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#966 / APR 24 – APR 30, 2014 VUEWEEKLY.COM

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CUTTING OUT THE CARBON 7 | THE FEVER QUESTIONS OUR STATUS QUO 20


ISSUE: 966 APR 24 – APR 30, 2014 COVER: CURTIS HAUSER

LISTINGS

ARTS / 21 FILM / 24 MUSIC / 31 EVENTS / 33 CLASSIFIED / 34 ADULT / 36

FRONT

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"Edmonton gets nearly 60 percent of all revenue from property taxes, a system that encourages urban sprawl."

DISH

9

"I don't know how they get away with it; they have marketed themselves brilliantly."

ARTS

17

"Startling, touching and so very, very human, this is not a collection of pithy sympathy or trite preaching."

FILM

22

"Davis is a queen of the stage, but she’s uneasy about being in her 40s—her boyfriend’s eight years younger."

MUSIC

26

"One morning you wake up and you're like, I'm in a lot less of a panic than I was five years ago, you know?"

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VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

CONTRIBUTORS Kathleen Bell, Chelsea Boos, Josef Braun, Rob Brezsny, Ashley Dryburgh, Jason Foster, Gwynne Dyer, Brian Gibson, Fish Griwkowsky, Josh Marcellin, Jordyn Marcellus, Michelle Mark, Stephen Notley, Mel Priestley, Dan Savage, Ryan Stephens, Mike Winters

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UP FRONT 3


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UP FRONT 5


FRONT VUEPOINT

NEWS EDITOR : REBECCA MEDEL REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

NEWS // FIRST NATIONS

RYAN STEPHENS RYANS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Arts fly away The University of Alberta is the latest institution to get sucked into the maelstrom that is Edmonton's downtown revitalization, doing so at the risk of becoming a casualty of the city's plans. Staring longingly as new towers and developments sprout up north of the river, it's no secret that the university has been eager to dip its fingers into the lucrative pie that is Edmonton's future downtown core. Already sporting Enterprise Square, the university has yet another opportunity to cement its presence downtown as an anchor tenant of the future Edmonton Galleria Project, which will serve as the new home of its departments of music and art and design. It's a win-win, says university provost and vice-president Carl Amrhein in a recent blog post, "bringing the vibrancy of the university downtown and the downtown vibrancy to the U of A." But such a move comes as a sacrifice to the school's integrity, with the potential to do more harm than good in finding an

The downtown revitalization has understandably led many to wonder about its effect on areas south of the river. audience for music and fine-arts students. There's already a rift between some of the university's many faculties, and much has been made over the past five years about the school's apparent neglect of arts and fine arts. One of the current problems is visibility; the limited display space on campus means visitors and students from other faculties have few chances to see much work from their artistic peers. The university's solution? Further separate these students and their output from the rest of the student body by housing them downtown, leaving them essentially forgotten by their most important audience. Meanwhile, MacEwan University—for so long fractured into small campuses in the far reaches of the city—is making the proper move to consolidate their fine-arts students downtown, adding a much-needed creativity incubator to the downtown core and creating a more cohesive student body in the process. The downtown revitalization has understandably led many to wonder about its effect on areas south of the river, particularly the established culture of Old Strathcona and the university. The U of A and its surrounding areas have together created a distinct vibe that thrives in part due to the university's artistic presence, and in no way should that be tainted by the promise of a booming downtown. The worst thing we can do as a city is to start putting all of our eggs in one basket when we can so easily have two. But it's so easy to become intoxicated, as Amrhein notes in his blog post, when you "imagine the vibrancy that 5000 art, design and music students, faculty and staff will bring to the downtown core." This vibrancy is already coming, but the University of Alberta doesn't have to be at its forefront. V

6 UP FRONT

Cindy Blackstock has been tirelessly speaking up for First Nations children

Fighting for the vulnerable

Cindy Blackstock's lifework advocating for First Nations children is seeing results

T

he struggle for equality among First Nations children has long been a labour of love for activist Cindy Blackstock, who has dedicated her career to fighting what she says is nothing short of discrimination against Canada's most vulnerable children. After years of witnessing the underfunded government services available for First Nations children, helping to launch a humanrights complaint and eventually being placed under surveillance by the Canadian government, Blackstock says it's high time Canadians put their collective feet down and call for an end to the injustice plaguing aboriginal communities. "I don't understand how a wealthy country like ours would give a child less because of who they are," she says. "That's a simple contradiction to what Canada stands for, for me, and it's in contradiction of the values of good Canadians. It's time we stopped putting up with it." Blackstock, an associate professor at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Extension and executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada, has recently been named the recipient of the university's annual Community Scholar Award for her staunch efforts advocating for equality for First Nations children in Canada. But she says the honour reflects more than just her own career's work. The award, coupled with the success of Edmonton's recent Truth and Reconciliation event—which boasted a turnout of around 5000 attendees—may just signal a new hope for First Nations children across the country. "I made the pledge there that I would stand with this generation of children, in the company of many others ... to ensure that this generation of children does not have to undergo the hardship of inequality like all the other generations that came before them," she says.

"People are waking to the past injustices, but what they're not so aware of is that these injustices can continue to pan out in the lives of children today, and that's what we need to take action on." Anastasia Lim, executive director of University Relations, says Blackstock's Community Scholar Award was based largely on the amount of impact she's had on the external community, which Lim says has been vast. Blackstock has been acknowledged internationally for her human-rights advocacy, even being recognized by the Nobel Women's Initiative, and acting as an advisor to UNICEF regarding the United Nations' Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. "The committee felt that her reach into the community abroad, and the impact, was insurmountable," Lim says. "[It was] based on the fact that she started with her research, and how she spanned out her scholarly experience to the external community and raised awareness. She made that movement and needle go forward for advocacy for children, taking down barriers to care, for health care for aboriginal children." Blackstock's efforts have been ongoing for decades, dating back to her years working alongside the federal government to document the inequalities in child welfare, and reveal how those inequalities led to rising amounts of First Nations children entering foster care unnecessarily. But she says her plans to foster equality for First Nations children took a turn for the worse when she and the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada came up with evidence-based solutions to increase funding from the federal government and found the government unwilling to commit. "Canada was running a budget surplus in the billions of dollars and still they didn't do any-

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

thing," Blackstock says. Laws on child welfare, education and health are set by provinces and apply on First Nations reserves, but are funded by the federal government, and Blackstock says many of her attempts to remedy the situation—including filing the human-rights case—were derailed by the government using legal technicalities. But when the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal began hearing the case a little more than a year ago, Blackstock says she felt a renewed hope for the outcome. "It's the first time in the developed world we know of where government like Canada has been on trial to face allegations it's racially discriminating against this generation of kids," she says. "We expect the ruling to be out later this year, and I'm pretty confident the tribunal's going to find the discrimination, just as every other independent body that's looked at it has found." Blackstock's Community Scholar award will be presented to her May 13 at a ceremony in City Hall, along with similar awards going to U of A community members including the Mixed Chorus for their community performances, and alumnus Jim Hole for his advocacy efforts on campus. Blackstock says although Canada still has a long way to go before its First Nations children achieve the equality they should have had years ago, she remains steadfast in her determination and positive for the country's future. "I really believe that with every generation comes a chance to create Canada anew. We have the chance to make ourselves good and great as our children want us to be as a country and as adults," she says. "We're trying to do a much better job about getting the word out, but I absolutely believe in the goodness of Canadians."

MICHELLE MARK

MICHELLE@VUEWEEKLY.COM


NEWS // LOW CARBON CITY

Edmonton's great green shift

Edmonton eyes carbon-neutral future despite lack of leadership from higher governments

E

Low carbon: not how yer granddad did things // Creative Commons

dmonton could be a hero in the history of climate change. While our provincial and federal politicians have only been paying lip service to the reality of a warming planet, municipal leaders know it's serious and they're doing something about it. Edmonton has the political will and the talent to do great things—but often lacks support from higher governments. Scientists are as sure that humans are causing climate change as they are that cigarettes cause cancer, according to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. This is not news. The world has known since at least the 1992 Rio Earth Summit that we need to kick our addiction to cheap and dirty fossil fuels. The consequences were, and still are, well understood: it's more damaging economically, environmentally and socially to do nothing than it is to control our collective CO2 output. Our response? According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change co-chairman Thomas Stocker, there's been a 61-percent global increase in greenhouse-gas emissions since world leaders committed to tackling their carbon habits back in '92. "A two-degree rise in temperature has become extremely ambitious because we've lost time—this info was available 20 years ago," Stocker said in Edmonton last week. "If we wait another 10 years then 2.5 degrees will be ambitious. The message is that we need to start now." Green Edmonton The high-ranking Swiss climate scientist was in town as a keynote speaker at Zero 2014, a three-day conference focused on the transition to a low-carbon future hosted by the City of Edmonton and Alberta's Climate Change and Emissions Management Corporation. The conversation at the event was not if we're causing climate change, but what we're doing about it. The fact that this conversation was happening in Edmonton is significant. The city has not historically been

green, its policies often more reactionary than visionary. Edmonton's GHG emissions climbed 38 percent between 1990 to 2008 when many other North American municipalities were working aggressively to cork their emissions. Much of Edmonton's carbon gain can be attributed to a near 25-percent population increase, a boom in business thanks to the oil sands and a corresponding lack of political will to seriously regulate emissions. Mayor Don Iveson, following Stocker's detailing of the hard facts of climate science, signalled to the assembled crowd of business and political leaders that Edmonton is making a sharp turn in their carbon course. "The questions of climate change must be on the mind of leaders in government, business and civil society—they're very much on our minds," Iveson said. "We'll be transitioning Edmonton to a low-carbon future. We understand the role that fossil fuels play now, but we know we have to transition." He listed Edmonton's ambitious projects: its world-class wastemanagement system that generates enough electricity for 4600 homes and will soon divert 90 percent of trash from landfills with the wasteto-biofuels facility; the Blatchford development at the old City Centre Airport will house up to 30 000 people as well as being carbon-neutral and powered 100-percent by renewable energy; the expanded LRT system will have six spokes from downtown to the city edges by 2040; an ambitious switch from coal to natural gas and eventually solar for electricity generation. Right place, right time Alberta's capital city is in the right place at the right time to be a world leader in climate innovation. The leadership is in place. Iveson and the newly-elected council seem to have the appetite to invest in long-term infrastructure, like improved public transit and carbon neutral developments, that could make Edmonton

a greener city for decades to come. These kinds of investments take guts as well as public support—things Edmonton's new council and mayor seem to have a healthy supply of. "We have to be willing to make that initial investment—to put some skin into the game," said Edmonton City Manager Simon Farbrother at Zero 2014. "We have to make decisions that won't have an immediate payoff; the benefits will be decades later. And that takes leadership and social commitment." Edmonton has aggressive goals to halve emissions from city operations by 2020 and be carbon neutral by 2040. The city also aims to slash all emissions, both public and private, by 17 to 20 percent by 2020. Efficiency— like retrofitting older structures and making sure new developments match Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design standards—will play a big role, as buildings use two-thirds of energy in Edmonton compared to just a third for transportation. But the most ambitious move is weaning off fossil fuels. Edmonton currently gets 95 percent of its energy from non-renewable resources, mainly coal. Coal is twice as dirty as natural gas, so moving away from it would be a big step. Although electricity only counts for a fifth of energy used in Edmonton, it accounts for 43 percent of all GHGs. More than 70 percent of Alberta's electricity comes from coal—emissions from this alone are nearly equal to all oil sands production. Iveson raised some eyebrows at Zero 2014 when he said we could make the switch from fossil fuels to solar power. But it's not as farfetched as you might think. Edmonton is Canada's third-sunniest city, just behind Winnipeg and Calgary. And, somewhat counter intuitively, solar panels work most efficiently in cold temperatures. Sun? Cold? Check and double-check. Edmonton's Renewable Energy Task Force, part of the city's 2012 The Way We Green environmental strategy, conservatively estimates that current renewable energy technology, mainly solar, could generate 20 percent of the city's energy needs. Coupled with strict energy efficiency for both new and existing buildings, big investments and innovations in solar could help Edmonton transition from fossil-fuel electricity. Along with solar power, Edmonton seems to be focusing on the right targets. The ambitious, $3-billion LRT project would have the dual benefits of reducing transportation emissions as well as encouraging denser population growth in the core. Growing the city inwards and upwards uses much less energy than planning the city like you'd pour a pancake. Farbrother says it can be difficult to

make those gutsy long-term investments when working with the city's "archaic" tax system. Edmonton gets nearly 60 percent of all revenue from property taxes, a system that encourages urban sprawl as the city is all but forced to approve additional suburban properties to add cash flow to the city. The city manager also noted that provincial funding is split one-third each for Edmonton, Calgary and the rest of province. That's a simple system that's convenient politically, but doesn't make much sense in a complex world. Edmonton and Calgary have been struggling to get a big-city charter finalized with the Alberta Government that would, among other things, give cities more independence to generate revenue besides the current property tax and provincial funding models. But dealing with the politically unstable Alberta PCs—with their revolving door leadership and hyper-partisan ways—has made this a lengthy chore. Provincial and federal leadership lacking It's that uncertainty in commitment—from the Progressive Conservative's foot-dragging on the city charter to their federal counterpart's reluctance to take real steps to cut national GHG emissions—that makes Edmonton's challenge doubly difficult. Canada lacks a unified GHG reduction strategy, a strong framework that provides clear policies and targets. Alberta, as part of their 2008 Climate Change Strategy, promised to create both an Energy Efficiency Act and a Climate Change Adaptation Strategy. We're still waiting on those. This uncoordinated approach means that towns and cities don't have access to best practices and, more importantly, focused federal and provincial leadership and funding for green initiatives. "Lack of coordination between governments in Canada has hindered both the effectiveness of efforts to reduce GHG emissions and their efficiency (the cost per unit of reductions)," states a 2011 report by The Conference Board of Canada titled "Greenhouse Mitigation in Canada." The carbon elephant in the room is that Edmonton's growth, both in population and GDP, is driven largely by the oil sands. Oil-sands growth disproportionately influences both the environment and public policy. Last year the oil and gas sector, thanks to aggressive oil-sands expansion, became the leading emissions source in Canada for the first time. The federal government has admitted it will badly miss its Copenhagen commitment to reduce emissions 17 percent below 2005 levels. Stephen Harper has repeatedly delayed

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

regulating the oil and gas sector, only vaguely saying we'll see standards "in the coming years." Alberta is by far the biggest polluter in Canada with GHG emissions nearly equal to the rest of the country combined. The province has outlined a carbon mitigation strategy, but it only plans to reduce emissions 14 percent below 2005 levels by 2050. That's well below the 80 percent reductions recommended internationally. And 70 percent of Alberta's reduction is supposed to come from carbon capture and storage technology that would pump GHGs from oil-sands production deep underground—a "business-as-usual" win for industry that doesn't factor in that 80 percent of CO2 from fossil fuels comes from the tail pipe, not production, so real reduction in GHGs would be minimal. There are bits and pieces of good news. National regulations on coal power-plant emissions will hopefully take a bite out of Alberta's dirty energy output by 2015. And there have been signs that Alberta, with some political will, could make the switch to natural gas plants within a decade. But the provincial and federal governments have stated clearly that their priority in Alberta for the next few decades is not to take steps to reduce the worst polluting province in the country—but to make sure there are enough workers to develop the oil sands. Edmonton looks to other cities While leadership may be lacking from higher governments, Edmonton's still has to accommodate the 52 people who move to the city every day. To do this efficiently, they've had to look at other cities. Boston and Portland, despite bulging populations, have slashed their GHG emissions and aim to reduce their carbon output 80 percent by 2050 through efficiency programs and renewable energy. Vancouver, which already has one of the lowest GHG emissions per capita of any city in the world, has the audacious plan to be the world's greenest city by 2020. "Boston moved beyond question, questioning the [climate] science a long time ago," says Brian Swett, Chief of Environment and Energy with the City of Boston. "If presented with the evidence that the do-nothing scenario is unacceptable, I can't see how any mayor or legislator would want their legacy to be that they were informed but didn't act." Climate change is by far the most complex problem humanity has ever faced. It requires coordinated international efforts. But cities like Edmonton simply can't afford to wait for that effort to come from above. JOSH MARCELLIN

JOSH@VUEWEEKLY.COM

UP FRONT 7


FRONT

ASHLEY DRYBURGH // ASHLEY@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Pink shirts don't equal allies The defeat of Motion 503 should continue to be questioned Oh, Alberta. It's easy to forget sometimes that, despite my queer bubble, I live in a province that tosses around queer issues like a poisonous hot potato. You have likely heard that on February 26, people across the country were encouraged to wear a pink shirt to show their support for anti-bullying initiatives. Then-premier Alison Redford and other politicos joined in. Although downplayed, it's important to note the original act of bullying that inspired Pink Shirt Day was an act of homophobia. On April 7, the Legislative Assembly voted down Motion 503, a non-binding piece of legislation that would require a school board to allow the creation of a gay-straight al-

DYERSTRAIGHT

liance if students chose to organize one. Education Minister Jeff Johnson, along with 30 other PC and Wildrose MPs, voted against it. On April 14, news broke that a taxpayer-funded Catholic school in Alberta, one that had just received $7 million from the government to expand and modernize, requires teachers to abstain from "homosexual relations." That same day, Danielle Smith released a statement saying that schools cannot discriminate against teachers or students, ending with the kicker, "You cannot be fired as a teacher or expelled or disciplined as a student based on your sexual orientation." Nice sentiment, but seems like more empty words. What we seem to have here is a problem of theory

and practice. In theory, bullying and homophobic discrimination are bad. But conservative factions in the province—of both the progressive and flowered variety—just can't bring themselves to do anything about it. This is Alberta's version of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." Catholic and secular schools shouldn't be allowed to override the choices of queer students and teachers. Attempts to offer support for students in the form of GSAs, however, are a violation of the Catholic school system’s religious beliefs. If you are confused about the math at work here, be assured you are not the only one. At least one teacher is hopeful that more will be done to support queer

students in the province. Kerry Maguire is a teacher and GSA advisor at Jasper Place High School and EPSB's consultant for sexual orientation and gender identity. She organizes a monthly GSA roundtable discussion for students and was joined this month by Smith and several other Wildrose MPs to discuss the rejection of Motion 503. "The students blew me out of the water with their poignant and thoughtful remarks and well-crafted answers to Smith's questions," Maguire says. "Their message of why all Alberta students deserve the right to have a safe space in their schools was clear and well understood by the Wildrose members." Student members of the Jasper

Place GSA repeatedly emphasize how GSAs create a sense of safety for all students. Grace, a Grade 12 student, says, "It's hard for any student to find a comfortable place in school in general. I feel comfortable in my GSA at Jasper Place and feel safe to be me." David, a Grade 11 student, argues that Catholic schools need GSAs more than anyone else. "As Catholic schools have refused the implementation of GSAs as it is against their doctrine," he says, "it makes one wonder how terrible students who may be struggling with sexuality and/or gender identity must feel as it is yet another voice telling them that they are not normal." With any luck, MPs will start to show this kind of empathy and compassion as well. V

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Spain: a handsome apology

The offer of citizenship for displaced Sephardic Jews opens up all of the EU The Spanish parliament still has to pass the new citizenship law, but the cabinet has already approved it and Minister of Justice Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón is sure there won't be a problem. "In Spain, a clear majority realize we have committed a historical error and have an opportunity to repair it, so I am sure that law will pass with an immense majority in parliament," he said. Historical apologies are in fashion—ex-South African president F W de Klerk apologized for apartheid, ex-British prime minister Tony Blair apologized for the slave trade and the Irish potato famine, and Pope John Paul II apologized for the Crusades, the Inquisition and the church's historical oppression of women—but Spain isn't just saying sorry for expelling its Jews 522 years ago. It's offering to give their descendants back their citizenship. 1492 was a busy year for Ferdinand and Isabella, joint monarchs of the recently united kingdom of Spain. Christopher Columbus, Isabella's favourite explorer, discovered the New World, Spain's armies concluded the seven-century-long campaign of the Reconquista by destroying the last Muslim kingdom in the peninsula, Granada—and Ferdinand decided to expel all the Jews from Spain.

8 UP FRONT

What Gallardón has not taken into Spain's Jews were given only four Jewish community. Gallardón insists that there are no account is the fact that Spanish citizenmonths in 1492 to choose between becoming Christian or leaving their political motives behind this initiative, ship is, for practical purposes, citizenhomes forever. Most left, settling in and you can actually believe him. His ship in all 28 member countries of the Muslim-ruled North Africa and the great-grandfather, Spanish ambas- European Union. A Spanish passportOttoman Empire or in other parts sador to Romania during the Second holder can enter Britain, France, Gerof Christian Europe. They kept their World War, saved many Sephardic many, Sweden or any other EU country Spanish language in the form of Ladi- Jews from the Nazis by giving them without a visa, take up residence, get no—Castilian written in the Hebrew Spanish visas, so it's sort of a family a job or start a business there. What's script—and became know as Sep- tradition. And to make the current of- not to like about this offer? fer more inviting, Gallardón has said Almost half of Israel's Jews are Sephardic (ie Spanish) Jews. Ladino is now a dying language, but the applicants can keep their existing hardim, and Israel is a country where second passports the Sephardim are in great dehave retained Spain isn't just saying sorry for expelling its Jews mand. The big their distinctive identity and 522 years ago. It's offering to give their descen- Sephardic communities in the are estimated dants back their citizenship. United States to number up and Mexico will to a third of the probably not be world's 13-miltempted, but the lion Jews today. remaining Sephardic Jews in Muslim Spain's planned new law potentially citizenship as well. covers almost all of them, for it is Spain's justice minister reckons that countries, including Turkey, certainly only about 150 000 Sephardic Jews will be. Gallardón is thinking mostly written very broadly. Applicants for Spanish citizenship will take him up on the offer (which about symbolism, which is imporneed not speak Ladino or even be will remain open for two years), and tant—but his offer will also have a religious. They need only be able to he doesn't think that many of them real impact on many people's lives. Portugal, which expelled its Jews show a link to Sephardic culture (it will actually want to move to Spain. could be as little as a Sephardic fam- But he promises that the govern- shortly after Spain did, is also trying to ily name). In most cases, however, ment will not be strict in deciding make amends, though on a less grand the simplest route to Spanish citizen- who qualifies as Sephardic—"We are scale. Last year it changed the law, and ship would be to have a local rabbi opening the door," he said—and he now grants citizenship to Sephardim certify their Sephardic ancestry, or may be surprised by how many actu- who can demonstrate a connection to the Portuguese Jewish community. to get certification of their Sephardic ally apply. How much further might this example heritage from a recognized Spanish-

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

spread? Not very far, alas. Most of the great expulsions of history have occurred in the context of war, like the compulsory "population exchange" of the Greek minority in Turkey and the Turkish minority in Greece after the First World War, or the expulsion of 10 million Germans from their ancestral homes in eastern Europe at the end of the Second. Even the expulsion of the Muslim minority from Spain in the course of the 16th century fits that model, although the wars of the Muslim conquest and the Christian reconquest were long over by then. The real history is a good deal more complex, but the view of the average Spaniard is that the Muslims arrived as conquerors and when they lost they had to leave. It's because the Jews of Spain and Portugal were entirely blameless and ruthlessly victimized that there is broad popular support in both these countries for this act of apology and belated recompense. All credit to Spain and Portugal for doing it—but it probably wouldn't be happening even there if it seriously inconvenienced the majority. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.


DISH

DISH EDITOR : MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FEATURE // WINE

Y

The rationale behind restaurant wine prices

ou're sitting in a restaurant, perusing the wine list, and you think, "Wow, these prices are exorbitant. I'll just have a beer." I'm willing to bet that if you've ever found yourself in that situation, you were either sitting in a chain restaurant or you've got unrealistic expectations of the cost of wine. Or both. I recently dined at Murrieta's on Whyte Avenue and was disconcerted by the prices I found on their wine menu. While the by-the-glass list was reasonable and on par with the average, their bottle prices seemed high—in particular, they sell a massproduced Cabernet Sauvignon from California, J Lohr Seven Oaks, for $63. This wine is nothing special— probably half a dozen places around town have it on their wine menu: the Keg sells it for $42 a bottle. You can buy a bottle in the liquor store for around $25, so the math is pretty obvious: Murrieta's is charging about

a 300-percent markup. Is this reasonable? To answer that, I decided to give Edmonton's restaurant community a chance to present their approach to wine pricing. "The bottom line is, we have to pay our bills," says Patrick Saurette, owner of The Marc Restaurant. "In the hospitality business there are two controllable costs: your labour cost and your cost of goods. We all agree that you have to make a living and I will go to bat for the industry in the sense that we work on an enormously razor-thin margin." Saurette has put a great deal of thought into the pricing of his wine list. He follows a formula for his "hot button" wines—the low and midpriced wines forming the bulk of his total wine sales. His by-the-glass wines are all priced between $11 and $15 for a standard six-ounce pour, CONTINUED ON PAGE 12 >>

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

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REVUE // WINE

et’s face it, a large percentage of us are not trained sommeliers and have no idea how to properly taste wine, or what a lot of the jargon associated with it means—despite the great information available in our wine column. With that in mind, we decided to round up a few bottles named after, or made by, musicians and see what we thought. We’ve provided our simple, laypersons’ opinions as well as some recommendations as to what music to pair with each wine.

THE DARK SIDE OF THE MOON 2010 Cabarnet Sauvignon By Wines that Rock $22.30

They say: “Aromas of black currant and cherry are followed by rich flavors of cassis, toasted vanilla bean, and hints of chocolate. Enjoy this rich dry red wine with hearty chicken dishes, beef and lamb, and red sauced pasta.” Musical pairing: Dark Side of the Moon. Duuuh. To see if its flavours sync up a la Wizard of Oz. Aroma: Like red wine: sharp and purple-smelling. So far, so good. It isn’t offering the complexities of the great void of space, but also, it hasn’t gone off. Then again, David Gilmour just sang “run, rabbit, run.” Does he mean towards or away from the bottle? Initial taste: We aren’t in Kansas anymore. Tart, nosy, purple-tasting flavours drift across the upper reaches of your mouth, sharp and shallow. The fruit flavour congregates at the top of the palette, giving it all a somewhat airy, effervescent feel, while flavour quickly fades from the lower regions of my facecave. I suppose that makes sense: it is trying to represent one of the headiest, driftingthrough-outer-space-while-probably-high albums of all time. But that sharp upper-tartness makes the more jarring aural sounds and shifts of the album even harsher on your wine-buzz. Clare Torry’s vocal riffage on “Great Gig in the Sky” pairs well with pretty much anything, though, so if nothing else, you can just loop that track and drift into your wine-buzz quite merrily that way. Later: Once “Money” arrives on Dark Side, I kind of realize this is a $10 bottle of wine trying to pass itself closer to the $20 range thanks to the Floyd branding. Sing it with me, folks: “Money! It’s a crime ... “ Other possible music pairings: The earlier, murkier Pink Floyd would probably match here. Try Atom Heart Mother. You can stare at the cows on the album cover, and drink, and really, like, wonder what they would think of this music. Who? The cows, maaaan. Do cows even, like, get music? Does listening to music like, change how a cow’s milk turns out? Someone’s done that research, right? Like, duuuuude. Who do we call about that?

PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

THE DREAMING TREE

2010 Chardonnay By Dave Matthews and winemaker Steve Reeder $18.99 They say: “An exciting collaboration between Dave Matthews and acclaimed winemaker Steve Reeder, The Dreaming Tree captures the spirit of California’s wine country. United by their shared passion to make quality wine accessible to everyone, the two friends set out on a journey to the unique characters and rich flavours that give the region its rare charms.” When Dave and I first met we talked about making a Chardonnay that captured the flavour of the Central Cost. With its big fruit, loads of spice and distinct citrus notes, we think this wine lives up to that promise. We hope you agree. — Steve Reeder.” Musical pairing: “Crash into Me” if you’re feeling nostalgic and want the full band. If you want Matthews solo try “I’m Alive.” Kenny Chesney sings on it, but it’s still from his solo days. Aroma: There was a distinct dusty and aged quality to this one with a hint of fruit, but nothing was prominent. My co-drinkers concurred.

FORTY LICKS MERLOT

(50TH ANNIVERSARY BOTTLE) 2011 Merlot By Wines That Rock $23.99 They say: “Please allow us to introduce the 50th Anniversary edition of our custom crafted Merlot. It’s Rock ‘n’ Roll in a bottle. Fill your glass, turn up the volume and enjoy the taste of the Rolling Stones.” Musical pairing: The Rolling Stones—Forty Licks to be exact. Aroma: The aroma was so vague that even after trying for several minutes, all I could smell was a hint of oak—maybe. Initial taste: When the wine first hit my tongue, there was not much flavour to speak of and was definitely not as aggressive as you would expect from something that claims to be rock ‘n’ roll in a bottle. It also did not taste like the Rolling Stones, for that matter. I let it linger for a moment and began to pick out flavours that seemed to resemble oak and spice, but it all seemed a little muddled and diluted. The chocolate mini eggs I had on hand paired well enough, with their aftertaste providing a little more flavour to a fairly lacklustre wine. Later: It took me more than one go to get this wine finished, and day two provided a more pungent aroma, but just barely. The acidic character of the wine came through stronger than it had during my first couple of glasses, but the flavour was still too muddled to make any element of the wine stand out.

Initial taste: The Dreaming Tree is dry and tangy, as well as slightly bitter if it sits around in your mouth too long. There were subtle notes of spice, but the aforementioned citrus was difficult to pinpoint. “It’s bland and uninspired, like his music,” quipped one of my co-drinkers—I wouldn’t go quite that far, but he’s a tough one. Later: This wasn’t a wine that grew on any of us as we worked our way through the bottle. The flavours remained too mild and the dusty, aged characteristic that was detected in the first sniff began to creep into the flavour. Wine gets better with age, but it shouldn’t taste like the cellar it’s been in. On the plus side, the philosophy behind the wine is commendable. The bottles are manufactured using clean-burning natural gas and the labels are recycled. You can also recycle the cork. Other possible musical pairings: Unlike the others, The Dreaming Tree does pair well with its namesake musician. MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Other possible music pairings: This Merlot lends itself more to mild folk than anything by the Stones. Listening to the band’s music with Forty Licks Merlot felt off, as the wine is much too passive and mild for rock music. I suppose if it were to pair with any Rolling Stones song, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” would fit the bill, if for nothing else than the fact this Merlot is not satisfying in the least. MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

10 DISH

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12 >>

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014


TO THE PINT

JASON FOSTER // JASON@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Growlin' for some beer The pros and cons of the latest trend in craft brew I like to keep readers of this fine paper updated on some of the interesting beer trends in the city. A strange entity has appeared over the past year or so in local breweries and finer liquor stores. The so-called “growler” is not a grumpy customer, nor is it a reference to the Australian slang word for female private parts. In the case of beer it refers to a two-litre bottle of draught beer that is becoming a big rage among craftbeer fans. Let me explain the concept. You purchase a two-litre bottle, roughly shaped like an old moonshine jug. The cost is usually about $10. You get it filled with your favourite beer, dispensed from a tap system just like those found in bars. Go home, consume the beer, clean the bottle and return to the brewery/store and get it refilled. Repeat as often as desired. The cost of each fill is roughly the same cost as a six-pack, sometimes cheaper. So what is the big deal? Well, in a nutshell it is a great way to get fresh draught beer at home without having to buy expensive keg equipment. Draught and bottled beer have subtle taste differences. The carbonation is quieter and the body more rounded in kegged beer. Bottled beer can be sharper in its overall impression. There is lots to argue for growlers. Fresh. Good for sharing. An interesting party talking point. Craft-beer fans have really taken to the idea and growler filling stations have been popping up around the city. They are a fun and a novel way to experience different beer, but like anything, you need to watch for the downsides and prevent them. The following are three common issues with growlers that require your attention. First, growlers are not perfectly sealed. This means even before you open it, a slow ingestion of oxygen will

occur. As a consequence, if you leave it sitting in your fridge for three weeks before opening it, the beer will both be flat and the oxidation process will have started. Once you pick up that growler, start drinking Then there is the issue of the size of the bottle. It fits approximately a sixpack of beer. For one person in one night, that would be a heck of a lot of beer. Obviously that makes it wellsuited for sharing with friends, but what you need to know is that once you crack it open, the beer is going to deteriorate rather quickly. As you pour, oxygen enters the bottle to replace the dispensed beer and oxygen creates oxidation: a stale, cardboard-like taste. In such a large bottle, oxidation can start to show within 48 hours. So, in short, once you start pouring be sure to finish the beer within a day or two. The third issue is cleaning. Growlers get re-used over and over. Most growler stations require the customer to clean their own bottle. They might give it a quick rinse, but that is all. The risk is yours.

OR ARY

mm-m

A growler from Yellowhead Brewery // Eden Munro

particularly good option are the local breweries. Alley Kat, Yellowhead and Hog’s Head all have growler stations you can use, and it is the best way to get the freshest possible beer around. Some better liquor stores also have growler stations, including Little Guy in Sherwood Park, Keg and Cork on the Southside, Wine and Beyond and some

As a homebrewer I take the issue of cleanliness seriously. An improperly cleaned bottle can trash a beer quickly, even over a couple of days. If you are going to partake in the growler game, be sure you know what you need to do to keep your growler clean. The first step is make sure you rinse it out immediately after emptying it. I don’t mean the next day, or even a couple hours later. I mean rinse it out minutes after finishing it. That will prevent residual beer from drying and creating a possible home for little critters. As necessary as quick rinsing is, it is not sufficient. You also need to make sure any micro-organisms that might have worked their way into the bottle

t r o f com

MP C O N TE

get wiped out. There are a number of ways to do that. Before the next fill you can do a rinse with some kind of sanitizer. Bleach is intense, environmentally disastrous and a bit of an atomic bomb, but is an easy source for sanitization. There are, however, some less crazy options that are just as effective. Go to a homebrew shop and ask for a sanitizer. They will give you a few options, including hydrogen peroxide (not the kind you buy at London Drugs), iodine or other acid cleaners. All of them are quite effective and I would recommend you use them before every fill. Overall, growlers can be an interesting way to experience craft beer. A

Liquor Depot locations. If you follow my advice around how to handle growlers, I am convinced you will find the growler experience entertaining and eclectic. V Jason Foster is the creator of onbeer.org, a website devoted to news and views on beer from the prairies and beyond.

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DISH 11


DISH WINE PRICES

<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 09

with most falling at the lower end of that spectrum. This is comparable to most restaurants around town, independent or otherwise; the bythe-glass list at Murrieta's is similarly priced. The difference resides in the specific wines on offer: "The independent restaurants offer innovation and much deeper wine lists, and innovation in their food," Saurette says. Chains and independents also tend to differ in their pricing of bottles and higher-end wines. Saurette is often happy accepting a flat amount of money for these bottles, dispensing with his formula and therefore selling the more expensive wines for significantly less than usual. "What I find is people look at me, particularly when they come from out of town, and it's as if they've discovered the mother lode on the wine list," he says. "But it's drinking better, and it brings our customers back. It's a simple philosophy and I think it's proved to be working really well for us." The Marc's wine list is priced so that the price per ounce decreases with larger serving sizes, meaning that it is more economical to order a bottle instead of a glass (provided you want to drink that much). This is common in restaurants, whereas wine bars often price their wines by the ounce: the per-ounce price is simply multiplied by the serving size, like a sixounce glass or a 26-ounce bottle. "My by-the-glass list is really the thing

that I baby the most," says Sheri Somerville, owner of Somerville Wine Room. "I work really hard at not having overlaps—if I see my wine on somebody else's list I try to get rid of it, because I think that's unimaginative. I couldn't run a business if I had to do it any cheaper—or I could serve swill; I could serve wines that I would never drink and that are mass-produced and chemicallyenhanced. But I would rather close my wine bar than serve those." Somerville prices her wines with only a one-time markup on the wholesale price; she averages around $11 for a sixounce glass and $40 for a bottle. The industry standard markup is two to three times higher than wholesale, and often more on the trendy or higherend wines—so for her prices to be the same as average with only a one-time markup, means that they are more expensive wines to begin with. Wholesale prices vary slightly depending on how restaurants order their wines: if they order directly from the warehouse they pay true wholesale but must also order full cases, have room to store those cases and be able to receive the order whenever it shows up at their door. Instead, many restaurants order through a liquor store, paying a marked-up price in exchange for the service of being able to order split cases, get product recommendations and arrange delivery times in advance. Probably the most overlooked factor when criticizing a restaurant's wine prices is the sheer amount of investment capital it takes to open a restaurant, never mind the daily overhead; there's a

reason so many restaurants fail in their first couple years. "When you come to a restaurant you are paying for the experience of the restaurant," Somerville says. "You're paying to be served; you're paying to be greeted; you're paying to have every wish granted before you can think to ask for it. You're paying for your water to be refilled nine times. You're paying for the music I have carefully chosen. You're paying for the atmosphere. The notion that we could just charge you what you can buy it for in the store—that means I'd invite you to my house, not my business." Returning to that seemingly overpriced bottle of J Lohr Seven Oaks on Murrieta's list: how do they justify their wine prices, and the inclusion of such humdrum bottles? "You can find that wine everywhere—that's why it's cheaper elsewhere," says Jeff Beerwart, general manager of Murrieta's in Edmonton. "There's a lot of bottles that are a lot more affordable than that, that you don't know, that you kind of should be trying and should be drinking." "When everybody goes through a wine list, even for me there may be wines I'm not familiar with," he continues. "But once you see three, four or five wines that you are familiar with, it kind of relaxes you. You're like, 'OK, so now I just have to ask the waiter about what should I try: this is what I like, but I'm looking for this price point.'" While this motive is understandable,

it isn't always plausible—the bottle in question is one of the cheaper Cabernet Sauvignons on Murrieta's list, so a customer must be willing to either spend more money or try a completely different type of wine; additionally, many of the other bottles on their list are quite common and widely available. This is disappointing, especially given how fortunate Albertans are with the sheer number of wines that are available in our province: the only province in Canada with a privatized system, Alberta liquor stores can stock pretty much anything available on the international market, while the other provinces are limited to the products that the government chooses to import. Albertans are spoiled for choice; I would have expected even chains to take advantage of such a situation, but sadly this is just not usually the case. "I don't know how they get away with it; they have marketed themselves brilliantly and that person should get a raise," Somerville says. "I've seen a couple of my high-end wines, big award-winning wines, over 35 dollars more at a couple of Edmonton restaurants. We just laugh, because it's like really—you don't think you're gonna get called out on that? I'm really cognizant—I direct people to the places I buy my wine from and I know they will go in and see how much it costs." Yet as we've seen, they do indeed get away with it—or else why would those prices remain so high?

"Sometimes Edmontonians get so wrapped up in the hype around a place that they stop trusting their own taste buds and their own instincts," Somerville adds. "You can wow people; you can jeuge them with a fancy light show and lots of noise and loud music and a happening scene—and they're drinking swill. Or they're drinking wine that's been open all week." "I want people to sit in the car at the end of the day and go, 'You know what? That was pretty good,'" Saurette says. "And their wallet is not that empty. Chances are they're going to talk about us then, and come back with a lot more frequency when we treat them fairly." Customers must educate themselves: about wine and about what it costs. If you're dining somewhere and the wine prices don't sit well with you, speak up—so long as you're polite about it, restaurant managers and owners are usually more than willing to discuss their business, especially if they have nothing to hide; after all, it's their livelihood. Chances are good that you will leave such discussions with a better perspective on the situation—and if the markup is unjustifiably high, they need to hear about it: they won't change if they have no reason to do so. Above all, as a consumer, remember that one thing speaks louder than any words: your money. Choose where you spend it wisely.

MEL PRIESTLEY

MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

WINE REVIEWS

<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

ERIK TURNER ROCKER RED 2011 Merlot By Erik Turner $30.45

They say: “As a young rocker I was seduced by the big beat, the bombastic guitars and jamming endlessly into the starry night. I have dedicated my life to all of this, and more. The essence of the music I love is reflected in Rocker Red—this Merlot is hot, sexy and perhaps a little dangerous. Maybe a Red from the wrong side of the tracks, but definitely a Rocker that will make you laugh, love and stay out too late. Certainly the best excuse to open a bottle! So make some unforgettable memories with friends and lovers ... and don’t forget to rock out to your favourite music with Rocker Red! This Merlot is rich in berries, spice earthy botanicals and a tannic backbone with a wonderful dense colour structure to match its aromatic character. The intensity of the fruit and oak are harmonious in the glass!” Musical pairing: Warrant, obviously, or some equally raucous hair metal from the ‘80s and ‘90s. Aroma: The first whiff evokes a slightly acidic aroma mixed with the oaky quality the wine’s lengthy description claims it has. Initial taste: Lush and full-bodied, just like Erik Turner’s hair—or at least how his hair was back in Warrant’s heyday. The quality that came forward first is a rich, oaky flavour followed by a sweet tartness that imparts essences of raspberries and blackberries. “It tastes like dirt, but in a good way—like it’s been aged a bit,” mused my co-drinker, who works in the hospitality industry and does know her way around her reds. I wish I could have detected a hint of cherry somewhere in the mix, because that would have lent itself perfectly to some “Cherry Pie” song references, but, alas, there was none. After allowing the wine to linger in my mouth for a moment, a sharp, acidic bite punched its way forward and made my cheeks pucker a little. However, it’s a bite that was still palatable and did not overwhelm the wine’s other qualities. Later: Rocker Red is less dry than what I always assume I’ll get from a Merlot, and as my co-drinker and I made our way through the bottle, the bite of the wine’s acidity became more subtle and the oaky berry flavours came to the forefront. Overall, it’s a flavourful concoction that makes for decent table wine, but we both agreed it isn’t something we’d be willing to fork over $30 for. Other possible music pairings: Rocker Red Merlot is a wine that claims to be sexy and badass, but those terms seem like a cry for attention in a wine that asserts itself as a rebel when it just really isn’t one. After a few minutes of Warrant, our soundtrack switched to a mix of indie pop that including Broods, MØ, Grizfolk and Electric Suns, which seemed better suited for a bottle of wine. Save the hair metal for cheap beer and wine coolers. MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

12 DISH

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014


Wedding Feature Relaxing and letting go of the day’s stresses can lead to great memories

Sandy Kang and Steve Jerat celebrate with their wedding party, on December 28, 2013. Wedding photography by Jessica Fern Facette (http://jessicafernfacette.com/)

It was the day of his wedding and Kyle Postmus didn’t know how to tie his bow tie. As it turned out, only two other people at the wedding on that hot August day in 2013 did know. One was Kyle’s husband-to-be, Chase Stampe, who for conventional reasons (the tradition of avoiding seeing your fiancé before the ceremony) obviously couldn’t come to his assistance.

“That just about caused a breakdown,” Stampe remembers. “It took about half an hour to find someone.” In the end, it was Stampe’s grandmother who came to the rescue. In the grand scheme of things, that may sound like a pretty minor issue—but on your wedding day, even something so minor as struggling to tie a bowtie can seem catastrophic.

For many, the day of the wedding is full of anticipation, emotions and pressures real and perceived. So it’s understandable that many couples approach the big day with mixed feelings—excitement, stress, trepidation, joy. Even with all the major decisions made and all the right supports in place, that one little misstep may make it feel like everything’s amiss. On the surface, everything

is going along smoothly, but inside the bride’s or groom’s head thoughts about commitment, inlaws, the events of the day itself, stage fright or any number of other things may rear up.

there are still things that can go wrong. The trick is to find ways to make the best of it. Bergman recalls one wedding where a power outage nearly put the reception in jeopardy.

It’s that emotional cocktail of the wedding day that reality TV shows, like WEtv’s infamous Bridezillas, capitalize on. That’s why Edmonton wedding planner Jennifer Bergman stresses to couples that they need to take the time to sit back and enjoy the moment.

“It turned into a really neat memory for the couple,” Bergman recalls. “Fortunately we had just finished dinner, so the dance was next. All the centerpieces were candles and the best man already had an acoustic guitar so it wound up being this very intimate, unique experience.”

It may sound trite, she admits, but that’s often the single most important advice she doles out. “Everyone says the day goes by so quickly,” She says. “It’s important to keep perspective. There’s only so much you can control. It’s more important to enjoy the day instead of worrying about the details, you have to take time to soak it in.”

For all the planning, sometimes giving in to the spontaneity of a moment leads to the most memorable events of the day. Julianne Cragg, another Edmonton wedding planner, says she isn’t usually surprised at the receptions she coordinates. “You come to expect it—okay, who’s dancing, who’s singing?” She says.

That, she adds, is why many couples hire a planner in the first place. Stampe agrees. One of the best decisions they made, he says, was hiring Bergman to plan their wedding. “From the engagement right through to the wedding, having Jennifer there gave us time to process everything and make decisions. On the day itself it meant we didn’t have to worry about anything.”

But occasionally something will catch her pleasantly off guard— like when she arranged R&B singer Lindsey Nagy’s wedding last summer. “I’d asked her if she wanted to sing but she said she would rather just enjoy the day,” Cragg remembers. “I didn’t know, the guests didn’t know, but all of a sudden she’s up there.” Needless to say the performance was a memorable one. But vocal

Cont. on pg 14

Even with a planner, of course,

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WEDDING FEATURE 13


Cont. from pg 13

unique to us.”

skills or not, there are plenty of ways to inject some of your own personality into the event.

With over 400 guests to accommodate, selecting a venue that suited their tastes and had enough capacity wasn’t easy, Kang recalls, but in the end they went with the Enjoy Centre at Hole’s Greenhouse. It set the stage perfectly, she says. The way the glass ceiling was lit up against the night sky was breathtaking. Combined with a creative culinary experience and a live Croatian band, “It was like a total out of body experience. Looking back at the videos, it’s like, wow, this really happened.”

Stampe and Postmus wrote their own vows, and it’s something Stampe recommends to other couples. “What’s important,” he says, “is that it comes from you, it’s personal. If it comes from the heart, even if you’re not a poet, your partner knows what you mean.” For many couples, the wedding is more than just an affirmation of their feelings, it’s an expression of who they are together. When each half of the couple comes from widely different cultures, that can be tricky. “I’m East Indian and he’s Croatian,” Sandy Kang explains. The fusion of the two cultures, she says, “was like nothing our family and friends had seen. It was

Big weddings aren’t necessarily the norm these days, but Bergman says venues are in limited supply in general in Edmonton. As an alternative to that, the destination wedding is becoming more and more popular. “We were torn between doing

a destination wedding and one here,” admits Kang. “Originally we were thinking of getting married in Croatia and having a big party when we came back. But then we thought, if we’re going to have a big party here, why don’t we just get married here?” The franchise for wedding reality TV shows seems endless. Just to give an idea, here is a sample of several of the shows in the growing canon. At least 12 different reality shows have aired on the topic at one point or another since 1996.

For Stampe and his spouse, who now call Vancouver home, Edmonton was the right choice for them as well. “Being from Vancouver, you might think it seems a little funny that we came to Edmonton to get married. But there are places in Edmonton that are very picturesque,” says Stampe, noting that the setting at Fort Edmonton was perfect for them. “And, Edmonton is home.”

Longest running: A Wedding Story (1996 – 2007) First aired on TLC in 1996, this show followed brides as they planned and made their way to the alter for their wedding day.

That feeling of being home can lend a certain air of comfort. Surrounded by the right people, in the right place, with only one big thing to do that day, all the stresses and pressures can melt away.

Weirdest: My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding (Runner-up: My Big Fat Redneck Wedding)

“People worry about stuff that really doesn’t matter,” says Cragg. “Those are things they will usually forget. Remember it’s one day; what’s important is to get married.”

Delving in to the lives of gypsy families on one of the most emotionally charged days of anyone’s life, this show purportedly aimed to reveal the culture and character of American gypsies.

Strangest spinoffs: Say Yes to the Dress Not one, but two spinoffs of this show have been created, one subtitled Bridesmaids, the other, Atlanta. Yes, the city of Atlanta has its very own version of the show. As with any TV show, this list comes with a disclaimer: these shows may or may not help you prepare for a wedding. Side effects include: rethinking everything you are doing, obsessing about a wedding you can’t afford, ending up on the wildest imaginable goose chase, ending up in a reality TV show, and being completely turned off of weddings altogether. To amuse, horrify and possibly prepare yourself and your betrothed further, Google “wedding reality shows” and enjoy the results.

Jeremy Derksen / jeremy@postvuepublishing.com

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1. Book the venue early. If having the right setting is important, give yourself time to find and reserve it. Wedding planner Jennifer Bergman says Edmonton has an ongoing challenge with limited capacity.

2. Sample everything. If you’re going to make your guests eat it, suggests Kang, you should try it ahead of time. That’s the only way to know for sure if it’s something you want, with no surprises on the day of the wedding.

Two Edmonton wedding planners (Jennifer Bergman and Julianne Cragg) and two newlywed couples (Sandy Kang and Steve Jerat, and Chase Stampe and Kyle Postmus) were asked for their advice on how to prepare for the big day. Here’s what they said.

3. Let your personality come through.

Whether it’s personally composed vows or a wedding that reflects the cultural backgrounds of the couple, this is a day to share who you are—both individually and as a couple—with your friends and family.

4. Take the time to visit with your guests.

If you don’t take time to go around and thank people, says Stampe, some of the people who came to see you may be too politely shy to visit your table. You invited them; let them know what it means to you that they came.

5. Embrace the spontaneous moments.

Power outages, bowties, impromptu performances—these are things that people will remember. Don’t stress, keep perspective and go with the flow.

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1. Rain on your wedding day is actually considered good luck, according to Hindu tradition!

2.

According to tradition in many countries (derived from Roman belief), the wedding ring is worn on the left ring finger because the vein in the left ring finger, referred to as the vena amoris, was believed to be directly connected to the heart, a symbol of love.

3.

Queen Victoria started the Western world’s white wedding dress trend in 1840 – before then, brides simply wore their best dress.

4.

Ancient Greeks and Romans thought the veil protected the bride from evil spirits. Brides have worn veils ever since.

5. In many cultures around the world -- including Celtic, Hindu and Egyptian weddings -- the hands of a bride and groom are literally tied together to demonstrate the couple’s commitment to each other and their new bond as a married couple (giving us the popular phrase “tying the knot”).

6.

CREATE. ENGAGE. INSPIRE.

The custom of tiered cakes emerged from a game where the bride and groom attempted to kiss over an ever-higher cake without knocking it over.

7. The tradition of a wedding cake comes from ancient Rome, where revelers broke a loaf of bread over a bride’s head for fertility’s sake.

8. The Roman goddess Juno rules over marriage, the hearth, and childbirth, hence the popularity of June weddings.

9.

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The first weddings comprised of a groom taking his bride by capture. He would take her somewhere hidden away so her relatives and villagers couldn’t find them. There they stayed for one moon phase and drank mead, a wine made from honey, to make them more amorous. Thus, the word “honeymoon” was born.

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Early Roman brides carried a bunch of herbs, such as garlic and rosemary, under their veils to symbolize fidelity and fertility and to ward off evil. These herbs served as a precursor to the modern bridal bouquet.

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11. In many cultures, the groom historically often kidnapped the bride, and the

groom’s friends would help him, leading to the modern-day groomsmen. At the alter, the groom always stood on the bride’s right side so his right hand—or his sword hand—would be free to fight a jealous rival!

Photography – Portraiture [PHOT115] Covers basic skills required for successful photographic portraiture including posing subjects and applying various lighting techniques to create formal and informal portraits. May 7 – June 11, Wed 6 – 9:30 pm, Fee: $425

Wedding Photography Boot Camp [PHOT120] Content includes how best to plan to minimize stress and increase potential for great photographs. Posing and lighting for location photography is a main focus. May 10 – 14, Mon + Wed 6 – 9 pm + Sat 8 – 5 pm, Fee: $425

12. “Matrimony” is from the Latin matrimonium, from matrem (“mother”) + monium (“action, state, condition”).

13.

Every year has interesting popular wedding dates. In 2010, it was 10-10-10 and in 2011, 09-10-11! Possibility the most popular wedding day in history was 7-7-7 – a number known for luck, religious symbolism, numerology symbolism and it happened to fall on a Saturday!

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ARTS

ARTS EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // THEATRE

hese aren't monsters—not ity and the profound artifice on which really. For if these people her life is based. are monsters, well, then we all are. The newest project from The Reality television is arguably our Maggie Tree will have you ponder- modern day equivalent of the circus ing such questions at length: the freak show; Vanessa Sabourin draws experimental and collaboratively- upon this in her fierce, unnerving piece, created Monstrosities presents co-written with Jill Connell. Cagey three separate stories of women yet resolute, Sabourin's character is a with significant physical abnormali- self-described Manticore: "I was not a ties, rendering her "other" and apart freak—I was a mythical creature," she from the mainstream world. They declares, with a sense of power that is later proven fleetare monsters—or are they? ing and false as Paramount in Until Sat, Apr 26 (7:30 pm; 2 pm she faces the cruel each piece is the Saturday matinee) reality of televirelationship of Directed by Sandra Nicholls sion exploitation. each woman to Varscona Theatre, $15 – $20 The show's tenmedia, because sion and stakes it's not just how find their climax individuals react to these abnor- in Kristi Hansen's performance, malities but also how society re- whose wry, cigarette-puffing monoacts to them, how they are put on logue is delivered alongside docudisplay or hidden away. Appropri- mentary footage of a woman with a ately, Monstrosities is fundamen- similar physical trait as Hansen hertally multimedia: T Erin Gruber has self, and who has decided to wear created a series of projections to her monstrosity, like Hansen, openly accompany each woman's perfor- and without shame—albeit in a very mance, fleshed out by Aaron Mac- different way. ri's sound design and Tessa Stamp's Monstrosities is a powerful, fasset and costumes. These video and cinating show, offering a brutally sound clips blend artfully with each honest perspective on deviations of woman's performance, supporting the human body. Startling, touching her words and actions rather than and so very, very human, this is not overriding them. a collection of pithy sympathy or Amber Borotsik opens the show as a trite preaching, but rather an open, woman with a vibrant, carefree online honest dialogue. It will make you persona—she punctuates her collo- squirm, and good—these are things quial narration with hair-tossing, spar- that we, collectively, need to stop kly photo-booth-style video clips. We shying away from under pretensions watch her prepare for a date with her of false modesty or shame. So take a beau—and then we watch it again as look, and make it a good one. PRIESTLEY the show shifts and exposes her fragil- MEL MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM Darkness and extremity in Monstrosities // Marc J Chalifoux Photography

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

ARTS 17


ARTS REVUE // THEATRE

Honk! The Musical

Anthropomorphic fun in Honk

ALBERTA BALLET COMPANY ARTIST COLBY PARSONS, PHOTO BY PAUL MCGRATH

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18 ARTS

here's something so delightfully world. Though this is a cast of anthrocharming in watching a group of pomorphic characters, rest assured people honk, quack and flap their it's more fun than garish—the animalistic side is kept low key, implied way through a Broadway musical. The young folks at Grindstone The- by their words, gestures and clever atre, who have previously been cut- costuming (by Marie Muggeridge). ting their teeth George Stiles' muwith the weekly Until  Sat, Apr 26 (7 pm; 12:30pm sic (performed live improvised musi- matinee on Fri, Apr 25) by Grindstone mucal The 11 O'Clock Directed by Mark Vetsch sical director Erik Mortimer) has the Number, have just PCL Studio, ATB Financial Arts mounted their first Barns, $20 – $25 ($70 for a fam- feel of hallmark Broadway show full-length produc- ily of four) tunes; the twist is tion: Honk!, a 1993 musical of the that the musical numbers are aniclassic fairy tale The Ugly Duckling. There are no surprises in this story, mal-themed and performed by barnbut its familiarity adds to its charm. yard residents—and they're rather What might be most startling is the delightful: when else will you see a number of poultry-themed puns dancing frog backed up by a line of sprinkled throughout this produc- can-can dancers? We've seen these animal tropes tion—Anthony Drewe's book and lyrics never resist a chance for silly before: there's the cunning cat wordplay. The tale begins in a nest (David Johnston), chatty barnyard on a lake, where selfless mother duck birds (Nicole English does a fantasIda (the lovely voiced Kayla Nickel) is tic chicken laugh), a goofy turkey sitting on her clutch of ready-to-hatch (Elisa Benzer), and a flock of aviaeggs, one of which is distinctly differ- tor geese. It's fun picking out the ent than the rest. While never ex- humanity amongst these animal plained as to how that particular egg caricatures of stock characters, and ended up in her nest, its inhabitant is although Honk!'s central message indeed different than the yellow bow- of tolerance could come across as a tied youngsters that emerge from the bit saccharine, in this treatment it's others, right down to his voice—not more fun than hackneyed. "I like my honk. I like being differa chipper quack, but a sustained, offkey honk. Enter Ugly, played disarm- ent," says Ugly. Indeed, wee bird— this is an insight some humans need ingly by Mathew Bittroff. to embrace as well. What follows is a coming-of-age MEL PRIESTLEY MEL@VUEWEEKLY.COM story as Ugly learns his place in the

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ARTIFACTS

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RAW artists / Thu, May 1 (8 pm) The multifarious independent arts organization planted its roots south of the border but is spreading into Canada with the first international showcases being held in Vancouver and Montréal last summer. Toronto, Ottawa, Winnipeg and, yes, Edmonton will be added to the list this year for an event that brings together artists across

genres in order to foster positive growth. This means fashion, music, visual art, film, you name it. The roster for Edmonton’s launch includes photographer Fish Griwkowsky, Middle Men filmmaker Matt Marshall, corset designer Elise Truong and musician Jenie Thai, among numerous others. For a full lineup visit rawartists.org/edmonton/ revolution. (Starlite Room)

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ARTS 19


ARTS PREVUE // THEATRE

The Fever

A feverish look at the world at large // Ryan Parker / PK Photography

D

epending on your pop culture touchstones, you might know Wallace Shawn as The Princess Bride's arrogantly intelligent Vizzini ("Inconceivable!"), or as a version of

himself in My Dinner With Andre, or, the jittery voice of Toy Story's Rex, or innumerable other one-off roles (the guy's popped up on Gossip Girl, even). He's immediately recognizable

he's played. "His father was the editor of The New Yorker," Ian Leung muses, in a downtown cafe "He comes from writing stock, and that's what he started out trying to be. He only became an actor when the people he was working with said, 'We need you to be in this.'" Shawn's writing is deeply questioning in tone, concerned with the operations of the world at large and how we operate within it, resisting or succumbing to social and political rhythms. And The Fever, a one-hander stage script of Shawn's that Leung is directing, hones in on that: it finds Until Sun, May 4 (7:30 pm; 2 pm its unnamed charSunday matinees) acter—originally Directed by Ian Leung performed by Livingroom Play House, $20 Shawn himself— in a delirious tailspin of thought, cycling through First World guilt from a Third World hotel room in an unnamed country. (The role here will be performed by Melissa Thingelstad, no stranger to as an actor, but performance marks solo shows.) "I saw it when a Toronto production a limited representations of Shawn's place on the cultural pantheon, given toured the country and came to the that he's also one of North America's Phoenix Theatre in 1993," Leung says. finest publishing thinkers, an essayist "I was struck with how outspoken a and playwright quietly but frequent- play it was, how candid he was about ly celebrated for a depth of thought his thoughts about how the world as important as any of the characters works. I found myself very much in

sympathy with him." Looking at Leung's own production history, you can see why—asking those big questions about status quo seems to be the fulcrum of his company, Theatre No. 6. Back in 2009, he created U: The Comedy of Global Warming, a multimedia smorgsaboard of considerations about climate change. Now, after a few years absent from our stages, The Fever marks the beginning of a return for Theatre No. 6: this show will be followed up in a few months by another, a production of Michael Healey's controversial Proud, which follows Stephen Harper attempting to navigate his own majority government. Leung's staging The Fever in the cozy Living Room Playhouse, akin to how Shawn first performed the work in the living rooms of friends before he ever took it to a proper stage. That proximity, Leung notes, between audience and actor, is important to the more confrontational aspects of the questions Shawn's asking. "I think it lets the play live as it is," he says. "Because I don't think it's written to be done in a great big hall. It's hard for me to imagine how you would approach it. It doesn't let you distance yourself from the thought process."

PAUL BLINOV

PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // DANCE

What's Cooking? E

ven though criticism is always Ainsley? We're performing and the hard to listen to, if the right work is bigger than you and you person says the right thing at have to meet it.'" In an effort to facilitate those the right time, it can change your moments of artistic clarity, Good whole perspective. Women is When Ainsready to ley Hillyard, Sun, Apr 27 celebrate founding mem(Lunch at noon, first showing at five years ber of the 12:30 pm, dinner at 6:30 pm and of What's Good Women second showing at 7 pm) Cooking?— Dance CollecPCL Studio Theatre, admission by an informal, tive, was traindonation ($10 minimum suggested work-ining at Grant for each show and $15 for a day pass) progress MacEwan, Heidi showcase. Bunting, her inWith lunch structor at the and dinner time, noticed something was off right before her catered by the Pourhouse Bier Bistro, What's Cooking? is an opportufinal showcase. "I was 18 and I think I had just bro- nity for artists across all disciplines ken up with my boyfriend—some- to present a five to 10 minute fragthing really stupid and childish," ment of their work followed by an Hillyard explains. "So I was sad— open dialogue with the audience to still doing the class but not as well get constructive feedback. as I could. And [Bunting] came up to me and was like, 'What's wrong All are welcome, including those who know very little about conwith you?'" While Hillyard brushed it off as temporary dance. "Our favourite people to come are simply having a bad day, Bunting's reply made her reevaluate how the people who know nothing about she approached performance. "She dance," Hillyard says. "They have was like, 'Well, you know what, such fresh eyes to look at the work,

20 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

they ask the most interesting questions and make the most bold statements about what's happening." Still, bold statements are sometimes tough to take, regardless of the speaker's good intentions. Over the past four years Hillyard has picked up some tricks on how best to approach these kinds of conversations. "For me, even when I'm giving critical feedback, I always pose things as questions," Hillyard says. "If [the artist] is being asked a question, it's less likely that they feel they have to defend themselves and more likely that they'll just want to answer the question. It makes for a better dialogue, too, because it's not a definitive 'I didn't like that.'" And it's that conversation that makes What's Cooking? so constructive and, perhaps, revelatory. "It's really special to come into somebody else's process while they're still creating," Hillyard adds. "It's kind of a gift to see how other people create, what their steps are and where they're coming from." KATHLEEN BELL

KATHLEEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


ARTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

THE BIRDS AND THE BODY: Works by Ben Sures; until Apr 27; opening: Apr 24, 5-8pm • NEIGHBOURHOODS: Works by Bruce Allen; Apr 29-May 2; artist reception: May 1, 5-8pm, with live music & NOISE FESTIVAL: Sean Caulfield projected artworks, part of Wind Rose Lamentations release. Performances by Wind Rose, K.M. Toepfer, Scott Smallwood, DNE, Aaron Macri, Skrunt Skrunt, Borys, Raimundo Gonzales, Gene Kosowan, Ocra, Bong Sample, Wayne DeFehr • May 4, 2pm • $5

SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta Print-Artists, 10123-121 St, 780.423.1492 • SHIFT: Printworks installation by Heather Huston; Apr 24-May 31; opening: Apr 24, 7-9pm • OUT OF THE ETHER: Printworks series by Joanne Madeley; Apr 24-May 31; opening: Apr 24, 7-9pm

DIXON GALLERY • 12310 Jasper Ave, 780.200.2711 • Richard Dixon's Studio and Gallery featuring historical Canadian works, antique jade sculptures and jewellery, 17th Century bronze masterworks, and works by Richard Dixon

EBDA BALLROOM DANCE • Lions Senior Recreational Centre, 11113-113 St, 780.893.6828 • May 3, 8pm

Olson and Dara Humniski • Until Apr 26

10330-84 Ave: What's Cooking?; Apr 27, noon (lunch), 12:30 (show); 6:30pm (dinner), 7pm (show); $10 (show)/$15 (day pass) • Artery, 9535 Jasper Ave: Next Up! Good Tunes with Good Women: Karaoke Party, silent auction; May 3, 8pm; $5 (adv)/$10 (door); $20 (for song of your choice, Good Women as back-up dancers)

MacEWAN UNIVERSITY • 10045-156 St • Blues Dance event; Shantzd3@macewan.ca • $65 • May 1-22, 6:30-8pm

MILE ZERO DANCE • Metro, 8712-109 St • Reeling and Flashdance: Mirages, Apr 26, 2pm; Pièces De Résistances; Apr 27, 2pm; International Dance Day: Flashdance, Jodie Vandekerkhove's quick choreography lesson before the show; Apr 29, 7pm • Apr 26-27, 29 • Admission to Mirages, and Pièces De Résistances: donation; tickets for Flashdance: $10 (door)

SUGAR FOOT • 10545-81 Ave, 587.786.6554 • Ballroom Friday Night Stomp!: beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels; $10, $2 (lesson w/entry); Every Fri until Apr 25 • Swing Dance: every Sat; beg lesson at 8pm; All ages/levels welcome; $10, $2 lesson w/entry

FILM FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley Milner Library Audio Visual Rm, main fl, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • Philomena (2013, PG); Apr 25, 2pm

THE CAPITOL THEATRE–Fort Edmonton • The Public Enemy (STC); Apr 24 • Pride and Prejudice; May 1

CINEMA AT THE CENTRE • Stanley Milner Library Theatre, bsmt, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • The Great Beauty (14A) 2013, Italy; Apr 30, 6:30pm EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum, 12845-102 Ave • Movie Series: Show Boat (1951, colour, PG) Apr 28, 8pm

EDUCATED REEL • Metro Cinema, 8712 109 St • Hungry For Change, local food activist, writer and educator, Gail Hall, '85 BA, discussion after film • Apr 24, 7pm • $6 (adv)/$8 (door, student/senior cash)/$10 (door, adult)

IMAX THEATRE • TELUS World of Science, 11211-142 St • Island of Lemurs: Madagascar 3D (G) Fri-Sat 11:00am, 1:10, 3:25, 4:35, 6:55; Sun 11:00am, 1:10, 3:25, 4:35; Mon-Thu 3:10 • Jerusalem 3D (G) Fri-Sat 2:15, 5:45; Sun 2:15; Mon-Thu 4:20 • Rocky Mountain Express (G) Sat-Sun 12:00 • Apr 25-May 1

DOCUMENTARY–DOCTORED • Royal Alberta Museum, 12845-102 Ave • The Edmonton Chiropractic Society: YEG Movie Premiere • Apr 30, 6-9:30pm

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY • 10186-106 St, 780.488.6611• Discovery Gallery: COALESCENCE: Ceramic artworks by Brenda Danbrook; until May 3 • Feature Gallery: FURNISH: Contemporary hand-crafted home furnishings and accessories; until Jul 5

VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St, 780.421.1731 •

DRAWING ROOM • 10253-97 St • SHELL: Works by Leanne

• FRESH PAINT: A Snapshot of Painting in Edmonton; until Apr 26 • LET US REMEMBER THAT WE ARE ALL RELATED: mixed-media works on paper by Carl Beam; until May 24 • KIYAS ASPIN: Works by Alberta artists Jane Ash Poitras, Dale Belcourt, Joane Cardinal-Schubert, Edward Harpe, Faye HeavyShield, Alex Janvier, George Littlechild, Ann McLean, Kimowan Metchewais, Ken Swan, Sam Warrior, and Lauren I. Wuttunee; until May 24 • AGA at Enterprise Square Galleries: REGIONS OF DISTINCTION: Works by the Edmonton membmers of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts; Apr 25-Oct 26; opening: Apr 24, 7pm

FAB GALLERY • 1-1 Fine Arts Bldg, 89 Ave, 112 St, 780.492.2081 • AFFINITIES: Bachelor of Fine Arts Graduate Show 2014; until May 3; opening: Apr 24, 7pm • Rutherford Library: BOOK AS WEAPON OF CHANGE II: Works by the U of A Sculpture class, winter 2014; until May 10; reception: Apr 26, 2pm-Apr 27, 5pm

GALLERIE PAVA • 9524-87 St, 780.461.3427 • CÉLÉBRONS LES LIENS: Works by Karen Blanchet; until Apr 29

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley Milner Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.944.5383 • GIVE IT SOME THOUGHT: Silkscreen prints by Joanne Madeley; May 1-31 • SLOW IT DOWN: Paintings by Meghan MacMillan; until Apr 30 • Display Cases: SMALL VICTORIES: The Students’ Design Association of the U of A; until Apr 30 GALLERY ON MAIN–Lacombe • MY TUSCAN ADVENTURE: Works by Elaine Tweedy • May 3-23 • Opening: May 3, 5-9pm

GALLERY WALK • Gallery Walk Galleries: Bearclaw, Bugera Matheson, Daffodil, Douglas Udell, Front, Garage Photographic, Lando, Peter Robertson, Scott, West End • Apr 26, 10-5pm; Apr 27, 1-4pm • First Thu Event: Galleries open late for an informal gathering of culture lovers the 1st Thu ea month

GRAY GALLERY • 9-11238, Robbins Health Learning Centre, 104 Ave, 109 St, 780.907.2816 • IN MEDIAS RES: Works by Gillian Willans, Tianna Mapstone-Lung, Tracy Suter • Through Apr HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112 St • Main

Gallery: JJ Levine, Queer Portraits • Front Room Gallery:

HUMAN ECOLOGY BUILDING–U of A • 1st Fl Gallery • COLOUR CATCH: Aesthetic experiences through West African Textiles and Nature • Until Jul 20

BEARCLAW GALLERY • 10403-124 St, 780.482.1204 •

Place Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 109 St, 78 Ave, 780.433.5807 • FROM THE PAST TO THE FUTURE: Works by Joyce Bjerke and Ethel Gulka • Until Apr 30

WOODLAND TREASURES: Featuring artworks by the Woodland School Painters • Until May 9 • Spring Gallery Walk/opening reception: Apr 26, 1-4pm

BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • 10345-124 St • FIELDS TO FORMS: Works by Les Graff; Apr 24-May 6; artist opening: Apr 24, 6-9pm; Apr 26, 1-4pm • Artwalk: Apr 26, 10-5pm; Apr 27, 1-4pm CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTA (CAVA) • 9103-95 Ave, 780.461.3427 • COLLECTIVE EXHIBITION: Members’ artworks; until Apr 29 • EXUBERANCE: Works by Doris Charest, Mormand Fontaine, Keith Nolan, Zoong Ngyuen, Dana Rayment; May 2-13; reception: May 2, 7-8pm CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain, 780.963.9573 • SPRING THINGS: Local pottery; until Apr 30 • SPRING GARDEN: Marian Majeau and friends present handmade pottery to enhance the garden; May 1-31; opening: May 3, 11-3pm

DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St, 780.760.1278 •

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM–St Albert • 5 St Anne St, St Albert, 780.459.1528 • HANDS ON NATURE: DISCOVER BIODIVERSITY: Until Jun 8 NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81 Ave, 780.432.0240 • Artisan Nook: COLOURS, TEXTURES AND PHOTOGRAPHY: Works by Ana Feher; until May 17 • Vertical Space: THE TWO CONTRARY STATES OF THE HUMAN SOUL: Paintings by Father Douglas, until May 7

NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE • 9225-118 Ave • Community Arts Night: Learn techniques, become familiar with new mediums; Every Tue until Jun 10, 6:30-8:30pm; Pre-register at 780.474.7611

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102 Ave, 780.453.9100 • CHOP SUEY ON THE PRAIRIES: Until Apr 27 • WESTERN THREADS: Contemporary Fibre Art, wall art, whimsical dolls, colourful quilts, stunning wearable art and pictorial

OF LONGING: Encaustic paintings and mixed media installations by Marlena Wyman • THE MEMORY ROOMS: History based works by Caitlin Richards, Patrick Arés-Pilon, and Mallory Gemmel; Apr 25-May 4; opening: Apr 25, 7-10pm; performance by VINE Choir at 8pm; closing reception: May 3, 4-7pm; performance by musician Dave Wall at 5pm • Open: Apr 26-27, May 1-4; 12-4pm

HAIRSPRAY–THE BROADWAY MUSICAL • Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615-109 Ave • Musical comedy about a big teenaged girl with big hair and a big heart • Until Jun 15 • Tickets at 780.483.4051

HONK! • Arts Barns, 10330-84 Ave • Grindstone Theatre, 10330-84 Ave • Musical adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s the Ugly Duckling, by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, • Until Apr 26 • $25/$20 (student)/$70 (family of four) at TIX on the Square IN THE HEIGHTS • Arts Barns • Scona Theatre Co • New Broadway musical by Lin Manuel Miranda; starring Aidan Burke, Jade Robinson Olivia Aubin, Evans Kwak • Until Apr 26, 7:30pm; Sat: 1:30 and 7:30pm • $15 (preview)/$20 (student)/$25 (adult) at TIX on the Square MAMMA MIA • Jubilee, 11455-87 Ave • Writer Catherine Johnson's sunny, funny tale unfolds on a Greek island paradise • Until Apr 27 MISTAKES WERE MADE • Varscona, 10329-83 Ave • By Craig Wright, starring Glenn Nelson, and Erica Conway • An

ROMEO AND JULIET • Citadel • By William Shakespeare with the participants of the Citadel/Banff Centre Professional Theatre Program • Until Apr 27 SCRIPT SALON • Holy Trinity Anglican Church, 10037-84 Ave • The Five Stages Of Death by Blaine Newton • May 4 SHREK THE MUSICAL • Strathcona Christian Academy Secondary School, Sherwood Park • Apr 29-May 2 • Tickets at scafinearts.com SHRUNKEN SHEADS • Kinsmen Hall, 47 Riel Dr, St Albert • St Albert Theatre Troupe • By M.Z. Ribalow • Apr 24-May 10, 6pm; Apr 27, May 4; Sun: 5pm (door), 5:45pm (buffet), 7pm (show) • $47.50 at box office, 780.222.0102 THEATRESPORTS • Citadel Zeidler Hall, 9828-101A Ave • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30pm and 10pm • Until June • $12/$10 (member) at TIX on the Square THE VIP KIDS SHOW • Varscona, 10329-83 Ave, 780.433.3399 • Music, comedy, art, puppets with Kate Ryan, Davina Stewart, Donovan Workun, Dana Andersen, Cathy Derkach, friends • May 4, 11am • All Seats $6 VIP Pass $60

Helper, Clint McElwaine, Jannie Edwards, Val Brandt, Anna Marie Sewell; Apr 26, 5pm • The Poetry Party: Mary Pinkoski, Tim Bowling, Iman Mersal; Apr 26, 7pm; $10 (member)/$15 (non-member) • Part of Poetry Festival

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • The Red Gala: Kimmy Beach, Jeanette Lynes, Steven Heighton, Hugh McMillan, Capital City Burlesque • Apr 25, 7:30pm (door), 8pm (event) • $30 (member)/$40 (non-member) AUDREYS BOOKS • 10702 Jasper Ave • Glass Buffalo Magazine Presents Words and Purport; Apr 24, 7pm • Book signing with Joe Woodcock, Keremeye'us: A Walking Journey Across America; Apr 25, 12pm • Edmonton Poetry Festival's Café: Reading Venue Event: Three Bananas L'espresso Café; Apr 27, 1:30pm • Launch of Bonnie Hutchinson's Transitions: Pathways to the Life and World Your Soul Desires; Apr 29, 7pm • Donna Milner signs Somewhere In Between; Apr 30, 12pm • Mothers of Invention: Readings by authors Theresa Shea, Jessica Kluthe, and Lisa Martin-DeMoor; May 3, 1:30pm

by Craig Wright

Verret, Giselle Lemire, Ariane Mahrÿke Lemire, Melissa Morelli Lacroix, Medgine Mathurin, Mary Pinkoski • Apr 24, 8pm

Event: new books by E. D. Blodgett, Dennis Cooley, Melissa Morelli Lacroix, and Stephen Scobie • Apr 24, 4pm • Part of Edmonton Poetry Festival

Portrait photos of parolees; curated by Mark Power • Until May 3, Mon-Fri 8:30am-4:30pm

780.963.9935 • Sculpture Installation by Kelly Johner • Apr 25-May 21 • reception: Apr 27, 1-3:30pm

Canvas Works Gallery: Don Wheaton YMCA–DT, 10211-102 Ave: Jenny Keith's nature-inspired paintings; until May • Jackson Power, 2nd fl. 9744-60 Ave: THE SISTERHOOD

THE FEVER • Azimuth, 11315-106 Ave • A stranger in a strange land wakes in a state of delirium • Apr 23-May 4

NINO NINA SHOW • Expressionz, 780.450.6462 • Variety show • Last Sun ea month, 5:30pm (door), 7:30pm (show) • $10 (door)

FACULTY CLUB • U of A Press: Literary Cocktails Poetry

KING’S UNIVERSITY COLLEGE • 9125-50 St • LIFE2:

MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-51 St, Stony Plain,

• Cityscapes by Fraser Brinsmead; May 3-15

WORKS GALLERY • 10635-95 St • YMCA Community

Theatre • Dark comedy by Hannah Moscovitch; starring Jamie Cavanagh, Andréa Jorawsky, and Matthew Hulshof • Apr 30May 4, 7:30pm; Apr 30 (preview): by donation; May 4, 2pm • $20/$15 (student/senior/industry) at TIX on the Square, door

THE MUSIC BOX • Capitol Theatre, Fort Edmonton • Bass Caravan and the Roving Company of Curiosities • May 2-3 • $30-$25 (adult)/$15-$20 (child 12 & under)

CITY HALL • Centre Stage: CBC at Noon, Conduit: Peter Midgley Pushpa Raj Acharya, Ella Zeltserman, Rita Espeschit; Apr 24, noon • Market Fresh Poetry–Fresh Produce: Skye Hyndman, Harleen Cheema; Apr 26, 10am • Part of Poetry Festival

JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY (JAAG) • Strathcona

780.407.7152 • MEASURING A YEAR: BY THE MINUTE: Knitted sculpture, installation by Margie Davidson; until May 16

SPRING GALLERY WALK: Apr 26, 10-5pm; Apr 27, 12-4pm

EAST OF BERLIN • C103, 8529-103 St • Punctuate!

MUMP & SMOOT–ANYTHING • Roxy, 10708-124 St • By Michael Kennard and John Turner • Until Apr 27 • $23-$29 at 780.453.2440

CBC CENTRE STAGE • CBC at Noon, New Books: Deborah Lawson, Michael Penny, Hendrik Slegtenhorst, Shawna Lemay, Randy Kohan • Apr 25, noon

Josée Aubin Ouellette • Until May 23

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St,

10322-83 Ave • THE ARTIST LENS • Until May 18

WEST END GALLERY • 12308 Jasper Ave, 780.488.4892 •

St • Two ONE-WAY Tickets To Broadway • Musical comedy by Bob Martin and Don McKellar • Until Apr 27 • $15 (student)/$20 (senior)/$25 (adult) at TIX on the Square

BICYCLETTE CAFÉ • French Twist: by RAFA: Jocelyn

LATITUDE 53 • 10242-106 St, 780.423.5353 • Main Space:

Albert, 780.460.4310 • FRAGILE ELEMENTS: Works by Susan Casault, Peter Ivens, and Teresa Stieben; until Apr 26 • HIGH ENERGY 19: RE-IMAGINING St Albert High School student artworks; May 1-24; opening: May 1, 6-9pm

WALTERDALE–ASA Gallery • Walterdale Playhouse,

soap opera • Every Mon, 7:30pm • Until May 26

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE • La Cité Theatre, 8627-91

MONSTROSITIES • Varscona, 10329-83 Ave • Maggie Tree's exploration of 3 women's freaky stories and lives • Until Apr 26

THE ARTERY • 9535 Jasper Ave • Cheatin' & Hurtin': Jim

780.459.2525 • NATURE’S AWAKENING: Featuring paintings by Nathalie Shewchuk-Peré and collages by Sylvia Grist • Until Apr 26

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St, St

780.460.5990 • Works by Wanda Resek and Bette Lisitza; through Apr

DIE-NASTY • Varscona 10329-83 Ave • Live improvised

off-Broadway producer has one night to stage an epic production about the French Revolution • Apr 30-May 18 • $23-$27 (adult)/$21-$24 (students/senior)

LITERARY

GALLERY 7 • Bookstore on Perron, 7 Perron St, St Albert,

LOFT GALLERY • AJ Ottewell Gallery, 590 Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park • 790.559.4443 • artstrathcona.com • Open: Sat-Sun 12-4pm • Art by Beth Gillard, and ASSC members • Until Apr 27

Gallery A: HOMETOWN DREAMS: Paintings by Linda Craddock; until May 3 • Gallery B: LABYRINTH OF THE ETERNAL ARCHETYPE: Installation by Shyra Desouza; until May 3

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert,

ENTERPRISE SQUARE GALLERIES • 10230 Jasper Ave

BLOWN UP: Video-game art about war in the Middle East by Wafaa Bilal, Harun Farocki, and Mohammad Mohsen, curated by Vicky Moufawad-Paul; May 2-Jun 14; Curator’s Talk: May 2, 7pm; followed by opening reception • ProjEx Room: OURS: Installation by Jennifer Tellier and Brittney Bear-Hat; May 2-Jun 14

Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • DUALITY IN A DIAPHANOUS LANDSCAPE: Works by Local glass artist Manola Borrajo • Until Apr 27 Science Research and Educational Showcase; May 3, 10am-4pm

LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St, 780.990.1161 • SPRING ON 124 STREET: Paintings by Waclaw Pietucha, photos by Steven Friedman; until Apr 30 • Lando Art Auctions Preview: May 2-4; Fine Art Auction: May 4, 2 pm

Churchill Sq, 780.422.6223 • BMO World of Creativity: CABINETS OF CURIOSITY: Lyndal Osborne's curious collection; until Jun 30 • HIGH ADVENTURE: Byron Harmon on the Columbia Icefield; until Aug 17 • LAWREN HARRIS AND A.Y. JACKSON–JASPER/ROBSON 1924: until Aug 17 • INSTINCTIVE BREAK: Installation by Andrew Frosst; until Jun 8 • BOWERBIRD, LIFE AS ART: Works by Lyndal Osborne: until Apr 27 • STRANGE DREAM: Artworks by Jill Stanton; until Dec 31 • Art on the Block: The art of the hunt: May 2, $125

STRATHCONA COUNTY ART GALLERY@501 • 501

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-142 St • Events:

Exhibition of Local Graphic Design Featuring Perry Gratton with Arrowz Featuring New Collaborative Works with Mat Simpson • Through Apr

ARTERY • 9535 Jasper Ave, 780.233.3635 • GRATITUDE: An

Your Television • Set in Kingston, Ontario, a look at four downand-out individuals battered by poverty, mental illness, and addiction • Apr 30-May 11

DC3 ART PROJECTS • 10567-111 St • YEG SOUND ART

BURLESQUE BRUNCH LEGEND'S CHALLENGE • Studio Music Foundation, 10940-166A St • Kabuki Guns Burlesque fundraiser • Apr 27, 12-3pm • $10 (online)/$15 (door)/$10 (EBF member); all you can eat brunch

THE GOOD WOMEN DANCE COLLECTIVE • PCL Studio,

THE CRACKWALKER • Arts Barns, 10708-124 St • Kill

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • LAKE'S EDGE: Loretta Kyle and Pamela Thurston • Until May 3 • Wayne MacKenzie: Designer Goldsmith; Apr 24-27 (ph for appt) • Gallery Walk: Apr 26, 10am-5pm; Apr 27, 12-4pm

DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY (DUG) • 10332-124 St • 47TH ANNUAL SPRING SHOW: Recent works by gallery artists Tony Scherman, Wilf Perreault, Tim Okamura, Bev Petow, Les Thomas, John Capitano, Mara Korkola, Eliza Griffiths, Nathan Birch, Harry Savage, Fabian Marcaccio, Iris Nardini, Robert Scott, more • Apr 26-May 10 • Opening: Apr 26, 2-4pm

DANCE

rugs; until Aug 4

HARCOURT • Master Classes: Dead or Distant: Steven Heighton; Apr 25, 5pm; free (member)/$10 (non-member) • Part of Poetry Festival

KOFFEE CAFÉ • 6120-28 Ave • April Glass Door Coffee House Reading Series: Jeanette Lynes, Michael Gravel (poets); Kaz Mega (slam artist); Megan Keirstead (singer-songwriter), Jannie Edwards (host); Open Mic • Apr 24, 7pm • $7 POETRY FESTIVAL • Various venues; edmontonpoetryfestival.com/schedule/; until Apr 27 • The Red Gala: at the AGA: with Capital City Burlesque, poetry by Kimmy Beach, Hugh McMillan, Jeanette Lynes, Steven Heighton, and silent auction; Apr 25, 8pm; $30 (Poetry Festival member)/$40 (non-member) ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St, 780.902.5900 • Spoken Word Tuesdays: Weekly spoken word night presented by the Breath In Poetry Collective (BIP); info: E: breathinpoetry@ gmail.com STRATHCONA COUNTY LIBRARY • 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park, 780.410.8600 • 8th Annual Evening of Poetry: Celebrating National Poetry Month: readings from Margaret Macpherson (writer-in residence), and other Alberta poets; open mic session to share work. Wine and cheese (adult-only) • Apr 25, 6:30-8:30pm • $5 at Library check-out desk, door

THEATRE THE 11 O'CLOCK NUMBER • Varscona, 10329-83 Ave • Improvised Theatre by Grindstone Theatre • Every Fri until Jul 26

THE BRITISH INVASION • Jubilations Dinner Theatre, WEM, 780.484.2424 • Until Jun 15

April 30 - May 18, 2014 Varscona Theatre 10329-83 Ave For tickets call:

Tix on the Square 780-420-1757 or Shadow Theatre 780-434-5564 www.shadowtheatre.org

CHIMPROV • Zeidler Hall, Citadel, 9828-101A Ave • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show • Every Sat, 10pm, until Jul • $12 (door, adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun, 2014

CONTRACTIONS • PCL Studio Arts Barns, 10330-84 Ave, 780.471.1586 • Northern Light Theatre • By Mike Bartlett • An Orwellian depiction of absolute power with a savage twist to end the negotiations • May 2-10; Preview May 1

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

ARTS 21


FILM

FILM EDITOR : PAUL BLINOV PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // HOLLYWOOD CLASSICS

Make Mine Hollywood: Selections from the Golden Age Sat, Apr 26 – Tue, May 6 Metro Cinema at the Garneau

W

e call it the golden age, but most of the movies were silver, like smoke, and smoking is something you will see a great deal of here. Gold is precious, rarefied, but Hollywood was churning out movies like bratwurst back then. The studios sought to mirror the assembly line in their mode of production, with talent working under contract and given little choice as to their projects, most often asked to repeat whatever they got right the last time. The stories then, as now, were often romantic, but we needn’t be—this was, and is, an industry. Which makes it that much more amazing how truly glorious the results could be. Maybe what separates the American cinema of the 1930s, '40s and '50s apart from what came later has to do with some particular alchemical magic drawn from the tensions between the restrictions and commercial imperative of the studio system and the untameable drives of the talent to be creative, to entertain at a higher level, to tell a truth or two, or even to make art— a dirty yet persistent word. Censorship breeds subtle subversion, so many of the most durable golden age movies found ways of offering us sex, violence, moral ambiguity, social commentary and artfulness that could be more sophisticated than what’s generated under more permissive circumstances. What would eventually be termed film noir is defined by such subversions. So there’s an interesting irony here: golden age movies are for me a kind of comfort food; I turn to them when I just want to sink into the

22 FILM

pleasures of pure movieness. And yet so many of these movies are troubling, dark, complicated, riddled with neuroses, shadow and despair; while others, though far lighter in tone, use dazzling artifice as a way of speaking cleverly to life’s inherent absurdities. Inspired by the premiere of Citadel Theatre’s Make Mine Love, Metro Cinema has curated a sextet of golden age classics. Some you likley already know. Others have fallen out of fashion, even amongst cinephiles. Me, I think you should see all of them. But if you must pick and choose, I hope the following will help with that. Made in the midst of the Depression, Frank Capra’s multi-Oscarwinning screwball comedy It Happened One Night (1934) turned class resentment into romance, pitting Clark Gable’s newly unemployed news hound against Claudette Colbert’s runaway heiress. The banter is delicious, even if some of Gable’s digs at Colbert’s privilege wind up feeling awfully close to mere sexism. The story takes the shape of a road movie. At one point the unlikely lovers-to-be are picked up by a guy who can improvise a song out of any topic, whether hitchhiking or tonsils. He’s the embodiment of this movie’s giddily inventive spirit: you feel like they could have thrown anything into the plot and made it sing.

Orson Welles’ thinly disguised portrait of news magnate William Randolph Hearst, Citizen Kane (1941) is one of the most astonishing directorial debuts in film history, a relentlessly inventive examination of power, money and loneliness, brought to life by an unduly talented cast of thespians and a few outright geniuses, such as cinematographer Gregg Toland and composer Bernard Herrmann. It failed to recoup its investment and was for some years RKO’s bête noire. It would eventually be rediscovered, hailed a masterpiece, and spend decades at the top of the British Film Institute’s poll of the greatest films of all time, though all this would occur too late to do doomed Welles much good. Proof that nothing spells top-shelf entertainment quite like fatalism, back-stabbing, claustrophobia and greed, The Maltese Falcon (1941), remarkably faithful to Dashiell Hammett’s hardboiled novel, stars Humphrey Bogart as Sam Spade, a private dick who sleeps with his partner’s wife, never saw a billfold he didn’t like, and mostly seems as cold as the grave-digging implement he’s named

after. He’s also charmingly cagey, vulnerable to femmes fatale and a master of repartee. (When accused of always having a smooth explanation, Spade retorts, “What do you want me to do, learn to stutter?”) Bogey keeps extremely good company: Mary Astor, Sydney Greenstreet, Elisha Cook and Peter Lorre—as an inimitable gardenia-smelling dandy so aroused by danger, riches and the promise of the body-searching Bogart. Midway through cinema’s first century two big, brilliant pictures appeared that delighted audiences by tarnishing the very idols they came to adore. Sunset Blvd. (1950) was Billy Wilder’s direct strike against the fallacy of Hollywood’s romantic vision of itself, a hilariously sour tale, told by a dead man, of glamour corroding in the wilderness of musty old mansions, brimming with crime, sex, vanity and delusion. William Holden’s screenwriter becomes the boy toy to Gloria Swanson’s batty and aging silent film star—it was high time for attention to be drawn to the industry’s callousness toward actresses. All About Eve (1950) had one

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

of those too, though Bette Davis was considerably younger than Swanson, and the theatre was supposed to be more forgiving of age than the movies. Davis is a queen of the stage, but she’s uneasy about being in her 40s—her boyfriend’s eight years younger—and that unease is exacerbated by the arrival of Anne Baxter’s pretty young sycophant. Eve isn’t as stylish or outré as Sunset Blvd., but you could watch and listen to Davis and George Sanders forever—while Baxter’s husky malice lays the groundwork for much of Kathleen Turner’s career. On the Waterfront, the final selection in Metro’s sextet, is, appropriately, a film that in certain ways signals the end of the sort of theatre we see in Eve, of Hollywood’s golden age, of the studio system and the old romantic idea of the movies. This arresting drama about work, violence and union corruption in New York’s waterfront was founded in reportage and used real locations and real longshoremen, but the most thrillingly real thing about it was its lead actor. As disgraced ex-boxer Terry Malloy, Marlon Brando is nothing less than a revelation, a fountain of nuance, seemingly hyper-masculine yet so vulnerable, even effeminate in his tenderness. His attention to behaviour and impulse would help change acting. He is also, quite simply, a marvel to behold.

JOSEF BRAUN

JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM


REVUE // SCIENCE FICTION

Transcendence and, apparently, all its inhabitants, to continue their research, which, needless to say, has the capacity to take over the world!

O

ne of the things that irked me about Spike Jonze's Her was its failure to consider any number of consequences generated by its eerily close-to-reality science fiction premise. By contrast, Transcendence, which shares a key narrative element with Her—its protagonist's beloved is an omnipresent immaterial being who exists solely via the supernatural realm known as the Internet—bends over backward to consider all sorts of grandiose consequences of living in a world where such love is possible. The problem is that consider is all Transcendence does. The film, written by Jack Paglen, checks off a lot of big ideas that we should probably all be thinking about, but is ultimately just as soft-headed as Her, while bearing little of that film's distinctions. Her sacrificed coherence in favour of some resonant knowingness about the nature of love and possession. Transcendence sacrifices coherence for the veneer of intellectual and/or spiritual heft—and for a nonsensical

Evelyn is our Dr Frankenstein, her hubris driven equally by grief and scientific vision, her fundamental innocence underlined by the fact that she wears Keds with every outfit. Will is her disembodied monster, HAL 9000 with a handsome synthetic visage, a novel spin on the abusive, controlling spouse, Big Brother as bad husband. There are other characters to comNow playing plicate and crowd Directed by Wally Pfister Transcendence: a soundly scepti third act full of cal neurobiologist big-ass explosions pal (Paul Bettany) who conspicuously wears a cross and sundry special effects. The portentously named Dr Will around his neck, a wise old former colCaster (Johnny Deep), a genius in the league (Morgan Freeman) and a fed realm of artificial intelligence, gets (Cillian Murphy) who keeps a watchshot by radical anti-AI activists. At first ful eye on the Casters' mad science, it seems he's going to be OK, but then which could one day prove useful to a doctor with an astonishingly poor the Department of Defense. The first hour is very intriguing, if bedside manner informs him that the bullet was laced with isotopes and he's poorly paced—so many scenes are a going to die from radiation poisoning few lines too long, and there's a great in a matter of weeks. A devastatingly deal of padding—but then the script brief window of time, but just enough devolves into ungovernable plottitime for Evelyn (Rebecca Hall), Will's ness. First-time director Wally Pfister, partner in love and science, to encode already famous as Christopher NoWill's memories, ideas, emotions—in lan's regular cinematographer, opts short, his consciousness—and up- to emphasize spectacle, whether it be load the whole package into PINN, or clouds of infectious nano-dirt reachPhysically Independent Neural Net- ing up out of the earth or a diamondwork, the Casters' revolutionary AI like drop of dew sliding off a sunflowprogram. So Will's flesh perishes, but er in slow-motion, the former being his mind, or some facsimile, lives on an empty conceit designed solely to in the cloud. He's everywhere, all the look freaky and thrilling, the latter time, and, it seems, all-powerful. He being an empty stab at profundity. BRAUN makes a bunch of money fast, and sets JOSEF JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM up Evelyn with an entire desert town,

REVUE // CAN-COM

Now playing Directed by Mike Clattenburg 

Trailer Park Boys

C

anada's rich regional variations on the hoser-buddy movie—Fubar's head-banging Terry and Dean, boozerbros Bob and Doug Mackenzie, the teammates of Les Boys—fizzle out east with what should be (but isn't) the smoked-out spliff-end of a cult Nova Scotia mockumentary series. Trailer Park Boys: Don't Legalize It jags and lags, offering no buzz at all to its trips into road-movie, bromance and stoner-comedy territory. Bud buddies Julian (John Paul Tremblay), Ricky (Robb Wells), and Bubbles (Mike Smith), out of jail, gather at the local dump to mourn Ricky's father. But Julian's into the drug-piss trade (getting clean urine samples so people can cheat their tests), Ricky's growing dope in a subdivision and Bubbles lives a cramped existence under J-Roc's (Jonathan Torrens) stoop ... when he's not

Welcome To His Nightmare.

biking around Sunnyvale Trailer Park to sell chicken, beers and smokes. But when Ricky hears of the government's plans to legalize pot, Julian has to make a delivery of his bladder bottles and Bubbles gets word his parents died, leaving him their estate, the trio reunite for a trip to Ottawa via Montréal and Kingston. They're pursued by nemesis Lahey (John Dunsworth) and his gutbaring crony Randy (Patrick Roach). When scenes aren't stilted, they're not funny, either; there's nothing interesting about the mockumentary style here. Scenes spin their wheels and the plot goes nowhere fast, disappearing into a white-out of confrontations and male posturing. The story's beats—the truth of Bubbles' inheritance; Julian getting ripped off; the three Dartmouth amigos becom-

ing best buds again—are hit so predictably, they may as well be tinnysounding rimshots. Ricky's climactic speech is especially amateurish, coming off as a disjointed diatribe about 4/20 pot pride that's less logical and articulate than most online commentboard rants. And there's nothing bigscreen about a single shot here. It's all a rather genial, homegrown failure at a scheming-and-conning crop of a comedy. Only fish-bowlspectacled Bubbles and white wannabe gangsta J-Roc are amusing; there's poignancy in a few scenes with Bubbles, whom Smith manages to push beyond caricature. But from the first puff to the last toke, this played-out product's about as stale and low as a cheaply manufactured high can go.

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COARSE LANGUAGE

A HOT DOCS LIVE PRESENTATION

FOLLOWED BY A LIVE SATELLITE Q&A WITH ALICE COOPER

ONE NIGHT ONLY - APRIL 28 AT 7PM! LANDMARK CINEMAS

BRIAN GIBSON

CITY CENTRE 9

BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014 DATE: THURS APRIL 24 ARTIST: JR

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FILM

WEEKLY

GOD'S NOT DEAD (PG) FRI-SUN 12:50, 3:30, 6:30, 9:20; MON-THU

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: COSÏ FAN TUTTE (Clas not avail)

9:40; MON-THU 6:10, 9:10

FRI 6:50, 9:10; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:15, 6:50 , 9:10; MON-THU 6:50, 9:10

6:30, 9:20

SAT 10:55

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) SAT-SUN 2:45; 3D: FRI 6:55; SAT-SUN 12:05,

THE LUNCHBOX (PG) FRI 6:55 & 9:05; SAT-SUN 2:00, 6:55, 9:05;

TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON'T LEGALIZE IT (18A substance

6:55; MON-THU 6:25

MON-THU 6:55, 9:05

abuse) FRI-SAT 1:00, 3:25, 5:50, 8:10, 10:50; SUN 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00; MON-WED 1:35, 4:15, 6:45, 9:20; THU 4:15, 6:45, 9:20; Star & Strollers: THU 1:00

NEED FOR SPEED (PG not rec for young child) FRI-SUN 6:50, 9:40;

THE RAILWAY MAN (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young

CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH 14231-137 Ave 780.732.2236

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) THU 7:00, 10:20

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) FRI-SAT 5:25, 8:05, 10:40;

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not

SUN 5:00, 7:35, 10:10; MON-WED 6:25, 9:15

rec for young child) DAILY 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50; 3D: DAILY 1:10, 4:15, 7:20, 10:25

MON-THU 6:20, 9:10

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young child) FRISUN 6:35, 9:35; MON-THU 6:05, 9:05

child) opens May 2

SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN (G) SAT-SUN 2:55; 3D: SAT-SUN 12:00

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes,

8:15, 10:45; SAT 5:35, 8:15, 10:45; SUN 5:25, 8:00, 10:30; MON-WED 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; THU 2:00, 4:45, 9:45

SON OF GOD (14A brutal violence) FRI 6:30; SAT-SUN 12:10, 3:20, 6:30; MON-THU 6:00

not rec for young child) THU 7:15, 10:30

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) SAT-SUN 12:10, 2:50

OCULUS (14A violence, frightening scenes) FRI 12:25, 3:05, 5:35,

Fri, Apr 25-Thu, May 1, 2014

DIVERGENT (PG violence) DAILY 12:50, 3:55, 7:10, 10:20

CAPITOL THEATRE–Fort Edmonton

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young child) FRI-

THE RAID 2: BERANDAL (18A gory brutal violence) FRI-SAT 6:55, 10:10; SUN 6:40, 9:55; MON-WED 6:15, 9:45

WED 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:40; THU 12:30, 3:30

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (PG) SUN 12:45

12:30, 3:05, 7:00, 9:45; MON-THU 6:30, 9:15

for young child) FRI-SUN 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 9:45; MON-TUE 1:10, 4:45, 8:30; WED 4:45, 8:30; THU 1:10; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00; 3D: FRI-SUN 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:45; MON-TUE 2:10, 7:10, 10:20; Wed 2:10, 10:20; THU 2:10; 3D: WED 7:10; THU 7:10, 10:20

RIO 2 (G) FRI, SUN 12:00, 1:20; SAT 11:10, 12:00, 1:20; MON-THU

BRICK MANSIONS (PG violence, coarse language) FRI-SAT 1:20,

THE RAID 2: BERANDAL (18A gory brutal violence) FRI-SUN 9:30;

DIVERGENT (PG violence) FRI-SUN 12:35, 3:45, 7:10, 10:20; MON

Fort Edmonton Park, fortedmontonpark.ca

THE PUBLIC ENEMY (STC) THU, APR 24

BEARS (G) DAILY 12:15, 2:10, 4:20, 6:20, 8:30

12:20, 1:20; 3D: DAILY 4:00, 6:40, 9:10

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (STC) THU, MAY 1 S

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) FRI-TUE, THU 1:50, 4:40, 7:30,

3:40, 6:00, 8:20, 10:45; SUN 12:50, 3:05, 5:30, 7:55, 10:15; MON-WED 1:25, 3:50, 6:35, 9:35; THU 3:50, 7:05, 9:35; Star & Strollers: THU 1:00

CHABA THEATRE–JASPER

10:15; WED 4:40, 7:30, 10:15; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00

ICE AGE: THE MELTDOWN (PG) SAT 11:00

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL (PG) DAILY 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: KING LEAR (Clas not avail) THU 7:00

6094 Connaught Dr Jasper, 780.852.4749

DRAFT DAY (PG coarse language) FRI-SAT 7:00, 9:05; SUN-THU

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) FRI 7:00, 9:45; SAT-SUN

MON-THU 9:00

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK 2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes,

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec

12:35, 3:45, 10:05; TUE 12:35, 3:45, 6:55, 10:05; WED-THU 12:35, 3:45, 6:55, 10:05

BEARS (G) FRI-SUN 12:40, 2:50, 4:55, 7:15, 9:30; MON-THU 12:40, 2:50, 4:55, 7:15, 9:20

not rec for young child) THU 7:00, 10:15

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young child) FRI 12:30, 3:35, 6:50, 10:00; SAT-SUN 3:35, 6:50, 10:00; MON-THU 12:30, 3:35, 6:50, 9:55

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) VIP 18+: THU 8:00; 3D: THU 7:00

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec for young child) FRI 6:20, 9:35; SAT-SUN 12:00, 3:10, 6:20, 9:35; MON-WED 7:10; 3D: FRI 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; SAT-SUN 12:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; MON-THU 6:30, 9:40

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG violence, not

DIVERGENT (PG violence) FRI 6:30, 9:45; SAT-SUN 12:05, 3:15, 6:30,

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) DAILY 1:45, 4:40, 7:40, 10:30

BEARS (G) FRI 4:40, 6:50, 9:00; SAT-SUN 12:10, 2:20, 4:40, 6:50,

SAT 10:55

rec for young child) VIP 18+ FRI 6:30, 10:00; Sat 2:00, 5:30, 9:00; SUN 1:00, 4:30, 8:00; MON-WED 7:45; THU 9:00; 3D: FRI 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; Sat 12:50, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20; SUN 12:30, 3:40, 6:45, 10:00; MON-WED 6:45, 9:50; THU 6:45, 9:50

TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON'T LEGALIZE IT (18A substance

DIVERGENT (PG violence) FRI 7:20; SAT 12:30, 6:50; SUN 12:40,

MON-THU 7:15, 9:55

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) FRI-SUN 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25; MON-THU 2:00, 5:00, 7:50, 10:25

SUN, TUE 1:40, 4:30, 7:20, 10:00; MON, WED-THU 4:30, 7:20, 10:00

abuse) FRI-SUN 2:30, 5:30, 8:10, 10:35; MON-THU 2:50, 5:30, 8:10, 10:35

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young child) FRI

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) FRI 3:45, 6:40, 9:40; SAT-SUN

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: COSÏ FAN TUTTE (Clas not avail)

RIDE ALONG (PG violence, coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:55, 4:25,

3:50, 10:30; SAT 3:40, 10:00; SUN 3:50, 10:10; MON-WED 10:00

12:40, 3:45, 6:40, 9:40; MON-THU 6:45, 9:35

SAT 10:55

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) DAILY 4:30, 9:20 OCULUS (14A violence, frightening scenes) FRI, SUN, TUE-THU 2:20,

RIO 2 (G) SAT 12:20; SUN 12:40; 3D: FRI 3:30, 6:10, 8:50; SAT 2:55, 5:40, 8:15, 10:45; SUN 3:15, 6:00, 8:40; MON-WED 7:00, 9:35; THU 6:50, 9:30

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL (PG) FRI 5:00, 7:40, 10:15; SAT-SUN 11:45,

TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON'T LEGALIZE IT (18A substance abuse) FRI-SUN 12:50, 3:15, 5:50, 8:10, 10:40; MON-THU 12:45, 3:10, 5:30, 7:55, 10:15

8:00; SAT-SUN 1:30

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content, coarse lang)

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) THU 6:50, 9:30; FRI,

CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS

SUN-WED 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; SAT 11:00, 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; THU 1:30, 4:10

FRI-SAT 9:05; SUN-THU 8:00

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) FRI 1:00, 3:20, 5:50, 8:20,

RIO 2 (G) FRI-SAT 6:50, 9:20; SUN-THU 8:00; FRI-SUN 1:30; FRI 7:00;

10:40; SAT 1:00, 3:30, 5:50, 8:20, 10:40; SUN, TUE-THU 1:00, 3:20, 5:50, 8:15, 10:40; MON 1:00, 3:20, 8:00, 10:40

SAT 1:30, 7:00; SUN 1:30

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content, coarse lan-

CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12 5074-130 Ave 780.472.9779

FROZEN (G) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:30; 3D: DAILY 4:00, 6:45, 9:15 ROBOCOP (PG coarse language, violence, not rec for young child) FRI-

7:30, 9:55; MON, WED-THU 4:25, 7:30, 9:55

THE MONUMENTS MEN (PG) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:20, 3:55, 6:35, 9:10; MON, WED-THU 3:55, 6:35, 9:10

THE NUT JOB (G) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:10; 3D: FRI-SUN, TUE 3:10, 5:10,

guage) FRI-TUE, THU 2:00, 7:00; WED 7:00; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: COSÏ FAN TUTTE (Clas not avail)

BRICK MANSIONS (PG violence, coarse language) FRI 1:40, 3:50,

7:20, 9:30; MON, WED-THU 4:10, 6:40, 9:10

POMPEII (14A) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:50, 4:10, 6:45, 9:15; MON, WED-THU 4:10, 6:45, 9:15

3 DAYS TO KILL (14A) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:35, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45; MON, WED-THU 4:15, 7:00, 9:45 THE WIND RISES (PG) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:15, 4:05, 6:40, 9:20; MON, WED-THU 4:05, 6:40, 9:20 LE WEEK-END (14A coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:45, 4:20, 7:25, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 4:20, 7:25, 9:50 2 STATES (PG) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 1:25, 5:00, 8:30; MON, WED-THU 5:00, 8:30

JATT JAMES BOND (STC) Punjabi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 2:15, 5:15,

9:55; SAT-SUN 12:15, 2:35, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55; MON-THU 7:30, 10:00

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (PG) SUN 12:45 THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) THU 7:00, 10:15

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) THU 7:15, 10:25; THU 7:00, 10:20

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec for young child) FRI 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10; SAT 12:50, 3:50, 7:00, 10:10; SUN 12:10, 3:35, 6:35, 9:35; MON-WED 3:30, 6:40, 9:40; THU 3:30; 3D: FRI-SAT 1:20, 4:30, 7:40, 10:50; SUN 1:20, 4:25, 7:25, 10:30; MON-WED 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 10:05; THU 12:55, 4:05; 3D: THU 6:40, 9:40

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content, coarse language) FRI 3:30, 6:20, 9:00; SAT 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 10:15; SUN 1:20, 4:10, 7:10, 9:40; MON-THU 7:10, 9:40

TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON'T LEGALIZE IT (18A substance

DIVERGENT (PG violence) DAILY 6:40 9:20

BRICK MANSIONS (PG violence, coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE

3:30, 5:35, 7:40, 9:45; MON-THU 1:50, 3:55, 6:00, 8:10, 10:10

12:10, 3:15, 7:10, 10:05; MON, WED-THU 3:15, 6:45, 9:45

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young child) FRI-SAT

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec

1:05, 4:15, 7:20, 10:35; SUN 1:05, 4:10, 7:15, 10:20; MON-THU 2:45, 6:20, 9:25

for young child) DAILY 3:45; 3D: FRI-SUN, TUE 12:45, 3:45, 6:50, 9:55; MON, WED 6:50, 9:55

RIO 2 (G) FRI 1:45, 4:25; SAT 11:10, 1:45, 4:25; SUN 1:35, 4:10; MON-

DOM HEMINGWAY (14A crude coarse language, sexual content) FRI-

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) FRI 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30; SAT

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL (PG) FRI-SUN 1:30, 4:00, 6:50, 9:30;

11:15, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30; SUN 1:40, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05; MON-THU 1:30, 4:25, 7:10, 10:00

MON-THU 6:50, 9:30

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL (PG) FRI-SAT 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:45, 10:20;

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) FRI-SUN 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20; MON-THU 7:30, 10:20

SUN 12:20, 2:50, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25; MON-THU 1:45, 4:20, 7:35, 10:00

TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON'T LEGALIZE IT (18A substance

12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00, 10:40; SUN 12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; MON-WED 1:50, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10; THU 1:50, 4:25

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) THU 7:30, 10:05; FRI-SAT

SUN, TUE 12:50, 3:50, 6:35, 9:35; MON, WED-THU 3:50, 6:35, 9:20

MUPPETS MOST WANTED (G) DAILY 12:40 2:55 5:10 NON-STOP (PG coarse language, violence) DAILY 7:25 9:30 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG violence, not rec for young child) DAILY 1:15 4:00 6:50 9:25

RIO 2 (G) DAILY 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:05

METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212

MAKE MINE LOVE GALA (PG) Signing In The Rain–Citadel: FRI 7:00 REELING: DANCE ON FILM SHORTS (STC) Mile Zero Dance: SAT

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec for young child) FRI-SUN 3:50, 10:15; MON-WED 3:50, 9:45; THU 3:50

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: KING LEAR (Clas not avail) THU 7:00 SUPER DUPER ALICE COOPER (14A coarse language) MON 7:00

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE–IMAX 11211-142 St, 780.452.9100

ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR 3D (G) FRI-SAT 11:00am, 1:10, 3:25, 4:35, 6:55; SUN 11:00am, 1:10, 3:25, 4:35; MON-THU 3:10 JERUSALEM 3D (G) FRI-SAT 2:15, 5:45; SUN 2:15; MON-THU 4:20 ROCKY MOUNTAIN EXPRESS (G) SAT-SUN 12:00

NEW FORT CINEMA 9922-100 St, Fort Saskatchewan, 780.992.1707

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) DAILY 6:50, 9:20; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:45 RIO 2 (G) DAILY 7:00, 9:10; FRI-TUE 2:00

9:10

IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT (STC) SAT 7:00; MON 7:00

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG violence, not rec for young child) FRI-WED 6:40, 9:30; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:30

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) THU 7:00, 10:15

DANCE ON FILM SHORTS 2 (STC) Mile Zero Dance: SUN @ 2:00;

GOD'S NOT DEAD (PG) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:05, 3:10, 6:25, 9:40; MON,

All-Ages

WED-THU 3:10, 6:20

THE MALTESE FALCON (STC) SUN 4:00; THU 9:15

NOAH (PG violence, disturbing content, not rec for young child) FRI-

SUNSET BLVD (STC) SUN 7:00; WED 7:00

SUN, TUE 12:00, 3:00, 6:20, 9:20; MON, WED-THU 3:00, 9:00

SUPER DUPER ALICE COOPER (14A coarse language) MON 7:00 7:00, 10:00; MON, WED-THU 3:20, 6:15, 10:00

9:50; MON-THU 7:10, 9:50

7:50, 10:20; SUN 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30, 10:15; MON-WED 1:55, 4:40, 7:20, 9:50; THU 1:55, 4:30, 7:20, 9:50

OCULUS (14A violence, frightening scenes) FRI-MON, WED 9:10;

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content, coarse

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:40, 3:40, 7:15, 9:50; MON, WED-THU 3:40, 7:05, 9:40

TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON'T LEGALIZE IT (18A substance abuse) FRI-SUN, TUE 1:00, 4:05, 7:20, 10:15; MON, WED-THU 4:05, 7:10, 9:50

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:30, 3:30, 6:45, 9:45; MON, WED-THU 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 ONE WEEK (PG coarse language) TUE 4:00

LANDMARK CINEMAS 10 CLAREVIEW 4211-139 Ave, 780.472.7600

THE GREAT BEAUTY (14A, nudity) Italian w/ English Sub-Titles SUN 9:15; MON 9:15; WED 9:15

FLASHDANCE (STC) Mile Zero Dance Party: TUE 7:00

LANDMARK 7–SPRUCE GROVE 130 Century Crossing, Spruce Grove 780.962.2332

BEARS (G) FRI, MON, WED-THU 6:45, 8:50; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:00, 3:00, 6:45, 8:50

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) Adv Screening: THU, MAY 1: 8:00

LEDUC CINEMAS 4702-50 St Leduc, 780.986-2728

RIO 2 3D (G) DAILY 3D: 6:55, 9:15; TUE 2D: 6:55; SAT-SUN 2D: 12:55; SAT-SUN 3D: 3:40

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) DAILY 7:00, 9:25; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:25

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) DAILY 6:55, 9:30; SAT-SUN 12:55, 3:30

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec for young child) FRI-WED 6:45, 9:30; SAT-SUN 12:45, 3:30

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec for young child) SAT-SUN, TUE 3:40; 3D: FRI, MON, WED 6:50, 9:45; SAT-SUN, TUE 12:40, 6:50, 9:45; THU 6:30, 9:30

DIVERGENT (PG violence) FRI, MON, WED 6:30, 9:30; SAT-SUN, TUE

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) Opening THU, MAY 1 3D: 6:30, 9:25

WETASKIWIN CINEMAS Wetaskiwin 780.352.3922

12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL (PG) FRI, MON, WED 7:10, 9:40; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:10, 4:00, 7:10, 9:40; THU 6:50, 9:10

RIO 2 3D (G) DAILY 3D: 6:55, 9:15; TUE 2D: 6:55; SAT-SUN 2D: 12:55; SAT-SUN 3D: 3:40

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL (PG) DAILY 7:00, 9:20; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:20

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE 3D (18A gory brutal violence) FRI-SUN

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes,

9:20; MON-THU 8:50

not rec for young child) 3D THU 7:00, 10:05

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) DAILY 6:55, 9:30;

A FIGHTING MAN (14A) FRI 7:05, 9:35; SAT-SUN 12:00, 3:00, 7:05,

RIO 2 (G) SAT-SUN, TUE 4:10; 3D: FRI, MON, WED 6:40, 9:10; SAT-SUN,

SAT-SUN 12:55, 3:30

9:35; MON-THU 6:35, 9:05

TUE 1:30, 6:40, 9:10; THU 6:20, 9:00

BEARS (G) FRI 6:45, 9:00; SAT-SUN 12:05, 2:45, 6:45, 9:00; MON-THU

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) FRI, MON, WED 6:20, 9:00;

6:30, 8:30

SAT-SUN, TUE 12:45, 3:20, 6:20, 9:00; THU 7:10, 9:50

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER 3D (PG violence, not rec for young child) DAILY 3D: 6:45, 9:30; TUE 2D: 6:45; SAT-SUN 2D: 12:45; SAT-SUN 3D: 3:30

BHOOTHNATH RETURNS (PG) FRI 7:45; SAT-SUN 1:00, 4:30;

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) FRI, MON, WED 7:00, 9:50; SAT-

MON-THU 7:15

SUN, TUE 12:50, 3:50, 7:00, 9:50; THU 6:40, 9:20

BRICK MANSIONS (PG violence, coarse language) FRI 7:10, 9:45;

PRINCESS

SAT-SUN 12:20, 3:10, 7:10, 9:45; MON-THU 6:40, 9:15

DIVERGENT (PG violence) FRI 6:40, 9:40; SAT-SUN 12:15, 3:15, 6:40,

24 FILM

BRICK MANSIONS (PG violence, coarse language) FRI-SUN 1:20, 3:40, 6:00, 8:20, 10:45; MON-THU 12:30, 3:15, 5:40, 8:00, 10:20

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (PG) SAT 4:00; all ages

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) FRI-SUN, TUE 12:20, 3:20,

language) FRI-SAT 12:30, 3:00, 5:25, 7:55, 10:30; SUN 12:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30; MON-THU 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55

MR PEABODY AND SHERMAN (G) DAILY 12:55 2:45 4:35

TRANSCENDENCE: THE IMAX EXPERIENCE (PG violence) FRIWED 1:00, 7:00; THU 1:00

2:00; All Ages

DRAFT DAY (PG coarse language) FRI-SUN, TUE 9:40; MON, WED

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) FRI-SAT 12:15, 2:45, 5:15,

TUE 9:25

DATE OF ISSUE ONLY: THU APR 24

BRICK MANSIONS (PG violence, coarse language) FRI 4:30, 7:00,

10200-102 Ave, 780.421.7018

BEARS (G) FRI-SAT 12:00, 2:05, 4:10, 6:20, 8:20, 10:25; SUN 1:25,

Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 780.458.9822

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) DAILY 1:45 4:30 7:10 9:35

LANDMARK CINEMAS 9 CITY CENTRE

3:45, 6:50, 10:05; SUN 12:35, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50; MON-THU 1:00, 4:05, 7:10, 10:15

GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT

abuse) FRI 4:10, 6:45, 9:45; SAT 12:10, 2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05; SUN 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:30; MON-WED 7:20, 9:55; THU 7:30, 10:00 9:30; SAT 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 8:10, 10:30; SUN 1:00, 3:20, 5:50, 8:15; MON-WED 7:00, 9:30; THU 7:20, 9:55

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) FRI-SUN 1:10, 4:10, 7:20, 10:10;

THE QUIET ONES (14A frightening scenes) FRI-SUN 1:20, 3:50, 7:10,

OCULUS (14A violence, frightening scenes) FRI-SUN 12:20, 2:55, 5:30, 8:05, 10:35; MON-TUE 2:30, 5:10, 7:45, 10:25; WED-THU 1:20, 4:20, 10:25

ICE AGE: THE MELTDOWN (PG) SAT 11:00

1525-99 St 780.436.8585

THU 1:15, 3:45; 3D: FRI 11:55, 2:30, 5:05, 7:35, 10:15; SAT 2:30, 5:05, 7:35, 10:15; SUN 2:05, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50; MON-TUE, THU 1:40, 4:20, 7:15, 9:50; WED 1:40, 9:50

abuse) FRI-SUN 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 8:10, 10:30; MON, THU 7:40, 10:15; Tue 7:45, 10:20; WED 7:40, 10:10

TRAILER PARK BOYS: DON'T LEGALIZE IT (18A substance

12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00, 10:40; SUN 12:50, 3:30, 6:10, 9:00; MON-THU 6:35, 9:20; VIP 18+: FRI 4:30, 7:30, 10:45; SAT 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:30; SUN 2:00, 5:30, 9:00; MON-WED 6:45, 9:45; THU 7:00, 9:45

CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH

1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40; MON, WED-THU 7:00, 9:40; TUE 6:50, 9:40 MON-WED 7:20, 10:10; THU 7:20, 10:10

SAT-SUN 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05; MON-THU 7:00, 9:45

BRICK MANSIONS (PG violence, coarse language) FRI 5:05, 7:30,

DIVERGENT (PG violence) FRI 12:35, 3:45, 6:55, 10:05; SAT 12:35,

RIO 2 (G) Fri-Sun 12:40, 3:10, 6:20; MON-WED 6:45; 3D: FRI-SUN

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) FRI 4:35, 7:20, 10:05;

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) FRI 3:40, 6:30, 9:15; SAT

Punjabi W/E.S.T. FRI-SUN, TUE 2:00, 5:30, 9:00; MON, WED-THU 5:30, 9:00

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (PG violence, not rec for young child) FRI-SUN 2:00, 5:00, 8:30; MON, WED-THU 8:30; TUE 8:35; 3D: FRI-SUN 12:30, 3:40, 6:40, 10:00; MON-THU 6:40, 10:00

2:25, 5:00, 7:40, 10:15; MON-THU 7:20, 10:00

8:00, 10:40; MON-TUE, THU 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10; WED 4:30, 7:20, 10:10; Star & Strollers: WED 1:00

ICE AGE: THE MELTDOWN (PG) SAT 11:00

2:35; SUN 2:30; MON-THU 3:35

not rec for young child) THU 7:00, 10:15

RIO 2 (G) SAT-SUN 11:50, 2:30; 3D: FRI-SUN 5:10, 7:50, 10:25;

THE OTHER WOMAN (14A crude content) FRI-SUN 12:00, 2:40, 5:20,

abuse) FRI 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; SAT-SUN 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; MON-THU 6:50, 9:20

THE LEGO MOVIE (G) FRI-SUN 12:05; MON-THU 1:05; 3D: FRI-SAT

15531-37 St

9:00; MON-THU 7:25, 9:30

3D: FRI-SUN 2:25, 5:00, 7:35, 10:05; MON-THU 4:00, 6:45, 9:30

SUPER DUPER ALICE COOPER (14A coarse language) MON 7:00

9:15; MON, WED-THU 5:15, 9:15

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 3D (PG violence, frightening scenes,

TRANSCENDENCE (PG violence) FRI 4:20, 7:30, 10:45; SAT 1:10,

9:45; TUE-THU 6:40, 9:50

RIO 2 (G) FRI-SUN 11:55; MON-THU 1:15

4:10, 7:20, 10:10; SUN 1:10, 4:00, 7:10, 10:05; MON-THU 6:40, 9:45 VIP 18+: FRI 5:30, 8:45; SAT 3:00, 6:30, 9:45; SUN 3:00, 6:30, 9:50; MON-WED 8:45

DISCO SINGH (PG)

CINEPLEX MANNING TOWN CENTRE

7:00; MON-WED 6:50

5:20, 8:00, 10:30; SAT 3:20, 5:45, 8:15, 10:45; MON 2:20, 5:20, 10:30 6:10, 8:30, 10:45; SAT 11:20, 1:40, 3:50, 6:10, 8:30, 10:45; SUN-THU 1:40, 3:50, 6:05, 8:25, 10:40

Cineplex Odeon Windermere, 6151 Currents Dr, 780.822.4250

10337-82 Ave, 780.433.0728

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (14A sexual content, coarse lang)

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN 2 (PG violence, frightening scenes, not rec for young child) Opening THU, MAY 1 3D: 6:30, 9:25


FILM ASPECT RATIO

JOSEF BRAUN // JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Inside the big house

Don Siegel's prison film lays out the making and breaking of a riot

The opening newsreel footage tells of an epidemic of prison riots across the US, and contains a stern message from Prison Association spokesman Richard A McGee about the lamentable conditions that will continue to prompt such riots if left unchanged. Opening a film with real-life reportage was not uncommon in crime films of the period, but Riot in Cell Block 11 (1954) was more grounded in reality than most: producer Walter Wanger had recently done time for shooting Jennings Lang, who had been having an affair with Wanger's wife, the actress Joan Bennett. Wanger received a light sentence, but those four months were more than enough to make him understand that the penal system was in appalling shape. Overcrowding, underfunding and the placement of highly dangerous, mentally ill convicts in with regular offenders were chief among the problems Wanger gained first-hand knowledge of, though it's the unfair placement of prisoners in solitary confinement, and the inhumane treatment received while there, that prompts the titular riot in this bleak, bracing, sometimes savage politically driven actioner. In the intervening 60 years things have only gotten worse. The same day that Riot comes out on DVD and BD from Criterion, PBS will broadcast a new documentary entitled Solitary Nation, which concerns the deep trauma suffered from long-term placement in solitary, and the consequences for everyone, both inside and out.

edited in such a way that nothing is lingered over yet everything looks like it really, really hurts. There's hardly what you could call a hero in the film, but Dunn (Neville Brand), the convict who leads the riot and announces the prisoners demands— which just happen to match those repeatedly filed by the prison's warden—is an extremely compelling protagonist, not a good guy, but a guy giving a reasonably intelligent voice to a good cause, while the warden (the wonderful character actor Emile Meyer) is a weary, hardboiled yet sympathetic figure caught between a chaotic mutiny led by sociopaths and a greater authority willing to resort to violence, murder and trickery to restore an unsustainable veneer of order.

It all works best when most of the artifice is stripped down to a minimum. Herschel Burke Gilbert's martial score is exciting, but it also gets in the way of what makes Siegel's work tick. For all its chaos, Riot in Cell Block 11 is in a sense a procedural, showing us step-by-step how a riot is staged, maintained and, finally, undone. It is thus never more riveting then when simply showing us action unimpeded by style or flash. The convicts clamouring for better treatment in this film are men with almost nothing left to lose—"We're rotting to death," declares Dunn—men whose daily existence has been reduced to numbing austerity. Riot does their story justice when it too feels austere, numb and scarily go-for-broke. V

Riot was directed by Don Siegel, a specialist in clean, male-centred, brutal thrillers, like The Big Steal (1949), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), The Lineup (1958) and, most famously, Dirty Harry (1971). It was shot in Folsom Prison, cast with relative unknowns, kept on the cheap, though it doesn't look it. The scenes of violence are framed and

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

FILM 25


PREVUE // TECHNO

MUSIC

MUSIC EDITOR : EDEN MUNRO EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Kevin Saunderson W

hile Kevin Saunderson has long end, he formed Innercity with Chicago been a figurehead of Detroit vocalist Paris Grey in 1987 and achieved techno, it's worth remembering that his greatest commercial success as rehe is in fact a native New Yorker. He sult. happened to be attending high school "We got a lot of club play, but never that in Belleville, Michigan in the mid-80s much radio—and that's specifically bewhen he met two fellow outsiders, Juan cause it was ahead of its time," he says. Atkins and Derrick May. Together, the "But we barely hit the Top 40 in the US." trio began tinkering and performing— Part of the problem, he says, was the American label's and what was once misguided attempt a fringe genre has Fri, Apr 25 (9 pm) to sell Innercity as become a global With John Glassey, Extra Studio 107, $30 a black group to a phenomenon. black audience. DeTo soften the edges of techno's futuristic philosophy spite techno being championed by three and raw, pulsing, minimalist aesthetic, African-American men from Detroit, Saunderson has imbued it with a sense one of America's most important cities of soul as a DJ and producer. With in- for black music, it likewise has never fluences ranging from Chaka Khan and held a strong connection to black audiEvelyn "Champagne" King to McFadden ences. Hip hop, Saunderson says, spoke & Whitehead and Sister Sledge, along more to the black experience in mid-80s with DJs like the late Larry Levan, Saun- America. derson says New York grooves have al- "Hip hop was very street-related. It was easy for hip hop to take over. It was ways been part of his palette. "I wanted to do songs, with a groove, huge," he explains. "Techno wasn't even vocal and melodies, but I wanted songs looked at as black music, especially by that could be played in clubs," Saunder- black youth. They would hear records son explains. "I wanted to be able to do from Europe and say, "Oh, that techno? different mixes or remixes that could That's not happening. We ain't into that, capture different areas of the record or it's too fast, not funky enough, etc. usage by the style or type of DJ." To that "The European stuff sounded more

commercial, so it wasn't like our music," he continues. "Those DJs started branding themselves here and getting support from MTV … we didn't get that. We were only a handful of black artists making techno and house. It's disappointing that urban communities, especially in America, got left out. We kind of got lost in our culture, but it expanded throughout the world."

It has also expanded to many other places, like Alberta, where Saunderson is paying his first visits to Edmonton and Calgary this month. For prairie electronic-music enthusiasts with techno bucket lists, the dates have been a long time coming. "As small as the world is, it's still pretty large," Saunderson says. "My early vision was for the whole world to hear this sound because I thought it was missing, but I'm glad because you still find new territories and different crowds that weren't ready five years [ago], or even 20. Sometimes you're surprised at just how good those new places can be." Kevin Saunderson presents Innercity Bad Girls, a tribute to the late Donna Summer, is out this month. YURI WUENSCH

YURI@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Jesse Clegg Sat, Apr 26 (7:30 pm) With the Johnny Clegg Band Festival Place, sold out South African singer-songwriter Jesse Clegg got his start on the road at an early age. His father is Afro-pop musician Johnny Clegg, and Jesse spent the first six years of his life on tour with him. Now he's embarking on his first North American tour and will be sharing the stage with his father on select dates, including the one at Festival Place. Prior to the show, Jesse shared his soundtrack picks with Vue.

At home Morning: Deftones. It's great to wake up to some alternative rock and Deftones are one of my all-time favourite bands. Their music gets me psyched and ready to take on the day. Noon: José González. I really love this guy's voice and songwriting ideas. I listen to his music over the course of a day to chill out or to get perspective on things. He has an amazing soulfulness to his lyrics that really hits home. Night: Radiohead are always a good option. Every time you listen to this band, you hear something new in their songwriting or production ideas. They also encapsulate an interesting ambience that sets the mood for reflection on a the day's events.

26 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

On the road Morning: Kasabian. With their heavy electronic beats and edgy lyrics, this band makes great driving music, especially when you are at the beginning of a long trip. Noon: The Waterboys. This is a classic band and one that I love listening to at any time of day. Their Celtic influences, jangling guitar and piano sounds, as well as Mike Scott's profound lyrics, make them perfect for losing yourself in thought while you stare out of the bus window, watching all the towns pass you by. Night: Bob Dylan. Dylan wrote songs about politics, people, places and events. His music is rooted in history and yet always maintains its universality. I like listening to his work at the end of a long day of travelling because, despite my own experiences on tour, I am always linked to a greater context or group of people. His work gives me a sense of perspective and challenges me to question my own position within a place or culture. V


APR. 25 & 26 •

PREVUE // METAL

ANDREW SCOTT

Tribune H

omer, Mary Shelley and HP Lovecraft—do they ring a bell? If not, they're the authors who wrote The Odyssey, Frankenstein and The Shadow Out of Time, among numerous other influential literary works. They also happen to play a role in the inspiration behind Tribune's latest album, Tales. "I've always been a reader. The first book I think I ever read was The Hobbit," says lead vocalist Bryan Baker while en route to Aurora, ON for the next stop on the Vancouver-based metal group's current tour. "I do read more contemporary stuff as well, but I've always had a soft spot in my heart for old stories, mythology and that kind of stuff." Although, this isn't the first time literature has made its way into Baker's lyrics—previous releases have usually had a reference in a line or two—it is the first time Tribune has focused an entire album on one concept, an idea that formed a couple of years back after penning what is now the title track for the melodic yet darkly aggressive disc.

APR. 27 •

SARAH SMITH APR. 28 • SINGER/ SONGWRITER OPEN STAGE HOSTED BY SARAH SMITH

"It's all kind of dark stuff and I've al- ing Lovecraft's work often focused on ways really been attracted to dark darkness and anger. art," Baker notes of the authors' re- Reminding new generations of these spective oeuvres. "Maybe not Homer stories and figures is important, too. so much, although his stuff is certain- Not to mention, the fact reading can ly tragic. But Shelley and Lovecraft actually be kind of cool. "It sort of feels especially are very dark, just in terms Sun, Apr 27 (8 pm) like each generation of metal muof the tones in Rendezvous Pub, $10 sicians has tried their stories. I've to do that in their always like that kind of stuff and I'm sure anyone own way. You look back to the Maswho's a big fan of heavy metal would ter of Puppets album and there's concur there's something powerfully some Lovecraft influence on that," attractive to the dark side." Baker adds. "I think bands, especially within heavy metal, have always been It's a little dangerous, Baker says, trying to do that because, let's fact adding it's a natural attraction because it, there is a certain amount of heavy the dark side is something that's so out- metal fans that are, shall we say, sort side of what we know in our day to day of meat-headish. I think you always lives. Lovecraft's work in particular is want to encourage young kids getprevalent among metal bands and has ting into metal to think, to keep usbeen a strong influence on Baker. ing their brains. Just because you're a "It's certainly not the first album metalhead doesn't mean you have to of ours he's had an influence on—I be a stereotypical one." BAXTER mean, Lovecraft is heavy metal," he MEAGHAN MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM says, emphasizing his point by not-

WEDNESDAY • OPEN STAGE W/ DUFF ROBISON

Fuck the Facts

SARAH SMITH

Tue, Apr 29 Filthy McNasty's, free

APRIL 29

AMIE WEYMES

Answered by: Melanie Mongeon, vocals Hometown: Ottawa, ON Genre: Metal Lastest album: Amer EP Fun fact: The group originally started out as a solo

MAY 2 - 3

In Sutton Place Hotel #195, 10235 101 Street, SHERLOCKSHOSPITALITY.COM

project for guitarist Topon Das, and has existed in different configurations since 1998.

First album

When I was a kid, I would say aroung age eight or nine, I bought the Paula Abdul cassette, as well as C&C Music Factory and Mitsou. A few years after, at around 10 years old or so, I got the EMF tape, Jean Leloup and the Best of the Doors. These were my first steps away from the pure poppy stuff. Then high school happened and things got crazy. I listened to a whole bunch of stuff. I remember at some point, the more obscure a band was, the more stoked I was.

First concert

It was the first time Lollapalooza stopped in Montréal in 1994. I had just turned 15 and was pretty into alternative bands. I was excited to see Beastie Boys, Smashing Pumpkins and Boredoms. I will remember forever the Beastie Boys' mosh pit, which was also my first mosh pit. It was pure insanity for me; imagine a 90-lb girl in a mosh pit of thousands of people—I loved it

so much! That day I got hooked on live concerts. The following years I would go see all the shows I could in my area. Being a minor, I couldn't see all the shows but I still managed to see one to two a month. It is funny to realize that 20 years later, my life still revolves around being at or doing live concerts. Even my day job is somewhat related to that. Thank-you, Lollapalooza, and sorry to the 13-year-old boys whom I sold some rolled tea ''joints'' to.

Last album

The last two I got my hands on are Beastmilk, Climax, and Impure Wilhelmina, Black Honey. Both of these albums are amazing and I can't stop listening to them.

Last concert

I went to see Topon (my better half and also band mate in Fuck the Facts) play a solo set. That was just a few days ago. The show was at a nice little café in Ottawa and was with two

other noise / ambient bands. Nowadays I find it refreshing to go see non-metal concerts. I am very fond of smaller venues and DIY spaces.

DOWNTOWN

Apr 24 - 26 JOANNE JANZEN Apr 29 - May 3 DERINA HARVEY BAND

Favourite album

There is not one album that sticks with me forever. I like certain albums a lot for a few years and then I don't have the same connection to them. The past years, Impure Whilhelmina has been one of my favourite bands, as well as Jérôme Minière

WEM

Apr 24 - 26 PARTY HOG Apr 29 - May 3 MIKE LETTO

Favourite musical guilty pleasure

Listening to indie pop stations at my work when I have to do lots of computer stuff. It makes me type faster! I can work and not focus too much on the music and more on the work while still getting some tunes going. Funny enough my supervisor goes for techno to help his productivity; some of this ends up crossing over to my everyday music listening. That is how I discovered Santigold. She is pretty rad! V

SUNDAY NIGHT KARAOKE

NOW OPEN

CAMPUS

Apr 24 - 26 AMIE WEYMES Apr 30 - May 3 ROB TAYLOR

SHERLOCKSHOSPITALITY.COM

Colleen’s Amber Ale now available at all pub locations. $0.50 from each pint sold will be donated to Ovarian Cancer Research in memory of Colleen Tomchuk.

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

MUSIC 27


MUSIC PREVUE // FOLK-ROOTS

The Good Lovelies T

Lovely, just lovely.

28 FILM

he Good Lovelies have an unoffi- just learned to say booger and we all cial fourth band member on the find it super entertaining ... it's going road these days—an 18-month-old to get annoying pretty quick I'm sure, but right now it's pretty cute." little girl named Annabelle. The Good Lovelies are about to hit "We call her Annie. She's a good partner in crime," says her mom, Caro- the road again for an eight-show run line Brooks, who makes up the folk- that will take the ladies (plus a new roots trio alongside Kerri Ough and touring upright bass player by the Sue Passmore. "She comes with us all name of MJ Dandeneau of Oh My the time. Her frequent-flyer miles are Darling) from Vancouver to Winniquite impressive. She started touring peg—and, yes, Annie will be in tow. Brooks admits with us when she she doesn't find was nine weeks Sat, Apr 26 (7:30 pm) balancing being a and we have done With Beth Portman mom and a touring a lot of shows Horizon Stage, sold out musician difficult, since she was born, though, considerso well over 100 shows now. She also just came along ing she's got help and support from to Australia with us, too, so she's a her band mates. "I was talking to Jill Barber revery well-travelled little soul—and extremely easy going. I'm very, very cently about this because she's been touring with her little guy for lucky I've been told." It's got to the point that if Annie a while now and it's pretty amazing isn't at a show, something feels out because we get to spend basically of place because she keeps the ladies the whole day with our kids. Unlike entertained backstage and on the nine-to-fivers who have to be away from their kiddos for eight hours a long drives in between gigs. "She just really brings a lot of joy day we get to spend all day with to touring," Brooks adds, with An- them and we're away from them nie's voice audible in the background for sound check and the show and over the phone. "We're pretty happy that's pretty much it," Brooks exin general, but she also brings this plains. "I'm super lucky that I travel extra layer of ridiculous laughter. She with women who are so supportive

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

... we also get to have an extended family in a way." Of course, there's also the matter of promoting the band's live album, Live at Revolution, as well as some new material while on the road, too. The Good Lovelies plan to have a new album out early next year and will be road testing a few of the new tunes, along with some new covers—past selections have included Leonard Cohen's "Halelujah," and "Heebie Jeebies," a '40s tune that makes use of the ladies' three-part harmonies. "I think Kerri puts it really well: she has said to our audiences that it's fun to pick a cover because you can go outside your comfort zone in terms of the type of music that you're performing," Brooks says, noting a song by Canadian singer-songwriter Corin Raymond will be among the new batch. "We also do a song by Bruce Springsteen, which wouldn't necessarily be associated with a Good Lovelies sound, but it's nice when we're picking these songs that we have an opportunity to look at the song from our own vantage point—we like to joke that we "Good Lovelify" it." MEAGHAN BAXTER

MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


PREVUE // FOLK-POP

Jordan Klassen looking at this fig tree and she was trying to decide which fig to eat, but as she stood there pondering, all the figs dried up and fell to the ground, and I think it's like that. I think that we have so many options and so little clear conscience as a society as to who people are. You're allowed to be whoever you want to be and you can be whatever you can to be, and then you're just kind of stuck there going, 'Well, what do I do now?'"

'I

have the least amount of 20s angst that I have had, probably," says folk-pop singer-songwriter Jordan Klassen, whose most recent album, Repentance, was inspired by the coming-of-age decade, and the highs and lows that come with it. Klassen just turned 29, so he's getting near the end of the tumultuous and uncertain phase, one that the thoughtful prose in his lyrics compares to spring, a season in which the ugliness is replaced with new, beautiful growth. "I think the questions of life are not small ones, at least for me it was my 20s that I kind of had to ask them and I don't know, just a lot of unsuredness for me, too," Klassen recalls. "Being raised with a faith and figuring that out—that was years. Who are you and who do you want to be and who do you want to marry and all those things. To me it's just very chaotic." He can't pinpoint exactly what caused the angst to subside and what it took for him to reach the state of content-

Entering his 30s is slightly terrifying, Klassen says, but he was more scared of it in previous years, buying into the ageism of our society and the notion that youth is ideal. It was actually 27, however, that was the roughest year for him. "It just felt old. It's also the age ment he's at right now, but admits it's been a long process of learning who that all the famous rock stars died he was—a journey that's subjective and they had already accomplished for everyone and so much," Klassen can't be forced, no Wed, Apr 30 (8 pm) adds, referencing matter how hard Artery, $12 (advance), the infamous 27 $15 (door) you try. Club whose mem"One morning you bers include Kurt Cobain and Jimi wake up and you're like, I'm in a lot less of a panic than I Hendrix. "It just felt like an age that was five years ago, you know?" he says. you should have a solid career and Repentance serves as a comfort of should be making good money or sorts to the "Peter Pan generation," something." Although, Klassen's doing well for one that doesn't quite seem to know how to grow up. Klassen is quick to himself these days as he continues to note he does love his generation and tour Repentance and work towards his isn't "anti-milennial" by any means, next album—although, he's not sure but he does think it's a generation that the seasonal theme will stick. "I recorded Repentance actually in that's had it pretty darn good. "We haven't really been through 2011, so it's been a lot of time for me a lot of darkness like I think a lot of and what I listen to has changed," he other generations have. Everything is explains, ticking off Haim, the Nationvery convenient for us and because al and High Violet as examples. "I'm everything is so good I think there are not as into kind of like quirky pop and just so many options open," he muses. I just want to make something a bit "I remember reading this Sylvia Plath more serious, I think." poem and she was talking about how MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM she had this dream where she was

BMBSHL / THU, APR 24 (9 PM) Brenna MacQuarrie—that's BMBSHL to you and I—spent the better part of last summer holed up in her basement tinkering with melodies on her laptop. It turned out to be time well spent, because the electro-pop songstress is releasing her self-titled debut album. (The Common)

GLENNIS HOUSTON / SAT, APR 26 (8 PM) Sometimes life just gets in the way, but that doesn't mean it should stop you. Calgary-based jazz singer Glennis Houston released her debut album Lies of Handsome Men in 2004, and she's finally able release her follow up, I'll Reminisce You. (Expressionz Café, $15 in advance, $20 at the door)

MEAGHAN BAXTER MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

THE MOTORLEAGUE / FRI, APR 25 (8 PM) Sure, the rock four-piece is playing in support of its 2013 release Acknowledge, Acknowledge, but have you checked out the Taco Thursday section on its website? The Motorleague's had some interesting culinary adventures, that's for sure. (Pawn Shop, $10) ELLIE GOULDING / SUN, APR 27 (7 PM) She's had a bunch of hit singles and dated Skrillex, but here's a fun fact—Ellie Goulding was personally selected by Will and Kate to sing at a party following their wedding reception. (Shaw Conference Centre, $39.50)

FRI, APR 25, THE ARTERY

GREG MACPHERSON BAND W/ RICK REID BAND

WED, APR 30, THE ARTERY

JORDAN KLASSEN

W/ PASSBURG, AND SEAN SONEGO WED, APR 30, AVENUE THEATRE

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W/ GUESTS

THU, MAY 1, AVENUE THEATRE AVENUE AND BLURRED LENZ PRESENT

DESTROYER

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SOLO SHOW

W/ FIELD ASSEMBLY

FRI, MAY 2, THE ARTERY JCL PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

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W/ THE FORTUNATE ONES, AND WHISKEY SHEIKHS THU, MAY 15, MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH JCL PRODUCTIONS AND THE EDMONTON FOLK FEST PRESENT

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W/ JOE NOLAN, & COLIN PRIESTNER

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

FILM 29


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Weaves Weaves (Buzz) 

Toronto's Weaves has unleashed a shotgun blast of glimmering guitarrock with its new self-titled debut out on Buzz Records. It's a delightful EP from the four-piece, with six stylistically different tracks all united by the power of vocalist Jasmyn Burke's voice and some slick pop sensibilities. Weaves is a pop band unafraid to experiment, like on the herky-jerky sin-

gle "Buttercup" and fuzzy closer "Hulahoop." Stand-out track "Motorcycle" is a fiery, hooky track driven by Bram Gielen's intense organ that explodes into a full-on freakout where Burke snarls on the sludgy "Take A Dip." What's most impressive about Weaves debut EP is that it is rare: a rock-pop album unafraid to poke and prod at the outer limits of the genre while still being a ton of fun to listen to on repeat. JORDYN MARCELLUS

JORDYN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Four IN 140 Rafter, It's Reggae (Asthmatic Kitty) @VueWeekly: Feel that weather out there? Time for some reggae, or maybe some Rafter which is really lo-fi, wobbly dub. Because Irie.

Bonobo, April 12, 2014 Essential Mix (BBC) @VueWeekly: Not an album, but a full on streaming set from the prolific UK producer, DJ & Ninja Tuner. Google this.

Breaks Co-Op, Sounds Familiar (Breaks Co-Op) @VueWeekly: A pleasant & breezy voice over subtle trip-hop finds its way over to North America from New Zealand just in time for summer.

Chet Faker, Built on Glass (Universal) @VueWeekly: A solid album. A strong version of what's R&B these days—somewhere between a radio sensible James Blake & Bonobo. 30 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014


MUSIC

WEEKLY

EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

THU APR 24 ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE

Rock&Roll, Funk, Soul, R&B and 80s with DJ Thomas Culture; jamz that will make your backbone slide; Wooftop: Dig It! Thursdays. Electronic, roots and rare groove with DJ's Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests CENTURY ROOM Lucky 7: Retro '80s with house DJ every Thu; 7pm-close

Live Music every Thu; this week: Alexander Michael Leggett

THE COMMON Uncommon

ARTERY Miss Quincy (CD release, alt blues rock), guest; 7:30pm; $8 (adv)/$10 (door)

FILTHY MCNASTY’S Taking

BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES Fred

7pm; no cover

Larose Song Writer's Evening; 7pm (door); no cover

BLUES ON WHYTE Reverend

Raven and the Chain Smokin Altar Boys BRITTANY'S Michael Chenoweth (acoustic tribute to the greatest folk-blues singer-songwriters of the twentieth century); every Thu, 8-11pm; $8

Thursday: Rotating Guests each week! Back Thursdays

KRUSH ULTRA Open stage; LEVEL 2 Funk Bunker Thursdays ON THE ROCKS Salsa Rocks:

every Thu; dance lessons at 8pm; Cuban Salsa DJ to follow

OUTLAWS ROADHOUSE Wild Life

Thursdays

UNION HALL 3 Four All

Thursdays: rock, dance, retro, top 40 with DJ Johnny Infamous

Jason Greeley and Johnny Quickstad (guitar duo); 9pm2am; no cover PAWN SHOP Sonic Band of the Month: Russ Dawson (pop), Pistols at 20 Paces, Motorleague, Royal Tusk; 8pm (door); $10 (adv) RED PIANO BAR Hottest dueling

piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Fri; 9pm-2am RENDEZVOUS Crash Titan-

Diabolikal; 8pm

SHERLOCK HOLMES–DT

Joanne Janzen

SHERLOCK HOLMES–U of A

Amy Weymes

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Party Hog

SIDELINERS South of Sanity; 9pm; no cover STARLITE ROOM The Todd James Band featuring Chantal Burn and Hammered by Sound; 8:30pm; $10 STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION

Dayglo Abortions, Bogue Brigade, Knuckledown, the Hippie Critz

CAFÉ HAVEN Music every Thu: this week: Crowded City Skyline; 7pm

FRI APR 25

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Thu

APEX CASINO Colleen Rae; 9pm

every Fri; 7pm

ARTERY Greg MacPherson

WUNDERBAR Rude Nite Out

Open Mic: All adult performers are welcome (music, song, spoken word); every Thu, 1:30-3pm

CHA ISLAND TEA CO Bring Your Own Vinyl Night: Every Thu; 8pm-late; Edmonton Couchsurfing Meetup: Every Thu; 8pm EARLY STAGE–Stony Plain

Open Jam Nights; no cover EXPRESSIONZ Open Stage hosted by Dr Oxide; 1st Thu each month, 7:30pm10:30pm J R BAR Live Jam Thu; 9pm JEFFREY'S Mars Hill Trio (instrumental guitar trio); 8pm; $10 KELLY'S Jameoke Night with

the Nervous Flirts (sing-along with a live band); every Thu, 9pm-1am; no cover

L.B.'S Thu open stage: the New Big Time with Rocko Vaugeois, friends; 8-12 LIVE AT SLY'S–THE RIG Every

Thu Jam hosted by Lorne Burnstick; 8pm-12am

NAKED CYBERCAFÉ Thu open

stage; 8pm; all ages (15+)

NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by

Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers every Thu; contact John Malka 780.447.5111

(alt rock), The Rick Reid Band, guests; 8pm; $15 (adv) /$18 (door) ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL

Dirty Seas

AVENUE THEATRE Element

Orange (alt rock), the Wisers, Call Apollo, guests; 8pm (door); $12 (adv)/$14 (day of)

BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES Mike

Clark Band; 7pm (door); $10

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Justine Vandergrift Band, Erin Faught; 8:30pm; $10 BLUES ON WHYTE Reverend

TIRAMISU BISTRO Live music

Act II

YARDBIRD International

Jazz Series: from Seattle/ Los Angeles: Dave Peck Trio; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $22 (member)/$26 (guest)

Classical FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Royal Canadian College of Organists, Edmonton: Organ in Concert Series: Tim Pyper (organ); 8pm; $25 (adult)/$22 (senior)/$15 (student) at TIX on the Square, door GRANT MACEWAN ALBERTA COLLEGE CAMPUS Kiwanis

Raven and the Chain Smokin' Altar Boys

Music Festival

BOHEMIA Diatessaron,

WINSPEAR CENTRE ESO: The

Jindalee, the Whiskey Sheikhs, You Are An Explorer; 9pm; $5 (door)

BOURBON ROOM Dueling

pianos every Fri Night with Jared Sowan and Brittany Graling; 8pm

Cocktail Hour: Music of the Mad Men Era: Steven Reineke (conductor), Ryan Silverman, Nikki Renée Daniels (vocals); 8pm

DJs

BRITTANY'S Jazz evening every

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Every Friday DJs on all three levels

BRIXX BAR The River and the Road, Towers and Trees, Our Good Wolf; 9pm

THE BOWER Strictly Goods: Old

Fri after work; 5-8pm

CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK Green

Eyed Blonde

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Live

school and new school hip hop & R&B with DJ Twist, Sonny Grimez, and Marlon English; every Fri

THE COMMON Good Fridays: nu

(roots); hosted by Gord Matthews; 6:30-9pm

Oddibles (rock); 9pm

disco, hip hop, indie, electro, dance with weekly local and visiting DJs on rotation plus residents Echo and Justin Foosh

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Nervous

DRUID DJ every Fri; 9pm

RIC’S GRILL Peter Belec (jazz);

ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove

most Thursdays; 7-10pm

Flirts (Jameoke, Karaoke with a band); 9pm

SHERLOCK HOLMES–DT

CENTURY CASINO Harlequin;

Joanne Janzen

$29.95

FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip hop

SHERLOCK HOLMES–U of A

CKUA PERFORMANCE SPACE

RED PIANO Every Thu: Dueling pianos at 8pm RICHARD'S PUB Blue Thursdays

Amy Weymes

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Party Hog

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Live Blues

every Thur: rotating guests; 7-11pm

STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION

Jump Ya Bones Tour: Ninjaspy, Samandriel, Grounded Star TAVERN ON WHYTE Open stage with Micheal Gress (fr Self Evolution); every Thu; 9pm-2am WUNDERBAR The Sweathearts,

music every Fri: Jim Penny; all ages; 7pm; $5 (door)

CASINO EDMONTON The

Live Broadcasts: The Celtic Show featuring the Beautiful Hearts; 6-9pm DUGGAN'S Andrew Scott DV8 Micelli, Math Debate,

Power Buddies with Johnny 2 Fingers and the Deformities; 8pm J+H PUB Every Friday: Headwind and friends (vintage rock 'n' roll); 9:30pm; no minors, no cover JEFFREY'S Trio Bembe (Latin);

9pm; $s10

LIVE AT SLY'S–THE RIG Wayne

Master Splinter, the Chokeouts, Kicked Out

Allchin Band; 9pm-1am

YARDBIRD The Music of

MERCURY ROOM/BLUE SKYS

Celebration–The Music of Exile: Gateway Big Band (directed by Allen Jacobsen), with Reckie Loyd (percussion); 7:30pm (door); 8pm (show); $15 (adult)/$10 (student)

Classical GRANT MACEWAN ALBERTA COLLEGE CAMPUS Kiwanis

Jimmy Wiffen Band; 7:3010pm; $15 (adv)/$18 (door); kids under 12 free NEWCASTLE PUB Sophie and

no cover

DJs Main Fl: Throwback Thu:

Kitchen Party: Noize Boyz with DJs

OVERTIME Sherwood Park

Totally Tom Petty host the Women of Rock; The Rock and Roll Society of Edmonton: Aerosmith Rocks, Punch Drunk Cabaret, Andrew Grose (comedy); 6pm (door), 7:30pm (music) BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Saturday Afternoons go Live!: World Music

Brunch with the Hawaiian Dreamers, 1-3pm, donations; Evening: Kat Danser Trio featuring Dee Brown and Dale Marchand; 8:30pm; $20 BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES Sat

RED STAR Movin’ on Up: indie, rock, funk, soul, hip hop with DJ Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson; every Fri SET NIGHTCLUB NEW Fridays:

House and Electro with Peep This, Tyler Collns, Peep'n ToM, Dusty Grooves, Nudii and Bill, and specials

SOU KAWAII ZEN Amplified Fridays: Dubstep, house, trance, electro, hip hop breaks with DJ Aeiou, DJ Loose Beats, DJ Poindexter; 9:30pm (door) SUITE 69 Release Your Inner Beast: Retro and Top 40 beats with DJ Suco; every Fri UNION HALL Ladies Night

every Fri

Y AFTERHOURS Foundation

APEX CASINO Colleen Rae; 9pm ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL

Dirty Seas

"B" STREET BAR Rockin Big

Blues and Roots Open Jam: Every Sat afternoon, 2-6pm

RED PIANO BAR Hottest dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Sat; 9pm-2am RICHARDS PUB The Terry

Evans Sat Jam: every Sat; 4-8pm

SHERLOCK HOLMES–DT

Joanne Janzen Amy Weymes

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Party Hog

STARLITE ROOM Early Show:

Ironstorm (Wrathwind CD release), Mortillery, Gatekrashor, Bleed; 7pm; $10 BRIXX Late Show: Electric Religious, Until Red, Puttin' on the Foil, Big City Supreme; 9pm; $10 STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION

Blues Legend Sonny Rhodes, Stephanie Harpe Experience, Boogie Patrol; 8pm WUNDERBAR Messiahlator

BLIND PIG Live jam every Sat;

YARDBIRD The Best Of Alberta

3-7pm

BLUES ON WHYTE Every Sat

afternoon: Jam with Back Door Dan; Evening: Reverend Raven and the Chain Smokin Altar Boys BOURBON ROOM Live Music

every Sat Night with Jared Sowan and Brittany Graling; 8pm

CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK Green

Eyed Blonde

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Sat

Open mic; 7pm; $2

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Nervous

Flirts (Jameoke, Karaoke with a band); 9pm

CELLAR LOUNGE–Petroleum Club Jazz @ the Cellar:

Edmonton Jazz Festival Society's Showcase of live jazz last Sat ea month; this month: Modo Trio, God Save the Trio; 8-11pm; $10 (adv at TIX on the Square)/$12 (door) DUGGAN'S Andrew Scott DV8 Hip Hop in the Park: DJ

Baggylean, Doobyis, Jaze Dubya; live painting; 9pm; $10 (door) fundraiser for the HHITP Festival FESTIVAL PLACE Johnny Clegg

Band; sold out

FILTHY MCNASTY'S Free

(metal punk), Chronobot, Slave Lake; 9pm (door); $8 (adv)/$10 (door)

Jazz Series: from Calgary/ Edmonton–Double Bill: Joanna Borromeo and Nuela Charles; 8pm (door), 9pm (show); $18 (member)/$22 (guest)

Classical GRANT MACEWAN ALBERTA COLLEGE CAMPUS Kiwanis

Music Festival HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN CHURCH ThingNY's This

Takes Place Close By (contemporary opera); 7:30pm; $20 (adult)/$15 (student/ senior)/$10 (NME member) at TIX on the Square, door ROBERT TEGLER STUDENT CENTRE Jubiloso! Bells of

Concordia Concert; 7:30pm WINSPEAR CENTRE ESO: The

Cocktail Hour: Music of the Mad Men Era: Steven Reineke (conductor), Ryan Silverman, Nikki Renée Daniels (vocals); 8pm

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

Floor: The Menace Sessions: Alt

Rock/Electro/Trash with Miss Mannered; Wooftop: Sound It Up!: classic hip-hop and reggae with DJ Sonny Grimezz; Underdog: Dr Erick

Afternoon Concerts: The Isotopes, Everyday Things, Change the Way; 4pm; no cover

BOHEMIA DARQ Saturdays:

GAS PUMP Saturday

THE BOWER For Those Who

Homemade Jam: Mike Chenoweth

HILLTOP Open Stage, Jam every Sat; 3:30-7pm HORIZON STAGE–Spruce Grove The Good Lovelies,

Rose of Tralee: Irish Club Function; $30 (meal, roses), music by Mark McGarrigle

JEFFREY'S The JQ (jazz)

9pm; $15

LEAF BAR Open Stage Sat–It 's the Sat Jam hosted by Darren Bartlett, 5pm; Evening: River Valley Search Party LIVE AT SLY'S–THE RIG Wayne Allchin Band; 9pm-1am

Know...: Deep House and disco with Junior Brown, David Stone, Austin, and guests; every Sat

THE COMMON Get Down

It's Saturday Night: House and disco and everything in between with resident Dane

DRUID DJ every Sat; 9pm ENCORE–WEM Every Sat:

Sound and Light show; We are Saturdays: Kindergarten

FLUID LOUNGE R&B, hip hop

and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Sat

LEVEL 2 Collective Saturdays underground: House and Techno MERCER TAVERN DJ Mikey

Wong every Sat

O’BYRNE’S Live band every Sat, 3-7pm; DJ every Sat, 9:30pm O'MAILLE'S Dwayne Allen;

RED STAR Indie rock, hip hop,

no cover

ON THE ROCKS Noize Boyz

with DJs

OVERTIME Sherwood Park Jason Greeley and Johnny

Quickstad (guitar duo); 9pm2am; no cover

PAWN SHOP Ladyhawk 10th Anniversary (alt rock), Shotgun Jimmie, the Lad Mags, Stepmothers; 8pm (door); $12 (adv)

ADD K-97 AND STARLITE ROOM PRESENT

TODD JAMES BAND FEAT. CHANTAL BURN W/ HAMMER THE SOUND

APR/26 IRONSTORM APR/28 THE 1975 MAY/1 RAW:REVOLUTION MAY/3 DIRTY DUBSTERS, PLANTRAE, SKIITOUR

EXCALIBUR PRODUCTIONS AND FARMEGEDON PRESENT

“WRATHWIND” CD RELEASE EXTRAVAGANZA

W/ MORTILLERY, GATEKRASHOR & BLEED THE UNION PRESENTS

RAW: NATURAL BORN ARTISTS & STARLITE ROOM PRESENT

ASTRAL HARVEST & ZODIAC SERIES PRESENTS: RUNNING OF THE BULLS

& GUESTS

MAY/9 ICED EARTH MAY/10 THE SPOONS MAY/12 EVAN DANDO MAY/13 BATHS MAY/15 KAYTRANADA MAY/16 AUTHORITY ZERO

CONCERTWORKS PRESENTS THE WORLWIDE PLAGUES TOUR FEATURING: W/ SABATON & REVAMP

W/ D TREVLON BAND & CHOIR AND MARCHING BAND

STARLITE ROOM PRESENTS (OF LEMONHEADS) SARA JOHNSTON & GUESTS THE UNION PRESENTS

W/ YOUNG FATHERS & GUESTS

NIGHT VISION PRESENTS

STARLITE ROOM IN ASSOCIATION WITH CALGARY BEER CORE PRESENTS W/ TORCHES TO TRIGGERS, ABANDIN ALL HOPE, THE MISFIRES & VANGOHST TIX ONSALE AT TICKETFLY.COM & BLACKBYRD MYOOZIK

MAY/17 MAY/24 MAY/29 MAY/30 MAY/31 JUN/4 JUN/7 JUN/12 JUN/13

ALTERRA & THE WILD! W/ GUESTS UBK AND TIMBRE CONCERTS PRESENTS

BONOBO DJ SET

THE UNION PRESENTS

HEAD OF THE HERD W/ GUESTS

TUPELO HONEY

W/ SPECIAL GUESTS THE UNFORTUNATES (CD RELEASE), DEATH BY ROBOT & KING’S FOIL

THE UNION PRESENTS

THE JEZEBELS TOOTH BLACKNER PRESENTS

CHAD VAN GAALEN W/ VIET CONG - TIX ONSALE APR 4

PURE PRIDE JCL PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

TIMBER TIMBRE

W/ GUESTS

GIRL: PRIDE 2014

Goth/Industrial/Electro hits with DJs Neo Zeo and the Gothfather; $5

PAWN SHOP Transmission Saturdays: Indie rock, new wave, classic punk with DJ Blue Jay and Eddie Lunchpail; 9pm (door); free (before 10pm)/$5 (after 10pm); 1st Sat each month

LEGENDS Open mic and jam every Sat with Nick Samoil and the Kyler Schogen Band; 3-6pm

APR/25

SHERLOCK HOLMES–U of A

Afternoon Jam: with Rott'n Dan and Sean Stephens, complimentary chili, noon, no cover

IRISH SOCIETY Eric Martin;

Friday: with DJ Thomas Culture

SAT APR 26

ON THE ROCKS Rock ‘N’ Hops

BLATCHFORD HANGAR–Fort Edmonton Park Rock the Fort:

MERCER TAVERN Homegrown

NOORISH CAFÉ Kevin Marsh; O'MAILLE'S Dwayne Allen;

of the Dog: Lindsey Walker (live acoustic music every Sat); 4-6pm; no cover

and dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali; every Fri

Fridays

7-9:30pm

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair

Beth Portman; 7:30pm; $35 (adult)/$30 (student/senior)

the Shufflehounds; 9pm; no cover

Music Festival

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Thu

DJ every Fri

BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES

Afternoon: Blues Jam: with Rott'n Dan and Sean Stephens; complimentary bowl of chili; noon; no cover; Evening: Mike Clark Band; 7pm (door); $10

and electro every Sat with DJ Hot Philly and guests ROUGE Rouge Sat: global sound and Cosmopolitan Style Lounging with DJ Mkhai

APR/25 APR/26 MAY/2 MAY/3 MAY/3 MAY/9 MAY/10 MAY/13 MAY/16 MAY/17 MAY/23 MAY/24

TOWERS AND TRESS RIVER AND THE ROAD W/ AND OUR GOOD WOLF BLACK COLLAR W/ PUTTING ON THE FOIL & UNTIL RED

THE JOLLY GOOD

& GUESTS

EARLY SHOW 6:30

MARKET FORCES CD RELEASE LATE SHOW 9:30

WILLHORSE

W/ SUPERSTACK & GUESTS

ABUSE OF SUBSTANCE W/ SNAKEBITE, RECKLESS REBELS THE IMPLICATE ORDER W/ GUESTS RUSS DAWSON W/ LITTLE INDIA 77 SUPERSTARS, JOHNNY DE COURCY AND THE DEATH RANGERS, DADA PLAN

BESTIE W/ GUESTS SEBASTIAN OWL W/ GUESTS HEADBANGERZ FEAT SPIRAL TIDE, OSYRON, HOUSE OF PINES

SET NIGHTCLUB SET Saturday

Night House Party: With DJ Twix, Johnny Infamous

SOU KAWAII ZEN Your Famous Saturday with Crewshtopher, Tyler M SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM Swing

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

MUSIC 31


Dance Party: Sugar Swing Dance Club every Sat, 8-12; no experience or partner needed, beginner lesson followed by social dance; sugarswing. com

with the Nightkeepers

SUITE 69 Stella Saturday:

RICHARD'S PUB Sunday

retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests TAVERN ON WHYTE Soul, Motown, Funk, R&B and more with DJs Ben and Mitch; every Sat; 9pm-2am UNION HALL Celebrity Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous Y AFTERHOURS Release

Saturdays

SUN APR 27 ARTERY Afternoon: High Noon

Brunch, live music; Evening: Trevor McNeely (EP release, folk rock), Lucas Chaisson, Alex Vissia; 7pm (door); $8 (adv)/$10 (door) BAILEY THEATRE–Camrose

The Bailey's Buckaroos Classic Country Extravaganza; 1pm (door), 2pm (show); $12 at Bailey box office BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES

Sunday BBQ Jam: Hosted by Marshall Lawrence; 4-8pm; no cover BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE– Nisku Open mic every Sun

hosted by Tim Lovett BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Sunday

Brunch: Hawaiian Dreamers; 9am-3pm; donations

CHA ISLAND TEA CO Open mic with March Music Inc; Every Sun 7pm

RENDEZVOUS Tribune; 8pm R. OUSE HOUSE CONCERTS

100 Mile House; 7:3010pm; $20 to artist

Country Showcase and jam (country) hosted by Darren Gusnowsky RITCHIE UNITED CHURCH

Jazz and Reflections: Charlie Austin Trio 3:30-5pm; silver collection at door SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE Ellie Goulding,

Conway, Rudimental; 7pm (door)/8pm (show); $39.50 at livenation.com SQUARE 1–Sherwood Park

Kyler Schogen Band; 8pm YARDBIRD Monday Night

Big Band

EMPRESS ALE HOUSE Hot Plains warm-up party: Camembert; 9pm NEW WEST HOTEL Hurtin'

Horsemen (country)

PLEASANTVIEW HALL

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm; contact Vi Kallio 780.456.8510 ROUGE Open Mic Night with

Darrek Anderson from the Guaranteed; every Mon; 9pm

STARLITE ROOM

Unionevents.com: The 1975, guests; 7pm; $25 at Blackbyrd, Unionevents.com

Classical GRANT MACEWAN ALBERTA COLLEGE CAMPUS Kiwanis

mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay

Cosmopolitan Chorus Concert with guest Robert Clark (tenor); 2:30pm; $10 (adv)/$12 (door)

DV8 T.F.W.O. Mondays: Roots

ORTONA ARMOURY Chenoa

Anderson (Krishna's Flute CD release), Ian Crutchley (electronics); 2:30-5pm; $20 (incl CD and reception)

ROBERTSON WESLEY UNITED CHURCH The Italian

industrial,Classic Punk, Rock, Electronic with Hair of the Dave TAVERN ON WHYTE Classic Hip hop with DJ Creeazn every Mon; 9pm-2am

TUE APR 29

Main Floor: Soul Sundays: A fantastic voyage through '60s and '70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy

L.B.'S Tue Variety Night Open

LEVEL 2 Stylus Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky, Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am

Trevor Mullen

hosted by Rockin' Randy every Tue, 7-11pm

MON APR 28

Post; 8pm

HOG'S DEN Rockin' the Hog

Jam: Hosted by Tony Ruffo; every Sun, 3:30-7pm

LIVE AT SLY'S–THE RIG Every Sun Jam hosted by Steve and Bob; 6-10pm NEWCASTLE PUB The Sunday Soul Service: acoustic open stage every Sun O’BYRNE’S Open mic every

Sun; 9:30pm-1am

ON THE ROCKS Blues Night

SHERLOCK HOLMES–DT The

Derina Harvey Band

Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

NEW WEST HOTEL Hurtin'

YARDBIRD Tue Session: Dave

OVERTIME–Sherwood Park

Mike Letto

Babcock Quartet; 7:30pm (door)/8pm (show); $5

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Sleeman Mon: live music monthly; no cover BOURBON ROOM Bourbon

Idol; 7pm

CKUA PERFORMANCE SPACE

Roys’ Record Room: Spring Fundraiser edition of Roy's Record Room; 6-7pm DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY Mon

singer-songwriter night: hosted by Sarah Smith; 8pm

Music Festival

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: alternative retro and

not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail; Wooftop: The Night with No Name featuring DJs Rootbeard, Raebot, Wijit and guests playing tasteful, eclectic selections

BRIXX Metal night every Tue

BOURBON ROOM Bourbon

DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY Celtic

Park Music Festival Assoc presents the 2014 Grand Concert; 2pm; EVENING: Tilo Paiz and Friends; Supporting Blind Athletes; 7:30pm

LIVE AT SLY'S–THE RIG Open jam every Wed hosted by Will Cole; 7-11pm

RED STAR Experimental Indie rock, hip hop, electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue

DRUID Open Stage Tue;

FESTIVAL PLACE Sherwood

SANDS HOTEL Country Western Dance featuring Country Music Legend Bev Munro; every Tue, 8-11pm

BOHEMIA Andy Brown (folk

Tue Jam with Big Dreamer; 7pm (door); no cover

DJs

Music with Duggan's House Band 5-8pm; Late show: Sarah Smith

Wed (unless there's an Oilers game); no cover

DV8 Creepy Tombsday: Psychobilly, Hallowe'en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES

Idol; 7pm

every Wed; 8-11pm

DUGGAN'S Wed open mic

Smith

GRANT MACEWAN ALBERTA COLLEGE CAMPUS Kiwanis

OLD STRATHCONA PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE

Idol; 7pm

BRITTANY'S Jazz evening

ROSE AND CROWN Sarah

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Blue Jay’s Messy Nest:

BOURBON ROOM Bourbon

with host Duff Robison

GRANT MACEWAN–Alberta College Campus Kiwanis

Music Festival

Erick every Wed; 9pm;

Music Showcase and Open Jam (blues) hosted by Mark Ammar; 7:30pm

Classical

the South Side: live bands; all ages; 7-10:30pm

DIVERSION Sun Night Live on

RICHARD'S PUB Tue Live

Music Festival

pop), Tyler Butler; 8pm (door); $10 (adv)

Folk Routes: Kacy and Clayton; 10am-noon

Nervous Flirts Jameoke Experience (sing-along with a live band); 7:30pm-12am; no cover; relaxed dress code

Classical

Masters: Alberta Baroque Ensemble featuring Robert Uchida (violin); 3pm; $25 (adult)/$20 (student/senior)/ at Gramophone, TIX on the Square, door

CKUA PERFORMANCE SPACE

RED PIANO Every Tue: the

ELEPHANT AND CASTLE– Whyte Ave Open mic every

MERCURY ROOM Little Flower

Horsemen (country)

Jason Greeley (acoustic rock, country, Top 40); 9pm2am every Wed; no cover PLEASANTVIEW HALL

Acoustic Bluegrass jam presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; every Wed, 6:3011pm; $2 (member)/$4 (non-member) RED PIANO BAR Wed Night

Live: hosted by dueling piano players; 8pm-1am; $5

SHERLOCK HOLMES–DT The

Derina Harvey Band

SHERLOCK HOLMES–U of A

Rob Taylor SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Mike Letto

WUNDERBAR Mitchmatic,

Sam the Living, Ghost Cousin

ZEN LOUNGE Jazz

Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

SUITE 69 Rockstar Tue: Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

Classical

stage with Darrell Barr; 7-11pm

WED APR 30

Music Festival

LEAF BAR Tue Open Jam:

ALBERTA BEACH HOTEL

DJs

9pm

LIVE AT SLY'S–THE RIG Jam

MANDOLIN BOOKS Jessica MERCER TAVERN Alt Tuesday

with Kris Harvey and guests

NEW WEST HOTEL Tue

Country Dance Lessons: 7-9pm; Hurtin' Horsemen (country)

O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam every

Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm

Open stage Wed with Trace Jordan; 8pm-12 ARTERY Jordan Klassen (singersongwriter, alt pop), guests; 8pm (door); $12 (adv)/$15 (door)

BILLIARD CLUB Why wait

Wednesdays: Wed night party with DJ Alize every Wed; no cover

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Allen (pop), guests; 6pm (door); $12 (adv)/$15 (day of)

Main Floor: RetroActive Radio: Alternative '80s and '90s, post punk, new wave, garage, Brit, mod, rock and roll with LL Cool Joe

BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES

BRIXX Eats and Beats

AVENUE THEATRE Andrew

Robbie's Reef Break Wed: Host Rob Taylor with guests every Wed, 7-10pm

THE COMMON The Wed Experience: Classics on Vinyl with Dane

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

NIKKI DIAMONDS Punk and

Open Stage every Tue

Main Floor: Glitter Gulch: live music once a month: Brass Buttons; 9pm; On the Patio: Funk and Soul with Doktor

HOGS DEN Yellow Head Tr, 142 St HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN CHURCH 10037-84 Ave HORIZON STAGE–Spruce Grove1001 Calahoo Rd IRISH SPORTS CLUB 12546-126 St, 780.453.2249 J+H PUB 1919-105 St J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JAVA XPRESS 110, 4300 South Park Dr, Stony Plain, 780.968.1860 JEFFREY’S 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890 KELLY'S 10156-104 St L.B.’S 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEAF BAR 9016-132 Ave, 780.757.2121 LEGENDS 9221-34 Ave, 780.988.2599 LEVEL 2 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 LIT ITALIAN WINE BAR 10132104 St LIVE AT SLY'S–THE RIG 15203 Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.0869 MANDOLIN BOOKS 6419-112 Ave MERCER TAVERN 10363 104 St, 587.521.1911 MERCURY ROOM 10575-114 St NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEWCASTLE 8170-50 St, 780.490.1999 NEW WEST HOTEL 15025-111 Ave NOORISH CAFÉ 8440-109 St NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535109A Ave

O2'S–West 11066-156 St, 780.448.2255 O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 OLD STRATHCONA PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE 8426 Gateway Blvd O'MAILLES 104, 398 St Albert Rd, St Albert ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 ORTONA ARMOURY 9722-102 St OVERTIME–Sherwood Park 100 Granada Blvd, Sherwood Park, 790.570.5588 PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 PLEASANTVIEW HALL 10860-57 Ave RED PIANO Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780.457.3118 RIC’S GRILL 24 Perron St, St Albert, 780.460.6602 ROSEBOWL/ROUGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235-101 St RITCHIE UNITED CHURCH 9624-74 Ave ROBERTSON WESLEY UNITED CHURCH 10209-123 St ROBERT TEGLER STUDENT CENTRE 7128 Ada Blvd R. OUSE HOUSE CONCERTS Sherwood Park acreage SANDS HOTEL 12340 Fort Rd,

OVERTIME–Sherwood Park

GRANT MACEWAN ALBERTA COLLEGE CAMPUS Kiwanis

‘80s metal every Wed

RED STAR Guest DJs every

Wed

VENUEGUIDE ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179 ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 "B" STREET BAR 11818-111 St BIG AL'S HOUSE OF BLUES 12402-118 Ave BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 1042582 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE– Nisku 2110 Sparrow Dr, Nisku, 780.986.8522 BLIND PIG 32 St Anne St, 780.418.6332 BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BOURBON ROOM 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert THE BOWER 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.425; info@thebower.ca BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523 CAFÉ TIRAMISU 10750-124 St CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK 99, 23349 Wye Rd, Sherwood Park CARROT 9351-118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-

32 MUSIC

153 St, 780.424 9467 CELLAR LOUNGE–Lower Level Edmonton Petroleum Club 11110-108 St CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 COMMON 9910-109 St DIVERSION LOUNGE 3414 Gateway Blvd, 780.435.1922 DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834 DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 DUSTER’S 6402-118 Ave, 780.474.5554 DV8 8130 Gateway Blvd EARLY STAGE– Stony Plain 4911-52 Ave, 780.963.5998 ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove 121-1 Ave, 780.962.1411 ELEPHANT AND CASTLE–Whyte Ave 10314 Whyte Ave ENCORE–WEM 2687, 8882-170 St EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ 9938-70 Ave, 780.437.3667 FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 10025-105 St FLUID LOUNGE 10888 Jasper Ave, 780.429.0700 GRANT MACEWAN–Alberta College Campus 10050 MacDonald Dr HILLTOP 8220 106 Ave

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

780.474.5476 SET NIGHTCLUB Next to Bourban St, 8882-170 St, WEM, Ph III, setnightclub.ca SIDELINERS 11018-127 St SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810-124 St, 587.521.6328 SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 1292397 St, 780.758.5924 SQUARE 1–Sherwood Park 993 Fir St, Sherwood Park, 780.705.4321 STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 STUDIO MUSIC FOUNDATION 10940-166 A St SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave SUITE 69 2 Fl, 8232 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6969 TAVERN ON WHYTE 10507-82 Ave, 780.521.4404 VEE LOUNGE, Apex Casino–St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 WEST END CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH 10015149 St WINSPEAR 4 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.28.1414 WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256 YARDBIRD 11 Tommy Banks Way, 780.432.0428 YEG DANCE 11845 Wayne Gretzky Dr ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St s


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

COMEDY

month; 2:30-4pm • $5

FAIR VOTE CANADA–EDMONTON CHAPTER • Boston Pizza meeting rm, bsmt,

10854 Whyte Ave • fairvote.ca • Fair Vote Canada– the Edmonton Chapter's Annual General Meeting: Free pizza at 6pm; screening of a short, funny film, elect a new board • Tue, Apr 29, 6pm

FERTILITY AWARENESS CHARTING CIRCLE • Justisse-Healthworks for Women,

show: Alternating hosts • Every Thu, 8-11pm • No cover

CENTURY CASINO • 13103 Fort Rd •

LOTUS QIGONG • 780.477.0683 • Downtown •

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Thu: 8:30pm; Fri: 8:30pm; Sat: 8pm and 10:30pm • Brian Work; Apr 24-26

COMIC STRIP • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999 • Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm • Hit or Miss Mondays: Amateurs and Professionals every Mon, 7:30pm • Battle to the Funny Bone; last Tue each month, 7:30pm • Andy Hendrickson; until Apr 27 DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • 780.710.2119 • Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm EDEN EXOTIC NIGHTCLUB/CONNIES COMEDY • T*ts & Giggles 2: Open comedy mic between dancers • Apr 30, 9pm • Call 780.914.8966 to get on the roster

EMPRESS ALE HOUSE • 9912-82 Ave •

Empress Comedy Night: featuring a professional headliner every week Every Sun, 9pm

FIONN MACCOOLS/CONNIE'S COMEDY • 4485 Gateway Blvd • Small Pints Saturday Comedy with Howie Miller closing the show • May 3, 7pm • Call 780.914.8966 to get on the roster KRUSH ULTRALOUNGE/CONNIES COMEDY

Practice group meets every Thu

MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION • Faculté

St Jean, Rm 3-18 • 780.490.7332 • madeleinesanam.org/en • Program for HIV-AID’S prevention, treatment and harm reduction in French, English and other African languages • 3rd and 4th Sat, 9am-5pm each month • Free (member)/$10 (membership); pre-register

THE MANKIND PROJECT • 10256-112 St • menmentoringmen.ca • A support group for men to talk and be heard, be acknowledged and recognized for the gifts you offer, challenge yourself and other men. A group of men committed to better themselves, their families, and their communities • Sun, Apr 27, 9:30am-4pm • Sun, May 4, 9:30am4pm • Sat, May 10, 9:30am-4pm

NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall,

3728-106 St • nawca.ca • Annual Spring Show & Competition: Wood art, Crafts, Retail Booths, Demonstrations, Food; Apr 26-27, 10am-5pm; free admission and parking

ORGANIZATION FOR BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm

OVERTIME PUB • 4211-106 St • Open mic

Braeside Presbyterian Church bsmt, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon, 7:30pm

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • Comedy

Groove every Wed; 9pm

GROUPS/CLUBS/MEETINGS AIKIKAI AIKIDO CLUB • 10139-87 Ave, Old

Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL EDMONTON •

8307-109 St • edmontonamnesty.org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug) E: amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org for more info • Free

ARGENTINE TANGO DANCE AT FOOT NOTES STUDIO • Foot Notes Dance Studio

(South side), 9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pm-midnight • $15

BRAIN TUMOUR PEER SUPPORT GROUP

• Mount Zion Lutheran Church, 11533-135 St NW • braintumour.ca • 1.800.265.5106 ext. 234 • Support group for brain tumour survivors and their families and caregivers. Must be 18 or over • 3rd Mon every month; 7-8:45pm • Free

CANADIAN INJURED WORKERS ASSOCIATION OF ALBERTA (CIWAA) • Augustana

Lutheran Church, 107 St, 99 Ave • canadianinjuredworkers.com • Meeting every 3rd Sat, 1-4pm • Injured Workers in Pursuit of Justice denied by WCB

EDMONTON ATHEISTS • Stanley Milner

Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • Monthly roundtable discussion group. Topics change each month, please check the website for details, edmontonatheists.ca • 1st Tue, 7pm; each month • May 6, Roundtable discussion, guest speaker Bradley Peters from Dying with Dignity will be presenting information about the organisation and the status of physician assisted dying in Canada

EDMONTON NEEDLECRAFT GUILD •

Avonmore United Church Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm

EDMONTON UKULELE CIRCLE • Bogani Café,

2023-111 St • 780.440.3528 • 3rd Sun each

WILD ROSE ANTIQUE COLLECTORS SOCIETY • Delwood Community Hall, 7515 Delwood

Rd • wildroseantiquecollectors.ca • Collecting and researching items from various periods in the history of Edmonton. Presentations after club business. Visitors welcome • Meets the 4th Mon of every month (except Jul & Dec), 7:30pm

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of the Old Strathcona Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence LECTURES/PRESENTATIONS rium, 11150-82 St • CARP meeting, advocating for social change that will bring financial security, equitable access to health care, and freedom from age discrimination; with Susan Eng as guest speaker • May 2; 12:30-1pm (register), 1-3pm (presentation) • $5 (member)/$10 (non-member); pre-register at 780.450.4802; E: CARP.Edmonton@gmail.com

106 St • 780.435.0845 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

WICCAN ASSEMBLY • Ritchie Hall, 7727-98 St • The Congregationalist Wiccan Assembly of Alberta meets the 2nd Sun each month (except Aug), 6pm • Info: contact cwaalberta@gmail.com

CARP ADVOCACY • Norwood Legion Audito-

NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-

• Komedy Krush: following a Capital City Singles Mixer with guest Danny Martinello; Apr 24, 9pm • Call 780.914.8966 to get on the roster comedy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free

waskahegantrail.ca • Meet at the NW corner of Superstore parking, 51 Ave, Calgary Tr; Carpooling available from here • 9km guided hike on the East Battle River portion of the Waskahegan Trail. Contact: Hike leader David 780.434.2675 • Apr 26, 8:45am-3pm • $5 (carpool); $20 (annual membership)

FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church,

8424-95 Ave • 780.465.2019, 780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm

780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:30-9pm

WASKAHEGAN TRAIL HIKE •

10145-81 Ave • justisse.ca • Meeting • 6:30-8:30pm • $10 (donation)

Black Dog Freehouse • Underdog Comedy

org; weekly meetings every Tue, 7-9pm (Jul-Aug off) • N'Orators Toastmasters Club: Lower Level, McClure United Church, 13708-74 St: meet every Thu, 6:45-8:30pm; contact bradscherger@hotmail. com, 780.863.1962, norators.com • Y Toastmasters Club: Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); Meet every Tue, 7-9pm except last Tue ea month; Contact: Antonio Balce, 780.463.5331

SEVENTIES FOREVER MUSIC SOCIETY • Call 587.520.3833 for location • deepsoul.ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm • Meet inside Millennium Place, Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10min discussion, followed by a 30 to 40-min walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta)

IN MY LIFETIME: A GLOBAL STORY OF HOPE, CHANGE & POSSIBILITY • Lister Cen-

SOUTH EDMONTON GARDENING VEGETARIAN AND VEGAN GROUP • Parkallen

tre, Maple Leaf Rm, U of A • Aga Khan Foundation of Canada will share stories of progress and possibility, and dispel common misconceptions about international development • Apr 26, 9:30-11:30am

Hall, 11104-65 Ave • Vegetarian potluck with talk by Scott Mcphee, and a Mercedes 300D converted to run on reclaimed Vegetable oil • Bring Vegetarian/Vegan/Raw dish for six people • Apr 27, 5pm; 6:30pm (speaker) • $8 each

SEEING IS ABOVE ALL • Acacia Hall, 10433-83

SUGAR FOOT SWING DANCE • Sugar Swing,

10545-81 Ave • 587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Swing Dance Social every Sat; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check the Sugar Swing website for info • $10, $2 lesson with entry

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave • 587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Friday Night Stomp!: Swing and party music dance social every Fri; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check web • $10, $2 (lesson with entry)

Ave, upstairs • 780.554.6133 • Free instruction into the meditation on the Inner Light • Every Sun, 5pm

TAI CHI SHOWCASE–INTERNATIONAL QIGONG/TAI CHI DAY S• Hunyuantaiji

Academy, 5222-86 St • practicalmethod.com • HUNYUANTAIJI ACADEMY 5222-86 St • Celebrate Qigong, Chen Tai Chi, Weapons and Foundations: Apr 26, 1-3pm; free • Seminar: Introduction to Silk Reeling and Detailed Qigong: Apr 27, 9am-noon, 780.413.0454, leave a message

QUEER

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY (TOPS) • Grace United Church annex, 6215-104 Ave • Lowcost, fun and friendly weight loss group • Every Mon, 6:30pm • Info: call Bob 780.479.5519

AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sunnybrook United Church, Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month

TOASTMASTERS • Fabulous Facilitators

Toastmasters Club: 2nd Fl, Canada Place, 9700

Jasper Ave; 780.467.6013, l.witzke@shaw.ca; fabulousfacilitators.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 12:05-1pm • Westend TNT Toastmasters: Trinity United Church, 8810 Meadowlark Rd; Public speaking: Parliamentary practice based on Robert's Rules of Order; vpm-2291@toastmastersclubs.

EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE • 10220-103 St • 780.424.0077 • yourgaybar.com • Community Tue: partner with various local GLBT groups for different events; see online for details • Happy Hour Wed-Fri: 4-8pm • Wed Karaoke: with the Mystery Song Contest; 7pm-2am • Fri: DJ Evictor • Sat: DJ Jazzy • Sun: Beer Bash G.L.B.T. SPORTS AND RECREATION •

teamedmonton.ca • Blazin' Bootcamp: Garneau Elementary School Gym, 10925-87 Ave; Every Mon and Thu, 7pm; $30/$15 (low income/student); E: bootcamp@teamedmonton.ca • Mindful Meditation: Pride Centre: Every Thu, 6pm; free weekly drop-in • Swimming–Making Waves: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; E: swimming@teamedmonton.ca; makingwavesswimclub.ca • Volleyball: Stratford Junior-Senior High School (west end): every Tue, until Apr 29, 7-9pm, $65 (season), $35 (Half season), $5 (drop-in) • Martial Arts–Kung Fu and Kick Boxing: Every Tue and Thu, 6-7pm; GLBTQ inclusive adult classes at Sil-Lum Kung Fu; kungfu@ teamedmonton.ca, kickboxing@teamedmonton. ca, sillum.ca

G.L.B.T.Q SENIORS GROUP • S.A.G.E

Bldg, Craftroom, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: tuff @shaw.ca

INSIDE/OUT • U of A Campus • Campus-based

Milner Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq, 780.496.7000 • Tackling the Widening Income Gap in Edmonton and beyond with Ricardo Acuña, Helen McFadyen, Ken Ward, Janet Keeping • Apr 27, 12-3pm

118 Ave • 780.973.5311 • nashvillesongwriters. com • NSAI (Nashville Songwriters Association International) meet the 2nd Mon each month, 7-9pm

WOODYS VIDEO BAR • 11723 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

• Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • eplc.webs.com • Free year long course; Family circle 3rd Sat each month • Everyone welcome

FERMENTED FOODS WORKSHOP 101– INTRODUCTION • King Edward Community

INCOME INEQUALITY FORUM • Stanley

SONGWRITERS GROUP • The Carrot, 9351-

EPLC FELLOWSHIP PAGAN STUDY GROUP

ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB • Pride Centre, 10608-105 Ave • 780.387.3343 • edmontonillusions.ca • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7:30-9pm

GREAT EXPEDITIONS • St Luke’s Anglican Church, 8424-95 Ave • 780.469.3270 • 1st Mon every month: Holland & Germany (2013), presentation by Enneke Lorberg; May 5, 7:30pm • Suggested donation of $2

SHERWOOD PARK WALKING GROUP + 50

ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH • 11526-76 Ave • 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

FAITHS COMING TOGETHER • U of A Campus • Featuring workshops and panels; featuring kenote speakers Amir Hussain, and Dawn Waring • May 1-4 • Pre-register at edmontoncpwr.ca

League Smalll Hall, 8008-81 St • Discuss how and why these foods are so important for your health and the planet's, the basics of safe fermenting and how to adapt recipes. Together we'll make a batch of cordito (Mexican sauerkraut) and find recipes for preserving your garden bounty through fermentation • May 7, 9pm • $25 EventBrite https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/ fermented-foods-workshop-101-introductiontickets-11082466957

SAWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP •

BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

BEERS FOR QUEERS • Empress Ale House, 9912 Whyte Ave • Meet the last Thu each month BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP • A social group for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo. com/group/bwedmonton

organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transidentified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, academic, straight allies and support staff • 3rd Thu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. E: kwells@ualberta.ca

LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB • geocities.com/makingwaves_edm • Recreational/ competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu OUTLOUD–LGBT YOUTH GROUP • St Paul's United Church, 11526-76 Ave • Group for LGBT teens from religious backgrounds • Meet the 1st and 3rd Wed ea month, 7-9pm • Until Jun 18 • Free PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • A safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental drop-in space, support programs and resources offered for members of the GLBTQ community, their families and friends • Daily: Community drop-in; support and resources. Queer library: borrowing privileges: Tue-Fri 12-9pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, closed Sun-Mon; Queer HangOUT (a.k.a. QH) youth drop-in: Tue-Fri 3-8pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, youth@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Counselling: Free, short-term by registered counsellors every Wed, 5:30-8:30pm, info/bookings: 780.488.3234 • Knotty Knitters: Knit and socialize in safe, accepting environment, all skill levels welcome; every Wed 6-8pm • QH Game Night: Meet people through board game fun; every Thu 6-8pm • QH Craft Night: every Wed, 6-8pm • QH Anime Night: Watch anime; every Fri, 6-8pm • Movie Night: Open to everyone; 2nd and 4th Fri each month, 6-9pm • Women’s Social Circle: Social support group for female-identified persons +18 years in the GLBT community; new members welcome; 2nd and 4th Thu, 7-9pm each month; andrea@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Men Talking with Pride: Support and social group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; every Sun 7-9pm; robwells780@hotmail.com • TTIQ: a support and information group for all those who fall under the transgender umbrella and their family/ supporters; 3rd Mon, 7-9pm, each month • HIV Support Group: Support and discussion group for gay men; 2nd Mon, 7-9pm, each month; huges@ shaw.ca PRIMETIMERS/SAGE GAMES • Unitarian

Church, 10804-119 St • 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

WOMONSPACE • 780.482.1794 • womons-

pace.ca, womonspace@gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured

SPECIAL EVENTS ACCELERATE AB • U of A's Centennial Centre for Interdisciplinary Science (CCIS), Rm 1-430 and 1-440 • accelerateab.com • Startup. Scale. Celebrate.: Celebration of entrepreneurship and tech startups in Alberta • Apr 30-May 1 • $60 (adult)/$25 (student); pre-register AINT SAFE NO MORE RELEASE/#FUERZAVALPO YEG FUNDRAISER • Azucar, 13062-50 St • Fuerzavalpo

YEG charity fundraiser to help the earthquake and fire affected families in Chile with FLK Unlimited (rap collective) • Apr 25, 7-11pm (YEG fundraiser); 11-12pm (performance • Free, donations for fundraiser

caN MaN DaN aND Yess • Northgate

Lions Rec Centre, 7524-139 Ave • Can Man Dan wrestles in a professional wrestling match to raise money, food and awareness for YESS • Apr 25, 7:30-9:30pm • $20 (door)/$17 (adv)/$12 (child); some of the ticket sales will be donated to YESS

CHILD HAVEN • Meridian Banquet Centre,

4820-76 Ave • East Indian Dinner; benefit to support Destitute children and women in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Tibet • May 4, 3-8:30pm, 4:45pm (dinner) • $60 (adult)/$20 (child 5-12)/free (4 yrs and under) at 780.454.6216 • childhaven. ca/fundraiser_edmonton.html

DEEPSOUL.CA • 587.520.3833; text to: 780.530.1283 for location • Classic Covers Shindig Fundraiser • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins on Les Paul Standard guitars: upcoming Century Casino show as well; Twilight Zone Razamanaz Tour; all ages • Fundraising for local Canadian Disaster Relief, the hungry (world-wide through the Canadian Food Grains Bank) DOG WASH FUNDRAISER • Pet Planet

Riverbend, 9:30am-3:30pm; Heritage Sq, 9am3pm • Alberta School of Dog Groomers, Calgary Tr: 9am-2pm • Cuddles and Bubbles Grooming: 9am6pm • Gallerie Beaumont Pet Planet: 10am-6pm • For Paws Ltd, Leduc: 9am-3pm • Mutts Adored, Stony Plain: 9am-3pm • E & E Kennels (Stony Plain)12 Boulder Blvd., Stony Plain, AB 9am-5pm • In support of ACTSS (Animal Cancer Therapy Subsidization Society) • May 3

EARTH DAY FESTIVAL 2014 • Earth's General Store (parking lot), 9605-82 Ave • Educational booths, presentations, food and demos • Apr 27, 12-14pm • facebook.com/ events/733832303313947/ EDMONTON COTTAGE LIFE & CABIN SHOW • Edmonton Expo Centre, 7515-118 Ave

• Making the most of cottage life with sports, food an decor • Apr 25-27 • $12 (adult)/$7 (youth 13-17yrs)/free (child 13); $18 (Weekend Pass)/$9 (senior, Fri only)

GRAVITY AND GRAVITAS: DR. ROBERTA BONDAR • Shaw Conference Centre, Hall C, 9797 Jasper Ave • Canada's First Female Astronaut, Dr. Roberta Bondar, shares her professional and personal experiences–Live and In-Person • Apr 24, 8:30-9:30am • $69/$30 (student) at apegaevents. com/apegaforms/bondar

JANE'S WALK YEG • janeswalk.org/canada/ edmonton • Various walks for details on all the walks, go to: www.janeswalk.org/canada/edmonton • Launch: at City Hall Plaza on May 2, noon • May 2-4 • Free MAYOR’S CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS •

Winspear Centre • Bringing together the business community, artists, media and arts appreciators to honour the contributions Edmonton artists make to our city • Mon, Apr 28

UNPLUG & RECHARGE MEDITATION •

Muttart Tropical Forest Pyramid, 9626-96A St • myearthmantra.com • Learn How to Meditate: Beginners, experience meditating in the Tropical Forest • Tue, Apr 29, May 6, 7-8:30pm • $75; preregister at 311, code #509797

THE YEGGIES • Avenue Theatre, 9030-118 Ave • Comedy, film/screen, food truck, pop, theatre • May 9, 7pm • $25 (adv)

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CLASSIFIEDS

2005.

To place an ad PHONE: 780.426.1996 / FAX: 780.426.2889 EMAIL: classifieds@vueweekly.com 400.

Courses/Classes

EPL Free Courses: Edmonton AB Check out the Free Online Interactive Instructor Led Courses offered through the Edmonton Public Library. Some of the courses for visual artists would include: Creating WordPress Websites, Secrets of Better Photography Beginning Writer’s Workshop many more… For a list of Free Courses visit: https://www.epl.ca/learn4life For information and instruction on how to get started https://www.epl.ca/learn4life

1005.

Help Wanted

Cook Thai Cuisine Jing Jai Thai Cuisine at 12556-132 Ave. Edmonton is seeking a Cook, Thai Cuisine. Duties include prepping and cooking Thai food such as stir fry and curry dishes, prepare sauces, soups, deserts. Full Time permanent position. $12.50-16.00 per hr. 2-3yrs experience is preferred. please email resume to info@bangkokexpress.ca

Greenline Distribution seeks full time driver

Must have a clean driver’s abstract, able to drive a 5 ton cube truck. Experience preferred but not necessary. 40 hrs per week. Interested parties please contact Mike Garth at michael@vueweekly.com or at 780-707-0476 Kitchen Helper Thai Cuisine Jing Jai Thai Cuisine at 12556-132 Ave. Edmonton is seeking a Kitchen Helper. Duties include prepping Asian foods, cutting vegetables, stocking shelves, general cleaning, operating rice cookers, and other kitchen equipment. Full Time permanent position. $11.00-13.00 per hr. 1-2yrs experience is preferred. please email resume to info@bangkokexpress.ca

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Build a home with Habitat for Humanity! All Habitat Volunteers participate in onsite safety orientation & training. Beginners to trades skill levels, groups and individuals welcome. No minimum number of shifts required. Visit www.hfh.org to register as a volunteer. We provide all tools, equipment and lunch! Follow us on Facebook /HabitatEdm and Twitter @HabitatEdm Can You Read This? Help someone Who can’t! Volunteer 2 hours a week and help someone improve their Reading, Writing, Math or English Speaking Skills. Call Valerie at P.A.L.S 780-424-5514 or email palsvol@shaw.ca Help the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation create a future without breast cancer through volunteerism. Contact 1-866-302-2223 or ivolunteer@cbcf.org for current volunteer opportunities

BRO?! WE GOT MORE CLASSIFIED ADS ONLINE! VUEWEEKLY.COM/ CLASSIFIED/

34 AT THE BACK

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Give some, Get some. Come have some fun, a little exercise and be recognized. We require volunteers almost every day of the week to help at various bingo locations around the city (WEM, Castledowns, south side). You give your time (4-6 hour shift) and we recognize your efforts. You do not need any experience as everything will be taught to you and you will be completely supported. Calll Christine at 780-953-1510 or email at christine.poirier@cnib.ca for more information Bingo is a smoke-free and friendly environment. Habitat for Humanity hosts Women Build Week June 17 21, 2014 Are you a woman who has always wanted to volunteer on a Habitat for Humanity build site, but were unsure if you had the necessary skills? Contact Kim at 780-451-3416 ext 232 or kdedeugd@hfh.org or register online at our website! Habitat for Humanity Tool Training Workshop and Info Session Have you often considered volunteering with Habitat for Humanity but just need more information about our charity and some guided practice with the tools we use on site? Sign up for our original Basic Tool Training and Volunteer Information Session! Visit our website at www.hfh.org/volunteer/learn-tools

Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network’s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers! Interested or want to learn more? Contact Maura at 780-392-8723 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Help someone in crisis take those first steps towards a solution. The Support Network`s Crisis Support Centre is looking for volunteers for Edmonton`s 24-Hour Distress Line. Interested or want to learn more? Contact Lindsay at 780-732-6648 or visit our website: www.TheSupportNetwork.com Needed for our Long Term Care residence, daytime volunteers for various activities or just for a friendly visit!Needed for our Long Term Care Residence, weekday morning volunteers for various activities. Especially for assisting with transporting residents to rehab, church services and hairdresser within facility. All volunteers must pass a Police clearance. Please contact Janice at Extendicare Eaux Claires for more details jgraff@extendicare.com (780) 472 - 1106 Options Sexual Health Association is looking for prochoice and sex-positive volunteers to attend events and festivals all summer long and beyond! Comprehensive training will be held throughout April. Please visit our website www.optionssexualhealth.ca to fill out an application form Room to Read is changing children’s lives in Asia and Africa through literacy programs and gender equality. Join our Edmonton team and help us plan events to support our work, and spread the word about our amazing results. Edmonton@roomtoread.org www.roomtoread.org

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

StreetFest wants to celebrate a very special milestone with its favourite people! Volunteer for the 30th Annual Edmonton International Street Performers Festival, running July 4 - 13, 2014 in Sir Winston Churchill Square. Make friends, have fun, win prizes and gain access to a post-festival party in exchange for a minimum of 20 volunteer hours! Join a community 30 years in the making! For more information and to apply, visit www.edmontonstreetfest.com, email volunteer@edmontonstreetfest.com

, or call Volunteer Coordinator Liz Allison-Jorde at 780-425-5162

The Canadian Cancer Society’s strongest asset is our dedicated volunteers. By offering the most meaningful opportunities for you to make the biggest difference as a volunteer, we’re having more impact, against more cancers, in more communities, than any other cancer charity. For more information on how to get involved: http://www.cancer.ca/en/getinvolved/volunteering/ways-tovolunteer/?region=ab#ixzz2vac GwaEX The Edmonton Pride Festival is a 10 day festival (June 5-15, 2014) with over 40 different events. It takes many dedicated and passionate volunteers to make these events a success. If you are looking for a rewarding volunteer experience, want to contribute to the LGBTQ Community and be part of one of Canada’s largest Pride Festivals, we hope you will be able to help and volunteer! Get involved at www.edmontonpride.ca! The Works - Volunteers Needed Apply Early & Win! All volunteers who hand in their application by Thursday May 15 will be entered into a draw to win an exciting early bird prize! There are so many ways to get involved! Contact: volunteer@theworks.ab.ca Volunteer Opportunities at WWT Interested in volunteering for us? The perks are great! We are currently looking for volunteers for PlaySlam 2014 taking place on May 2nd. If you are interested, email tickets@workshopwest.org or call 780-477-5955 ext *11. Are you a theatre artist looking for free rehearsal space? If you volunteer for us, you get three hours of free space at EPIC* Underground (our basement rehearsal hall) for every hour that you volunteer. *Formerly known as the Third Space (11516 103 Street) Volunteer with us! Team Edmonton is run by volunteers, and we always welcome new people to help us promote LGBT sports and recreational activities. Volunteers can assist during particular events or can take advantage of other short-term and ongoing opportunities. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, or if you would like more information, please email volunteer@teamedmonton.ca.

2005.

Artist to Artist

All you poets out there, do you know about the CBC Poetry Prize? First Prize: $6000 and 4 runners-up get $1000. Deadline is May 1. Check it out here. http://www.cbc.ca/books/canad awrites/literaryprizes/poetry

Artist to Artist

1st Assistant Director required for a motion picture to work with main director. Action adventure film. 1st assistant director must be willing to travel to occasionally to Jasper National Park (township) to assist main director. 1st Assistant director must be able to use the Arriflex film camera. The 1st assistant director must reside in the Edmonton Area. (or soon will be) For more details, contact Craig at crgsymonds49@gmail.com, or at 1-613-484-7063. (director would like to thank those who have contacted me) A New Award for Emerging Artists raises the profile of the Arts in Red Deer! For more information contact Diana at info@reddeerartscouncil.ca (403)348-2787 Hours: Monday to Wednesday, 9am to 4:30pm Assistant Film Producer required to assist main Film Producer with funding, must reside in Edmonton area only, must have experience with Telefilm Canada funding (as main producer, needs second producer to acquire funds). Must be willing to travel to Jasper National Park to assist producer on location. Female preferred. The project is an action adventure film. Contact Craig at crgsymonds49@gmail.com or 1-613-484-7063 for more information Call For Submissions: The 2014 Calgary Biennial This event will take place in numerous venues around the Calgary between December 2014 to January 2015. If you’re interested in being part of the biennial, you can apply before May 1st. For more information, check out the website: http://calgarybiennial.ca/ Call to Makers, Mercer Collective: A Maker’s Market You must MAKE, BAKE or CREATE what you sell. You can not be a reseller of goods not produced by you. Costs: $60 per market December show is $200 Additional Fees Table Rental is available at $10 per show. Please specify 6 ft or 4 ft. Limited quantities available. Show Dates: March 29,April 26, Sept 27,October 25, November 22 December 13-14 – $200

http://www.emailmeform.com/ builder/form/er27bvY7c0dhM9 0B9dX49 Calling all talented Canadian artists! Artailer is an innovative online gallery dedicated to showcasing and selling the work of new and emerging Canadian artists. Inviting all artists who wish to turn their passion into a career to submit their art for review. For more information, please see the FAQ page on our website (www.artailer.ca), or contact us directly: info@artailer.ca; 416-900-4112 Figure Drawing with Daniel Hackborn With live models. Tuesday evenings, 6-9PM, until June 24. Instruction available 1st Tuesday of the month. Drop-in sessions, $15. The Paint Spot, 10032 81 Avenue 780.432.0240 www.paintspot.ca.

2005.

Artist to Artist

Community Arts Program Application Deadline: May 1st Community art is valued for its ability to bring people together in shared, collaborative, creative experiences to express the things that have meaning to us. The principles behind community art projects are artistic exploration, active participation and intentional inclusiveness that allows communities to tell their own stories. For more information head to www.edmontonarts.ca Gallery @ 501 Presents: Art Object D’Sport Call for Entry In celebration of the Canada 55+ Games (to be held in Strathcona County, Sherwood Park, AB), Gallery @ 501 will be hosting the exhibition Art Object D’Sport, July 7 – August 31, 2014 Art Object D’Sport is an open call for entries from artists and artisans across Canada. DEADLINE – Friday June 23rd at 6:00 pm Further information contact Brenda Barry Byrne, Curator,Gallery @ 501 brenda.barrybyrne@strathcona.ca www.strathcona.ca/artgallery Live Model Figure Drawing Drop-in sessions every Tuesday, February 11 – June 24, 6-9PM. $15/session; 11-pack only $150. Instruction by Daniel Hackborn available 1st Tuesday of each month. Save 20% on supplies. Reserve your seating – space is limited. 10032 81 Avenue, Edmonton; ph. 780.432.0240. www.paintspot.ca; accounts@paintspot.ca OR info@paintspot.ca Marking the Valley A juried art exhibition Call to artists Leave Your Mark on the Capital Region River Valley Visual Arts Alberta-CARFAC is partnering with the River Valley Alliance to showcase the Capital Region River Valley through your artwork. Submission Guidelines can be downloaded at:

http://visualartsalberta.com/ marking-the-valley/ Deadline for this juried exhibition: May 30th, 2014

Now entering its 7th year, Alberta Culture Days is becoming our province’s largest celebration of our heritage, arts and cultural diversity. This year, you can continue playing a lead role in putting culture centre stage during the last weekend of September! The Government of Alberta is providing funding to organizations to put on events September 26–28, 2014. The application deadline is Monday, April 28, 2014. Visit the ‘Get Involved’ section at AlbertaCultureDays.ca for full details. Paintings done especially for sale, its a type of pop art and they’re female. 26 to choose from, 16” x 16”. Triangle Lips Mr. Jim Willans 780-438-1969 The Edmonton Arts Council is inviting visual artists in the Edmonton area to submit a proposal to become the first artist-in-residence hosted by the City of Edmonton’s Office of the City Clerk. The successful artist will commence duties in late June 2014, for an anticipated sixmonth period (terms negotiable/flexible). Deadline: April 25th, 2014 For more info, please visit: www.edmontonarts.ca

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

2005.

Artist to Artist

Phone-In Professional Development with Sydney Lancaster Wednesday May 28th: 6:30 – 8:00 a tele-conference Professional Development Workshop with Sydney Lancaster Limited to 12 participants from small centres of Alberta that do not have access to Professional Development talks and participants living in major centres that have issues of access. FREE: RSVP as soon as possible as this PD workshop will fill up fast! RSVP to info@visualartsalberta.com or by telephone to 1.866.421.1731 providing name, full address, email address, land line telephone number… RAW: Natural Born Artists is an indie arts organization for artists, by artists. We focus on spotlighting indie underground talent to the public. It will be featured in Edmonton for the first time this May 2014. If an artists wants to be considered, they can build an artist profile on www.rawartists.org ! Make sure they indicate that they are an Edmonton area artist to be considered for this opportunity in May! Once they show their work in their locale, they are automatically eligible to Showcase in any RAW location across Canada and the US. For additional information please email or call Kaley Bird the Edmonton Showcase Director at 1.780.264.3650. The City of Lacombe requires an artist is to create a low maintenance, hardy, weather resistant, permanent threedimensional artwork that integrates a water feature (fountain, spray, burbler, or aeration system). Budget:22,500 CAD Eligibility:All Canadian Visual Artists Completion:2014 Deadline for Submissions: May 30, 2014, Noon For more information contact the City of Lacombe’s Recreation & Culture Manager, Sandi Stewart at 403.782.1266 or sstewart@lacombe.ca The Friends of the Alberta Jubilee Auditoria Society is pleased to announce a call for submissions for their Rotating Art Exhibition Program: if you are an artist interested in showing your work in the Kaasa Gallery; the Alcove Gallery or the Lower Lobby (Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium) please head to: http://visualartsalberta.com/blo g/wpcontent/uploads/2014/04/Callfor-submissionsAJAS_2014.pdf Deadline for proposals is May 12 Volunteer couples needed for comedy show. Cal Nino at 780-450-6462 Works to Work Summer Internship The Works is currently looking for hardworking, enthusiastic individuals to join the team for summer 2014! The Works to Work program, an Enbridge Art Internship, is a unique leadership and professional development program that connects theoretical with practical learning. For more information about the internship, please visit www.theworks.ab.ca and click “Education”

2010.

Musicians Available

Blues musician likes to jam in the key of F, but knows no songs in that key. Do you? Contact sirveggi@telus.net

2010.

Musicians Available

Making Music Fun for All Ages - Piano lessons offered Central Edmonton (private) Wendy Jensen is a classically trained musician of 30 years from Edmonton, AB. Upon popular demand from fans, Wendy is now offering piano lessons for beginner students in the downtown area. Wendy’s mission is to make learning music fun for students of all ages. Wendy is now booking lessons for: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday evenings from 4 PM-8 PM and Saturdays 11:00 AM-3:00PM. Lessons can be booked hourly for $50 or $25 per every half hour (plus cost of materials) For a limited time only, Wendy is offering a special rate of $150 for 4x 1hr lessons. Book now for your free initial interview. Your lesson plan can include: Learning how to read music Learn basic music theory Learn to play the piano Learn specific pieces of music (music coaching) Coaching for the emerging artist Improving stage performance & presence How to organize events/concerts How to promote your music & build your network What’s in a brand name? Learning the basics of the music industry (copyright infringement, etc) Visit www.wendyjensenca.com for more information

Veteran blues drummer available . Influences include BB King, Freddie King, etc. 780-462-6291

2020.

Musicians Wanted

Auditions for Pro Coro Canada 2014/15 Auditions for singers wishing to be on the sub-list will take place on Sunday 27 April, in Room 1-29 of the Fine Arts Building at the University of Alberta, starting 2pm. For more information, please inquire at the Pro Coro Office

Guitarists, bassists, vocalists, pianists and drummers needed for good paying teaching jobs. Please call 780-901-7677

Jah-LeLe Band seeks female vocalist, drummers, guitarist, bass guitarist, keyboardist, trumpet players (Men or Women), must be talented in the genre of reggae music. Musicians must have their own instruments. If interested, please contact: Jones (main):780-757-4757 Collins: 780-802-2139 Albert: 780-680-1959

MODERN RECORDER Amateur recorder player seeks same to play/develop/perform modern and atypical repertoire (incl. pop, jazz, rag, rock, folk, klezmer, etc.). Avoiding the comfort of ancient music. For more info contact Jan at jellyparrot@hotmail.com or 780-428-9495

Seeking a musician to participate in a unique exchange. A offering of a short live show, in swap for a holonomic design (art) created for the musician. To take place this summer Contact and more detail through

www.facebook.com/intuitcreations


ALBERTA-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS •• auctions •• MEIER-2 DAY Classic Car & Truck Auction. Saturday & Sunday, May 3 & 4, 11 a.m. both days. 6016 - 72A Ave., Edmonton. Consign today, call 780-440-1860. COLLECTOR CAR AUCTION! 7th Annual Calgary Collector Car Auction, May 9 - 10, Indoors Convention Center Grey Eagle Casino. Over 100 pieces of memorabilia selling No Reserve. All makes & models welcome. Consign today 1-888-296-0528 ext. 102; EGauctions.com. PUBLIC AUCTION. City of Cold Lake: Equipment, trucks, Bobcat, shop items, etc. 1515 - 16 St., Cold Lake, Alberta. May 3, Saturday, 11 a.m. Scribner Auction, 780-8425666; www.scribnernet.com. WHEATLAND AUCTIONS Consignment Auction. May 3, 10 a.m. in Cheadle, Alberta. Farm equipment, vehicles, heavy equipment, RVs, etc. Consign now! Phone 403-669-1109; www.wheatlandauctions.com. CLOSEOUT AUCTION. Wellington Garden Centre. Saturday, May 3, 10 a.m., 13648 - 142 St., Edmonton. Final closeout of garden centre, fountains, garden furniture, greenhouse fixtures, new fireplaces, plus a complete 2012 Tutti Frutti Kiosk at 11 a.m. For details: www.foothillsauctions.com or 780-922-6090. AUTO/TOOL AUCTION. Saturday, April 26, 11 a.m. Auto’s, golf cart, tools, parts, surplus, storage buildings, benches, tents, pressure washers. Scribner Auction, Wainwright, Alberta. 780842-5666; www.scribnernet.com. ESTATE AUCTION for Larry Thimer. Sunday, May 4, 10 a.m. Machine Shop & North Star Hydraulics, 55103 - Hwy 28A, Gibbons. Also tractors, vehicles, etc. Details: Andruchow Auctions Ltd.; www.andruchowauctions.com. WELDING & FABRICATION. Innovative Solutions, Hayter, Alberta, Fri., May 2, 10 a.m. Selling trucks, trailers, hydrovac tanks, Bobcat versa handler, forklifts, shears, lathes, brakes, benders, welders and shop equipment. Online available: bidspotter. com or www.montgomeryauctions.com. 1-800-371-6963.

•• auto parts •• WRECKING AUTO-TRUCKS. Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. North-East Recyclers 780-875-0270 (Lloydminster).

•• business •• opportunities GET FREE vending machines. Can earn $100,000. + per year. All cash-retire in just 3 years. Protected territories. Full details call now 1-866-668-6629. Website: www.tcvend.com.

•• coming events •• CALGARY DOLL CLUB Antique & Collectible Show & Sale. Hourly door prizes & face painting. Saturday, May 3/14, 10 - 3 p.m., Acadia Recreation Complex, 240 - 90 Ave. SE, Calgary. Admission: Adults $5. Children under 12 free.

•• employment •• opportunities HOME BUILDING CENTRE, Red Deer - Seeking experienced salespeople (contractor desk); also Project Estimator. Building supplies knowledge a must.

Wage commensurate with experience. Email resume: rob@executivehbc.com. 1-403-343-6422. FULL-TIME TRUCK DriverTrack Hoe and Cat Operators wanted. Experience in operating equipment, loading & unloading all types of equipment. Competitive wages & benefits. Must have all tickets. Resident of Whitecourt an asset. Please fax resume to 780-778-2444. FREIGHTLAND CARRIERS, a tri-axle air ride flatdeck carrier is looking for Owner/Operators to run Alberta only or 4 Western Provinces. Average gross $18 - 20,000/month. 1-800-9179021. Email: ed@freightland.ca. INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT Operator School. No Simulators. In-the-seat training. Real world tasks. Weekly start dates. Job board! Funding options. Sign up online! iheschool.com. 1-866-399-3853. WANTED WATER WELL rig with driller/helper for subcontract domestic wells. Central/ north central Alberta. Also driller wanted for Permton rig. Failing, Mayhew size. Permton Supplies Co. Ltd., 1-800-244-3668. LEARN TO EARN $25 - $50/ hour+. Window Painting Workshop! “Hidden Career”. Insider secrets revealed! Edmonton, May 2, 3, 4. 10 spots only! Info and registration; www.windowjeannie.com. 780-266-1122. SEEKING A CAREER in the Community Newspaper business? Post your resume for FREE right where the publishers are looking. Visit: awna.com/for-job-seekers. NEW BRIGDEN KINDERGARTEN accepting applications for a 0.5FTE Kindergarten Teacher for 2014 - 2015. Valid Alberta Teaching Certificate preferred. Send resume: agthor@netago.ca. 403-664-1241.

•• for sale •• METAL ROOFING & SIDING. Very competitive prices! Largest colour selection in Western Canada. Available at over 25 Alberta Distribution Locations. 40 Year Warranty. Call 1-888-263-8254. BEAUTIFUL SPRUCE TREES. 4 - 6 ft., $35 each. Machine planting; $10/tree (includes bark mulch and fertilizer). 20 tree minimum order. Delivery fee: $75 - $125/order. Quality guaranteed. 403-820-0961. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% off! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100, sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206; www.crownsteelbuildings.ca. DISCONNECTED PHONE? Phone Factory Home Phone Service. No one refused! Low monthly rate! Calling features and unlimited long distance available. Call Phone Factory today! 1-877-3362274; www.phonefactory.ca. SAWMILLS from only $4,897. Make money & save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info & dvd: www. NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT. 1-800-566-6899 ext. 400OT. STEEL BUILDINGS. Hot savings - spring sale! 20x24 $4348. 25x24 $4539. 30x30 $6197. 32x36 $7746. 40x46 $12,116. 47x72 $17,779. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422; www.pioneersteel.ca. FASTER in the field! Get more work done faster and save on fuel. Chip Tuning Safely gives you 15% more power. AG equipment, semis. 1-888-9201351; Dieselservices.com.

LOOKING FOR a shop? Post Frame Buildings. AFAB Industries has experience, expertise, reliability and great construction practices. For a free quote, contact Ryan Smith 403-818-0797 or email: ryan.afab@gmail.com. COLORADO BLUE SPRUCE: $1.49/each for a box of 270 ($402.30). Also full range of trees, shrubs, cherries & berries. Free shipping. Replacement guarantee. 1-866-873-3846 or treetime.ca. Heavy Equipment For Sale A-STEEL SHIPPING dry storage containers. Used 40’ & 40’ high cube & insulated containers 40’-53’ long. Specials in stock now. Self unloading delivery. Phone toll free 1-866-5287108; www.rtccontainer.com.

•• manufactured •• homes SHOWHOME SALE. Substantial savings to be had! Need room for whole new display! Visit Grandview Modular Red Deer to see the quality and craftsmanship that set us apart. 1-855-347-0417; www.grandviewmodular.com; terry@grandviewmodular.com.

•• notices •• NEED TO ADVERTISE? Province wide classifieds. Reach over 1 million readers weekly. Only $269. + GST (based on 25 words or less). Call this newspaper NOW for details or call 1-800-282-6903 ext. 228.

•• personals •• TOP REAL PSYCHICS Live. Accurate readings 24/7. Call now 1-877-342-3036; Mobile dial: # 4486; http://www.truepsychics.ca. DATING SERVICE. Long-term/ short-term relationships. Free to try! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1 Call 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet local single ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+).

•• real estate •• ELINOR LAKE RESORT. Lots selling at 25% off listed price, or 5% down on a rent to own lot with no interest over 5 years. 1-877-6233990; elinorlakeresort.com.

•• services •• GET BACK on track! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need money? We lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-9871420; www.pioneerwest.com. CRIMINAL RECORD? Think: Canadian pardon. U.S. travel waiver. (24 hour record check). Divorce? Simple. Fast. Inexpensive. Debt recovery? Alberta collection to $25,000. Calgary 403-228-1300/1-800-347-2540; www.accesslegalresearch.com. DO YOU NEED to borrow money - Now? If you own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits will lend you money - It’s that simple. 1-877-486-2161. DROWNING IN DEBT? Cut debts more than 60% & debt free in half the time! Avoid bankruptcy! Free consultation; www. mydebtsolution.com or toll free 1-877-556-3500. BBB rated A+.

•• travel •• GRIZZLY BEAR TOUR. Experience a unique one day charter flight and cruise ship adventure to Khutzeymateen, BC this summer. Calgary and Edmonton departures. 1-866-460-1415; www.classiccanadiantours.com.

FREEWILLASTROLOGY ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): If for some inexplicable reason you are not simmering with new ideas about how you could drum up more money, I don't know what to tell you—except that maybe your mother lied to you about exactly when you were born. The astrological omens are virtually unequivocal: if you are a true Aries, you are now being invited, teased and even tugged to increase your cash flow and bolster your financial know-how. If you can't ferret out at least one opportunity to get richer quicker, you might really be a Pisces or Taurus. And my name is Jay Z. TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): You remind me of a garden plot that has recently been plowed and rained on. Now the sun is out. The air is warm. Your dirt is wet and fertile. The feeling is a bit unsettled because the stuff that was below ground got churned up to the top. Instead of a flat surface, you've got furrows. But the overall mood is expectant. Blithe magic is in the air. Soon it will be time to grow new life. Oh, but just one thing is missing: the seeds have yet to be sown. That's going to happen very soon. Right? GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): Here's an excerpt from "Celestial Music," a poem by Louise Gluck: "I'm like the child who buries / her head in the pillow / so as not to see, the child who tells herself / that light causes sadness." One of your main assignments in the coming weeks, Gemini, is not to be like that child. It's true that gazing at what the light reveals may shatter an illusion or two, but the illumination you will be blessed with will ultimately be more valuable than gold. CANCER (Jun 21 – Jul 22): Would you like to forge new alliances and expand your web of connections and get more of the support you need to fulfill your dreams? You are entering the Season of Networking, so now would indeed be an excellent time to gather clues on how best to accomplish all that good stuff. To get you started in your quest, here's advice from Dale Carnegie: "You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you." LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): Does Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt run faster than any person alive? As far as we know, yes. He holds three world records and has won six Olympic gold medals. Even when he's a bit off his game, he's the best. At the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, he set the all-time mark for the 100-metre race—9.69 seconds—despite the fact that one of his shoelaces was untied and he slowed down to celebrate before reaching the finish line. Like you, Bolt is a Leo.

VUEWEEKLY APR 24 – APR 30, 2014

I'm making him both your role model and your anti-role model for the foreseeable future. You have the power to achieve something approaching his levels of excellence in your own field— especially if you double-check to make sure your shoelace is never untied and especially if you don't celebrate victory before it's won. VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): In his unpublished book The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, John Koenig coins new words that convey experiences our language has not previously accounted for. One that may apply to you sometime soon is "trumspringa," which he defines as "the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your flock between pastures with a sheepdog and a rifle, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin." To be overtaken by trumspringa doesn't necessarily mean you will literally run away and be a shepherd. In fact, giving yourself the luxury of considering such wild possibilities may be a healing release that allows you to be at peace with the life you are actually living. LIBRA (Sep 23 – Oct 22): "The supreme pleasure we can know, Freud said, and the model for all pleasure, orgasmic pleasure, comes when an excess tension built up, confined, compacted, is abruptly released." That's an observation by philosopher Alphonso Lingis. I bring it to your attention, Libra, because I expect that you will soon be able to harvest a psychospiritual version of that supreme pleasure. You have been gathering and storing up raw materials for soul-making, and now the time has come to express them with a creative splash. Are you ready to purge your emotional backlog? Are you brave enough to go in search of cathartic epiphanies? What has been dark will yield light. SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): The potential turning points that might possibly erupt in the coming days will not become actual turning points unless you work hard to activate them. They will be subtle and brief, so you will have to be very alert to notice them at all, and you will have to move quickly before they fade away. Here's another complication: these incipient turning points probably won't resemble any turning points you've seen before. They may come in the form of a lucky accident, a blessed mistake, a happy breakdown, a strange healing, a wicked gift or a perfect weakness. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21): If you happen to be an athlete, the coming week will not be a good time to head-butt a referee or take performance-enhancing drugs. If you hate to drive your car anywhere but in the fast lane,

ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

you will be wise to try the slower lanes for a while. If you are habitually inclined to skip steps, take short cuts and look for loopholes, I advise you to instead try being thorough, methodical and bythe-book. Catch my drift? In this phase of your astrological cycle, you will have a better chance at producing successful results if you are more prudent than usual. What?! A careful, discreet, strategic, judicious Sagittarius? Sure! Why not? CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): My interpretation of this week's astrological data might sound eccentric, even weird. But you know what? Sometimes life is— or at least should be—downright unpredictable. After much meditation, I've concluded that the most important message you can send to the universe is to fly a pair of underpants from the top of a flagpole. You heard me. Take down the flag that's up there and run the skivvies right up to the top. Whose underpants should you use? Those belonging to someone you adore, of course. And what is the deeper meaning behind this apparently irrational act? What exactly is life asking from you? Just this: stop making so much sense all the time—especially when it comes to cultivating your love and expressing your passion. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): You need to take some time out to explore the deeper mysteries of snuggling, cuddling and nuzzling. In my opinion, that is your sacred duty. It's your raison d'etre, your ne plus ultra, your sine qua non. You've got to nurture your somatic wisdom with what we in the consciousness industry refer to as yummy warm fuzzy wonder love. At the very least, you should engage in some prolonged hugging with a creature you feel close to. Tender physical touch isn't just a luxury; it's a necessity. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): Your body contains about four octillion atoms. That's four with 27 zeroes after it. Believe it or not, 200 billion of that total were once inside the body of Martin Luther King, Jr. For that matter, an average of 200 billion atoms of everyone who has ever lived and died is part of you. I am not making this up. (See the mathematical analysis here: tinyurl. com/AtomsFromEveryone.) As far as your immediate future is concerned, Pisces, I'm particularly interested in that legacy from King. If any of his skills as a great communicator are alive within you, you will be smart to call on them. Now is a time for you to express high-minded truths in ways that heal schisms, bridge gaps and promote unity. Just proceed on the assumption that it is your job to express the truth with extra clarity, candor and grace. V

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DAN SAVAGE SAVAGELOVE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

WEBCAM-LAND

nating images circulating online is a pair for $50. Score! I went home My son is 19, but due to some phys- quickly coming. And at that point— and replied to a few more and met ical and social disabilities (mostly which will likely coincide with your another guy the next morning for unseen), his emotional maturity son's entry into the workforce—a another $50. Both guys seemed level is closer to 14, though he is few stray dirty pics, videos or GIFs nice and I felt exhilarated after I quite intelligent. After a lifetime won't be the career-ending scandal walked away. But once I got home, of therapists, specialized educa- that it is today. I was extremely paranoid about tion and other interventions, he is Now here's what Judy Savage, the risk of being followed. I was up now a freshman in college far from my late mom, would've said if she most of the night and constantly home. His dad and I are paying for discovered that one of her four looking out the windows to make his tuition, room and board, and kids was camwhoring to pay col- sure no one was there. My boybooks. He was expected to use his lege expenses: "You're an adult, friend is OK with me doing this; summer job earnings for personal and I can't tell you what to do. he just wants me to be safe about expenses. His lack of social skills You are going to make your own it. I think I was pretty safe. I set makes him dependent on alcohol choices and you're going to make up a separate email account and I and cigarettes to form his social your own mistakes. But you do met them in public in the daytime. life, and that plus his immaturity have to listen to my concerns. You My boyfriend offered to go with (imagine sending your son to col- owe me that." Hesitating to hear me to meet these guys and hang lege at age 14) back where he means he went wouldn't be There are thousands of women out there sellthrough his monseen. I'm fine ing their used panties online and you never read with this, but ey quickly. But he is still drinkabout one being stalked or murdered by a collec- we work differing and smokent schedules, ing and getting tor, but the news is full of stories of women being so it's not realhigh. When he istic. And I don't murdered by their boyfriends and husbands. was home for think having his last break, someone with I asked him me would ease how he affords to do this, and he Mom out would result in a single my concern about being followed wouldn't tell me. You can imagine raised eyebrow—a move that had home. I looked into the sites that what went through my head. (Drug a paralyzing effect on me and my allow you to sell the goods online dealing?) I asked if it was safe and siblings—and then Mom asking if and mail them, but those don't relegal, and he said yes. After some we would rather talk about her ally work for me. You have to pay snooping, I learned that he is using four C-section scars instead. to use all of those sites. You also a webcam service for chats with We always chose to hear her out. have to pay to set up a PO box and men who offer "tips" for sexual So have a conversation with your have a way to accept payments. viewing. I suppose this is techni- son, WORRIED, but first familiar- (PayPal also displays some of your cally safe and legal, but because ize yourself with the technology personal info.) I don't really have I'm unfamiliar with the technology and the phenomenon that is cam- a lot of time to dedicate to sellinvolved, I don't know if he is put- ming. The New York Times wrote ing my panties. I just want to do ting himself at risk emotionally or a great story on the risks and re- it every once in a while for some if screenshots can be captured that wards of camming ("Intimacy on spare cash. So is there anything can affect his future career, rela- the Web, With a Crowd," Septem- else I could do to feel a little safer? tionships, etc. I'm a longtime fol- ber 21, 2013), and the first episode Will this paranoid feeling go away lower of your column, podcast and of HBO's Real Sex reboot, Sex// after a few interactions? Or is my books, and I hope that someday my Now, focuses on camming. Check- brain trying to tell me that I'm not son and I will be as close as you ing out both might help you have cut out for this kind of thing? And and your mother were. So tell me, a more informed, less freaked con- exactly how dangerous is this? Dan: what would Judy Savage do? versation with your son about how Pensive And New To Intense Worried Over Repercussions Re- he's paying for his booze, ciga- Exciting Salaciousness garding Incriminating Employ- rettes and pot. ment Deal There are thousands of women out SLEEPY TIME SEX there selling their used panties onWebcamming—aka camwhor- My fiancée and I have a lovely line and you never read about one ing—is widely regarded as the GGG relationship. Recently we being stalked or murdered by a safest form of sex work. Webcam- discovered a shared fantasy of un- collector, PANTIES, but the news is mers aren't in the same room with conscious sex—basically, one of full of stories of women being murtheir clients (unlike strippers, lap us would be unconscious while the dered by their boyfriends and husdancers, escorts, foot-fetish-party other would do whatever they like. bands. I don't mean to downplay girls, pro doms, etc), and cammers Both of us are interested in both the risks—or play fast and loose have the ability to instantly block roles. Our question is how we go with the math (there are tens of creepy, rude or abusive viewers. about fulfilling this fantasy. Are millions of women with boyfriends But there are risks, WORRIED, there safe ways to put each other and husbands)—and most women chief among them how easily to sleep? who sell their panties online aren't viewers can take screengrabs and GGG To ZZZ meeting their customers face-torecord videos of a cammer's sesface. But if you don't want to go sions. So if your son is planning on Try C-SPAN. If C-SPAN doesn't the website route, here's how you a career as a teacher or a cop or work, try golf—playing it, watch- can sell your panties in person a politician, it's possible that pics ing it, reading about it. If golf more safely: get the Uber app on and videos could come back to doesn't work, try Ambien. your phone and order a car after haunt him. you make a sale. Having a driver But with so many young people PANTY PARANOIA drop you a mile away will cost you out there swapping dirty pics and I'm a girl in my mid-20s living in a $5 or $10, PANTIES, but the peace videos (and so many old people do- large city. After listening to some of mind will be worth the price. ing it, too), and with so many stu- of your older podcasts, I decided dents camming their way through to hop on Craigslist to see if there Get a whole year of Savage Lovecollege (getting naked online is ar- were any boys that might like to cast magnums at savagelovecast. guably less of a risk to someone's buy my used undies. I posted a few com. V future prospects than crushing ads and got tons of responses. student-loan debt), a time when Money has been tight, so why not? @fakedansavage on Twitter everyone will have a few incrimi- I met up with a guy and exchanged

JONESIN' CROSSWORD

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“I Take It Back” - which will change my response.

Across

1 ___ Lanka 4 Beaver barriers 8 Like some phones or moves 13 “___ Dieu!” 14 “The Dark Knight Rises” director 15 Hall’s singing partner 16 Entanglement 18 Cuban dance 19 The result of turning dollar bill portraits into clouds? 21 Acts human? 22 “Jack Sprat could ___ fat” 23 Commuter’s option 26 “Man of a Thousand Faces” Chaney 27 Embarrassing reason that hospital gown won’t stay put? 30 Actress Sue ___ Langdon 31 Abbr. with a Spanish surname 32 Tiny amount 33 Farm’s mouse-catcher 37 Enjoy, like pretzels 39 Plenty 40 Small batteries 42 Article printed daily? 43 Where pigs find potential partners? 46 A bird in the bush 49 Find a job for 50 Some tests 51 “Agreed!” 52 24-hour marathon of Bruce Lee movies, for instance? 55 “Pink Friday” singer Nicki 58 Not lopsided 59 Agreeable odor 60 Athletic competitions 61 Hearing aid? 62 “Catch Me If You Can” airline 63 Detective novelist ___ Stanley Gardner 64 Kicking org.

8 More or less 9 Haleakala National Park’s island 10 24-hr. device 11 1860s soldier, briefly 12 Scanning org. 14 Egg ___ 17 Monopoly quartet: abbr. 20 Moderately slow in tempo 23 Bibliophile’s item 24 “Do ___ others Ö” 25 Jazzman Getz 27 Card game with a colorful deck 28 Yanni fan, maybe 29 Jasmine, e.g. 30 Disapproving of 33 Erykah who sang “On & On” 34 “Poor me!” 35 Memorization 36 “Previously...” 38 “I get it” responses 41 Wood furniture worker 44 1990s arcade basketball game 45 “The House of the Spirits” author Allende 46 “My Name Is” rapper 47 Liquor made from agave 48 Indy-winning family 51 King or carte lead-in 52 “Baby ___” (Amy Poehler/Tina Fey movie) 53 Tardy 54 Agcy. that compiles the Occupational Outlook Handbook 55 “You Are Here” chart 56 Glass in the radio booth 57 Parisian turndown ©2014 Jonesin' Crosswords

Down

1 “SNL” cartoon creator Robert 2 “Dawn of the Dead” director 3 Hereditary 4 Shiba Inu meme character 5 Good to go 6 Cocktails with umbrellas 7 Horses, at times

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