and cross a Missouri country road in his bare feet. He'll find his way

20 FILM

to a friend's tavern, which is so lovingly stripped of any item that might allude to commerce or modernity that it might as well be Havana. Bob's coming to get Ruth so he can be with her and the daughter he's yet to meet. But he'll need to evade cops and the thugs hired by old Skerritt (Keith Carradine), who has taken it upon himself to become Ruth's protector, while that injured deputy keeps coming around Ruth's place, always polite, always with the cowboy hat, always somehow making it known that he might like to take Bob's place and offer Ruth another life. But none of this finally matters because Bob's a-coming. Did I mention this all happened in Texas? The opening title card tells us so, but I suspect you'd figure that out soon enough. Yep. Something about all this feels like someone's borrowed fantasy, though that feeling is not as pronounced as it is in, say, Beasts of the Southern Wild. David Lowery's Ain't Them Bodies Saints, which gained much attention at Sundance 2013 and is now avail-

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR 02, 2014

able on DVD and Blu-ray from IFC, has a great deal going for it, but man, is it ever self-consciously solemn, twilit, regional and in love with the worlds of Terrence Malick, without exhibiting much of Malick's intelligence, esthetic rigour, philosophical depth or personal touch. The music feels fussy, with its sustained strings and claps, while the sound design is oddly flattened, as artificial as the exteriors look pleasingly naturalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the interiors, however, are lit in many shades of beige and yellow and orange. The film makes you want to nit-pick, despite its gentle aura and many pleasures. A moustache puts a good 10 years on Foster, and Affleck is very effective in his inescapable weirdness. It would be easy to tell you to see Ain't Them Bodies Saints if you "like this sort of movie," but my problem with Ain't Them Bodies Saints is that it's very much like this sort of movie. I like it so much that I can't stop noticing how studied it feels, how much Lowery also likes this kind of movie, and how much he really wants us to know exactly what kind of movie he likes. V


wide version MÉTIS3.75” YOUTH SUMMER STUDENT 12345 PROGRAM REVUE // MUPPETS

If you’re a Métis youth between 15 – 30 years old, and going back to school this fall, Métis Training to Employment Services can give you the assistance you need to land that 12345 summer job where you can gain employable skills and the pay cheque you deserve.

Muppets Most Wanted

Funded in part by the Government of Canada.

Call 1-888-48-MÉTIS (1-888-486-3847) online at: www.metisemployment.ca

could put a song in the heart of their audience, if they could make adults feel like kids again. In the first Muppet Movie, the scene of Kermit singing "Rainbow Connection" was all that was needed to keep a whole generation coming back for decades on end.

E

ver since 1979's inaugural film the line between kid movies and adaptation of Jim grown-up movies. But for Muppets Henson's hit TV va- Now playing Most Wanted riety puppet show, Directed by James Bobin Wanted, the Muppet movies have  most self-evident rebecome something view was the noticeof an institution, able lack of laughter adored by parents and children alike. during the advance screening, for the Of course, as time goes on, the origi- simple reason that this film doesn't nal voices and creative personalities have very many "funny parts" in it— behind the timeless characters must and for kids and grown-ups alike, pass away and be replaced by new that's a bit of a deal breaker. voices and new personalities. It's To be fair, the Muppets have always 2014 after all, and not 1979. But one been about more than self-aware measure of consistency between gen- Vaudeville jokes and sight gags with erations is that audiences still expect funny looking puppets. Jim Henson an entertaining 90 minutes from this knew too well that audiences would or any other franchise. The Muppets only keep coming back if these lifehave always successfully straddled less felt dolls seemed real, if they

These latest two films—Muppets Most Wanted, and Jason Segel's 2011 reboot—give every impression that they were made by people who know neither how to capture the magic of childhood, nor how to pen a sincere musical number. Most Wanted's script spends most of its time on the criminal Kermit doppelganger and his sidekick (a capable Ricky Gervais), whose evil plan to send Kermit to the Gulag, covertly steal a series of precious artifacts from European museums, and frame the Muppets for the crimes, leaves us wondering if these writers had ever seen a Muppet movie before. The ham-fisted attempts at emotion between characters feels forced, and the songs sound like self-aware, ironic, joke songs. Times change, but without heart, this film loses track of the difference between a Muppet movie and a movie about a bunch of dumb puppets.

3.75” wide version

MÉTIS YOUTH SUMMER STUDENT PROGRAM 12345

If you’re a Métis youth between 15 - 30 years old, and going back to school this fall, Métis Training to Employment Services can give you the assistance you need to land that summer job where you can gain employable skills and the pay cheque you deserve.

Funded in part by the Government of Canada.

Call 1-888-48-MÉTIS (1-888-486-3847) online at: www.metisemployment.ca

“Grade:

– Owen Gleiberman,

“A

TOUR DE FORCE!” – Peter Travers,

HHHH

½

BRILLIANT AND FUNNY!”

JAMES CUMING

JAMES@VUEWEEKLY.COM

– Richard Roeper,

“GREAT is the word! The

PREVUE // COEN BROS

FUNNIEST, SMARTEST, MOST ENTERTAINING COMEDY in a very long time.

Fargo

W

A-. HILARIOUS!”

e are in the wintry Midwest and that harken back to the region's Swedeven the spacing of the open- ish heritage, that begs to be taken for ing titles looks desolate. The swell of naive if not moronic by urban sophisCarter Burwell's score as a car makes it ticates. But Margie, who doesn't even over a rise in a blizzard briefly invokes enter the film until it's a third over, the western—later on certain tran- proves herself a well of humble intellisitional cues will echo Bernard Her- gence and know-how. She is a chipper, rmann's music for Taxi Driver (1976)— very pregnant, female Colombo, and but Fargo (1995) is very much a '90s near-impossible not to love. The rest of Fargo's personage are crime film, a semi-rural neo-noir where violence and humiliation are played for easy to loathe and, in keeping with noir laughs. Most crime films of the '90s fatalism, speak to some fundamental, seemed pitched as black comedies, so inescapable corruption at the core of it's no wonder that the Coen Brothers everything. Jerry Lundegaard (William cemented their prominence in that H Macy, a vivid, nuanced cartoon), a decade, collecting Academy Awards car salesman drowning in financial while prompting a critical backlash ruin of his own doing, arranges the that's never quite abated. It's been kidnapping of his own wife, Jean (Kristin Rudrüd), noted ad nauseam that Mon, Mar 31 (7 pm) by far the the Coens don't display Directed by Joel Coen film's crudthe appropriate amount of Metro Cinema at the Garneau est character, love for their characters, played mostly whatever that means, and as hysterical indeed Fargo often seems in the grips of a cruel hand, its motley but whose terror I find too awful to criminals mined for amusement while giggle at. Even Jerry's adolescent son dangling on the hook that'll ultimately understands how things can go horriflay them. But Fargo also has one of bly wrong—maybe he's been watching the most iconoclastic heroines in the Coen Brothers films? Jerry hears about movies. Like most of the film's small a pair of crooks named Carl Showalter town Minnesotans, Brainerd Police (Steve Buscemi, groomed as John WaChief Margie Olmstead-Gunderson ters if John Waters bought his clothes (Frances McDormand, brilliant and at flea markets) and Gaear Grimsrud totally at ease) speaks with sunny ami- (Peter Stormare, convincingly disafability and an accent or cadence, gen- fected) from Shep Proudfoot (Steve erously peppered with those "ya, ya"s Reevis, in a steely, explosive cameo),

a Native American mechanic with a fraught past. Carl is a babbling sociopath, while Gaear barely speaks, perhaps because he spends all of his time holding vigil for the first opportunity to kill an innocent bystander. What kind of idiot would trust these two with his wife? Greed and stupidity constitute the twin engines of Fargo, which is ostensibly based on a true story, though some of its narrative masterstrokes—the emergence of a man named Mike Yanagita, or an extensive conversation between two parkas—must surely the product of the skewed imaginations of the authors, Minnesotans both. Theirs is a cold and nasty world—no country for old men or pregnant women—in which people like Margie seem the minority. That final scene: Margie, who's just seen a man shoved into a wood chipper with a 2x4, who's two months away from giving birth, snuggles with Norm (John Carroll Lynch, endearingly sedated), whose painting has just been selected for a measly threecent stamp, and warmly urges him to look on the bright side of things. It's not exactly a happy ending, but in the Coens' filmography it's about as happy as things usually get. JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The entire cast is PERFECTION.” – Pete Hammond, Movieline

CRUDE COARSE LANGUAGE, SEXUAL CONTENT, NOT RECOMMENDED FOR CHILDREN

STARTS FRIDAY

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014 DATE: THURS MARCH 27 ARTIST: JR

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FILE NAME:

FILM 21

ONE_3X8_0327.1EV


FILM PREVUE // SCI-FI

Ikarie XB-1: Trio Latitude

Sat, Mar 29 (7 pm) Harcourt House Annex, $10

A robot in search of a soundtrack

D

“A RAMBUNCTIOUS CAPER

BURSTING AT THE SEAMS WITH QUICK WIT, FAMOUS FACES, AND WES ANDERSON’S PATENTED AESTHETIC DELIGHTS.” ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

RALPH FIENNES F. MURRAY ABRAHAM MATHIEU AMALRIC ADRIEN BRODY WILLEM DAFOE JEFF GOLDBLUM HARVEY KEITEL JUDE LAW BILL MURRAY EDWARD NORTON SAOIRSE RONAN JASON SCHWARTZMAN LÉA SEYDOUX TILDA SWINTON TOM WILKINSON OWEN WILSON introducing TONY REVOLORI

o you remember the film Ikarie XB-1? Don't worry if your memory is hazy—it's been a while. The Czech sci-fi flick was originally released in 1963 before being edited and dubbed for North American audiences under the title Voyage to the End of the Universe. But the original Czech iteration is about to be remounted in a silent screening with English subtitles and live musical accompaniment from Trio Latitude. The story is set in the year 2163 and the eponymous starship embarks on a 28-month journey to the mysterious "White Planet." The film follows the crew's adjustment to life in space and the obstacles it encounters, all while 15 years lapse back on Earth. Since its release, the film has been cited as a potential influence in Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey and a precursor for future space-themed films. "It's pretty wacky," says electroacoustic musician Sean Pinchbeck, who plays in Trio Latitude alongside Gary James Joynes and Scott Small-

wood. "It's kind of got this utopic vision of travelling in space. It'll be interesting because there's some different themes to work with and there's all this emotional tension between the people on the journey." The trio seldom has the opportunity to perform together due to each member's respectively busy schedules, but Pinchbeck is confident they will be able to compose a suitable score for the film, and have more creative freedom than they would if they were working under a director's vision. At the time of this interview, the group was in the early stages of its composition, with plans to watch the film together and spot it for scenes in which various sounds would be suitable. Pinchbeck imagines there will be an outline of where the composition will head, but there will be a great deal of room for improvisation as well, drawing on each musician's experience: Pinchbeck scores one or

two films per year and works extensively in sound design; Joynes, who is better known in electronic music circles as Clinker and Wind Rose, has been awarded for his frequency painting projects, which meld tones and visual elements; and Smallwood holds five different music degrees and is an assistant professor of composition at the U of A. "The earliest electronic music ended up in sci-fi movies, like Forbidden Planet was a big one where there's all this early theremin and early synthesizer sounds that kind of created a whole language of how sci-fi soundtracks are supposed to be and how we associate electronic sounds to sci-fi movies," Pinchbeck explains, noting there will be a homage of some sort to early sci-fi. "You can play with that; you can make it sound sci-fi and we're definitely going to be using old electronic equipment so then it lends itself to that sound." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // DYSTOPIA

Divergent O SEXUAL CONTENT, COARSE LANGUAGE

“ WES ANDERSON MAKES ‘ THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL’

A FOUR-STAR DELIGHT.” LOS ANGELES TIMES Kenneth Turan

NOW PLAYING!

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CINEPLEX ENTERTAINMENT

WINDERMERE

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WINDERMERE V.I.P.

Check theatre directory or go to www.tribute.ca for showtimes

AIM_VUE_MAR27_QTR_HOTEL 22 FILM Allied Integrated Marketing • EDMONTON VUE •

ne day, perhaps, there'll be a factions with SAT-wordy titles (Abmovie-based-on-the-young- negation, Amity, Candor, Dauntless, adult-novel that's mature beyond its Erudite), her peers only acting cool years, rising beyond its hornymoans or brazen, Woodley does single-handand arcing beyond mere addled ado- edly make two scenes stand out—a lescent angst to transcend the genre. moment of stabbing grief and a showThat doesn't, in other words, bold- down she turns around by gambling face the YA in yawn. Divergent, adapt- on, yep, the truth of love. ing the first book in Veronica Roth's trilogy, isn't it. Instead, this dystopia Because of course Tris, joining the flick offers a pseudo-allegory for fearless, fighting Dauntless, meets teenagehood—feeling you don't fit her match in Four (Theo James), a in, ie "divergence"—an all-too-predict- hunk who tenderly touches her hair, able plot, a bland setlooks out for her, and ting, and pat romance. Now playing believes in her at just So the movie itself Directed by Neil Burger the right moments. conforms to today's  (And there are the alt-world teen-film requisite romantic cliformula. chés, ie "I'm not going Tris (Shailene Woodley) is feistier, to let that happen" or "I don't want to quicker-witted, and more take-no- go too fast.") Beyond this tried-andnonsense than, say, Twilight's simper- trite relationship, the post-apocalyping Bella. And, caught in a glum, post- tic world seems like boot camp meets war Chicago of glass buildings and college frat houses. The factionalindustrial spaces, populated by five ism's meant to keep peace (paradox

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

alert), but the cocky, elitist Erudites are soon plotting against the altruistic Abnegators. The title metaphor for difference remains obvious and undeveloped, though the climax of the Erudites' conformity scheme, led by icy blonde Jeanine (Kate Winslet), is a chilling echo of the Nazis clearing out Jewish ghettos. Divergent also fails to play smartly with Tris' mind tests (she's faced with imagined fears). It could've gone two Inception nesting-dream-dolls deep to reveal the finale as another, longer endurance test for Tris' psyche, divulging more of her inner resolve and exploding the clichés of the genre (heroine leaves parents behind, gets the guy, saves the day). But that would mean diverging too much from its unoriginal source and not making room for that most conformist move of all—a sequel.

BRIAN GIBSON

BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


FILM

WEEKLY

Fri, Mar 28-Thu, Apr 2, 2014

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE-THU 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:35; Mon 1:15, 4:10, 7:30, 10:35

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (G) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video SAT-THU 12:50; 3D : FRI 4:15, 7:00, 9:30; SAT-WED 3:35, 6:15, 9:00; THU 3:35, 6:15

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE (18A gory brutal violence) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital SAT-SUN 3:15

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (G) Closed Captioned

DIVERGENT (PG violence) Closed Caption & Descriptive

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG violence,

FRI, SUN-THU 11:50, 1:20; SAT 11:00, 11:50, 1:20; 3D : Closed Captioned FRI-WED 3:40, 6:30, 8:50; THU 3:40, 6:15, 8:30

DIVERGENT (PG violence) No Passes FRI-WED 1:00,

4:10, 7:20, 10:30; THU 1:00, 4:10, 7:20; Closed Captioned FRI-WED 12:00, 2:10, 3:10, 5:20, 6:10, 8:30, 9:10; THU 12:00, 2:10, 3:10, 5:20, 6:10, 9:10, 10:40

GRAPES OF WRATH (STC, 1940) Thu, Mar 27 7:30 pm

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI-TUE 12:10, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20; WED 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; THU 12:25, 3:30, 6:45, 8:30, 9:50; FRI-TUE 12:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; WED 12:10, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20; THU 1:15, 4:15; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00

BONNIE AND CLYDE (M) 1967; Apr 3, 7:30

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) Closed Captioned DAILY

CAPITOL THEATRE–Fort Edmonton Fort Edmonton Park, fortedmontonpark.ca

BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID (STC,

1969) Thu, Apr 10

CHABA THEATRE–JASPER 6094 Connaught Dr Jasper, 780.852.4749

DIVERGENT (PG violence) FRI-SAT 6:50, 9:20 ;SUN-THU 8:00 NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended for young children) FRI-SAT 6:50, 9:20; SUN-THU 8:00

SUPER SAVER TUESDAYS: Film Club's CAS AND

DYLAN: Apr 3, 6:00

11:45, 1:10, 2:20, 3:50, 5:00, 6:40, 7:45, 9:15, 10:25

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) Closed

Captioned FRI-SAT, MON-THU 1:50, 4:20, 7:00, 9:30; SUN 4:45, 7:15, 9:55

BOLSHOI BALLET: MARCO SPADA (classification not available) SUN 12:55

BAD WORDS (14A crude coarse language, sexual con-

tent, not recommended for children) Closed Captioned FRI-TUE, THU 1:40, 3:55, 6:05, 8:20, 10:40; WED 3:55, 6:05, 8:20, 10:40; Star & Strollers : WED 1:00

6601-48 Ave Camrose, 780.608.2144

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young children) DAILY 6:30, 9:20; SAT-SUN 1:30

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) DAIILY 6:50, 9:10;

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content,

coarse language) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI, SUNTHU 12:15, 2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10; SAT 11:10, 12:15,

MONSTERS VS. ALIENS (G) SAT 11:00 CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 1525-99 St 780.436.8585

FROZEN (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SAT, MON-THU 12:55;

SAT-SUN 1:50

Sun 12:50

DIVERGENT (PG violence) DAILY 6:40, 9:25; SAT-SUN

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE 3D (18A gory brutal vio-

1:40

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young

children) DAILY 7:05, 9:35; SAT-SUN 2:05

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G) DAILY 7:00; SAT-SUN 2:00

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE (18A gory brutal

violence) DAILY 9:00

lence) Closed Captioned FRI-SAT 12:25, 3:05, 5:40, 8:20, 10:45; SUN 12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:50, 10:15; MON-THU 2:15, 4:40, 7:35, 10:00

violence, not rec for young children) Midnight Movie Marathon

SUN 1:15, 4:15; 3D : FRI-SAT 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:40; SUN 7:05, 10:00; MON-THU 1:15, 4:20, 7:15, 10:10

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G)

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (G) Closed Captioned

language, violence) Midnight Movie Marathon

CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 5074-130 Ave 780.472.9779

WALKING WITH DINOSAURS (PG) Closed Cap-

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended

THE NUT JOB (G) DAILY 1:30; 3D : DAILY 4:10,

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 11:40,

2:20; 3D : FRI-WED 4:50, 7:20, 9:55; THU 4:50, 6:40

mended for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dts Stereo FRI, SUN, TUE 12:00, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00; SAT 12:20, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00; MON, WED 3:00, 6:30, 9:45; THU 3:00, 6:30

BAD WORDS (14A crude coarse language, sexual content, not recommended for children) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dts Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 12:50, 3:45, 7:20, 10:10; MON, WED-THU 3:45, 7:20, 9:55 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D

Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo FRISUN, TUE 3:50; MON, WED-THU 3:40; 3D : FRI-SUN, TUE 1:00, 7:30, 10:15; MON, WED-THU 7:15, 10:00

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) Closed Captioned, Digital

Presentation, Dolby Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 12:10, 3:15;

MON, WED-THU 3:30

Presentation, Dolby Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 6:30, 9:15;

MON, WED-THU 6:25, 9:20

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) No Passes Closed Cap-

DAILY 12:00, 2:30; 3D : DAILY 5:10, 7:40, 10:10

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, No Passes DAILY 12:20, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00 THE MONUMENTS MEN (PG) Closed Captioned DAILY 12:40, 3:35, 6:30, 9:25

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45, 10:30

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) Closed Captioned DAILY 11:35, 2:10, 4:45, 7:30, 10:05 MONSTERS VS. ALIENS (G) SAT 11:00 GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.458.9822

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G) DAILY 1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 8:55

FROZEN (G) DAILY 12:45 2:55 5:05 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE 3D (18A gory brutal violence) Reald 3d; no passes DAILY 9:10 THE LEGO MOVIE 3D (G) DAILY 1:10 3:10 5:10 7:05

METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212

SUN 4:00, 9:15; TUE 9:15; WED 7:00

BLOW-UP (M) Antonioni in the Sixties FRI 9:15; SUN

SLINT: BREADCRUMB TRAIL (STC) Music Docs: TUE 7:00; with live music by Electricity for Everybody, music at 6:30

3D: Digital 3d, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI 6:55, 9:15; SATTHU 12:30, 6:55, 9:15

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)

FESTIVAL OF (IN)APPROPRIATION #6 (PG violence,

subject matter) THU 9:15

LANDMARK 7–SPRUCE GROVE 130 Century Crossing, Spruce Grove 780.962.2332

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) Digital FRI 6:00; SAT-SUN 12:50, 3:10, 6:00; MON-WED 3:10, 6:00; THU 12:50, 3:10, 6:10

THE NUT JOB (G) Toonie Matinee MON-WED 12:50; THU 12:45, 3:00

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE (18A gory brutal violence)

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) Closed Captioned,

STALINGRAD (14A violence) DAILY 6:50, 9:30

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content, coarse language) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI 12:30, 3:00, 5:25, 8:05, 10:30; SAT 12:30, 2:55, 5:25, 8:05, 10:30; SUN 11:55, 2:25, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45; MON-THU 2:10, 4:55, 7:30, 9:55

3D: Closed Captioned, Digital 3d, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI 6:35, 9:35; SAT-THU 12:25, 6:35, 9:35

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) Digital FRI 6:10, 8:50; SAT-WED 12:45, 3:15, 6:10, 8:50; THU 8:30

MARRIAGE DA GARRIAGE (STC) Punjabi W/E.S.T.

MONSTERS VS. ALIENS (G) SAT 11:00

DIVERGENT (PG violence) Closed Captioned, Digital

14231-137 Ave 780.732.2236

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE 3D (18A gory brutal

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE 3D (18A gory brutal violence)

violence) Closed Captioned FRI-WED 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:40; THU 1:45, 4:15, 7:05, 10:20

FRI 4:10, 7:00, 9:40; SAT 12:40, 3:10, 5:40, 8:15, 10:45; SUN-THU 12:40, 3:10, 5:45, 8:15

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG

mended for young children) ULTRAAVX: DAILY 1:00, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30

NOAH THE IMAX EXPERIENCE (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended for young children)

FRI-WED 12:20, 3:30, 6:40, 9:45; THU 12:20, 3:30

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 11:55, 2:35, 5:15, 7:55, 10:35

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) Closed Captioned FRI-TUE, THU 1:50, 4:40, 7:40, 10:25; WED 1:50, 4:40, 7:40, 10:25 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: WAR HORSE–ENCORE (classification not available) WED 6:30

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE–IMAX 11211-142 St, 780.452.9100; telusworldofscienceedmonton.com

JERUSALEM 3D (G) FRI-SAT 11am, 2:10, 3:20, 6:50,

3:05 5:15 7:25 9:30

HER (14A coarse language, sexual content, mature

SON OF GOD (14A brutal violence) Closed Captioned

Cineplex Odeon Windermere, Vip Cinemas, 6151 Currents Dr, 780.822.4250

3:10, 9:50

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recom-

DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU, MAR 27

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) Closed

KAUM DE HEERE (14A) Punjabi W/E.S.T. DAILY 1:20,

CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH

RIDE ALONG (PG violence, coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:30, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50; MON 12:40, 3:10, 10:15; Closed Captioned WED 12:40, 3:10, 10:15; THU 12:40,

6:55 9:35

not rec for young children) THU 7:00

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G)

CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS

FRI-TUE 12:30, 2:00, 3:40, 5:30, 6:50, 8:45, 10:00; WED 1:10, 4:20, 5:30, 7:30, 8:45, 10:45; THU 2:00, 5:30, 8:45; ULTRAAVX: FRI-TUE 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:45; WED 12:30, 3:40, 10:00; THU 1:10, 4:20; Star & Strollers : WED 1:00; THU 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) No passes DAILY 12:50

3d, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI 7:05, 9:30; Sat-Thu 12:05, 7:05, 9:30

3D: Closed Captioned, Digital 3d, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI, MON-THU 7:00, 9:35; SAT-SUN 12:30, 7:00, 9:35

DAILY 1:10, 3:55, 6:55, 9:45

DIVERGENT (PG violence) Closed Captioned, No Passes

8:00; SUN 11am, 2:10, 5:15, MON-WED 2:00, 3:10, 5:15, 6:30; THU 3:10, 5:15, 6:30

TO THE ARCTIC (G) FRI 12pm ROCKY MOUNTAIN EXPRESS (G) SAT-SUN 12pm;

GRAVITY 3D (PG, coarse language)

available) SUN 12:55

1:15, 4:15, 7:20, 9:35

NEED FOR SPEED (PG not rec for young children)

BORN TO BE WILD 3D (G) MON-THU 4:20

BOLSHOI BALLET: MARCO SPADA (classification not

PAGPAG (14A violence, frightening scenes) DAILY

tioned THU 1:20; 3D : FRI-WED 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 10:15; Closed Captioned THU 3:50, 6:30

FAVA GALA (STC) SAT 7:00

12 YEARS A SLAVE (14A brutal violence, disturbing content) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:05, 4:00, 6:50, 9:40

1:35, 4:40, 8:00

mended for young children) No Passes THU 8:00

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) FRI-WED 12:10; Closed Cap-

1:30, 7:00, w/60’s Vinyl Dance party at 6:00; MON 9:00; WED 9:00

Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 3:00; MON, WED-THU 3:05; 3D: FRI-SUN, TUE 12:30, 6:20, 9:00; MON, WED-THU 6:00, 8:30

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE (18A gory brutal violence)

FRI-SUN, THU 3:35, 6:45, 9:50; MON-TUE 3:40, 6:45, 9:50; WED 3:40, 9:20

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG violence, not recom-

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G) Closed Captioned,

THE LEGO MOVIE 3D (G) Closed Captioned, Digital

not available) WED 6:30

violence, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, No Passes THU 9:45; ULTRAAVX: THU 8:15

THE ROCKET (PG) Lao with English subtitles FRI 7:00;

4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600

BAD WORDS (14A crude coarse language, sexual

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG

Digital Presentation, Dts Stereo, Closed Captioned DAILY 4:00; 3D : Closed Captioned, Digital 3d, Dts Stereo FRISUN, TUE 12:40, 6:55, 9:55; MON, WED-THU 6:50, 9:50

LANDMARK CINEMAS 10 CLAREVIEW

(classification not available) SAT 10:55

violence) Closed Captioned FRI-WED 12:25, 3:00, 5:35, 8:10, 10:40; THU 12:25, 3:00, 5:35, 8:10, 10:40

DIVERGENT (PG violence) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI-WED 11:50, 12:30, 3:05, 3:45, 6:20, 7:00, 9:35, 10:15; THU 11:50, 12:30, 3:05, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15

Closed Captioned DAILY 1:00, 4:05, 7:10, 10:20

FARGO (14A) Metro Retro Coen Brothers: MON 7:00

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: RUSALKA–ENCORE

WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE 3D (18A gory brutal

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recom-

Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 12:20, 3:35, 6:50, 9:40; MON, WEDTHU 3:35, 6:40, 10:00

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)

4:30, 7:10, 9:40; SAT-SUN 7:10, 9:40; MON-WED 1:25, 3:55, 6:30, 9:25; THU 1:25, 3:55, 6:25, 9:25

SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (G) Closed Captioned DAILY 12:00, 2:25, 4:50; 3D : DAILY 12:50, 3:15, 5:40, 8:00, 10:20

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: WAR HORSE (classification

QUEEN (14A sexual content) Hindi W/E.S.T. DAILY

(PG violence, not recommended for young children) No passes THU 8:00, 9:30

PHILOMENA (PG language may offend) SAT-SUN 1:00

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (G) Closed Captioned

10200-102 Ave, 780.421.7018

Captioned DAILY 1:55, 4:25, 7:15, 9:55

4:05, 7:10, 9:50

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D

THE GREAT BEAUTY (14A nudity) FRI 6:40, 9:20; SATSUN 3:00, 6:40, 9:20; MON-THU 6:40, 9:20

DIVERGENT (PG violence) Digital Presentation, Dts

Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI, MON-THU 7:10, 9:45; SAT-SUN 12:25, 3:05, 7:10, 9:45

LABOR DAY (PG mature subject matter) Closed

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE 3D (18A gory brutal violence) DAILY 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25

coarse language) FRI 6:50, 9:10; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:15, 6:50, 9:10; MON-THU 6:50, 9:10

Closed Captioned DAILY 7:15, 10:10; 3D : DAILY 1:40, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45

LANDMARK CINEMAS 9 CITY CENTRE

content, not recommended for children) FRI-SAT 1:10, 3:25, 5:45, 8:10, 10:30; SUN 12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:55; Mon-Thu 1:05, 3:20, 5:35, 7:50, 10:05

6:40, 9:15

2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150

10337-82 Ave, 780.433.0728

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content,

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)

tioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 12:05, 2:50, 7:05, 9:45; MON, WED-THU 2:50, 7:05, 9:45

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) FRI 1:50,

Closed Captioned DAILY 4:20, 7:05, 9:50

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 7:10, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 7:00, 9:40

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG

SAVING MR. BANKS (PG mature subject matter)

Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital MON-THU 12:30, 3:15

DIVERGENT (PG violence) No passes DAILY 1:25 4:10

language, violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:25, 3:55, 6:45, 9:20 violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:00; 3D :

THE NUT JOB (G) Toonie Matinee, Closed Captioned,

PHILOMENA (PG language may offend) DAILY 7:15 9:15

10:05; SAT 11:25, 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05; SUN-WED 1:35, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35; THU 3:50, 6:30, 9:35; Closed Captioned: FRI-SAT 11:55, 2:35, 5:15, 7:55, 10:35; SUN-WED 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05; THU 1:35, 4:15, 6:55; Star & Strollers: THU 1:00

DAILY 4:30, 8:00

Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital MON-THU 12:25, 3:05

ENEMY (14A nudity, sexual content) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo FRI-SUN, TUE 12:50, 3:45; MON, WED-THU 3:45

FRI-SAT 12:10, 12:40, 3:20, 3:50, 6:30, 7:00, 9:45, 10:15; SUN 12:10, 2:50, 3:20, 6:00, 6:25, 9:15, 9:45; MON-THU 3:05, 3:35, 6:10, 6:40, 9:15, 9:45; ULTRAAVX: FRI-SAT 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:45; SUN 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:05; MON-WED 1:00, 4:05, 7:10, 10:15; THU 1:10, 4:30

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) FRI 2:05, 4:45, 7:25,

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT (PG coarse

HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE (PG) 1953, colour

WALKING WITH DINOSAURS (PG) Toonie Matinee,

DIVERGENT (PG violence) Closed Captioned, No Passes

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (G)

Closed Captioned DAILY 1:45

Royal Alberta Museum Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave, 780.439.5285

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital SAT-THU 3:20

THE MONUMENTS MEN (PG) Closed Captioned, Digital

not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned DAILY 1:50, 4:35, 7:00, 9:10

I, FRANKENSTEIN (PG violence, frightening scenes,

EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY

not rec for young children) Toonie Matinee, Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital

MON-THU 12:05, 3:20

FRI-SAT 12:35; SUN 12:30; MON-TUE, THU 1:30; Wed 1:30, 6:50; 3D : FRI-SUN 2:55, 5:20, 7:50, 10:10; MON-TUE, THU 4:00, 6:50, 9:20; WED 4:00, 10:50

for young children) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI-SAT 12:30, 1:00, 3:40, 4:10, 6:50, 7:20, 9:55, 10:35; SUN 12:00, 12:30, 3:10, 3:40, 6:20, 6:50, 9:25, 9:55; MONWED 1:00, 3:25, 4:05, 6:35, 7:10, 9:40, 10:15; THU 3:25, 4:05, 6:35, 7:10, 9:40, 10:15; Star & Strollers: THU 1:00

tioned DAILY 1:40; 3D : DAILY 4:45

coarse language) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video, No Passes FRI 4:30, 7:40, 10:30; SAT-THU 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 9:50; VIP 18+: FRI, MON-THU 5:30, 9:00; SAT-SUN 2:00, 5:30, 9:00

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE (18A gory brutal violence)

NEED FOR SPEED (PG not rec for young children)

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT (PG coarse

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content,

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) Closed Captioned FRI-SAT 12:05;

THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG

Marathon

3:40, 6:30, 9:15; SAT-THU 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:40

(PG violence, not recommended for young children) No passes, Closed Captioned, Digital 3d, Dts Stereo THU 9:40

ENDERS GAME (STC) Midnight Movie Marathon

GRAVITY (PG coarse language) Midnight Movie

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) Closed Captioned FRI

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG violence, not recommended for young children) No Passes THU 9:35; ULTRAAVX: THU 8:00 SUN 12:00; MON-THU 2:00; 3D : FRI-SUN 2:30, 4:55, 7:35, 10:00; MON-THU 4:25, 7:05, 9:30

Midnight Movie Marathon

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended for young children) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video, No Passes FRI 4:30, 7:40, 10:55; SAT 12:20, 3:50, 7:00, 10:25; SUN-THU 12:20, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10; VIP 18+: FRI, MON-THU 6:30, 10:15; Sat-Sun 3:00, 6:30, 10:15

Mon, Mar 31, 8:00

2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10

DUGGAN CINEMA–CAMROSE

Video, No Passes FRI 6:50, 10:00; SAT 5:15, 8:30; SUN-THU 4:30, 8:00; VIP 18+: FRI, MON-WED 4:30, 8:00; SAT-SUN 1:00, 4:30, 8:00; THU 4:30; ULTRAAVX: FRI 4:00, 7:30, 10:45; SAT 12:15, 3:30, 6:50, 10:15; SUNWED 12:15, 3:30, 6:50, 10:00; THU 1:30, 5:00

PRINCESS

Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI 6:50, 9:30; SAT-THU 12:10, 3:00, 6:50, 9:30 Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, On 2 Screens FRI 6:45, 7:45, 9:45; SAT-THU 12:15, 1:00, 3:25, 6:45, 7:45, 9:45

SON OF GOD (14A brutal violence) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI, MON-THU 6:40, 9:40; SAT-SUN 12:20, 3:30, 6:40, 9:40

(PG violence, not recommended for young children) No Passes THU 9:30; ULTRAAVX: THU 8:00

violence, not rec for young children) VIP 18+, No Passes THU 8:00; THU 9:30; ULTRAAVX: THU 8:30

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI 6:30, 9:40; SATTHU 12:00, 3:10, 6:30, 9:40

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) Closed Captioned FRI, SUNTHU 12:20; Sat 11:20, 12:20; 3D : FRI-SUN, TUE-WED 2:50, 5:15, 7:50, 10:15; MON 2:45, 5:10, 10:15; THU

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) Closed Captioned, Digital Presen-

FRI 4:05; SAT 12:00, 2:40; SUN-THU 1:20

tation, Dolby Stereo Digital Sat-Thu 2:45

2:50, 5:15, 7:50

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)

Closed Captioned FRI 3:50, 7:10, 10:20; SAT 1:15, 4:15, 7:20, 10:35; SUN-THU 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G) Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital SAT-THU 2:50

Digital FRI-WED 8:30

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)

3D : Reald 3d FRI 6:40, 9:45; SAT-THU 12:40, 6:40, 9:45

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recommended for young children) Digital FRI 6:30, 9:30; SAT-THU 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)

Digital SAT-THU 3:40

TUE 4:20

FLIGHT OF THE BUTTERFLIES 3D (G) FRI-SUN 1:00; WED 4:20

FRI-SAT 4:35, 9:10; SUN 3:25, 6:30; THU 7:45

NEW FORT CINEMA 9922-100 St, Fort Saskatchewan, 780.992.1707; Office: 780.992.1878

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recom-

mended for young children) DAILY 6:30, 9:20; SATSUN, TUE, THU 1:30

DIVERGENT (PG violence) DAILY 6:40, 9:30; SAT-SUN, TUE, THU 1:15

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G) DAILY 7:00; SAT-

SUN, TUE, THU 2:00

NON-STOP (PG violence, coarse language) DAILY 9:00 LEDUC CINEMAS 4702-50 St Leduc, 780.986-2728

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) DAILY 12:50, 3:35,

6:50, 9:20

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recom-

mended for young children) DAILY 12:40, 3:25, 6:40, 9:25

DIVERGENT (PG violence) DAILY 12:30, 3:25, 6:30, 9:25 NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children)

FRI- TUE 6:45, 9:30; WED-THU 9:30; FRI-TUE 12:45, 3:30

WETASKIWIN CINEMAS Wetaskiwin 780.352.3922

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) DAILY 6:50, 9:20;

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G) Digital FRI 7:00,

SAT-THU 1:15, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50

mended for young children) DAILY 6:40, 9:25; SAT-SUN 12:40, 3:25

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG

DIVERGENT (PG violence) DAILY 6:30, 9:25; SAT-SUN

9:20; SAT-THU 1:30, 4:00, 7:00, 9:20

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) Digital FRI 6:50, 9:50;

violence, not recommended for young children) Reald 3d THU 8:00

DIVERGENT (PG violence) Digital FRI 6:20, 9:40; SATTHU 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:40

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

SAT-SUN 12:50, 3:35

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not recom-

12:30, 3:25

NEED FOR SPEED 3D (PG not rec for young children) DAILY 6:45, 9:30; SAT-SUN12:45, 3:30

FILM 23


MUSIC

MUSIC EDITOR : EDEN MUNRO EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // SINGER SONGWRITER

Joe Nolan’s Tornado

Songwriter finds his groove with Nashville pros

A Tornado on the inside // Heather Pollock

'I

'm a fan of recording spontaneously, and only doing three takes," Joe Nolan says. "Because, honestly, when you're recording, if you don't nail it in three takes, you either don't know the song well enough or it's not going to get any better."

Which is exactly how Nolan spun out Tornado, the songwriter's second album, and first for Six Shooter Records. He went down to Nashville for a whirlwind week with longtime producer Colin Linden and a host of studio musicians he'd

Strangers playing your songs it's fresh in everyone's mind, and then selecting one of a pre- and you haven't played a song cious few takes to craft an re- 200 times in a year playing bars. cord doesn't seem the most meticulous way to make an album, The resulting Tornado is a whiskey-barrel but that doesn't seem to be the country-tinged Fort Saskatchewan native's gen- of songs about longing and lost eral MO love, some treated with the Sat, Mar 29 (7:30 pm) anyway: on grin of a fond memory ("TightRoxy Theatre, $12 the phone, rope Dancer"), others like rawer, in sleepy, fresher wounds in need of dressm o r n i n g ing (the title track). The album's efficient recordtones, he praises a more off-thecuff approach. Being prepared ing process aside, delivering an enough to be off the cuff, mind album out of a single week's you, but trusting in the initial work, however spontaneous in its recording, spark of idea still proved a that comes test of Nolan's with the first "A lot of the time, mettle. exposure to a when you put "It chalsong. yourself and a band lenged me to "A lot of the have to rise time, when in that situation, to the occayou put youryour initial instincts sion, and get self and a are usually the best myself in the band in that places to go in a zone, because situation, song." it's a little your initial bit out of instincts are my comfort usually the best places to go in a song," he zone," he says. "Being that far never met before. "I played [each song for the mu- says. "Your initial melody and from home and playing with sicians] once, acoustically," Nolan approach to the song is, a lot musicians I've never jammed says. "And they wrote their Nash- of the time, the way to go. And with before, or met. ... It forced ville charts, and then we went I think doing that with studio me to really get inside the in and recorded it. We did three musicians that are very experi- groove." takes of each song, and took the enced is a really cool and inter- PAUL BLINOV esting way of recording, when PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM best one of each."

PREVUE // METAL

Scythia

Folk-metal locals go all out(side)

T

here's been a temporal shift in Scythia's music. The first two albums from the local folk-metal outfit spun tales of ancient and medieval times but the band has moved forward into the age of discovery on its new album, ... Of Conquest. "People mistake it for pirate metal, but it's not; it's definitely the age of

24 MUSIC

ebbs and flows with thundering and melodic instrumentation while the lyrics portray the struggles of a young sailor whose lofty ideas of going on an adventure find him tricked into boarding a ship that sails into a storm and becomes shipwrecked, rather than discovering the riches he beSat, Mar 29 (8 pm) lieved With Ides of Winter, were in Eye of Horus, Ironstorm s t o r e Pawn Shop, $10 for him. Instead, the sailor finds himself in a strange and exotic land where he learns more than he bargained for. "I think if we jut did 10 songs on an discovery renaissance, you know, where exploration was paramount," album that were unrelated, I don't explains vocalist and guitarist Dave think we would have the same kind Khan. of appeal," Khan says. "It wouldn't Scythia is a band with a proclivity feel like the whole thing was a big for going all out with its themes, piece of artwork. When we do it as carrying the storylines from its a concept it's like the whole album stage wardrobe to merch and ... Of becomes one sculpture and each Conquest is no exception. The album song is a facet of that sculpture and

we've just got to carve it away so it complements everything around it, but in itself sounds great." Despite the conceptual nature of Scythia's albums, Khan maintains it's got catchy singles, too, pointing to 2013's "Bear Claw Tavern" as an example. The song's video garnered nearly 100 000 views, and Khan says if that's the only song listeners relate to from the bunch, that's fine by him. "We have those singles in there for people, but at the same time we have larger ones for those you know, connoisseurs, the elitists, whatever you want to call them that like to dig deeper with their bands," he adds. "I think what we're coming up with, and each album kind of moves more in this direction, is a formula for winning both types of audience." With any luck, Scythia will be winning over new audiences as it embarks on its first US tour this

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

spring. The tour is on the smaller side, focusing on some key markets to build on, but Khan says the band wanted it that way for the first time out—just in case there were any border or logistical issues. "Believe it or not, most of our fans are from the US," he says, adding Canadian fans are equally loyal, but a couple of festivals and critics taking notice of the band south of the border hasn't hurt. "What I've discovered, too, in the US it's kind of like here where power metal and traditional metal seem to be a little more of a niche thing compared to thrash metal and death metal. Those who like it down there really like it and they really support bands and really promote it, and it's just always my mentality that things that happen in the States happen in a more extreme way—whether that's good or bad."

MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


MAR. 28 & 29 • THE RURAL ROUTES

PREVUE // INDIE ROCK

NO

SUNDAY CELTIC MUSIC 5 - 8PM WEDNESDAY • OPEN STAGE W/ DUFF ROBISON

I

t was just one of those nights. Bradley Hanan Carter had recently turned 30, got divorced, went bankrupt and wasn't feeling optimistic about life. He'd left his home in New Zealand to pursue what seemed to be a lucrative music career as guitarist and backup singer for Stereogram, a band that landed an Apple commercial and a Grammy nomination, but decided to part ways in 2007 to pursue other projects. Carter found himself in Los Angeles with few prospects, and considered packing it all in and returning to New Zealand. But that fateful night in a bar called El Prado, situated in the Los Angeles suburb of Echo Park, Carter's slightly intoxicated friend convinced him to start another band. Thankfully, Echo Park was a neighbourhood chock-full of musicians, and it didn't take long for Carter to meet Sean Stentz and for NO to take shape, adding Reese Richardson on guitar, Ryan Lallier on guitar and keys, Michael Walker on drums and, more recently, Simon Oscroft on guitar. "It's kind of like that vibe where if you're just there and you can play something, there's a job for you and there's a part to play in a band," Carter says of the neighbourhood. "Once we had some songs down and people could see what was going on, the other guys just kind of joined in and it became what it is now. We've had the same lineup since we started, essentially, but we added Simon a year ago and he took over my guitar parts and I've just been doing the singing thing." NO released its debut EP, Don't Worry You'll Be Here Forever, in 2011 and began to gain a following around Echo Park and the LA area. The band's reach continues to expand, but in homage to where it came from, chose to name its debut LP El Prado. The songs are an atmospheric and slightly dark mix of keyboard- and guitar-driven tunes that provide a snapshot of Echo Park as NO knew it in the band's early days—the rents have gone sky-high in recent years, making it less affordable for aspiring musicians—and a testament to the struggles that got the group to where it is. "I had a really rough time in my 20s. It started off pretty exciting and got really weird at the end," recalls Carter, who is in a much better place these days. That weird state was a byproduct of not only Carter's financial and roman-

Tue, Apr 1 (8 pm) With Reuben and the Dark, the Darcys Artery, $16 (advance), $20 (day of show)

tic struggles, but attempting to figure out who he was and who he wanted to become. He had been raised in a religious household and yearned to separate himself from the way he was brought up, a feat he admits is difficult when family is involved. "I came to a conclusion that we spend so much of our lives worrying about where we're going to go when we die that we don't spend any of our life worrying about where we go when we live," he muses, explaining he wanted to be more present in his life. "I think you're always going

to be figuring it out, but I feel a lot happier now, and a lot of this record's been processing that and all the byproduct of being part of a world like that, which is really counter culture. It doesn't really make sense when you look back at it, but when you're in the middle of it it makes all the sense in the world. I think I just had to keep asking questions and I think I still am and everyone should, you know? Never stop asking questions." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

JIMMY WHIFEN MARCH 27 - 29

THE RURAL ROUTES APRIL 11 & 12

In Sutton Place Hotel #195, 10235 101 Street, SHERLOCKSHOSPITALITY.COM

DOWNTOWN Mar 27 - 29

STAN GALLANT WEM

Mar 27 & 29

MARK MCGARRIGLE NOW OPEN

CAMPUS

Mar 27 - 29

STU BENDALL SHERLOCKSHOSPITALITY.COM

Colleen’s Amber Ale now available at all pub locations. $0.50 from each pint sold will be donated to Ovarian Cancer Research in memory of Colleen Tomchuk.

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

MUSIC 25


MUSIC PREVUE // ALT-COUNTRY

New Country Rehab 'T

hey're one and three and they're band. Then it feels like a life; it doesn't both sick, so I'm sick now," says just feel like, 'Where the hell are we?'" The old-time Appalachian fiddle styles New Country Rehab frontman John Showman with a faint chuckle as he have been most informative for Showtries to get last-minute errands done man and New Country Rehab's enerbefore his tour, and take care of his getic alt-country sound, and he says that influence is beneficial when tourtwo children at the same time. ing through those "I'll be fine. I had to regions in particular, perform with full- Mon, Mar 31 (8 pm) since it's what audiblown laryngitis a With Eyes on Ivan, the Misery ences are familiar couple of years ago Mountain Boys Pawn Shop, $12 with—though New and I did fine." Country Rehab adds Showman isn't its own flavour to it. about to let a cold "They like what we're doing because slow down the frenetic pace New Country Rehab has been keeping over the it's different. We're Canadian and we past couple of months. The band did a don't play the music the same way six-week European tour before a spin they play it and I think they like it, they through the US in February, followed be a like the difference," he adds. European audiences enjoy the music small break until spending the latter part too, but Showman says performing for of March performing in Canadian cities. "I think an important thing to remem- those crowds offers a different experiber for being on tour is just really try ence altogether. Showman points out and enjoy the whole process of being that in North America, music, and New on tour and make sure that you're actu- Country Rehab's style of roots in parally doing tours that are fun and kind ticular, can become background noise of in line with what we want to do," he for conversation—which is fine, he says. "Most of the music we play kind adds—but European audiences tend of comes from the Appalachian region, to listen much more intently. "They have such an attraction to the from the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Appalachian Mountains, and I feel Wild West and the new frontier and the like touring kind of coincides with go- concept of America and, by extension, ing to these places that hold a lot of North America, as a land of opportunity, interest for me and for the guys in the so I feel as though when they listen to

26 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

the music they're listening for some kind of sign or something," he says. "They don't want to miss anything; they don't want to miss something that you're imparting culturally. They don't want to miss the message, but they have fun." New Country Rehab is still touring with its 2013 release, Ghost of your Charms, promoting its third—and final—single from the album, "Lost Highway." The tune was inspired by the Hank Williams song of the same name, but that's where the similarities end. Williams' was about a young man who had lost his way by partying too much and eventually everyone gave up on him, whereas Showman took a more spiritual approach. "For me, the lost highway is sort of the last place that you go before you go to the afterlife, you know? So I sort of turned it into a spiritual metaphor for the lost highway being the road to heaven or the road to hell, and then I just wrote lyrics to play off that," he explains, adding the band has been working on some new material and a couple of songs may be ready by the time it gets to Edmonton. "We've got one song we just started performing and there's two or three more that are just a rehearsal or two away from that. ... I feel like there's at least a half dozen songs that are bubbling to the surface and ready to happen. I feel like we've got as much mileage out of this last album as we need and now we'll just write another one." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


This one-of-a-kind fantasy special event, Middle-earth EXPOsed, will thrill fans of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings with appearances from Manu Bennett, Billy Boyd, Sean Astin, Jed Brophy, Mark Hadlow, Dean O’Gorman, Sadwyn Brophy, Mark Ferguson, Craig Parker, and the CEO of Weta Workshop - Richard Taylor. Guests can expect interviews, comedy, improv, stories, music and more - one night only - in the Stampede Corral! Tickets available now! For more info visit:

calgaryexpo.com This is a separate ticketed event and does not grant access to the Calgary Expo show-floor. A ticket to the Calgary Expo isn’t required to attend Middle-earth EXPOsed. Guest line up is subject to change.

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

MUSIC 27


MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

EMPOWER APP BENEFIT CONCERT / FRI, MAR 28 (7 PM) You need something to do tonight anyway, so why not help out a good cause? The Unfortunates, Webster, Drive the Day and a few other local acts are putting on a benefit concert for a new app developed by U of A master of psychology student Lindsay Redman to assist those who have been or are being affected by abuse. You could also take home some prizes from the silent auction. (Avenue Theatre, $12 in advance, $15 at the door)

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD / SAT, MAR 29 (8 PM) It’s easy to find out anything and everything about a band these days, but the Neighbourhood likes to leave most of its biography to the imagination. All you need to know right now is the guys are coming here to support their album, I Love You. (Union Hall, $29.50)

AGAINST ME! / FRI, MAR 28 (8 PM) Lead singer Thomas James Gabel is now known as Laura Jane Grace after coming out as transgender two years ago, but in terms of rock, it’s still business as usual for Against Me! as the band supports its latest album, Transgender Dysphoria Blues. (Starlite Room, $25)

KARL ANDRIUK / SAT, MAR 29 (6 PM) His latest album, The Limited Sky is a true “made in Edmonton” product, from recording in his home studio to collaborating with a roster of musicians who have ties to the city. (Brixx)

BROKEN HOPE / FRI, MAR 28 (7 PM) You may want to limber up so you don’t throw your neck out headbanging. Broken Hope is co-headlining the Best in Brutality tour alongside Oceano, with Fallujah, Rivers of Nihil and Kublai Khan as support. (Studio Music Foundation)

BATTLEFIELD BAND / SAT, MAR 29 (7:30 PM) This one sounds aggressive, doesn’t it? In reality, it’s going to be an evening of Scottish folk music. (Arden Theatre, $35)

FEARING AND WHITE / SUN, MAR 30 (7:30 PM) Ireland meets Canada in a duo that spent a decade trading lyrics and song ideas before releasing its debut in 2011. Three years later and the pair are back with a follow-up titled Tea and Confidence. (Festival Place, $28 – $32)

SAT, APR 5, AVENUE THEATRE

FARA FUNDRAISER

W/ JESSE NORTHEY, BOMBPROOF THE HORSES, THE GIBSON BLOCK, TWO BEARS NORTH, AND F&M FRI, APR 11, THE ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE ALL AGES AND LICENSED W/ ID JCL PRODUCTIONS & OPEN SKY MUSIC FESTIVAL PRESENT

KIM CHURCHILL W/ MATT EPP

FRI, APR 25, THE ARTERY

GREG MACPHERSON BAND

JAMES EHNES / WED, APR 2 (8 PM) How many 13-year-olds do you know who have composed a symphony? Chances are, none. James Ehnes happened to do just that a few years back, and has gone on to win a Grammy and seven Juno Awards. Not too shabby.(McDougall United Church, $20 – $50)

W/ RICK REID BAND

WED, APR 30, THE ARTERY

JORDAN KLASSEN

W/ PASSBURG, AND SEAN SONEGO WED, APR 30, AVENUE THEATRE

ANDREW ALLEN

W/ GUESTS

THU, MAY 1, AVENUE THEATRE AVENUE AND BLURRED LENZ PRESENT

DESTROYER

(DAN BEJAR)

SOLO SHOW W/ FIELD ASSEMBLY

FRI, MAY 2, THE ARTERY JCL PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

THE KIN / WED, APR 2 (8 PM) Want to get noticed? Maybe it’s time to take a page from the Kin’s book. The band got its start staging “musical robberies” in which its members burst into unsuspecting businesses to steal some ears. We don’t guarantee the approach will always have a good outcome, though. (Starlite Room, $15)

SUNPARLOUR PLAYERS W/ THE FORTUNATE ONES, AND WHISKEY SHEIKHS

THU, MAY 15, MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH JCL PRODUCTIONS AND THE EDMONTON FOLK FEST PRESENT

THE MILK CARTON KIDS W/ GUESTS

FRI, JUN 20, THE ARTERY

LIBRARY VOICES

W/ GUESTS

28 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014


Babysitter Sat, Mar 29 (9 pm) With Hagface, the Tee-Tahs, Terry Fox Wunderbar, $10 Babysitter is leaving its hometown of Victoria, BC for Montréal, and decided to make a tour out of the daunting cross-Canada trip. Since the band's about to get to work on a new LP in its new home city, this might be the last we see of them for a while. Prior to the show in Edmonton, lead singer and guitarist Kristian shared his Soundtrack picks with Vue.

At home

On the road

Morning: Andy’s (bass) been on an Einstüerzende Neubauten kick [which] would be good to wake to. I’ve had my alarm set to play Lee Hazlewood’s version of “Dolly Parton’s Guitar” because the song is really annoying and gets me out of bed to turn it off.

Morning: Lots of Neil Young’s Landing on Water Noon: Sweet Leaf at 4:20 Night: Flipper V

Noon: Probably shitty radio at work, but we quit our jobs just now. Night: Been pretty deep into Lou Reed’s New York

The Arden Theatre presents

MARIA DUNN & JOHN WORT HANNAM

Saturday, April 5 • 7:30 pm • $28

MARIA MULDAUR Friday, April 4 • 7:30 pm • $36

DARRELL SCOTT & TIM O'BRIEN

Wednesday, April 23 • 7:30 pm • $40

Cultural Services

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

MUSIC 29


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Future Islands Singles (4AD) 

Singles is Future Islands' fourth album, but if you're reading this review because you recognized the name, it's quite possibly thanks to a nowviral performance the Baltimore band did last week on David Letterman's program, showcasing, more than anything, frontman Samuel T Herring's remarkable ability to mix total ridiculousness and absolute sincerity together in performance. But with an album as cooly effective as this, the band deserves more than the 15 minutes of internet fame that the Letterman slot's allotted them. There's an energy to Singles, one that carries over from performance onto the recording, particularly thanks to the guy singing front and centre, but not exclusively. Part of Singles' strength comes from the tight band making its rhythms and hooks—the music is a cool, reflective wash of new-wave synths, rocksteady drumming and driving, front-and-centre bass. It's a unified sound, but finds enough variation within that structure—the guiding blip-riff of "Spirit", the slow, tropic groove of "Like The Moon"—to stave off redundancy.

Lyrically, Singles largely draws on matters of the longing heart— well-tread territory, and with a lesser voice up front, the exact same words could belong to a far more generic album. But it's Herring's performance that pushes all of this into more remarkable territory. His presence and delivery are huge and often uncool: he's as unafraid of adding a death metal scream to the emotional peak of "Fall From Grace" as he is of delivering a line like "dreams belong to those who let them in" with absolute sincerity. He's smart, too, in how he shapes his ruminations. Take "Seasons (Waiting on You)": over frosted synths and commanding bass, he manages to take a pretty rote observation—giving up on a particular romance after a long time spent pining—dress it up in an effective seasonal metaphor, and take it one step further, recognizing the added sadness of having to watch that once-lovely thing drift away at all. You could call it overblown—these are basically the sounds of someone shouting "STELLA" from the bottom of the new-wave staircase—because it's rare to hear someone emote this hard without finding a knowing wink in there somewhere. And it doesn't quite manage to maintain its balance the whole way through (closer "A Dream of You And Me" feels a little too on the nose in its musings). Still, it seems that Herring just frequently makes choices none of his peers would dare for fear of their appearances. Singles is both ridiculous pop and totally sincere in being so over the top. And, in that, it's pretty fucking awesome.

You Are An Explorer You Are An Explorer (Independent) 

There's a sense of melancholy streaked through You Are An Explorer's debut self-titled EP. The Edmonton trio, music teachers all, makes a solid brand of instrumental post-rock, and are at their best channeling longing melancholia as on "... As We Built." But at its worst, the album is aimless, like on the opening duo of "My Name Is Driftwood" and "Palisades." The back-half of the EP is the strongest. "Mystique Theory" features excellent interplay between the bass and spare guitar; the song starts slow and subtle, then roars to life before ending in a whisper-quiet finish. The heavy "... And We Built" is then followed by the brighter, more hopeful closer in "Beacon." You Are An Explorer should be commended for this album. It's brimming with interesting ideas, even if they don't all work out. JORDYN MARCELLUS

JORDYN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Four IN 140 Thievery Corporation, Saudade (ESL) @VueWeekly: Thievery Corp veer away from trip hop and rally some wonderful & lingering Bossa Nova troops.

Chuck Ragan, Till Midnight (Dine Alone) @VueWeekly: A beast of Americana, this Hot Water Music frontman deserves some serious recognition for this gravely, melodic 4th album.

Johnny Cash, Out Among the Stars (Sony) @VueWeekly: Shelved cuts from the early '80s show off Cash's prerenaissance voice and song-choices. A truly golden thing.

Nickel Creek, A Dotted Line (Nonesuch) @VueWeekly: This reunion sounds so nice. This brand of bluegrass, unison & harmony might make your day.

30 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014


MUSIC

WEEKLY

EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

THU MAR 27 ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE

Live Music every Thu This week: Michael Averill (playing with Diana Pearson, starting earlier than normal at 9:30pm) ARTERY Just A Lovely Night:

Trevor Tchir, Ashley Barlow, Jey Witten with Abra King; 7:30pm; $5 (adv)

ATLANTIC TRAP Duff Robison AVENUE THEATRE Fefe

Dobson, Courage My Love, guests; 6pm; $20 (adv at Blackbyrd/$25 (day of )

BIG AL’S HOUSE OF BLUES

Fred Larose Song Writer’s Evening; 7pm (door); no cover BLUES ON WHYTE Donald Ray

Johnson

9pm-2am WUNDERBAR Mark Sultan,

Strugglefucks, The Switches

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Thu

Main Fl: Throwback Thu: Rock&Roll, Funk, Soul, R&B and 80s with DJ Thomas Culture; jamz that will make your backbone slide; Wooftop: Dig It! Thursdays. Electronic, roots and rare groove with DJ’s Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests

CENTURY ROOM Lucky 7:

Retro ‘80s with house DJ every Thu; 7pm-close THE COMMON The Common

Uncommon Thursday: Rotating Guests each week!

Thu Open Mic: All adult performers are welcome (music, song, spoken word); every Thu, 1:30-3pm CHA ISLAND TEA CO Bring Your Own Vinyl Night: Every Thu; 8pm-late; Edmonton Couchsurfing Meetup: Every Thu; 8pm EARLY STAGE SALOON–Stony Plain Open Jam Nights;

no cover

EXPRESSIONZ CAFE Open Stage hosted by Dr Oxide; 1st Thu each month, 7:30pm-10:30pm FILTHY MCNASTY’S A Rock

Off: Thrillhouse vs. Whale and the Wolf; 8pm

J R BAR Live Jam Thu; 9pm JEFFREY’S CAFÉ Lora Jol;

7:30pm; $10

KELLY’S Jameoke Night

with the Nervous Flirts (sing-along with a live band); every Thu, 9pm-1am; no cover

L.B.’S Thu open stage: the

New Big Time with Rocko Vaugeois, friends; 8-12

LIVE AT SLY’S Every Thu Jam hosted by Lorne Burnstick; 8pm-12am NAKED CYBERCAFÉ Thu open stage; 8pm; all ages (15+) NEW WEST HOTEL Hurtin

Horsemen

NORTH GLENORA HALL

Jam by Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers every Thu; contact John Malka 780.447.5111 PAWN SHOP Glorious Sons,

Teenage Kicks, JFR; 8pm

RED PIANO Every Thu: Dueling

pianos at 8pm

RICHARDS PUB Blue Thursday: with Gord Matthews; 6:30-9pm RIC’S Peter Belec (jazz); most Thursdays; 7-10pm ROSE AND CROWN Jimmy

Whiffen

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Stan Gallant SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Mark McGarrigle

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Live Blues every Thur: rotating guests; 7-11pm; this week: Jenie Thai (keyboards and vocals) STARLITE ROOM Mounties, Rich Aucion; 8pm (door); no minors; $17.50 at Backbyrd TAVERN ON WHYTE Open

stage with Michael Gress (fr Self Evolution); every Thu;

ON THE ROCKS Rock ‘N’ Hops Kitchen Party: The Ramifications with DJs OVERTIME–Sherwood Park

Jeff Hendricks Band

Beast: Retro and Top 40 beats with DJ Suco; every Fri UNION HALL Ladies Night

every Fri

Y AFTERHOURS Foundation

RED PIANO Hottest dueling

ARDEN Battlefield Band; 7:30pm; $35 (plus facility fee). Purchase through the Arden Theatre box office

the Month. Gibson Block, Red Ram, Rend, Revenge of the Trees

“B” STREET Rockin Big Blues

stage; 7pm; no cover

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Funk Bunker

Thursdays

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Stan Gallant

ON THE ROCKS Salsa Rocks:

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Mark McGarrigle

SIDELINERS PUB Amie

Weymes (country rock); 9pm; no cover

STARLITE ROOM Against Me!,

Laura Stevenson, Cheap Girls; 8pm (door); $25 at Blackbyrd

STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION

The Best In Brutality Tour: Featuring Oceano, Broken Hope, Fallujah, more; 5:30pm

ARDEN Martyn Joseph; 7:30pm; $32 at the Arden box office

WUNDERBARTarantujah,

ATLANTIC TRAP Duff Robison

YARDBIRD SUITE Canadian Jazz Series: Jerrold Dubyk Organ Trio (From Edmonton/ Vancouver); 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $18 (member)/$22 (guest) at Ticketmaster.ca

App Fundraiser: The Unfortunates, Big City Supreme, Make Out City, more; 7pm; $12 (adv)/$15 (door) at Blackbyrd

BAILEY THEATRE–Camrose

Tim Hus; 8-10pm; $20 (adv)/$25 (door)

BIG AL’S HOUSE OF BLUES Rita

Mcdade; 7pm (door); $10

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Front

Porch Roots revue with Karla Anderson; 8:30pm; $17

BLUES ON WHYTE Donald Ray

Johnson

BOURBON ROOM Dueling

pianos every Fri Night with Jared Sowan and Brittany Graling 8pm

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE Jazz

evening every Fri after work; 5-8pm

CAFFREY’S IN THE PARK

Love Junk

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Live

music every Fri: this week: Erin Korthuis all ages; 7pm; $5 (door)

CASINO EDMONTON Trace

Jordan

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Catalyst CENTURY CASINO The

Stampeders; $44.95; Sold out

Skabiis, Vitriolage, Bonglord, Horrendouse Miscreation

Classical WINSPEAR CENTRE

Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody: ESO, Jean-Marie Zeitouni (conductor), Nareh Arghamanyan (piano); 7:30pm; Afterthoughts: main lobby: post-concert conversation with guest artists, hosted by D.T. Baker; $24- $79

DJs

J+H PUB Every Friday: Headwind and friends (vintage rock ‘n’ roll); 9:30pm; no minors, no cover JEFFREY’S CAFÉ Lora Jol;

BLIND PIG Live jam every Sat; 3-7pm

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Stan Gallant SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Mark McGarrigle

STARLITE ROOM Joe Solo, Element Orange, Echos of Apathy, the Universe Machine STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Big Dave

McLean; 8:30pm; $20

Cash Game, The Nasty Boys, Doobyis, Kancer, Black Lung, Urban Indian; 9pm

BLUES ON WHYTE Every Sat

UNION HALL The

afternoon: Jam with Back Door Dan; Evening: Donald Ray Johnson

BOURBON ROOM Live Music

every Sat Night with Jared Sowan and Brittany Graling; 8pm

BRIXX Karl Andriuk (the

Limited Sky CD release party), Pax Arcana; 6pm (Door), 7pm (show), tickets at door

Neighbourhood, Kitten, Born Casual; sold out

WUNDERBAR Babysitter

(Victoria), Hagface (Calgary), the Tee-Tahs, Terry Fox

YARDBIRD SUITE Canadian

Jazz Series: From Vancouver/ Calgary: Laura Crema Quartet; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $18 (member)/$22 (guest) at Ticketmaster.ca

CAFFREY’S IN THE PARK

Classical

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Sat

CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Jubiloso! Bells

Love Junk

Open mic; 7pm; $2

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Catalyst DUGGAN’S The Rural Routes DV8 The Rural Routes: No

Problem, PMMA (CGY), X-Ray Cat (CGY), CROaK; $8

FILTHY MCNASTY’S Free

of Concordia; 3pm; $15 (adult)/$12 (student/senior) at TIX on the Square, door; $40 (family)

CONVOCATION HALL A

WINSPEAR Rachmaninoff’s

BRIXX SICK: A Night of Hard Hitting Industrial with DJ Dervish and Greg Gory with guest Dj Verlaag CHICAGO JOES Colossal

Ikarie XB-1 (1963 Czech film), Trio Latitude (electroacoustic accompanimen); 7pm (door), 7:30pm (show); $10 HILLTOP PUB Open Stage,

Jam every Sat; 3:30-7pm

Flows: Live Hip Hop and open mic every Fri with DJs Xaolin, Dirty Needlz, guests; 8:30pm2am; no cover

JEFFREY’S CAFÉ Lana Lenore & Co (blues pop); 9pm; $10

THE COMMON Good Fridays:

(year 3); 7:30pm

Fri; 9pm

ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove DJ every Fri FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip hop and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Fri MERCER TAVERN Homegrown

Friday: with DJ Thomas Culture

RED STAR Movin’ on Up: indie,

JOHN L. HAAR THEATRE – MacEwan Uni Composition L.B.’S Oil City Sound Machine THE LEAF Open Stage Sat Jam at 5pm; True North; 9:30pm LEGENDS Open mic and jam every Sat with Nick Samoil and the Kyler Schogen Band; 3-6pm LIVE AT SLY’S Marshall

Lawrence

NEWCASTLE PUB Shmenge

Fest: Evil Dr. Bob, The Posse, Always Dirty, South of Sanity, Sandeal Foot, Storming Alice, Wyddershynns, 500, Whiskey Business, Dee and the Rejects, the Shmenge Brothers, Chronic Rock, Tom Hammered; 3pm; fundraiser for Make a Wish

House and Electro with Peep This, Tyler Collns, Peep’n ToM, Dusty Grooves, Nudii and Bill, and specials

O’BYRNE’S Live band every Sat, 3-7pm; DJ every Sat, 9:30pm

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE

A.J.

O’MAILLE’S IRISH PUB

MAR/28 MAR/29 APR/2 APR/4 APR/5 APR/8 APR/11 APR/12 APR/15 APR/18 APR/25

THE UNION PRESENTS

AGAINST ME!

W/ LAURA STEVENSON & CHEAP GIRLS

RAISED FIST PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

JOE SOLO, ECHOES OF APATHY, ELEMENT OF ORANGE, & UNIVERSE MACHINE THE UNION PRESENTS

THE KIN

W/ GUESTS

THE UNION PRESENTS

BOY AND BEAR W/ GOLD & YOUTH & WILDLIFE THE UNION PRESENTS

SUICIDE GIRLS BLACKHEART BURLESQUE

MRG CONCERTS PRESENTS

STEVEN J MASKUS THE UNION PRESENTS

THE ZOLAS

W/ SPEEDY ORTIZ

W/ JAMES YOUNGER & GUESTS

UBK PRESENTS

DJEMBA DJEMBA & MR. CARMACK (TEAM SUPREME) THE UNION PRESENTS

THE DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN THE HANSON BROTHERS

W/ TRASH TALK, RETOX AND SHINING

STARLITE ROOM PROUDLY PRESENTS (FEAT ALL NOMEANSNO MEMBERS) W/ THE MANGE & ZERO COOL & GUESTS ADD K-97 AND STARLITE ROOM PRESENT

TODD JAMES BAND FEAT. CHANTAL BURN W/ GUESTS

APR/26 IRONSTORM MAY/1 RAW:REVOLUTION MAY/9 ICED EARTH

EXCALIBUR PRODUCTIONS AND FARMEGEDON PRESENT

“WRATHWIND” CD RELEASE EXTRAVAGANZA

W/ MORTILLERY, GATEKRASHOR & BLEED RAW: NATURAL BORN ARTISTS & STARLITE ROOM PRESENT CONCERTWORKS PRESENTS THE WORLWIDE PLAGUES TOUR FEATURING:

W/ SABATON & REVAMP

MAY/10 THE SPOONS MAY/12 EVAN DANDO (OF LEMONHEADS) MAY/13 BATHS MAY/16 AUTHORITY ZERO

W/ D TREVLON BAND & CHOIR AND MARCHING BAND

STARLITE ROOM PRESENTS

& GUESTS

THE UNION PRESENTS

W/ YOUNG FATHERS & GUESTS

STARLITE ROOM IN ASSOCIATION WITH CALGARY BEER CORE PRESENTS W/ TORCHES TO TRIGGERS, ABANDIN ALL HOPE, THE MISFIRES & VANGOHST TIX ONSALE AT TICKETFLY.COM & BLACKBYRD MYOOZIK

MAY/24 BONOBO DJ SET MAY/29 HEAD OF THE HEARD UBK AND TIMBRE CONCERTS PRESENTS THE UNION PRESENTS

W/ THE BALCONIES & GUESTS

Collection of Mispronounced Names: Piano Concert by Elizabeth Garay, Greg Mulyk; 5-6pm; free

HARCOURT HOUSE ANNEX

Old school and new school hip hop & R&B with DJ Twist, Sonny Grimez, and Marlon English; every Fri

SET NIGHTCLUB NEW Fridays:

Playtime Cabaret: Will Stroet (bilingual for children); 10:30am

Hair of the Dog: Nadine Kellman (live acoustic music every Sat); 4-6pm; no cover

Whiffen

Chapter fundraising solo concert featuring Louisa Lu (violin); 7pm

LIVE AT SLY’S Marshall MACLAB CENTRE–Leduc

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

ROSE AND CROWN Jimmy

Homemade Jam: Mike Chenoweth

L.B.’S The Canyon Rose Outfit

Lawrence

Afternoon Jam: with Rott’n Dan and Sean Stephens, noon, no cover; Rita Mcdade; 7pm (door); $10

RENDEZVOUS PUB Cyril

Sneer; 8pm

THE BOWER Strictly Goods:

rock, funk, soul, hip hop with DJ Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson; every Fri

8:30pm; $10

BIG AL’S HOUSE OF BLUES Sat

RICHARDS PUB The Terry Evans Sat Jam: every Sat; 4-8pm

GAS PUMP Saturday

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ every

Suspects (blues roots); 8-11pm; no cover

and Roots Open Jam: Every Sat afternoon, 2-6pm

piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Sat; 9pm-2am

Friday DJs on all three levels

DUGGAN’S The Rural Routes

FORT LOUNGE The Usual

release), Revenge of the Trees, Bryan Coffey, Noisy Colours; 8pm; $8 (adv)

RED PIANO Hottest dueling

Afternoon Concerts: The Frolics (CD release), Call Apollo; 4pm; no cover

CHA ISLAND TEA CO Five Bands! 5 Bucks! Brother Octopus, Victoria Baldwin and more; 7pm; $5

Enduring the Fall, Silence the Machine

ARTERY Push and Pull (CD

Garcia “La Voz” (Latin); 8pm2am; no minors; $50 (adv at TIX on the Square)/$60 (door)

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Every

nu disco, hip hop, indie, electro, dance with weekly local and visiting DJs on rotation plus residents Echo and Justin Foosh

DV8 Death Assembly,

Conquest’ (CD release), Ides of Winter, Eye of Horus, Ironstorm; 8pm

PAWN SHOP Sonic Band of

Whiffen

AVENUE THEATRE Empower

PAWN SHOP Scythia ‘... Of

APEX CASINO Souled Out

ATLANTIC TRAP Duff Robison

APEX CASINO Souled Out

Nervous Flirts; 9pm-1am; no cover

PORTUGESE CANADIAN CULTURAL SOCIETY Osmani

party; $8 (door)

FRI MAR 28

PALACE CASINO–WEM The

SAT MAR 29

ROSE AND CROWN Jimmy

Thursdays: rock, dance, retro, top 40 with DJ Johnny Infamous

Jeff Hendricks Band

Fridays

KRUSH ULTRA LOUNGE Open

UNION HALL 3 Four All

OVERTIME Sherwood Park

Nervous Flirts; 9pm-1am; no cover

PALACE CASINO–WEM The

Back Thursdays

Life Thursdays

Ramifications with DJs

PORTUGESE CANADIAN SOCIETY HALL 12964-52 St

RANCH Sweet Brown hosting

OUTLAWS ROADHOUSE Wild

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE

O’MAILLE’S IRISH PUB A.J.

SUITE 69 Release Your Inner

FILTHY MCNASTY’S Taking

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE Mike

7pm; this week: Shelly Dubois

Horsemen

ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove DJ every Thu

every Thu; dance lessons at 8pm; Cuban Salsa DJ to follow

CAFÉ HAVEN Music every Thu;

NEW WEST HOTEL Hurtin

Amplified Fridays: Dubstep, house, trance, electro, hip hop breaks with DJ Aeiou, DJ Loose Beats, DJ Poindexter; 9:30pm (door)

piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Fri; 9pm-2am

BOHEMIA Art + Muzak, curated by Abra King

Chenoweth (blues, roots); 8:30pm; $8

NEWCASTLE PUB Ending the Winter Blues: Thirst ‘n’ Howl; 9pm

MUTTART HALL–Alberta College CMC Edmonton

Rhapsody: ESO, Jean-Marie Zeitouni (conductor), Nareh Arghamanyan (piano); 8pm:

Symphony Prelude: Upper Circle lobby: at 7:15pm: an

informative presentation about the program; $24- $79

DJs

MAR/28 MAR/29 PAX ARCANA APR/4 THE MISFIRES APR/5 COWPUNCHER STARLITE PROUDLY PRESENTS

A NIGHT OF HARD HITTING INDUSTRIAL - SICK W/ DJ DERVISH, GREG GORY AND UNEASY LISTENING HOUR WITH DJ VERLAAG THE LEGEND RETURNS FOR ONE NIGHT ONLY

REUNION SHOW W/ SPECIAL GUESTS SPOIL 5, KMA W/ LEFT AS OBJECTS AND LOVE TAPPER

W/ BLACK COLLAR AND FOXJAW

W/ THE MOANIN’ AFTER, TASMAN JUDE & JESSICA MARSH

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

APR/12

Alt Rock/Electro/Trash with Miss Mannered; Wooftop: Sound It Up!: classic hip-hop and reggae with DJ Sonny Grimezz; Underdog: Dr Erick

APR/18 THE FRONTS

Floor: The Menace Sessions:

THE BOWER For Those Who

Know...: Deep House and disco with Junior Brown, David Stone, Austin, and guests; every Sat

THE COMMON Get Down It’s Saturday Night: House and disco and everything in between with resident Dane DRUID IRISH PUB DJ every

Sat; 9pm

ENCORE–WEM Every Sat: Sound and Light show; We are Saturdays: Kindergarten FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip hop and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Sat

APR/19

DMB PRESENTS

TRACE THE SKY, LUCID SKIES, LEAVE THE LIVING & FICTION OF FATE W/ FRANKIE MCQUEEN AND CALL APOLLO

THE RETURN OF NOBODY LIKES DWIGHT W/ MARY LEE BIRD & 1000 WORDS FOR WATER

APR/25 RIVER AND THE ROAD

APR/26

W/ TOWERS AND TRESS AND OUR GOOD WOLF

ELECTRIC RELIGIOUS W/ PUTTIN ON THE FOIL & UNTIL RED

MAY/2 THE JOLLY GOOD

MAY/3 MAY/3

& GUESTS

EARLY SHOW 6:30

MARKET FORCES CD RELEASE WILLHORSE W/ THOMPSON HIGHWAY & GUESTS

LATE SHOW 9:30

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Collective Saturdays underground: House and Techno MERCER TAVERN DJ Mikey

ON THE ROCKS The

Wong every Sat

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

MUSIC 31


PAWN SHOP Transmission

Saturdays: Indie rock, new wave, classic punk with DJ Blue Jay and Eddie Lunchpail; 9pm (door); free (before 10pm)/$5 (after 10pm); 1st Sat each month

RED STAR Indie rock, hip hop,

FRI MAR 28

SONIC BAND OF THE MONTH

GIBSON BLOCK W/ GUESTS RED RAM, REND & REVENGE OF THE TREES

SAT MAR 29

SCYTHIA ‘... OF CONQUEST’ CD RELEASE W/ IDES OF WINTER, EYE OF HORUS & IRONSTORM

MON MAR 31

NEW COUNTRY REHAB W/ EYES ON IVAN & MISERY MOUNTAIN BOYS FRI APR 4

BEND SINISTER

W/SHORT OF ABLE, UNWED MOTHERS & THOMPSON HIGHWAY

SAT APR 5

DESTRUCTION W/ KRISIUN, EXMORTUS & MORTILLERY

FOR TICKETS- PLEASE VISIT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA

and electro every Sat with DJ Hot Philly and guests

ROUGE LOUNGE Rouge

Saturdays: global sound and Cosmopolitan Style Lounging with DJ Mkhai SET NIGHTCLUB SET Saturday

Night House Party: With DJ Twix, Johnny Infamous

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE

Your Famous Saturday with Crewshtopher, Tyler M SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM

Swing Dance Party: Sugar Swing Dance Club every Sat, 8-12; no experience or partner needed, beginner lesson followed by social dance; sugarswing.com SUITE 69 Stella Saturday: retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests TAVERN ON WHYTE Soul,

Motown, Funk, R&B and more with DJs Ben and Mitch; every Sat; 9pm-2am

UNION HALL Celebrity

Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous

Y AFTERHOURS Release

Saturdays

SUN MAR 30 BAILEY THEATRE– Camrose The Bailey’s Buckaroos Classic Country Extravaganza; 1pm (door), 2pm (show); $12 at the Bailey box office BIG AL’S HOUSE OF BLUES

Sunday BBQ jam hosted by Marshall Lawrence; 4-8pm; no cover BLACKJACK’S ROADHOUSE– Nisku Open mic every Sun

hosted by Tim Lovett

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Sunday

brunch: Hawaiian Dreamers; 10am-3pm; donations

BLUES ON WHYTE Donald Ray

Johnson

BRITTANY’S Kent Sangster

Trio; 5-8pm

CHA ISLAND Open mic with March Music Inc; Every Sun 7pm DUGGAN’S Celtic Music

7-10:30pm

Misery Mountain Boys; 8pm

Jam hosted by Mark Ammar

game); no cover

DV8 Canadian Rifle (Chicago),

PLEASANTVIEW HALL

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Duane Allen

LIVE AT SLY’S Open jam every Wed hosted by Will Cole; 7-11pm

Cancers (Athens, GA), Daydreaming; 9pm; $8

FESTIVAL PLACE Fearing and

White (folk duo); 7:30pm; $32 (table)/$30 (box)/$28 (theatre) at Festival Place box office

HOG’S DEN PUB Rockin’ the

Hog Jam: Hosted by Tony Ruffo; every Sun, 3:30-7pm

JOHN L. HAAR THEATRE– MacEwan Uni Contemporary

Combos (Year 3 Concert); 7:30pm

ROUGE RESTO-LOUNGE

RICHARDS PUB Sunday

Country Showcase and jam hosted by Darren Gusnowsky and Curtis Ebner RITCHIE UNITED CHURCH

Kent Sangster Trio; 3:305pm; silver collection at door YARDBIRD SUITE

International Jazz Series: From Luxembourg: Reis/ Demuth/Wiltgen Trio; 7:30pm (door), 8pm (show); $18 (member)/$22 (guest) at Ticketmaster.ca

Classical ALL SAINTS’ ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL Baroque and

CONVOCATION HALL Monday

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Blue Jay’s Messy Nest:

mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay

DV8 T.F.W.O. Mondays: Roots

industrial,Classic Punk, Rock, Electronic with Hair of the Dave

TAVERN ON WHYTE Classic

Hip hop with DJ Creeazn every Mon; 9pm-2am

TUE APR 1 ARTERY Reuben, the Dark, the Darcys, NO; 8pm BIG AL’S HOUSE OF BLUES Tue

Jam with Big Dreamer; 7pm (door); no cover

BLUES ON WHYTE James

Buddy Rogers

the Current: Alissa Cheung; 7:30pm; donation

DRUID IRISH PUB Open

LENDRUM MENNONITE BRETHREN CHURCH Excentrica

L.B.’S Tue Variety Night Open

& Friends: Women’s Chamber Chorus; 7pm

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: Soul Sundays: A fantastic voyage through ‘60s and ‘70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Stylus

Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky, Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am

MON MAR 31 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Sleeman Mon: live music monthly; no cover Buddy Rogers

DIVERSION LOUNGE Sunday

NEW WEST HOTEL Silverado

BLUES ON WHYTE James

PAWN SHOP New Country

Rehab with Eyes on Ivan,

Session: Mike Morriseau; 7:30pm (door)/8pm (show); $5

College Choir Concert: King’s Music Faculty Joachim Segger (organ), Jessica Ginn (piano), guests Millcreek Colliery Band, David Hoyt (conductor), Duo Majoya; 7:30pm; $20 (adult)/$15 (senior/student)/$5 (child under 12) at Winspear box office, King’s University College Bookstore, 780.465.8306

Giant (Mind Over Matter Tour), Vance Joy; 7pm (door), 8pm (show); all ages; $29.50

Noon Music: Piano Concert; noon; free

Sun; 9:30pm-1am

YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday

WINSPEAR CENTRE Young the

NEWCASTLE PUB The Sunday Soul Service: acoustic open stage every Sun

O’BYRNE’S Open mic every

Joanne Janzen

Classical

Classical

ON THE ROCKS Blues Night with The Nightkeepers

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Open Mic Night with Darrek Anderson from the Guaranteed; every Mon; 9pm

LIVE AT SLY’S Every Sun Jam hosted by Steve and Bob; 6-10pm

with Duggan’s House Band; 5-8pm; singer-songwriter open stage Night Live on the South Side: live bands; all ages;

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm; contact Vi Kallio 780.456.8510

Stage Tue; 9pm

WINSPEAR Kings University

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE MAIN FLOOR: alternative retro and

not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail; WOOFTOP: The Night with No Name featuring DJs Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests playing tasteful, eclectic selections BRIXX Metal night every Tue DV8 Creepy Tombsday:

Psychobilly, Hallowe’en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

RED STAR Experimental Indie

rock, hip hop, electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue

SUITE 69 Rockstar Tuesdays: Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

stage with Darrell Barr; 7-11pm

WED APR 2

LEAF BAR Tue Open Jam:

ALBERTA BEACH HOTEL Open

Trevor Mullen

LIVE AT SLY’S Jam hosted

by Rockin’ Randy Every Tue, 7-11pm

stage Wed with Trace Jordan; 8pm-12

BIG AL’S HOUSE OF BLUES

MERCER TAVERN Alt Tuesday

with Kris Harvey and guests

Robbie’s Reef Break Wed: Host Rob Taylor with guests every Wed, 7-10pm

NEW WEST HOTEL Tue

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

Country Dance Lessons: 7-9pm; Silverado

O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam every Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm OVERTIME Sherwood Park

Open stage every Tue

Floor: Glitter Gulch: live music once a month; On the Patio:

Funk and Soul with Doktor Erick every Wed; 9pm

BLUES ON WHYTE A Fist Full

of Blues

BRITTANY’S LOUNGE Jazz

MERCURY ROOM Little Flower

Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12

NEW WEST HOTEL Silverado OVERTIME Sherwood Park

Jason Greeley (acoustic rock, country, Top 40); 9pm-2am every Wed; no cover PAWN SHOP Wacken Metal

Battles Edmonton–Round III

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL Acoustic Bluegrass

jam presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; every Wed, 6:30-11pm; $2 (member)/$4 (non-member) RED PIANO Wed Night Live:

hosted by dueling piano players; 8pm-1am; $5

REXALL PLACE Kings of Leon,

Local Natives; 6:30pm (door), 7:30pm (show); all ages; $25.50, $49.50, $69.50

SHERLOCK HOLMES– Downtown Duane Allen SHERLOCK HOLMES–U of A

Adam Holm

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Joanne Janzen

STARLITE ROOM The Kin, guests; 8pm (door); no minors; $15 at Unionevents. com, Blackbyrd ZEN LOUNGE Jazz

Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

Classical MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH

James Ehnes (violin), Andrew Armstrong (piano); 8pm; $50 (adult)/$40 (senior)/$20 (student) at ECMS, TIX on the Square, the Gramophone

DJs BILLIARD CLUB Why wait Wednesdays: Wed night party with DJ Alize every Wed; no cover BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: RetroActive Radio:

Alternative ‘80s and ‘90s, post punk, new wave, garage, Brit, mod, rock and roll with LL Cool Joe

BRIXX Eats and Beats

evening every Wed; 8-11pm: This week: Kent Sangster Trio; 8-11pm

THE COMMON The Wed Experience: Classics on Vinyl with Dane

DUGGAN’S Wed open mic

with host Duff Robison

NIKKI DIAMONDS Punk and ‘80s metal every Wed

RICHARDS PUB Tue Live Music Showcase and Open

ELEPHANT AND CASTLE– Whyte Ave Open mic every

Wed

8900-114 St, U of A

RED PIANO Every Tue: the

Nervous Flirts Jameoke Experience (sing-along with a live band); 7:30pm-12am; no cover; relaxed dress code

RED STAR Guest DJs every

Wed (unless there’s an Oilers

VENUEGUIDE ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179

CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK 99, 23349 Wye Rd, Sherwood Park

EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ 9938-70 Ave, 780.437.3667

ALE YARD TAP 13310-137 Ave

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE 9351118 Ave, 780.471.1580

FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378

ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 "B" STREET BAR 11818-111 St

CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464153 St, 780.424 9467

BAILEY THEATRE–CAMROSE 5041-50 St, Camrose

CENTRAL SENIOR LIONS CENTRE 11113-113 St

BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES 12402-118 Ave BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE– NISKU 2110 Sparrow Dr, Nisku, 780.986.8522

FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 FLUID LOUNGE 10888 Jasper Ave, 780.429.0700 FORT LOUNGE 13403 Fort Rd

CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000

HARCOURT HOUSE ANNEX 10211-112 St

CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482

HOGS DEN Yellowhead Tr, 142 St

CHICAGO JOES 9604 -111 Ave

IRISH SPORTS CLUB 12546-126 St, 780.453.2249

NEWCASTLE 8170-50 St, 780.490.1999 NEW WEST HOTEL 15025-111 Ave NOORISH CAFÉ 8440-109 St NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535109A Ave O2'S–WEST 11066-156 St, 780.448.2255 O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766

COMMON 9910-109 St

J+H 1919-105 St

O'MAILLES 104, 398 St Albert Rd, St Albert

BLIND PIG 32 St Anne St, 780.418.6332

DARAVARA 10713 124 St, 587.520.4980

J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403

ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861

DIVERSION LOUNGE 3414 Gateway Blvd, 780.435.1922

JEFFREY’S CAFÉ 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890

BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981

DOW–SHELL THEATRE–FT SASK 8700-84 St, Fort Saskatchewan

KELLY'S 10156-104 St

OVERTIME–SHERWOOD PARK 100 Granada Blvd, Sherwood Park, 790.570.5588

BOHEMIA 10217-97 St

DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834

BOURBON ROOM 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert THE BOWER 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.425; info@thebower.ca BRITTANY'S 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099

32 MUSIC

CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467

NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730

DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 DUSTER’S 6402-118 Ave, 780.474.5554 DV8 8130 Gateway Blvd EARLY STAGE SALOON– STONY PLAIN 4911-52 Ave, Stony Plain

THE BUCKINGHAM 10439 82 Ave, 780.761.1002 BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636

ELECTRIC RODEO–SPRUCE GROVE 121-1 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.1411

CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca

ELEPHANT AND CASTLE–WHYTE AVE 10314 Whyte Ave

CAFÉ TIRAMISU 10750-124 St

ENCORE–WEM 2687, 8882-170 St

RIC’S GRILL 24 Perron Street, St Albert, 780.460.6602 ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235-101 St SET NIGHTCLUB Next to Bourban St, 8882-170 St, WEM, Ph III, setnightclub.ca SIDELINERS 11018-127 St SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810-124 St, 587.521.6328 SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St, 780.758.5924 STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION 10940-166 A St SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave SUITE 69 2 Fl, 8232 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6969

PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814

TAVERN ON WHYTE 10507-82 Ave, 780.521.4404

LEAF BAR 9016-132 Ave, 780.757.2121

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave

LEGENDS 9221-34 Ave, 780.988.2599

PORTUGESE CANADIAN SOCIETY HALL 12964-52 St

VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO–ST ALBERT 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128

LEVEL 2 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495

RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722

WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414

RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825

WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286

RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St

Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours.com

L.B.’S 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100

LIT ITALIAN WINE BAR 10132-104 St LIVE AT SLY'S 15203 Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.0869 MERCER TAVERN 10363 104 St, 587.521.1911

RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780.457.3118

MERCURY ROOM 10575-114 St

RITCHIE UNITED CHURCH 9624-74 Ave

MYER HOROWITZ THEATRE

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

WEST END CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH 10015-149 St

YARDBIRD SUITE 11 Tommy Banks Way, 780.432.0428 YEG DANCE CLUB 11845 Wayne Gretzky Dr


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

COMEDY Black Dog Freehouse • Underdog Comedy

FERTILITY AWARENESS CHARTING CIRCLE • Justisse-Healthworks for Women,

10145-81 Ave • justisse.ca • Meeting • Apr 7, 6:30-8:30pm • $10 (donation)

FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church, 8424-95 Ave, 780.465.2019, 780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm LOTUS QIGONG, 780.477.0683 • Downtown • NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-

106 St, 780.435.0845 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

CENTURY CASINO • 13103 Fort Rd,

NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall,

780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:30-9pm

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment

Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Thu: 8:30pm; Fri: 8:30pm; Sat: 8pm and 10:30pm • Jeff Leeson; Mar 27-29 • Hannibal Thompson; Apr 3-5 • That's Improv; Apr 10-12

COMIC STRIP • Bourbon St, WEM, 780.483.5999 • Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm • Hit or Miss Mondays: Amateurs and Professionals every Mon, 7:30pm • Battle to the Funny Bone; last Tue each month, 7:30pm • Jeff Leeson; Mar 27-29 • Tommy Davidson special presentation: Mar 27-30, $28.95 • Bert Kreisher; Apr 3-5 • Bobby Lee Special Presentation; Apr 1012 • Daniel Kinno; Apr 16-20 • Andy Hendrickson; Apr 23-27 DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.710.2119 •

Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm

EMPRESS ALE HOUSE • 9912-82 Ave •

Empress Comedy Night: featuring a professional headliner every week Every Sun, 9pm

KRUSH ULTRALOUNGE/CONNIES COMEDY

• Komedy Krush with Simon King; follows a Capital City Singles Mixer; Mar 27, 9pm • If you want on the roster, call 780.914.8966

0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

SHERWOOD PARK WALKING GROUP + 50 • Meet inside Millennium Place, Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10min discussion, followed by a 30 to 40-min walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta)

SOCIETY OF EDMONTON ATHEISTS •

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • Comedy Groove every Wed; 9pm

SOUTH EDMONTON GARDENING VEGETARIAN/VEGAN CLUB • Park Allen Hall,

11018-127 St • Connie's Comedy Travelling Open Mic - April Fool's Day with Howie Miller • April 1, 8pm • If you want on this roster, call 780.914.8966

GREAT EXPEDITIONS • St Luke’s Anglican Church, 8424-95 Ave, 780.469.3270 • 1st Mon every month • Galapagos Islands, Ecuador and Machu Picchu, Peru (2013); presentation by Jim Cochrane • Mon, Apr 7, 7:30pm • Suggested donation of $2

SEVENTIES FOREVER MUSIC SOCIETY • Call 587.520.3833 for location • deepsoul.ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm

comedy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free

SIDELINERS PUB/CONNIE'S COMEDY •

Cathedral, 10825-97 St, 780.422.3181 • Public veneration • Every Tue, Thu 4-9pm, Sun 1-4pm until Apr 10

Braeside Presbyterian Church bsmt, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon, 7:30pm

OVERTIME PUB • 4211-106 St • Open mic

11104-65 Ave • Vegetarian Potluck: Bring Vegetarian/Vegan/Raw dish for six; and talk: Container Gardening in Edmonton, featuring speaker Bernice Kadatz at 6:30pm • Mar 30

GROUPS/CLUBS/MEETINGS

SUGAR FOOT SWING DANCE • Sugar Swing, 10545-81 Ave • 587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Swing Dance Social every Sat; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check the Sugar Swing website for info • $10, $2 lesson with entry

AIKIKAI AIKIDO CLUB • 10139-87 Ave, Old

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave •

WINSPEAR CENTRE • International Comedy Sensation Danny Bhoy with His New Show dear Epson • Mar 30, 7:30pm • $37.50 and $42.50

Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL EDMONTON •

8307-109 St • edmontonamnesty.org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug) E: amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org for more info • Free

ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE AT FOOT NOTES STUDIO • Foot Notes Dance Studio

(South side), 9708-45 Ave, 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pm-midnight • $15

587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Friday Night Stomp!: Swing and party music dance social every Fri; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check web • $10, $2 (lesson with entry)

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY (TOPS) • Grace United Church annex, 6215-104 Ave • Lowcost, fun and friendly weight loss group • Every Mon, 6:30pm • Info: call Bob 780.479.5519 TOASTMASTERS • Fabulous Facilitators Toastmasters Club: 2nd Fl, Canada Place, 9700

• Strathcona Library, Program Room, upstairs • fairvote.ca • Democracy Shorts: Free popcorn and cold beverages • Apr 1, 7pm • facebook.com/ events/676302442412137

Jasper Ave; 780.467.6013, l.witzke@shaw.ca; fabulousfacilitators.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 12:05-1pm • Westend TNT Toastmasters: Trinity United Church, 8810 Meadowlark Rd; Public speaking: Parliamentary practice based on Robert's Rules of Order; vpm-2291@toastmastersclubs. org; weekly meetings every Tue, 7-9pm (Jul-Aug off) • N'Orators Toastmasters Club: Lower Level, McClure United Church, 13708-74 St: meet every Thu, 6:45-8:30pm; contact bradscherger@hotmail. com, 780.863.1962, norators.com • Y Toastmasters Club: Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); Meet every Tue, 7-9pm except last Tue ea month; Contact: Antonio Balce, 780.463.5331

FAIR VOTE CANADA–Edmonton Chapter

VOGUING • Pique Dance Centre, 10604-105

EDMONTON NEEDLECRAFT GUILD • Avonmore United Church Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm FAIR VOTE CANADA–Edmonton Chapter

• Strathcona Library, Program Room, upstairs • fairvote.ca • Chapter's monthly meeting • Wed, Apr 16, 7pm

FAIR VOTE CANADA–Edmonton Chapter •

Boston Pizza meeting rm, bsmt, 10854 Whyte Ave • fairvote.ca • Fair Vote Canada–the Edmonton Chapter's Annual General Meeting: Free pizza at 6pm; screening of a short, funny film, elect a new board • Tue, Apr 29, 6pm

and Conference Centre, 4820-76 Ave • Dinner and Silent Auction • Sat, Apr 5, 5:30pm (auction bidding starts), 6:30pm (dinner) • $50 (adv, before Apr 1) at 780.718.2984; proceeds to assist others in developing inner peace by supporting the ongoing operations of Gaden Samten Ling’s Alberta Centre for Peace and Meditation

EPARCHIAL VENERATION OF THE HOLY SHROUD • St Josaphat Ukrainian Catholic

SAWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP •

SONGWRITERS GROUP • The Carrot, 9351118 Ave, 780.973.5311 • nashvillesongwriters. com • NSAI (Nashville Songwriters Association International) meet the 2nd Mon each month, 7-9pm

cona Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence

AN EVENING IN TIBET • Meridian Banquet

ORGANIZATION FOR BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm

Stanley A. Milner Library, Centennial Rm (bsmt); edmontonatheists.ca; E: info@edmontonatheists. ca; Monthly roundtable • Mon, Apr 7

vs. Spenny vs. Canada: Kenny Hotz and Spencer Rice an evening of comedy, Q & A, behind the scenes footage and more • Apr 1, 8-11pm

group plans a 10 km guided hike • Car pool available meeting place to trail • Meet at McDonalds, 14920-87 Ave • Hike the Blackfoot Recreation Area; contact Michele 780.417.6928 • Mar 30

LECTURES/PRESENTATIONS

3728-106 St • nawca.ca • Annual Spring Show & Competition: Wood art, Crafts, Retail Booths, Demonstrations, Food; Apr 26-27, 10am-5pm; free admission and parking

MYER HOROWITZ THEATRE • U of A • Kenny

WASKAHEGAN TRAIL HIKES • Each week

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of the Old Strath-

Practice group meets every Thu

show: Alternating hosts • Every Thu, 8-11pm • No cover

ETY • Delwood Community Hall, 7515 Delwood Rd • wildroseantiquecollectors.ca • Collecting and researching items from various periods in the history of Edmonton. Presentations after club business. Visitors welcome • Meets the 4th Mon of every month (except Jul & Dec), 7:30pm

Ave • A blend of Dance, Modelling and Acting; all bodies/levels • Every Sun, 7-8pm until Apr 13 • $5-$10 (Sliding Scale); info: houseofdam@yahoo. com

THE LEGACY OF LIVING TOGETHER • trc. ca • Local meets national: arts project to bear witness to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s National Event in Edmonton • Mar 27-Apr 1 • Free • City Hall City Rm: A PLACE TO HANG YOUR STORIES: Visual art installation featuring an interactive art project and healing garden by Cree Metis artist Dawn Marie Marchand; Mar 27-30 • City Hall, City Rm, Mezz and Stanley Milner Library, 2nd Fl: Photos by Ken Armstrong; Mar 27-30 • CKUA Radio Bldg, 9804 Jasper Ave: BUNK 7: by Larry Guno, residential school survivor: play reading, Elder Song and talk back by Porcupine Stone Productions; Mar 27, 5pm • Winspear Lobby: Dreamspeakers’ Walk of Honour Ceremony with Douglas Cardinal, Willie Littlechild, Audrey Poitras, and Pearl Calahasen; Mar 29, 2pm • CKUA Radio Bldg: A MUSTA BE: MASKIHKIY MASKWA ISKWEW: play reading and talk back by Jane Heather and Old Earth Productions; Mar 31, 7:30pm • Stanley Milner Library Theatre: Indigenous Writers Readings featuring Anne Marie Sewell, Naomi McIlwraith, Norma Dunning, Nola Nalugiak, Daniel Poitras, Doris Torangeau, and Marilyn Dumont. Music by Cris Derksen, and contemporary dance, Native Girl Syndrome, choreographed by Lara Kramer; Apr 1, 6:30pm FABULOUS FABRIC FRENZY • Strathearn

United Church, 8510-095 Ave • edmgrandmothers. org • Fundraiser is a sale of donated fabric, yarns & notions being sold @ bargain prices. The GANG (Grandmothers of Alberta for a New Generation) raises funds to support African grandmothers caring for millions of children orphaned by the AIDS pandemic. Profits go to the Stephen Lewis Foundation. Event in cooperation with the women's group @ Strathearn United Churc • Apr 5, 9:30am3:30pm; donate: 780.434.0036, 780.469.6327

THIS OLD EDMONTON HOUSE SEMINARS • Reed's Tea Room, Fort Edmonton Park: Millwork

And Floors: by Johanne Yakula; Apr 2, 7-9pm; $20; registration #519455 • Edmonton.ca/city_government/Edmonton_archives/This-Old-EdmontonHouse-Seminars.aspx • Reed’s Tea Room, Firkins and Rutherford Houses, Fort Edmonton Park: Historic Interiors Tour: by Johanne Yakula; Apr 5, 7-9pm; $20; registration #519450 • AGT Bldg or Reed's Tea Room, Fort Edmonton Park: Foundations: by Arda Ozum And Peter Caron; Apr 7, 7-9pm; $20; registration #519447 • AGT Bldg or Reed's Tea Room, Fort Edmonton Park: Wall Treatments: by Johanne Yakula; Apr 9, 7-9pm; $20; registration #519456

SEEING IS ABOVE ALL • Acacia Hall, 1043383 Ave, upstairs, 780.554.6133 • Free instruction into the meditation on the Inner Light • Every Sun, 5pm TRASHED: A MOVIE AND PANEL DISCUSSION • Strathcona County Council Chambers,

401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park, 780.410.8601 • sclibrary.ab.ca • Screening of the documentary Trashed, panel discussion follows the movie • Apr 3 7-9:30pm • Pre-register at 780.410.8600 • Free

BEERS FOR QUEERS • Empress Ale House, 9912 Whyte Ave • Meet the last Thu each month

ter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured

BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP • A social group for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo. com/group/bwedmonton

WOODYS VIDEO BAR • 11723 Jasper Ave, 780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725 Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE • 10220-103 St, 780.424.0077 • yourgaybar.com • Community Tue: partner with various local GLBT groups for different events; see online for details • Happy Hour Wed-Fri: 4-8pm • Wed Karaoke: with the Mystery Song Contest; 7pm-2am • Fri: DJ Evictor • Sat: DJ Jazzy • Sun: Beer Bash G.L.B.T. SPORTS AND RECREATION • teamedmonton.ca • Blazin' Bootcamp: Garneau Elementary School Gym, 10925-87 Ave; Every Mon and Thu, 7pm; $30/$15 (low income/student); E: bootcamp@teamedmonton.ca • Mindful Meditation: Pride Centre: Every Thu, 6pm; free weekly drop-in • Swimming–Making Waves: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; E: swimming@teamedmonton. ca; makingwavesswimclub.ca • Bowling: Bonnie Doon Bowling Lanes: Every Tue, 6:30pm; until Apr 1, 2014; $15/week • Volleyball: Stratford JuniorSenior High School (west end): every Tue, until Apr 29, 7-9pm, $65 (season), $35 (Half season), $5 (drop-in) • Martial Arts–Kung Fu and Kick Boxing: Every Tue and Thu, 6-7pm; GLBTQ inclusive adult classes at Sil-Lum Kung Fu; kungfu@teamedmonton.ca, kickboxing@teamedmonton.ca, sillum.ca G.L.B.T.Q SENIORS GROUP • S.A.G.E

Bldg, Craftroom, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: tuff @shaw.ca

ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB • Pride Centre,

10608-105 Ave, 780.387.3343 • edmontonillusions.ca • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7:30-9pm

LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling

MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB • geocities.com/makingwaves_edm • Recreational/ competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu

St • The Congregationalist Wiccan Assembly of Alberta meets the 2nd Sun each month (except Aug), 6pm • Info: contact cwaalberta@gmail.com

WILD ROSE ANTIQUE COLLECTORS SOCI-

AN EVENING IN TIBET • Meridian Banquet

Hall, 4820-76 Ave • Indian buffet, silent auction featuring a variety of imported goods from Tibetan refugee communities • Sat, Apr 5, 5:30pm (door, pre-bidding), 6:30pm (dinner) • $50 at gadensamtenling.org/003-events/Evening_In_Tibet_Tickets. htm, 780.718.2984

DEEPSOUL.CA • 587.520.3833; text to: 780.530.1283 for location • Classic Covers Shindig Fundraiser • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins on Les Paul Standard guitars: upcoming Century Casino show as well; Twilight Zone Razamanaz Tour; all ages • Fundraising for local Canadian Disaster Relief, the hungry (world-wide through the Canadian Food Grains Bank) FASHION FOR FREEDOM • City Life, Unit 1, 5216-50 Ave, Leduc • poiemaproductions.com • A night of food, entertainment and an innovative fashion show featuring designs by local artists using secondhand clothing, fabrics, and items. Fundraiser and awareness gala in support of the George Spady Society • Apr 12, 7pm • $30 (early bird before Mar 28)/$40 (after Mar 28) at TIX on the Square FOR THE LOVE OF WINTER • TransAlta Arts

Barns • Design Competition and Fashion Show: Competition challenges local fashion designers to create a winter outfit that will inspire us to dress warmly and fashionably • Until Apr 4 • edmonton. ca/city_government/initiatives_innovation/winterfestivals-events.aspx

HOARDING INTERVENTIONS CONFERENCE

• Santa Maria Goretti Centre, 11050-90 St • Conference encourages integrated community response to hoarding disorder presented by Canadian Mental Health Association • Until Mar 28 • edmonton.cmha.ca/events/2014-hoarding-interventionsconference-save-the-date/#.UzBnNIVpfx4

HOT CHEFS, COOL BEATS • Shaw Conference Centre, 9797 Jasper Ave • Street food festival, mini film-festival; ending with dancing to music by the Rockin’ Highliners • Mar 29, 6:30-10:30pm • $125 + gst, includes all food and beverage at hotchefs. ca; no minors; proceeds to the High School Culinary Challenge and Edmonton Community Foundation’s Grateful Palate Fund MINBID IN STITCHES • Coup & Workhall Bou-

OUTLOUD - LGBT YOUTH GROUP • St Paul's

tiques, #101/102 10137-104 St • minbidauctions. com • Silent and Live Art Auction: Art and Fashion • Fri, Apr 4, 8-11pm

PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON • Pride Cen-

ORCHID FAIR • Enjoy Centre, 101 Riel Dr, St Albert • orchidsalberta.com • Orchid Society of Alberta's celebration of everything from plants (rare and beginners), displays, art, workshops and lectures • Apr 4-6 • $10; free for children under 12

United Church, 11526-76 Ave • A group LGBT teens from religious backgrounds • Meet the 1st and 3rd Wed each month, 7-9pm; beginning until Jun 18 • Free

tre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave, 780.488.3234 • A safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental drop-in space, support programs and resources offered for members of the GLBTQ community, their families and friends • Daily: Community drop-in; support and resources. Queer library: borrowing privileges: Tue-Fri 12-9pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, closed Sun-Mon; Queer HangOUT (a.k.a. QH) youth drop-in: Tue-Fri 3-8pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, youth@ pridecentreofedmonton.org • Counselling: Free, short-term by registered counsellors every Wed, 5:30-8:30pm, info/bookings: 780.488.3234 • Knotty Knitters: Knit and socialize in safe, accepting environment, all skill levels welcome; every Wed 6-8pm • QH Game Night: Meet people through board game fun; every Thu 6-8pm • QH Craft Night: every Wed, 6-8pm • QH Anime Night: Watch anime; every Fri, 6-8pm • Movie Night: Open to everyone; 2nd and 4th Fri each month, 6-9pm • Women’s Social Circle: Social support group for female-identified persons +18 years in the GLBT community; new members welcome; 2nd and 4th Thu, 7-9pm each month; andrea@ pridecentreofedmonton.org • Men Talking with Pride: Support and social group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; every Sun 7-9pm; robwells780@hotmail.com • HIV Support Group: Support and discussion group for gay men; 2nd Mon, 7-9pm, each month; huges@shaw.ca

PRIMETIMERS/SAGE GAMES • Unitarian

Church, 10804-119 St, 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm

ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH • 11526-76

WICCAN ASSEMBLY • Ritchie Hall, 7727-98

SPECIAL EVENTS

QUEER

Ave, 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sunnybrook United Church, Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month

WOMONSPACE, 780.482.1794 • womonspace.

PARK INSTITUTE ADVOCACY CONFERENCE • Chateau Lacombe Hotel, 10111 Bellamy

Hill • pialberta.org/content/pia-2014-annualconference • Featuring Creating Earth Democracy: Reclaiming the Commons from Corporate Enclosures with keynote speaker, Vandana Shiva • Apr 11 • Pre-register by Apr 8

PEROGIES FOR A PAWS • Artery, 9535 Jasper Ave • Edmonton Humane Society Fundraiser: Performances by Amy Van Keeken, Pretty Taken, Bootsy Cline, Jessica Marsh, and selling their homemade perogies • Wed, Apr 9, 7:30pm • $6 (adv) at theartery.ca RUN WILD FOR WILDLIFE • William Hawrelak Park • wildlife-edm.ca/events • Walk/Run fundraiser for the Wildlife Rehabiliation Society of Edmonton (who rehabilitate injured wildlife, clean oiled wildlife, and educate the public on wildlife stewardship) • Apr 13; register online through the Running Room SPRING EDMONTON POP CULTURE FAIR

• Alberta Aviation Museum, 11410 Kingsway Ave • popculturefair.com • The pop culture fair is a one day pop up market, held in the spring and fall specializing in all things pop culture, Toys, videogames, music and movies • Mar 30, 10am4:30pm • $7/free (child 10 and under)

THIS IS WHAT WE SEE • Crestwood Com-

munity Hall, 14325-96 Ave, 780.686.8777 • African art sale • Apr 4, 5-10pm; Apr 5 10am-5pm • Proceeds support the Chipembele Wildlife Education Trust, South Luangwa Conservation Society

ca, womonspace@gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newslet-

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

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CLASSIFIEDS

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To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com 130.

Coming Events

ATTENTION! OPEN CALL FOR SPEAKERS: TEDxEdmonton is looking for potential speakers to present their ideas worth sharing! If you know somebody or are that somebody that can follow through with this years theme of ‘For Certain: Uncertainty’ apply through our website http://www.tedxedmonton.com/ speakers/application.html or email at info@tedxedmonton.com YWCA Edmonton has been honouring the best and brightest women in our city for over 30 years. We are now accepting nominations for the 2014 YWCA Women of Distinction Awards. Edmontonians are urged to reflect upon the exceptional women in our city and nominate someone in one of eight categories:Advocate,Arts & Culture,Volunteer,Educator, Entrepreneur & Businesswoman,Trailblazer, Turning Point, Young Woman of Distinction The nomination process is simple: submit a form online or fill out a hard copy and submit via mail or email. Both options are available on the Women of Distinction website ywcaofedmontonwomenofdisti nction.org Important Dates: Nominations Deadline | Friday March 28, 2014

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Courses/Classes

EPL Free Courses: Edmonton AB Check out the Free Online Interactive Instructor Led Courses offered through the Edmonton Public Library. Some of the courses for visual artists would include: Creating WordPress Websites, Secrets of Better Photography Beginning Writer’s Workshop many more… For a list of Free Courses visit: https://www.epl.ca/learn4life For information and instruction on how to get started https://www.epl.ca/learn4life

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Help Wanted

AGA seeks Special Events & Volunteer Coordinator The Art Gallery of Alberta (AGA), a non-profit arts institution, is seeking an energetic, innovative and highly organized candidate to fill the full-time position of Special Events & Volunteer Coordinator. Salary commensurate with experience. Please submit resume and cover letters to careers@youraga.ca by 5pm on Thursday, February 20, 2014. No phone calls please. Only those considered for an interview will be contacted.

Greenline Distribution seeks full time driver

Must have a clean driver’s abstract, able to drive a 5 ton cube truck. Experience preferred but not necessary. 40 hrs per week. Interested parties please contact Mike Garth at michael@vueweekly.com or at 780-707-0476

MORE CLASSIFIEDS ONLINE @ VUEWEEKLY.COM/ CLASSIFIED/ 34 AT THE BACK

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Volunteers Wanted

Are You Looking for a Great Volunteer Experience? Habitat for Humanity’s On-Tap volunteer program allows busy people to get out and volunteer when they can. For more information about the On-Tap program. angela@hfh.org or 780-451-3416 ext 223. HFH.org Can You Read This? Help someone Who can’t! Volunteer 2 hours a week and help someone improve their Reading, Writing, Math or English Speaking Skills. Call Valerie at P.A.L.S 780-424-5514 or email palsvol@shaw.ca Give some, Get some. Come have some fun, a little exercise and be recognized. We require volunteers almost every day of the week to help at various bingo locations around the city (WEM, Castledowns, south side). You give your time (4-6 hour shift) and we recognize your efforts. You do not need any experience as everything will be taught to you and you will be completely supported. Calll Christine at 780-953-1510 or email at christine.poirier@cnib.ca for more information Bingo is a smoke-free and friendly environment. Growing Facilitators Volunteer Opportunity Sustainable Food Edmonton offers a Little Green Thumbs indoor gardening program to schools and childcare agencies and we are looking for volunteers. For info and volunteer application form:

www.sustainablefoodedmonton.o rg

Habitat for Humanity is building at Neufeld Landing! We are actively scheduling individuals and groups of volunteers for Canada’s largest project located in South Edmonton’s Rutherford area. To get involved, go to www.hfh.org and register as a volunteer. Kim Dedeugd 780-451-3416 kdedeugd@hfh.org Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network’s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers! Interested or want to learn more? Contact Maura at 780-392-8723 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation create a future without breast cancer through volunteerism. Contact 1-866-302-2223 or ivolunteer@cbcf.org for current volunteer opportunities

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Volunteers Wanted

Needed for our Long Term Care residence, daytime volunteers for various activities or just for a friendly visit!Needed for our Long Term Care Residence, weekday morning volunteers for various activities. Especially for assisting with transporting residents to rehab, church services and hairdresser within facility. All volunteers must pass a Police clearance. Please contact Janice at Extendicare Eaux Claires for more details jgraff@extendicare.com (780) 472 - 1106

Options Sexual Health Association is looking for prochoice and sex-positive volunteers to attend events and festivals all summer long and beyond! Comprehensive training will be held throughout April. Please visit our website www.optionssexualhealth.ca to fill out an application form

Room to Read is changing children’s lives in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our work, and spread the word about our amazing results. Edmonton@roomtoread.org www.roomtoread.org

RUNNERS WANTED Run Wild for Wildlife is a campaign that raises money for the Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton . This year’s Walk/Run is taking place on April 13th, 2014. We are looking for vegan/vegetarian runners to join the VVoA’s team for this event! Please email info@vofa.ca if you are interested in participating, or if you have any questions. Representatives of the VVoA will also be selling vegan cookies at the event, with the proceeds going to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton.

Showcase your creativity and love for the environment! Become a Reuse Crafter! Reuse Crafters lead crafting workshops that focus on the utilization of Reuse materials. Guide public crafting workshops at locations in the Edmonton community Plan meaningful crafts, suited to participants abilities Engage with participants and educate about Reuse and the Reuse Centre Apply online. Visit edmonton.ca/reusecentre

The Canadian Cancer Society’s strongest asset is our dedicated volunteers. By offering the most meaningful opportunities for you to make the biggest difference as a volunteer, we’re having more impact, against more cancers, in more communities, than any other cancer charity. For more information on how to get involved: http://www.cancer.ca/en/getinvolved/volunteering/ways-tovolunteer/?region=ab#ixzz2vac GwaEX

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteering - Does your employer have a Day of Caring program? Volunteers from beginners to garage “putterers”, to trades people come out and help us to build homes for families in our community. For more information, go to our website at www.hfh.org or contact Kim at 780-451-3416 ext 232. Volunteering - Improve the Lives of Children in the Developing World Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our programs, and spread the word about the fantastic results we are achieving. Skills in event planning, PR, marketing, graphic design are needed, but not essential. We welcome all volunteers. If this sounds interesting, email us at Edmonton@roomtoread.org

2005.

Artist to Artist

1st Assistant Director required for a motion picture to work with main director. Action adventure film. 1st assistant director must be willing to travel to occasionally to Jasper National Park (township) to assist main director. 1st Assistant director must be able to use the Arriflex film camera. The 1st assistant director must reside in the Edmonton Area. (or soon will be) For more details, contact Craig at crgsymonds49@gmail.com, or at 1-613-484-7063. (director would like to thank those who have contacted me) A New Award for Emerging Artists raises the profile of the Arts in Red Deer! For more information contact Diana at info@reddeerartscouncil.ca (403)348-2787 Hours: Monday to Wednesday, 9am to 4:30pm Alberta Foundation for the Arts: Art Acquisition by Application Deadline: April 01st, 2014 For more information and to download forms visit: http://www.affta.ab.ca/ArtCollection Art Gallery of St Albert (AGSA), seeks submissions from artists working in all styles and mediums for exhibition in the 2015 calendar year. Deadline for submissions: Saturday, March 1, 2014, 5 pm For more information: Jenny Willson-McGrath, Exhibition Curator 780.651.5741 I jennyw@artsheritage.ca Assistant Film Producer required to assist main Film Producer with funding, must reside in Edmonton area only, must have experience with Telefilm Canada funding (as main producer, needs second producer to acquire funds). Must be willing to travel to Jasper National Park to assist producer on location. Female preferred. The project is an action adventure film. Contact Craig at crgsymonds49@gmail.com or 1-613-484-7063 for more information Call For Submissions: The 2014 Calgary Biennial This event will take place in numerous venues around the Calgary between December 2014 to January 2015. If you’re interested in being part of the biennial, you can apply before May 1st. For more information, check out the website: http://calgarybiennial.ca/

2005.

Artist to Artist

Call For Submission To SHE Publication: Edmonton Edmonton’s Women’s Arts Museum (WAM) is looking for articles by and about women in Canadian visual art to feature in their upcoming publication Sharing Her Experience (SHE). Articles can be about women who are overlooked, opinion articles about Canadian visual artwork and how it relates to women, or spotlights on women currently creating artwork within Canada. If you are interested, you can submit by April 15th, 2014. For more information, check out WAM’s website: http://www.wamsoc.ca/SHE.html Call to Makers, Mercer Collective: A Maker’s Market You must MAKE, BAKE or CREATE what you sell. You can not be a reseller of goods not produced by you. Costs: $60 per market December show is $200 Additional Fees Table Rental is available at $10 per show. Please specify 6 ft or 4 ft. Limited quantities available. Show Dates: March 29,April 26, Sept 27,October 25, November 22 December 13-14 – $200

http://www.emailmeform.com/ builder/form/er27bvY7c0dhM9 0B9dX49 Calling all Canadian fibre artists! Fibreworks 2014’s deadline for submission is approaching quickly on March 31. This is one of Canada’s largest shows of fibre artwork and is going into it’s 15th year. The exhibition is open to Canadian artists, given that their submission is principally made from textiles or fibre. This also gives artists the opportunity to potentially be purchased by and kept in the collection of the Cambridge Galleries if selected for the exhibition. For more information, visit Art Rubicon: http://artrubicon.com/5183/callcanadian-fibre-artistsfibreworks-2014-closesmar-31/ Calling all talented Canadian artists! Artailer is an innovative online gallery dedicated to showcasing and selling the work of new and emerging Canadian artists. Inviting all artists who wish to turn their passion into a career to submit their art for review. For more information, please see the FAQ page on our website (www.artailer.ca), or contact us directly: info@artailer.ca; 416-900-4112 CALLING ALL YOUTH ARTISTS! We are looking for submissions for Tabula Rasa, an evening to celebrate artistic talent of Edmontonians under 24! Accepting submissions in the form of visual or performing arts (send us your music, poetry, photography, paintings, choreography..etc) The event will be held at Mercer Building downtown, April 11th. Find the link to our submissions on tumblr, twitter and instagram: @tabularasa_yeg . Help us show you off! Paintings done especially for sale, its a type of pop art and they’re female. 26 to choose from, 16” x 16”. Triangle Lips Mr. Jim Willans 780-438-1969

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

2005.

Artist to Artist

Gallery @ 501 Presents: Art Object D’Sport Call for Entry In celebration of the Canada 55+ Games (to be held in Strathcona County, Sherwood Park, AB), Gallery @ 501 will be hosting the exhibition Art Object D’Sport, July 7 – August 31, 2014 Art Object D’Sport is an open call for entries from artists and artisans across Canada. DEADLINE – Friday June 23rd at 6:00 pm Further information contact Brenda Barry Byrne, Curator,Gallery @ 501 brenda.barrybyrne@strathcona.ca www.strathcona.ca/artgallery Join Visual Arts Alberta~ CARFAC for a FREE professional development workshop in Edmonton this April! Saturday, April 19: Grant Writing for Artists with Paul Freeman Join us from 1-4 pm at the SNAP Printshop (12056 Jasper Avenue in Edmonton). Please RSVP by Wednesday, April 16th to SNAP at 780.423.1492 or snap@snapartists.com Live Model Figure Drawing Drop-in sessions every Tuesday, February 11 – June 24, 6-9PM. $15/session; 11-pack only $150. Instruction by Daniel Hackborn available 1st Tuesday of each month. Save 20% on supplies. Reserve your seating – space is limited. 10032 81 Avenue, Edmonton; ph. 780.432.0240. www.paintspot.ca; accounts@paintspot.ca OR info@paintspot.ca Marking the Valley A juried art exhibition Call to artists Leave Your Mark on the Capital Region River Valley Visual Arts Alberta-CARFAC is partnering with the River Valley Alliance to showcase the Capital Region River Valley through your artwork. Submission Guidelines can be downloaded at:

http://visualartsalberta.com/ marking-the-valley/ Deadline for this juried exhibition: May 30th, 2014

Now entering its 7th year, Alberta Culture Days is becoming our province’s largest celebration of our heritage, arts and cultural diversity. This year, you can continue playing a lead role in putting culture centre stage during the last weekend of September! The Government of Alberta is providing funding to organizations to put on events September 26–28, 2014. The application deadline is Monday, April 28, 2014. Visit the ‘Get Involved’ section at AlbertaCultureDays.ca for full details. Painting Group(Acrylic & Oils) in Edmonton At the very beginning stage of starting a painting group, for all skill levels, and seeing if anyone else would be interested. The aim would be to: - provide an agreeable regular time to meet with others and paint - meet like-minded people, or at the very least, people with similar interests - Keep creativity level up or revitalized - learn from other members and share skills Contact info: becausepaint@gmail.com

2005.

Artist to Artist

Phone-In Professional Development with Sydney Lancaster Wednesday May 28th: 6:30 – 8:00 a tele-conference Professional Development Workshop with Sydney Lancaster Limited to 12 participants from small centres of Alberta that do not have access to Professional Development talks and participants living in major centres that have issues of access. FREE: RSVP as soon as possible as this PD workshop will fill up fast! RSVP to info@visualartsalberta.com or by telephone to 1.866.421.1731 providing name, full address, email address, land line telephone number… RAW: Natural Born Artists is an indie arts organization for artists, by artists. We focus on spotlighting indie underground talent to the public. It will be featured in Edmonton for the first time this May 2014. If an artists wants to be considered, they can build an artist profile on www.rawartists.org ! Make sure they indicate that they are an Edmonton area artist to be considered for this opportunity in May! Once they show their work in their locale, they are automatically eligible to Showcase in any RAW location across Canada and the US. For additional information please email or call Kaley Bird the Edmonton Showcase Director at 1.780.264.3650. Recognize your favourite greater #yeg artist and/or arts investor with a nomination for a Mayor’s Celebration of the Arts award. PACE is very fortunate to have Catch the Keys as our producers for the 27th Annual Mayor’s Celebration of the Arts. You can expect to be hearing a lot from them as they work their magic on our wonderful event. You can track our hash tag #mca2014 to keep abreast of developments. E-mail admin@pacedmonton.com The 2014 Wood Buffalo Artist in Residency program will host a studio location in Fort McMurray. The residency includes a dedicated studio space (with no associated fee) commencing on June 4th, 2014 in Fort McMurray. We invite visual artists who are Canadian residents to submit a proposal by Friday April 11th, 2014 at 4:00PM (Mountain Time). For more information please visit www.woodbuffalo.ab.ca/artist to learn more about this project and the call to artists. The City of Calgary is seeking a professional artist(s) with experience in Community Cultural Development to create public artwork for the newly renovated Ernie Starr Arena. The successful artist(s) will work with The City’s project team to determine the best location(s) for public art at the facility and will then lead the design, development and installation/implementation of the public artwork. Internal, external, permanent and temporary initiatives will all be considered, and must involve the geographic and/or user community in some way. The all-inclusive budget is $40,000 CDN and the submission deadline is Friday, April 4, 2014 at 4pm MST. All questions must be submitted in writing to Dawn Ford at dawn.ford@calgary.ca.


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COLLECTOR CAR AUCTION! 7th •• for rent •• Annual Calgary Collector Car Auction, May 9 - 10, Indoors Convention 6000 SQ. FT. Commercial/Retail Center Grey Eagle Casino. Over Space, Two Hills, Alberta. Former 100 pieces of memorabilia selling Fields location. $9/sq.ft. negotiable, 3 No Reserve. All makes & models welcome. Consign today 1-888-296- 5 year lease; plus utilities, no triple net. Will renovate. Phone 780-603-1090. 0528 ext. 102; EGauctions.com. UNRESERVED AUCTIONS. Sat., April 5 - Complete kitchen cupboard woodworking shop, Spruce Grove. Sun., April 13 - Antique store close-out, Elk Point. View online: prodaniukauctions.com.

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ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): I have coined a new word just for your horoscope this week. It's "zex," short for "zen sex." Zex is a kind of sex in which your mind is at rest, empty of all thoughts. You breathe slowly and calmly, move slowly and calmly, grunt and moan slowly and calmly. You are completely detached from the sensual pleasure you are experiencing. You have no goals other than the intention to be free of all goals. Zex is the ONLY variety of sex I recommend for you right now, Aries. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Zex may be fine to practice at any other time, but not these days. The style of sex you need most is exuberant, unbridled, expansive and even zany. TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): In Somalia, there's a law that forbids you from putting your used chewing gum on your nose and walking around in public. Fortunately, you don't live there, so it's fine if you want to do that. In fact, I encourage you to go right ahead. To do so would be right in alignment with the cosmic omens. APRIL FOOL! I lied. You should definitely not take yourself too seriously this week; you should look for opportunities to playfully lose your dignity and razz the status quo. But there are craftier ways to do that than by sticking gum on your nose. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): Tata Massage is a salon in San Francisco that provides an unusual beauty treatment: face slapping. The Thai masseuse named Tata claims to be improving your complexion as she smacks your cheeks and forehead with her hands. She also does "massage boxing," in which she administers healthgiving punches to your body with her fists. Is there a comparable service available where you live? I highly recommend it. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Here's the truth: you should be absolutely firm that you won't tolerate whacks and wallops—including the psychological kind—even if they are supposedly good for you.

CANCER (Jun 21 – Jul 22): Now would be an excellent time to launch a new tradition or instigate a fresh trend or make a beautiful thing that will last for a thousand years. I'm talking about an amazing marvel or useful innovation or unique creation that will improve the lives of countless humans all over the planet for the next 40 generations. APRIL FOOL! I was exaggerating a bit. Producing something that will last a thousand years is too ambitious. How about if you simply launch a new tradition or instigate a fresh trend or create a beautiful thing that will last for the rest of your long life—an amazing marvel or useful innovation or unique creation that will continue to teach and amuse you all along the way? LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): Your

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

patron saint for the next three months is surrealistic artist Salvador Dali. Regard him as your muse and role model. In fact, you might want to spout some of his famous declarations as if they were your own. Start with these: 1) "The only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad." 2) "I do not take drugs; I am drugs." 3) "Mistakes are almost always of a sacred nature." 4) "Have no fear of perfection. You'll never reach it." APRIL FOOL! I lied. Salvador Dali is your patron saint, role model and muse for only the next 14 days, not three months.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21): To be in strict compliance with cosmic necessity, you should attend a party every day in the coming week. Dance ecstatically, make love abundantly and expose yourself to previously unknown pleasures. Feast on a wide variety of food and drink that introduces you to novel tastes. Make sure you experience record levels of sensual enjoyment, nonstop excitement and dynamic socializing. APRIL FOOL! I'm exaggerating, although just a little. Try doing a 70-percent version of what I advised.

VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): You know how Jesus could supposedly turn water into wine? Well, St Brigit, a sixth-century Irish nun, was legendary for an even greater miracle. When visitors came to her monastery in Kildare, she changed her old bath water into beer for them to drink. I think there's a good chance you will develop that precise talent sometime soon. APRIL FOOL! I kind of lied. You won't really possess St Brigit's supernatural power. However, you will have an uncanny ability to make transmutations that are almost as dramatic as changing bath water to beer.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): Lifehacker.com has a step-bystep guide to set up your home as a command centre where you can pursue your plans for world domination. The article provides advice on how to build a surveillance system, encrypt your computer files and prepare for blackouts and weather emergencies. Do it, Capricorn! Get the lowdown at bit.ly/secretlair. APRIL FOOL! I lied. You don't really need to create a high-tech fortress. But you would be wise to make your home into more of an ultra-comfortable, super-inspiring sanctuary—a place where you feel so safe and strong and smart that you will always have total power over yourself and never feel driven to fulfill anyone else's standards of success but your own.

LIBRA (Sept 23 – Oct 22): The band Rush was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last May. Guitarist Alex Lifeson delivered an unusual acceptance speech. For the two minutes he spoke, he repeated one word endlessly: "blah." "Blah-blahblah," he began. "Blah-blah-blah blah-blah blah-blah." Many hand gestures and shifting vocal inflections accompanied his rap, always in support of variations on "blah-blah." This is the spirit you should bring to all of your important conversations in the coming week. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, the opposite is true. It's crucial for you to speak very precisely and articulately in the coming week. Say exactly what you mean. Don't rely on meaningless bullshit like "blah-blah." SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): When a human embryo begins to develop in the womb, the very first body part that appears is— can you guess?—the anus. This scientific fact led the witty commentators at QI.com to declare that "Every human being starts out as an asshole." They were making a joke, of course, hinting that every one of us has an unattractive quality or two that make us at least a little bit of a jerk. That's the bad news, Scorpio. The good news is that you now have an unprecedented chance to transform the asshole aspects of your personality. APRIL FOOL! I lied. You're not an asshole, not even a little bit. But it is true that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to try to fix or at least modulate your least attractive qualities.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): The planetary omens suggest that you need to experience all possible flavours of Doritos corn chips. Here's the problem: the place where you live offers only a limited range. That's why I urge you to drop everything and travel to Japan, which is the world leader in Dorito variety. There you can sample coconut curry-flavoured Doritos, along with fried chicken, corn soup, smoked bacon, tuna and mayonnaise, and many others. Buy your plane ticket now! APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, you will benefit from communing with a wide variety of sensations and experiences and ideas in many areas of your life, not just Doritos. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): According to a survey by Public Policy Polling, four percent of the population believes that "shapeshifting reptilian people control our world by taking on human form and gaining political power to manipulate our societies." My own research suggests that 62 percent of those believers are Pisceans. Are you one? If so, now is a good time to intensify your fight against the shape-shifting reptilian people. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, I strongly encourage you NOT to feed your paranoid delusions and fearful reveries. This should be a time when you bolster your positive fantasies, constructive visions and inspiring dreams. V

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MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“Something Themes Wrong” -restaurants I won’t be visiting. Qs FROM COLLEGE KIDS

READERS: A crowd of smart, engaged students packed a theatre for Savage Love Live at Centenary College of Louisiana last week. Centenary is a terrific liberal-arts school in Shreveport. Centenary students submitted more Qs than I could possibly A in the 90 minutes I had with them. So here are some bonus answers to questions I didn't get to during my time there. How does a young person learning to accept their sexuality come to terms with losing the unconditional love of their family? You can't lose something you never had. You weren't aware of the conditional nature of your family's love until you accepted yourself and asked your family to do the same. That's how you discovered their love for you came with at least one condition: you had to be straight or be closeted. Now here's a paradox for you: you lost the illusion of your family's unconditional love when you came out, but coming out could win you their unconditional love in the end. Stand your ground, demand their love and respect—and your family, like the families of so many other queers, may grow to love and accept you for who you really are. It could take some time. But one day, you may be able to look back and see that your sexuality didn't cost you your family's unconditional love—it won it for you. What do you do when your male friend who is already in a relationship (engaged) wants to have sex with you but lets you know via social media? You block him or fuck him—or you fuck him and then block him. How can you have a conversation with a man about his sexual performance without making him feel like you're criticizing him and without giving him the impression that you're unsatisfied? By opening with a compliment, closing with a compliment and making sure everything that comes between your opening compliment and closing compliment is also a compliment. Do you think "butch" lesbians are really transgender? Nope. Are you really anti-transgender? Nope. How can we be sure that having an

"open" relationship won't hurt our relationship? You can't be sure that openness won't hurt your relationship. But you can't be sure that closedness won't hurt your relationship, either. Yes, sometimes relationships end after people open them up—and openness gets the blame, even if it had nothing to do with the breakup. But plenty of tightly closed/strictly monogamous relationships end every day. It's possible that many of those failed monogamous relationships could've been saved by some openness, a little leeway or embracing monogamishamy. I have been in a relationship with a married woman for five years. What are the odds that she will leave her spouse to be in a committed relationship with me instead? I put the odds at zero. Unless this woman is in an honest open relationship with her husband, and LTRs with other men are allowed, her relationship with you is proof that she's not much good at this commitment stuff. By which I mean to say: even if she did leave her husband for you, it would be foolish of you to expect to have a committed relationship with her— committed in the sexually-and-romantically-exclusive sense of the term—as she's currently not committed to the man to whom she's committed. What makes you think she'll commit to you? Can you pray the gay away? A girl can pray for whatever she wants. Can it hurt a long-term, monogamous relationship if you had multiple sexual partners/experiences before? Or rather, how do you feel about sleeping around before marriage?

People who marry young—people who are likelier to have married without having had multiple partners/experiences—divorce at much higher rates than more experienced people who marry later in life. Sleeping around before marriage seems to help people figure out what they want. Or it helps them figure out whether what they were taught to want is actually what they do want. And someone who knows what they want is likelier to keep any longterm, monogamous commitments that they make. Could I possibly be allergic to sperm? You could! Possibly! Dr Debby Herbenick, while filling in for me on Savage Love Letter of the Day

duties recently, covered the topic of why some people are sensitive—sensitive to the point of explosive diarrhea—to semen: "Prostaglandins are substances made by the body and that the body is sensitive to. Semen contains prostaglandins—and prostaglandins can have a laxative effect on people. Related: if you've ever felt a little loosey-goosey right before getting your period, that's also thanks to prostaglandins (which spike just before your period, because the prostaglandins get the uterine muscles to contract, which then helps to shed the lining of the uterus, resulting in a menstrual period). Prostaglandins are also used to induce labour. So why don't more semen swallowers find themselves running to the bathroom post-blowjob? Fortunately, we're not all so sensitive to prostaglandins. I don't know why most people aren't extra-sensitive, but fortunately most of us aren't, or there would probably be a lot less swallowing in the world." Herbenick is a research scientist at Indiana University, a sexualhealth educator at the Kinsey Institute, and a frequent Savage Love guest expert—and you can and should follow her on Twitter @DebbyHerbenick. What is the difference between a Methodist and a Baptist? There's no difference between a Methodist and a Baptist, according to my Catholic grandma. They're both going to hell. What is the percentage of people who find male partners with the perfect penis? Perfect size, shape, length, girth, texture, head-toshaft differential? There's no research out there on this issue—no one has thought to pick the brains of folks who have successfully landed male partners with perfect penises— and I'm not sure such studies would even be possible. Because penis preferences are subjective: one person's perfect penis is the next person's imperfect penis. And isn't the person to whom a particular penis is attached at least as important as the size, texture, head-to-shaft differential, etc of any given penis? Imagine if you made it your life's work to locate the world's perfect penis—perfect length, girth, bouquet, flavour, mouthfeel, etc—only to discover that the penis is attached to Bill O'Reilly. Could that penis still be called perfect? This week on the Lovecast, Dan chats with a panel of sex workers: savagelovecast.com. V @fakedansavage on Twitter

Across

1 Item with a pole position? 5 Suffix meaning “followers of” 9 Like cartoonists’ hands 13 Candy rack cylinder 14 Big picture? 16 Questionnaire box 17 NYSE newsmakers 18 Nimble 19 Lemon candy 20 Unappealing theme restaurant based on a hit CGI movie? 23 Ancient Mexican pyramid builder 24 Try with the shirt again 25 Hot pants wearer, so to speak? 27 Looking over 30 Total 33 Org. with many conferences 35 “___ Flux” 37 Unappealing theme restaurant devoted to Hans Christian Andersen? 42 Circumstance’s partner 43 Opposed to 44 Role for Keanu 45 Chinese cuisine style 49 “Hair” producer Joseph ___ 51 “Mercy me!” 53 Like the wars between Carthage and Rome 57 Unappealing theme restaurant devoted to Irving Berlin? 60 Kudrow who’s among “Friends” 61 Barbershop offering 62 “Casablanca” character 63 Rapper/actor who turned 56 in February 64 One-on-one student 65 Insulting remark 66 Have the moxie 67 Keep goal in hockey 68 “Lights out” music

7 Erie or Huron 8 ___ Mae (college money provider) 9 Unwilling to face reality 10 Screenwriter Ephron 11 Stomach tightness 12 “Got that right” 15 A little suspicious 21 Bake sale topping 22 Barney’s bartender 26 Oft-injured knee part, briefly 28 Kurt denial? 29 Outta here 30 “The Racer’s Edge” sloganeer 31 “Whoops!” 32 Inbox item 34 Nabokov novel 36 Doctors Without Borders, e.g. 38 Current 39 Yet to be confirmed 40 Kingston Trio hit 41 Kate Middleton’s sister 46 Some degree of success? 47 Praiseful poet 48 Drill sergeant’s command 50 Not one to try new ideas 52 Marble type 54 ___ Wafers 55 “___ to you!” 56 Former rulers 57 Typography unit 58 Wi-fi seeker 59 Have to have 60 Box top ©2014 Jonesin' Crosswords

Down

1 Painter Kahlo 2 Urban partner on TV? 3 “It’s ___ cause” 4 Mahalia Jackson’s genre 5 Apple product 6 Leonard or Robinson

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014

AT THE BACK 39


40 AT THE BACK, ACK, ACK, ACK, ACK, ACK

VUEWEEKLY MAR 27 – APR 02, 2014


962: Vue weekly - Seeds of Change