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First steps

First impressions

First experiences as a newcomer

Experience a newcomer’s Day 1 in Canada through stories, art and artifacts

Explore the exhibition at the

Borealis Gallery

Legislative Assembly Visitor Centre

Until December 4 9820-107 Street, Edmonton, Alberta assembly.ab.ca assembl

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ISSUE: 1095 OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016 COVER: JESSICA HONG

LISTINGS

ARTS / 11 MUSIC / 16 EVENTS / 18 ADULT / 20 CLASSIFIED / 21

FRONT

6

Political action can’t keep pace with industrial change: Gwynne Dyer // 6

DISH

7

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Washoku Bistro demonstrates the improving offerings in Edmonton // 7

ARTS

10

Steve Driscoll’s “And a Dark Wind Blows” wraps the Peter Robertson Gallery in shadows // 10

FILM

12

Denial offers a drier take on legal drama // 12

MUSIC

13

Calgary’s Foonyap explores the deep creative vein of shame and alienation // 13

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FOUNDING EDITOR / FOUNDING PUBLISHER .......................................................................................RON GARTH PRESIDENT / PUBLISHER ROBERT W DOULL......................................................................................................................rwdoull@vueweekly.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER / ACCOUNT MANAGER JOANNE LAYH ..................................................................................................................................joanne@vueweekly.com EDITOR ANGELA BRUNSCHOT ................................................................................................................. angela@vueweekly.com STAFF WRITERS LEE BUTLER..............................................................................................................................................lee@vueweekly.com TRENT WILKIE .................................................................................................................................trentw@vueweekly.com LISTINGS HEATHER SKINNER....................................................................................................................... listings@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION MANAGER CHARLIE BIDDISCOMBE .............................................................................................................charlie@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION JESSICA HONG..................................................................................................................................jessica@vueweekly.com STEVEN TEEUWSEN ................................................................................................................... stevent@vueweekly.com ACCOUNT MANAGER JAMES JARVIS ....................................................................................................................................james@vueweekly.com NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE DPS MEDIA .......................................................................................416.413.9291....................dbradley@dpsmedia.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER MICHAEL GARTH .........................................................................................................................michael@vueweekly.com

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Community evolution

// © Adobe Stock/pitangacherry

your fund

Arts space Ficus celebrates closure with a fundraiser

H

ow do communities begin? What, exactly, are the conditions that enable the seed of an idea—a shared passion, a shared space, a shared goal —to germinate and flourish? I use this metaphor intentionally: I want to talk about a garden today. Specifically, I want to talk about how woodworking in Edmonton connects to a garden in C’yele, near Chase, BC and how all of this is triangulated through a party. But first, we need to talk about Ficus. Ficus is a collective DIY artist space that was founded about five years ago by two woodworkers. It eventually grew into a shared physical space that could be rented by artists—at one point, about 25 different artists rented space there. The concept was straightforward: rent is expensive and art needs space to flourish. More artists equals cheaper rent for everyone. However, the administrative burden of maintaining the space and looking for new artists (turnover was very high) has become too great and Ficus has slowly been shrinking and is planning to finally close at the end of this month. But bigger is not always better. Leila, one of three remaining tenants, told me that something sort of magi-

cal happened as the space shrank. The conversations became more intimate and more political: whereas the space started out as rather white and straight, this began to change as they thought about how to support queer, racialized and Indigenous communities. Ficus began to think about space in our city. Why do so many buildings remain derelict, and why are there tax incentives to leave them so? Who controls the land? These questions led into conversations about colonization, land sovereignty, and Indigenous rights, which eventually led them to Nourish the Nation. To say that Nourish the Nation is a garden is an understatement. The garden is an act of political resistance and nourishment by Secwepemc Elder Wolverine. Wolverine was a long time defender of Indigenous sovereignty and was most notably involved with the Ts-Peten/ Gustafsen Lake stand-off (the largest paramilitary assault in Canada’s history) twenty years ago. While in his 70s, he began tending an eight acre garden, mostly by himself, giving away almost all of the food he grew to other elders, single families, and camps of land defenders protesting resource extraction. He did this for more than a decade, unpaid,

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The Legislative Assembly of Alberta’s Standing Committee on the Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund will meet with Albertans to discuss the status of the Fund.

Final Fruit Roll-Out October 29 (7pm) 7437 104 St NW $5 suggested donation tinyurl.com/z9khf66

with any funds raised going towards vital infrastructure like a small tractor or irrigation upgrades. Although Wolverine passed away in April, his grandson has taken over the garden. Which brings us to the party. To celebrate the closure of Ficus, they are hosting Ficus’ Final Fruit RollOut, a Halloween dance party and fundraiser for Nourish the Nation. There will be bingo, DJs, and fruit roll-ups at the door. Heritage seeds from Wolverine’s garden will also be available. Fruit and vegetable costumes are encouraged—although I have been assured that queers can happily show up as themselves as declare that they are fruits. Sometimes the seeds we plant sustain and nourish resistance. Other times, they grow into new communities and spaces that, while fleeting, create new connections that outlive their origins. Both are worth celebrating by dancing our faces off. V

Where Faeries Live

Public Meeting Thursday, October 27, starting at 7 p.m. Edmonton Federal Building, 2nd Floor 9820-107 Street, Edmonton Attend in person, watch the live broadcast on Shaw TV or follow online at assembly.ab.ca/committees/ abheritagetrustfund

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Always chasing our tails

Global political action can't keep pace with industrial advances

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LaughforLife.ca

he chief source of new problems is solutions to old problems. The ammonia that we used in domestic fridges as a coolant in the early 20th century was poisonous if it leaked, so in the 1930s we replaced it with chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which you can breathe all day without harm. Problem solved. Unfortunately, it turned out that CFCs, when they leaked, eventually rose into the stratosphere where they began destroying ozone. The ozone layer is the only thing protecting us from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet radiation, so countries responded quickly in the 1980s when scientists discovered a spreading “ozone hole” over the Antarctic. In only a few years the world’s nations negotiated the Montreal Protocol of 1987, which mandated the elimination of CFCs from all industrial processes by 1996. The deadline was met, and the latest projection is that the ozone layer will recover to 1980 levels between 2050 and 2070. Problem solved. Unfortunately, the CFCs were replaced in most fridges and airconditioning units by hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). They don’t hurt the ozone, but they are very powerful warming agents—10,000 times more powerful than the same volume of carbon dioxide—when they escape into the atmosphere. Global warming was not seen as an urgent threat in the 1980s, so the negotiators were not much concerned by that. If the warming turned out to be a major problem, it could be dealt with later. But it did turn out to be a major problem, and later is now. The rapid industrialization of the warmer parts of the world (India, China, Brazil, etc.) has led to an explosion of demand for air condition-

ing and other cooling technologies. According to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, about 1.6 billion new air-conditioning units will be switched on worldwide by 2050. HFC leakage from air conditioners alone will raise the global average temperature by half a degree Celsius by mid-century. When all the world’s government are pledged to stop the warming before it reaches plus two degrees Celius, and we are already well past plus one degree Celisus, an extra half a degree is a lot. So we needed another miracle like the Montreal Protocol—and now we have it. On 15 October, in Kigali in Rwanda, almost 200 countries signed an agreement to curb the use of HFCs being used. US Secretary of State John Kerry called it “the single most important step we could take at this moment to limit the warming of our planet.” Well, yes it is, but you are probably noticing a pattern in all this. It’s not so much that we keep getting it wrong. It’s the time it takes to put it right: a century so far, and we’ll still be at it for at least another 30 years before all the HFCs are out of the system. When you read the fine print of the Kigali Amendment, it turns out that the United States (the secondbiggest HFC polluter), the European Union, and some other rich countries will have to achieve their first 10 percent cut in HFC production by 2019—but the schedule for further cuts is not clearly defined, apart from the fact that they must be down by 85 percent by 2036. (That’s twenty years from now.) The majority of the world’s countries—including China, the biggest polluter—will only have to freeze their production level in 2024. (At

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the moment, their production of HFCs is going up by an average of 16 percent a year, which means it could almost triple by 2024.) The first 10 percent cut by these countries is only due in 2029, and it will be 10 percent of whatever they are producing five years from now— possibly double the current amount. They will then make further cuts in 2030-2045, getting production of HFCs down by 85 percent by the latter date (three decades from now). India, Pakistan and most of the Middle Eastern countries don’t even have to freeze production until 2028, and their target date for getting to 85 percent cuts in production is 2047. At a rough guess, global HFC production will peak some time in the late 2020s, and will be back down to the current level by the mid-2030s. Don’t get angry. Countries don’t know how to negotiate any other way: nobody gives anything away if they don’t absolutely have to. But if you want to despair, go right ahead. The pace of the political process does not remotely match the speed with which the threat is growing. We have to do much better than this if we are to avoid crashing through the plus-two-degree limit and tumbling into runaway warming. We are not ready to make those deals yet, but when we finally are we will have one small consolation. This deal has been far easier to make because it is an amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, not a whole new treaty. The more treaties we have on climate matters now, however imperfect they may be, the faster we will be able to move when we finally do take fright. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.


FEATURE // BAKERY

DISH

Wife-and-husband team Agnes and Csaba Nemeth of Breadland Organic Whole Grain Bakery. // Bryan Saunders

Excruciatingly slow

T

he tastiest and healthiest bread is the kind that is made excruciatingly slowly. At least, this is the philosophy of wife-and-husband team Agnes and Csaba Nemeth. For almost 10 years, the Nemeths have used an unhurried, Old World tradition to make bread in their tiny European bakery. Tucked snugly between a Second Cup and a Bell store in Oliver Square, Breadland Organic Whole Grain Bakery is easy to miss if you’re not looking for it. But as Agnes Nemeth explains, new customers find them every single day— many of them referred by doctors and nutritionists. “When we first moved to Canada from Hungary, we were seeing more and more people looking for healthy products. Products that are easy to digest, and don’t cause allergic reactions,” she recalls. In many modern bakeries, production is rushed along using tons of yeast, dough conditioners, stabilizers, preservatives, and refined ingredients. The Nemeths use slow, natural, sourdough fermentation, and organic, whole grains—including ancient grains like kamut and spelt, and even sprouted grains. With the exception of one special challah egg-bread, all of their breads are vegan. They supply bread to grocery stores such as Blush Lane, Planet Organic, and Earth’s General Store. And while the facility is not technically gluten-free, they have lots of wheat-free products and many happy, celiac customers.

At Breadland, a loaf of traditional European bread takes at least 24 hours With many people self-diagnosing as “gluten-sensitive” and going gluten-free—Agnes Nemeth points to increased amounts of yeast in modern diets as another potential problem. “That’s why we make the yeast-free products, because we have many customers who have problems with yeast,” her husband Csaba Nemeth chimes in. “Also, because of the long fermentation time, the protein in the grain is broken down more, and it becomes easier to digest.” Agnes Nemeth adds that they don’t use any preservatives, stabilizers, or dough conditioners in their breads. The disadvantage of natural fermentation is that the bread takes much longer to prepare, and—without any yeast or stabilizers or dough conditioners—the dough becomes unpredictable, requiring a careful eye and an experienced hand. “None of the days are the same,” Csaba Nemeth acknowledges. “It depends on the bakery temperature, how warm is the flour, how warm is the water, the humidity in the air... I’ve been baking for 35 years, but I am still learning something every day. “Some of the regular bread [in grocery stores] is made in a very short time period: maybe three hours. In our bakery, the bread is made over at least 24 hours. And some of the bread—like the sprouted bread—is made over three or four days. After the sprouting process, the grain becomes soft and sweet tasting and very easy to digest. There is also

a lot of vitamin and nutrition in sprouted grain.” Baking in this less efficient way isn’t easy, Agnes Nemeth admits. In the early days, their slow-fermented bread made without stabilizers or conditioners sometimes turned out too big or too small. “We made those bad batches into breadcrumbs and sold the breadcrumbs,” she explains with a laugh.

“Now, these days, there are no more breadcrumbs.” But in those early years, did they ever think of just giving up and making things the fast and easy way? They could have, says Agnes Nemeth, but the traditional way is what they believe in. “And there’s less competition, because it is harder, and not as many people want to do this,” she adds,

and then advises, “Read the label of your bread. The traditional European style way of making bread doesn’t need more that three or four ingredients. If the ingredients label on the bag is like a book, and half of the words are difficult to pronounce, then put that bread back, that’s the wrong bread.”

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Elevated expectations

// Photo by Steve Teeuwsen

Sushi offerings are improving, as evidenced by Washoku Bistro

W

ashoku Bistro recently joined the procession of Japanese restaurants looking to carve their niche, from the uptick of izakayas and ramen joints to the steady trickle of sushi places that continually crop up. Washoku is of the latter persuasion, though in the subset of sushi vendors which pad out their offerings with Korean dishes (Sabu in Bonnie Doon and Watari on 124 Street are other examples). It also proclaims itself a sake bar, but I didn’t have a chance to explore this aspect of its expertise, that may or may not set them apart from other Japanese restaurants tilling the same patch food-wise. Washoku shares the orderly austerity of interior decor many a sushi dining room espouses, foregoing even the fabric scrims and self-consciously Japanese art objects that pass for atmosphere in some instances, favouring lustrous wood paneling and leatherette booths, with a few splashes of red. Generic satellite radio pop burbles innocuously through all that empty space. Consigned to a solo dining excursion by fate, I figured a bento box would help me sample a range of Washoku’s distinctive take (or lack thereof) on sushi and accompaniments, but their menu contains no bento provision, at least not at supper time—there are “individual plates,” but they didn’t touch on

8 DISH

all the facets of the menu I wanted to sample. I finally settled on a spicy salmon roll ($7.50), tuna sushi ($4.20 for two pieces) and vegetable dol sot bibimbap as approximately the right amount of food for one guy, chased by the requisite fizzy Japanese lager ($6). Both the maki and the sushi came with ample wasabi and ginger, and the roll was neatly crisscrossed with creamy mayo that had been imbued with impressive spiciness to amplify the chilies rolled up with the minced salmon, cucumber and tempura bits in a seaweed envelope. Thank goodness for fizzy lager to ease the mounting burn. The tuna nigiri was generously portioned and smooth like butter, making me wish I’d ordered some sashimi. But the main course was yet to come. Five bites into the eight-piece portion of maki, my entree arrived on a wooden tray and my friendly server offered to mix it up for me. Bibimbap consists of rice with shredded carrots, cukes, spinach, sprouts and mushrooms, topped with a sunnyside-up egg, that is all mixed together with a spicy-sweet-pungent condiment called gochujang, that is made from chili peppers and fermented soybeans. The dol sot version of bibimbap comes in a hot stone bowl that toasts some of the rice, adding a crispy dimension to the stir-

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

Washoku Bistro 10702 124 St 780.705.2055 washokubistro.com fried savour. The bowl is also a nice source of thermal warmth on a cool autumn evening, though you better not touch it. The server inquired after my spice tolerance, spooned some gochujang and stirred it all up. No question, the results were delicious, delivering plenty of tasty, just-tender veggies in every bite, but I could have used my own side of gochujang to tweak the spiciness as I went. My entrée boded well for the other hot entrees like bulgogi, beef ribs, pork belly and the gochujang-soaked fried chicken that’s becoming a standard item on Korean menus. The final tally on the night was just under $35, which slaked me pretty exactly. While everything I ordered stood up well to my expectations, it didn’t really outstrip them. Washoku is a quality option, if not a destination dining experience, with pleasant service and a price-point consistent with its niche. It speaks volumes about our good fortune that their charms are the norm rather than exceptional in Edmonton’s sushi-sphere. SCOTT LINGLEY

DISH@VUEWEEKLY.COM


PREVUE // OPERA

ARTS

// Illustration by Jessica Hong

Princess Death

Edmonton Opera takes a stylized approach to Puccini's Turandot

T

urandot may not be Giacomo Puccini’s most well-known opera, but it is famed as the Italian composer’s final masterpiece that remained unfinished at the time of his death in 1924. Grandiose in song and scale, the piece is still performed on stages around the world, including the acclaimed Metropolitan Opera in New York. But director Robert Herriot says he's taking a fresh approach to the production at the Edmonton Opera. Set in the ancient Forbidden City, Beijing, it's the story of an imperious Chinese princess who beheads her suitors if they can’t provide the answer to three riddles. The plot unfolds as a brave and love-sick prince, Calaf, tries to win her affections. Fictional or not, Turandot was never produced in China until 1998, as authorities thought it portrayed the country in a cruel and negative light. Franco Zeffirelli’s recent production at the Met in September 2015 was criticized by New York Times reviewer David Allen as being “forthright in its Orientalism.” Written by an Italian composer who has never travelled to Asia but sets two of his operas in China (Turandot) and Japan (Madame Butterfly), Allen questions whether it’s right to show Turandot today “so unquestioningly, and so unashamedly.” Herriot, however, sees little controversy as the show is a fantasy based on fictitious characters. Unlike Turandot at the Met, whose set strove for traditional realism, the Edmonton Opera’s landscape is a medley of Chi-

nese symbolism rather than a realistic mimicry of Asian milieus. This adds elements of reverie to the stories of characters that act more as symbols than as historical figures. “Turandot certainly isn’t real—she’s representative of death, in fact. Calaf is representative of life; he becomes very symbolic in that he’s destined to find her and be with her. Life and death have been in love with each other from the beginning of time. Life gives death many gifts and death keeps them forever. I think that’s sort of the story here,” says Herriot. Herriot feels that Puccini’s piece at the time of inception was less about Chinese culture and more about pushing boundaries in the world of operatic composition. “It’s about finding a different scale, finding a different way of composing, and finding different colours in music,” he says. “This was hugely different from many things that came before.” Since Turandot is a first for many— Othalie Graham is making her Canadian debut as Turandot—it was decided that the cast and crew would explore it from scratch to create an opera with real and recognizable human connection. “I find my approach is a little different in that I’ve really tried to find depth and layering of character and relationships so that they’re not stereotypical,” says Herriot. The chorus of almost forty people is, in itself, a character of many facets.

Sat, Oct 22 (8pm) Jubilee Auditorium, $20 to $175

The company moves as one and rises to the challenge of depicting bloodthirsty brutality one moment and sympathetic understanding the next. All things considered, Turandot is rich in human emotions and expresses them with grandeur. Edmonton Opera’s more stylized approach distances audiences from its display of the 'exotic' and instead resonates due to its lessons that are still relevant to today’s problems. Herriot describes opera as just another art form that serves a purpose—to allow pent-up passion to cry out. It is no longer an avant-garde affair, which makes it accessible to everyone. Similar to theatre, opera has a timeless ability to provide emotional catharsis, no matter who is in the audience. “Hearing a human voice express these emotions which are larger than life—it serves as an extension to our soul. There’s no vocabulary in the English language or in any language to capture how one feels when they’re falling in love. And I think the music definitely takes us there—it helps us to feel that even greater,” Herriot says. “It’s universal, and it will never go away.”

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ARTS PREVUE // VISUAL ARTS

'Floating in space'

Steve Driscoll's "And a Dark Wind Blows" wraps the Peter Robertson Gallery in shadows

// Photo supplied

A

dark lake has replaced the floor of the Peter Robertson Gallery. Abstract celestial clouds, golden milky ways and the luminous glow of the aurora borealis dance in the reflective water. Steve Driscoll has always painted nature—forests, landscapes and gardens—but this time he bids us to gaze upwards. And he’s gone to great lengths to complete the picture with his latest exhibit, "And a Dark Wind Blows." Driscoll and his assistant flew in from Toronto and, in just a few days, with hundreds of kilograms of stone and thousands of litres of water, transformed the entire gallery into an outdoor adventure. Seriously, dockfriendly footwear is required. The wooden boardwalk brings guests in over the water with each step sending gentle ripples across the obsidian surface. It winds past heavenly scenes toward his centrepiece, “These Are Truly the Last Days”, spanning the entirety of the gallery’s back wall, painted a deep shade of midnight. Those willing to maneuver over the great stepping stones get a closer look from a solitary raft. “One of the main memories I had was looking up into the stars,” Driscoll says of his inspiration for the installation. “You look up and see this vast array of stars, and then you look down into the water and it’s doubled and you feel like you’re sort of floating in space.” The 35-year-old artist has mastered his unique medium, mixing transparent urethane and pigment that literally captures light and gives his colours a magical vibrancy.

10 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

Until Nov 5 Peter Robertson Gallery 12323 104 Ave

“It’s sort of like a glaze, like a ceramic glaze. You know, you see a really thick transparent colour on a piece of ceramic and it has that sort of depth and luminosity,” says the artist. He first started experimenting with the unusual medium as a student at the Ontario College of Art and Design in the late '90s, eventually learning how to thicken the material using heat. “Unfortunately, I did burn the studio down through that process, but I did figure out how to do it.” His exhibit this spring at Toronto’s Angell Gallery featured his first public lake reflecting a series of day-glo hued shorelines by day. However, the fixed boardwalk didn’t allow water movement, and the white walls, usually an ideal background to highlight art, didn’t do the urethaned surfaces of his enormous pieces justice. So, Driscoll took a darker turn with this series. “Especially on dark paintings, the reflections of white walls go into the reflections of the piece and you actually don’t see the light go in and come back, you just see the surface light,” Driscoll explains, adding that owners Camille and Peter Robertson supported darkening the gallery, even removing several dozen lights, to achieve the ideal environment for the work. While somewhat of an evolution of the Angell installment, this series stands on its own and definitely has heavier roots. Music is always playing in his studio and he acknowledges its influence on his work. Prior to this series, Driscoll painted while listening to Billy Bragg and Wilco’s Mermaid Avenue. “The paintings were happier, they were sort of ironic and playful and cheerful. And then I ended up listening to Godspeed You! Black Emperor and it’s not cheerful, not playful, but it fits the visuals of the show,” he says, adding that most of the titles, of the work and even the exhibit itself, are cherry-picked lyrics from the sombre Montreal collective’s music. With 25 solo shows to his name already, Driscoll is a prolific artist and was already at work on a new project while letting the water rise at the Edmonton gallery. In a fun twist, Driscoll’s collaborating with photographer Finn O’Hara for a show at the McMichael Museum, in conjunction with the CONTACT photography festival. His huge works are being taken outdoors, some in urban settings, others in nature, and photographed for the collection "Giving Context." “One of the shoots here in Edmonton was actually on top of a parking garage on Rice Howard Way looking at Scotia Plaza. It was a 15-foot triptych, three-panel piece that we held, me and actually Peter Robertson from the gallery,” Driscoll says. “Let me tell you, when the wind picks up, its heavy.” JENNY FENIAK

ARTS@VUEWEEKLY.COM


ARTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

DANCE LES AMIES DANCE CLUB PHANTOM BALL • Santa Maria Goretti Centre, 11050-90 St • 780.460.9465 • wyldeparnelle@shaw. ca • lesamies.ca • Night of Ballroom dancing on hardwood floors with a live band • Oct 21, 8:30pm (dance begins) • $25 (per person)

FILM CINEMA AT THE CENTRE • Stanley Milner Library Theatre, bsmt, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.496.7070 • Film screening every Wed, 6:30pm • Free • Schedule: The Witch (Oct 26)

DEDFEST • Metro Cinema at the Garneau • dedfest.com • Featuring new independent action, horror, sci-fi and cult cinema from around the world • Oct 18-23 • $12-$129

EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum, 12845-102 Ave • 780.439.5285 • edmontonfilmsociety@gmail.com • royalalbertamuseum.ca/movies • Theme: Favourite Films Forever III • Father Goose (Oct 24) • 8pm • $3-$30

FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley A. Milner, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.496.7000 • epl.ca • Films adapted from books every Fri afternoon at 2pm • Schedule: The Revenant (Oct 21)

Oct 14-Nov 10 Park • 780.410.8585 • strathcona.ca/artgallery • The Wild Party; Sep 1-Oct 23

Oct 23, 2-3:30pm • "Who Will Catch Us As We Fall" Book Launch; Oct 24, 7-9:30pm • Second Coming: Canadian Migration Fiction; Oct 25, 5-7pm • "No Way to Run" Book Launch; Oct 26, 7-9:30pm

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner

BOOK LAUNCH • Variant Edition Comics,

GALLERY@501 • 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood

Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.944.5383 • epl.ca/gallery-at-milner • On the Walls: Muse Series • In the Cases: Agua de Rosas - Herencia: Jewellery • Throughout Oct

GALLERY U • 9206-95 Ave • contact@ galleryu.ca • galleryu.com • Viva Cuba!; Sep 18-Nov 18

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112 St • 780.426.4180 • harcourthouse. ab.ca • Artwork by Jill Stanton; Oct 7-Nov 25

JAKE'S GALLERY • 10441-123 St • karen@ jakesframing.com • Resonance; Oct 17-Nov 12; Opening reception: Oct 21, 7-9pm

JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY (JAAG) • Strathcona Place Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 109 St, 78 Ave • 780.433.5807 • seniorcentre.org • Conversations with Nature; Oct 3-Nov 2

LATITUDE 53 • Latitude 53, 10242-106 St NW • latitude53.org • Ghost Dance; Oct 7-Nov 13 • Game Start; Oct 7-Nov 13

LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St • 780.990.1161 • landogallery.com • Lando Gallery October Group Selling Exhibition; Until Oct 31

MACEWAN UNIVERSITY • City Centre Campus, 7-266 • amatejko@icloud.com • Between Here and There; Sep 8-Oct 21

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St • 780.407.7152 • friendsofuah. org/mcmullen-gallery • InterCity; Sep 10-Oct 30 MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-

METRO • Metro at the Garneau Theatre, 8712109 St • 780.425.9212 • GATEWAY TO CINEMA: Army of Darkness (Oct 26)

51 St, Stony Plain • multicentre.org • Pottery to Die For; Sep 25-Oct 28

OVER THE RAINBOW • St. Albert United Church, 20 Green Grove Dr, St. Albert • Panel discussion to follow the film screening• Oct 22, 7-10pm • Free (donations will be accepted in support of Camp fYrefly)

Albert Place, 5 St Anne Street, St Albert • MuseeHeritage.ca • 780.459.1528 • museum@artsandheritage.ca • Weiller and Williams Co Ltd: Building a Livestock Empire; Sep 20-Nov 13

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM • St

READING EDMONTON: 3 ABORIGINAL WOMEN WRITERS SHARE THEIR WRITING • Enterprise Square, 10230 Jasper Ave • macrae@ualberta.ca • Oct 26, 12-1pm • Free

THE SHACK • Gateway Alliance Church,

Featuring contributors from Ten Canadian Writers in Context • Oct 22 • $25 (Eventbrite), $30 (door). All are welcome Strathcona County Library, 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • 780.410.8600 • sclibrary. ca • Oct 21, 7-8:30pm • Free (seating is limited – please register online, in person or call 780.410.8600) 780.422.8174 • strollofpoets.com • The Poets’ Haven Reading Series • Most Mon (except holidays), 7pm, Sep-Mar; presented by the Stroll of Poets Society • $5 (door)

WRITING BETWEEN CULTURES WITH ANITA RAU BADAMI • Strathcona County Library, 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park • 780.410.8600 - sclibrary.ca • Oct 26, 7-8:30pm • Free (seating is limited – please register online, in person or call 780.410.8600)

11 O'CLOCK NUMBER • Venue TBA • grindstonetheatre.ca • A ompletely improvised musical comedy • Every Fri, starting Sep 30-Dec 9 & Jan 20-Jul 30, 11pm

CHIMPROV • Citadel's Zeidler Hall, 9828-

Ave, Spruce Grove • 780.962.0664 • alliedartscouncil.com • Days of Sunlight; Oct 4-29

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.422.6223 • youraga. ca • Beauty’s Awakening: Drawings by the Pre-Raphaelites and their Contemporaries from the Lanigan Collection; Jul 23-Nov 13 • Grey to Pink: Jul 23-Nov 13 • Every Story Has Two Sides; Sep 17-Jan 8 • The Vessel; Oct 8-Jan 29 • The Edge: The Abstract and the Avant-Garde in Canada; Oct 8-Jan 29 • Every Story Has Two Sides; Sep 17-Dec 31 • Open Studio Adult Drop-In: Wed, 7-9pm; $18/$16 (AGA member) • All Day Sundays: Art activities for all ages; Activities, 12-4pm; Tour; 2pm • Late Night Wednesdays: Every Wed, 6-9pm

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St, St Albert • 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert.ca • Reconstructions; Sep 1-Oct 29

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave • 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery. com • And a Dark Wind Blows; Oct 14-Nov 1 PICTURE THIS GALLERY • 959 Ordze Rd, Sherwood Park • 780.467.3038 • picturethisgallery.com • The Great Fall Art Event; Sep 15-Nov 15

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St •

HEY LADIES!• The Roxy on Gateway (formerly

Jasper Ave • Open: Thu-Fri, 12-6pm, Sat 124pm • A Little Bit of Infinity Part 1; Aug 11-Jan 28 • A Little Bit of Infinity Part 2; Sep 22-Jan 28

VAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St • visualartsalberta.com • Art + Activism; Aug 31-Nov 26

BEAR CLAW GALLERY • 10403-124 St • 780.482.1204 • info@bearclawgallery.com • bearclawgallery.com • New Mixed Media Paintings; Oct 22-Nov 3

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill

BOREALIS GALLERY LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY VISITOR CENTRE • 9820-

10322-83 Ave • albertasocietyofartists.com • We Went to Winter; Oct 11-Oct 22

107 St • 780.427.7362 • assembly.ab.ca/ visitorcentre/borealis/CD1.html • Canada: Day 1; Aug 27-Dec 4

BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • 10345124 St • bugeramathesongallery.com • Naughty & Nice; Oct 14-28

CAVA GALLERY • 9103-95 Ave • 780.461.3427 • galeriecava.com • Art Exhibition: Artwork by Claude Boocock, Zdenka Urmila Das, and more; Oct 7-25

Ave, St Albert • 780.460.5990 • vasa-art.com • Textural Dimensions; Oct 18-Nov 18

WALTERDALE THEATRE GALLERY •

WEST END GALLERY • 10337-124 St • 780.488.4892 • westendgalleryltd.com • New works by Annabelle Marquis; Oct 22-Nov 3

WOMEN'S ART MUSEUM OF CANADA • La Cité Francophone 2nd Pavillon, #200, 8627 Rue Marie-Anne-Gaboury (91 St) • 780.803.2016 • info@wamsoc.ca • wamsoc.ca • Little Kitchens: artwork based on the kitchen; Oct 8-Nov 5

FAB GALLERY • Fine Arts Building Gallery,1-1

LITERARY

FAB (University of Alberta) • ualberta.ca/artshows • Graduate Design Group Show; Sep 20-Oct 22

AUDREYS BOOKS • 10702 Jasper Ave

FRONT GALLERY • 12323-104 Ave • thefrontgallery.com • Artwork by Ira Hoffecker;

Patrons are invited to stay for a post-concert conversation with Jayme Stone hosted by folkwaysAlive!

November 12 7:30 PM • $38

C103), 8529 Gateway Blvd • theatrenetwork.ca • Edmonton’s premier comedy, info-tainment, musical, game, talk show spectacular that’s suitable for all sexes! • Oct 21, 8pm • $26 (call 780.453.2440) or Tix on the Square Theatre, Citadel Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave • 780.425.1820 • citadeltheatre.com • Memphis, 1956. Four icons of rock ‘n’ roll have a chance meeting at Sun Records where they sing and record together for the first and only time. • Oct 22-Nov 13

December 6 7:30 PM • $35

RED • Walterdale Theatre, 10322-83 Ave • 780.439.3058 • walterdaletheatre.com • Oct 12-22 Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • 780.433.3399 • shadowtheatre.org David Belke’s classic comedy of love, logic and learning to live returns to the Shadow stage • Oct 26-Nov 13

SKIRTOBERFEST 2016 • Holy Trinity Anglican Church, 10037-84 Ave • A selection of savoury and sweet pretzels and dips from Zwick's Pretzels, as well as beer tastings from local micro-brewery. Oct 22, 7-11pm • $30 (adv), $40 (door) THEATRESPORTS • Citadel's Zeidler Hall,

BLUEGRASS

DAVID MYLES:

MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET • Shoctor

RED KING'S DREAM • Varscona

BLUEGRASS

JAYME STONE’S Lomax Project

GOD'S EAR • Timms Centre for the Arts,

SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta

U OF A MUSEUMS GALLERIES AT ENTERPRISE SQUARE • Main floor, 10230

November 9 7:30 PM • $34

DIE-NASTY • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • die-nasty.com • Live improvised soap opera • Runs every Mon, 6:30pm (doors), 7:309:30pm • Oct 17-May 29 (except Dec 26 and Jan 2) • $18-$40

scottgallery.com • Michael Matthews; Oct Print-Artists, 10123-121 St • 780.423.1492 • snapartists.com • A Modern Cult of Monuments; Oct 13-Nov 26 • To Do; Oct 13-Nov 26

AOIFE O’Donovan

101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show • Every Sat, 10pm • $15 (door or buy in adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun

8703-112 St • ualberta.ca/artshows • Oct 13-22 • $12-$25

WORLD

*Bonus Performance

BITTERGIRL: EDMONTON POETRY FESTIVAL THE MUSICAL • The Club, Citadel

PAINT SPOT • 10032-81 Ave • 780.432.0240

ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF SPRUCE GROVE • Melcor Cultural Centre, 35-5th

7:30 PM • $42

THEATRE

volunteer@thenina.ca • Corrections Show; Oct 15-31

FOLK

QUARTANGO: Body and Soul November 5

UPPER CRUST CAFÉ • 10909-86 Ave •

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY •

• paintspot.ca • Naess Gallery: Landscape in Memory • Artisan Nook: Journey Through Expression • Both exhibits run Oct 13-Nov 22

November 4 7:30 PM • $32

THIS IS HAPPY WITH CAMILLA GIBB •

Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave • 780.425.1820 • citadeltheatre.com • A howlingly funny musical on getting over getting dumped • Oct 4-30

AN ARTS & CULTURE CELEBRATION FROM ACROSS THE NATION

FORTUNATE Ones

TEN-TEN SOIRÉE AND CLC CELEBRATION • Latitude 53, 10242-106 St NW •

NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS • 9225-118 Ave • 780.474.7611 •

10186-106 St • 780.488.6611 • albertacraft. ab.ca • Mise en Scene; Oct 8-Dec 24; Reception: Oct 22, 2-4pm • Distil; Oct 22-Nov 26; Reception: Oct 22, 2-4pm • Material Witness; Oct 22-Nov 26; Opening reception: Oct 22, 2-4pm

2016-2017

13931-140 St • gracealberta@yahoo.ca • Oct 23, 10am & 7pm • Admission by donation; GraceAlberta@yahoo.ca; Tickets available at Eventbrite

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS

Canada MADE IN

10132-151 St • 780.452.9886 • Join Edmonton's Eileen (E.C.) Bell at the launch of the third book in her paranormal Marie Jenner Mystery Series–Stalking the Dead • Oct 25, 7-9pm • Free

It’s Christmas

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

The Arden Theatre Box Office • 780-459-1542 • ardentheatre.com UP TO 20% OFF. THE MORE YOU BUY, THE MORE YOU SAVE.

9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30pm and 10pm • Sep-Jun • $15

• 780.423.3487 • audreys.ca • "A Princess Wish" Book signing; Oct 22, 12-1pm • "The Yoga Alphabet" Book launch and Kids Yoga;

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

ARTS 11


REVUE // DRAMA

FILM

Her day in court

Denial offers a drier take on legal drama Opens Friday Directed by Mick Jackson 

D

THE DRESSMAKER

FRI, MON–THUR 9:00PM SAT & SUN 3:45PM

RATED: 14A, CL

QUEEN OF KATWE

FRI, MON–THUR 7:00PM SAT 1:15PM & 7:00PM SUN 1:15PM & 6:15PM

FRI, OCT 21–THUR, OCT 27

JUSTE LA FIN DU MONDE FRI, MON–THUR 6:45PM SAT 1:30PM & 6:45PM SUN 1:30PM & 6:00PM

RATED: G

SULLY

FRI, MON–THUR 9:15PM SAT 4:00PM & 9:15PM SUN 4:00PM & 8:30PM

RATED: 14A, CL

RATED: PG

PRESENTS DEDFEST 2016 FILM FESTIVAL OCTOBER 18 - 23 • WWW.DEDFEST.COM

0CT 20 - OCT 26

18+ LICENSED, NO MINORS

WHOOPING COUGH MON @ 7:00 HUNGARIAN WITH SUBTITLES FREE ADMISSION

RINGU TUES @ 9:30

JAPANESE WITH SUBTITLES

SUSPIRIA MON @ 9:30

GATEWAY TO CINEMA / DEDFEST

HUNGARIAN FILM FESTIVAL

HUNGARIAN FILM FESTIVAL

HUNGARIAN WITH SUBTITLES FREE ADMISSION

HUNGARIAN WITH SUBTITLES FREE ADMISSION

ANGI VERA TUES@ 7:00

ARMY OF DARKNESS WED @ 7:00 FREE ADMISSION FOR STUDENTS WITH VALID ID

LOVEFILM WED @ 9:30

Metro Cinema at the Garneau: 8712-109 Street WWW.METROCINEMA.ORG

12 FILM

Even Jackson, himself an Englishman—albeit one with decades of experience producing Hollywood schmaltz—seems to be taking the film’s lessons in subtlety, patience and old-fashioned dignity to heart: there are several key scenes in court where, against convention, Howard Shore’s brooding score is eschewed in favour of near-silence. You can almost hear a pin drop when, for example, Irving shrugs off video evidence of his own history of baldly racist neo-Nazibating speeches, which renders Denial as something surprisingly more suspenseful than your garden-variety slab of legal triumphalism.

JOSEF BRAUN

FILM@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Wolff of the mean streets

Autistic math-savant in The Accountant leaves the audience cold

I

ITALIAN/ RUSSIAN/ ENGLISH/ GERMAN/ LATIN W/ SUBTITLES

// Photo supplied

means that, compared to how we normally think of the genre, Denial is the very antithesis of a courtroom drama. Aside from its historical value, this is in fact the most interesting thing about the movie. Adapted by David Hare (who also adapted The Hours and The Reader) from Lipstadt’s 2005 memoir, History on Trial: My Day in Court with a Holocaust Denier, and given sturdy direction from elder journeyman Mick Jackson (The Bodyguard, Volcano), Denial is precisely the sort of stately prestige production that draws respectable, award-winning actors. Rachel Weisz plays the earnest and outspoken Lipstadt, while an astonishingly slimmed down Timothy Spall plays the showboaty Irving. Both are excellent actors and responsible for bringing a modicum of energy to the largely somber proceedings. Yet it is Andrew Scott and Tom Wilkinson who provide Denial with its most finely graded and nu-

REVUE // DRAMA

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW SAT @ MIDNIGHT SOLD OUT HUNGARIAN FILM FESTIVAL

enial dramatizes the long-running libel case brought by British Hitler scholar David Irving against American Holocaust scholar Deborah Lipstadt and her publisher, Penguin, after Lipstadt labeled Irving a liar in her 1993 book Denying the Holocaust. The curious thing about the film is that while its taut, marqueefriendly title is obviously meant to refer to Irving’s heinous pseudohistorical claims, the term equally encapsulates the central conflict that arises within Lipstadt-Penguin’s legal team: Denial is about what happens when a feisty Yankee goes to court in Britain, where her righteous impulses need to be repeatedly stifled in the name of good manners and sound legal procedure. Unlike an American trial—or, in any case, trials as seen in most American movies—a British trial requires its participants to wear a wig, stand in one place and, above all, exert rigorous composure. Which

anced performances, playing, respectively, Lipstadt-Penguin’s barrister and solicitor, who gradually emerge as the most complex and fascinating characters in the film. They initially seem to be Lipstadt’s enemies, ever urging her to reel in her fire, to refrain from bringing Holocaust survivors to stand, and to antagonize Irving further. They, of course, prove to be Lipstadt’s devout allies.

n the ’80s, that odd-cool couple, the autistic and the math-savant, went on a road-trip as brothers became buddies again in Rain Man; in the ’00s, an autistic math-savant went Holmes with The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time; now, in The Accountant, a “high-functioning autistic” and math-savant meets the mafia . . . and the neurodevelopment condition gets its very own caped-crusader movie. Working in plain view in Plainfield, Illinois, Christian Wolff (Ben Affleck) is a mild-mannered number-cruncher in a strip-mall office by day. By night,

when need be, he’s a stone-cold assassin. He’s uncooked books for cartels and mobs the world over, but now he’s told, by his mysterious handler, to look into the ledgers of a robotics company (irony, no doubt, since Christian comes off like OCD2). His investigation’s cut short when a high-calibre hitman-network starts targeting company executives, Christian, and a low-level bean-counter, Dana Cummings (Anna Kendrick), who’d worked with him on the file. Meanwhile, Ray King (JK Simmons), top brass at the Treasury Department, assigns agent Marybeth Medina (Cynthia Addai-Robinson) to uncover the enigmatic figure known only as “The Accountant”. Christian tells Dana in a brief lunchtime conversation that he likes “incongruity” and, here and there, the incongruity of super-auditor and super-killing machine in one man is intriguing (forensic accountant leaves countless bodies for forensic examiners!). The shots of Christian living and working in cool, antiseptic spaces are more interesting than the action scenes (CPA goes 007!), for

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

Now playing Directed by Gavin O’Connor  sure. But as more and more coincidence and backstory piles up—Christian’s military dad having him trained in fighting and weaponry; Christian’s mysterious killing of mobsters in NYC—this Wolff-of-Mean-Streets quickly leaves a viewer cold. Autistic-savant becomes, basically, a sociopathic killer, though the script twist-ties up its plotlines ludicrously so it’s all about family and Christian’s basic desire to emotionally connect with people. All the origin-story stuff, mysterious machinations, and even action-scenes come off as calculated contrivances in the end, gearing us up all along for a grand revelation of the man behind the mask, the basic goodness and repressed sweetness that’s within this super(anti)hero for our neuro-atypical times. BRIAN GIBSON

FILM@VUEWEEKLY.COM


INTERVIEW // AMBIENT

MUSIC

Boring is as boring does

Calgary's Foonyap explores the deep creative vein of shame and alienation

//Photo supplied

M

ulti-genre musician Foonyap is a refined taste. Her sound is cross-generational, mixing violin with electronic and ambient sensibilities. Her latest release Palimpsest does not shy away from this recipe. The Calgarian started violin lessons at the age of four and entered

the Mount Royal Conservatory of Music at 11. It is here that she battled the constraints of her upbringing within Catholicism and traditional Chinese culture and started on a long path of self exploration. At the time of this interview Foonyap had a nasty throat infection, so the in-

terview had to be done over email. Vue Weekly: Do you create your music with the audience in mind, or do you just focus on the creation of the work solely for yourself? Foonyap: I create music for myself. To me, music is a way of working out fantasies, urges, desires, and in the case

of Palimpsest, deeply personal feelings of shame, alienation and their reconciliation. I know my work is eccentric and idiosyncratic—I never have an idea in mind of who will connect with it. VW: Your music is complex, yet accessible. How long did it take you to find your ‘sound'? Or does that notion even exist? F: I think my music is accessible because it's lyrical—that's my classical violinist coming through. I always played the melodies, the leading parts, even in orchestras and chamber music groups. When I decided I was going to write my own music, it came effortlessly. The years of messing around in the practice room instead of actually practicing paid off. For me, most of the effort comes in accepting 'my sound'. There's a part of me that is afraid to admit that this is who I actually am. VW: Do you work on spontaneous inspiration, or do you have to craft out your work slowly? F: It depends. The title track was written spontaneously after a triggering incident, when I realized that I was still deeply affected by my childhood feelings of shame. Some songs, especially the poetic ones, like "Gabriel Moody" or "Woolf and Plath," were crafted slowly, word by word, countless revisions.

Sun, Oct 23 (8pm) Sewing Machine Factory, $12 at the door

VW: Does the creative process ever become boring for you? If so, do you just move on to another project or do you force yourself to finish what you started? F: No. I had an orchestral conductor who once said: 'There is no boring music; just boring people.' That has always stuck with me as a way of constantly approaching something with new eyes, a new mind. Sometimes I need to take a break in order to regain that new mind. I don't believe you always have to finish what you start. Sometimes an unfinished idea can be recycled into something better. VW: What are you working on next? F: I'm looking forward to touring all over Canada and in the UK/EU in the spring. I'm also working on a remix EP, which is going to have my own twist on it of course. For Palimpsest's photography, I choreographed a series of eight little dances. At some point, I would love to turn one of them into a full-length work and make a music video. TRENT WILKIE

TRENTW@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // EXPERIMENTAL

Unpredictable evolution

Tues, Oct 25 (9pm) The Buckingham, $10

Mauno's live show 'takes on a totally different energy and sound'

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ova Scotia four-piece Mauno (mao-no) conjure up edgy and languid sonic sculptures glistening with emotion and swirling with unpredictability. Mauno was formed in 2014 by Nick Everett (guitar and vocals) and Eliza Niemi (bass, vocals, cello) after they met and became fast friends while attending a theatre performance. The Mauno line up was solidified a year later when guitarist Scott Boudreau and drummer Adam White were recruited. “We come from different musical backgrounds which breeds tension of the good variety. We each have different ways of listening to and playing music but we’re always

open to hearing each other,” says Eliza Niemi from the road. Touring in support of their new release Rough Master, Mauno will take the stage at The Buckingham with full roster of guest openers. Released in late September, Rough Master is so much more than Niemi’s off the cuff description as “left of center pop music.” Lead singer Nick Everett’s angelic voice flutters over their musical landscape like a butterfly deftly navigating an undulating tidal pool, each song transitioning unpredictably through a series of personality changes. “Every song has come about in a different way. For some tracks,

Nick has come with an almost finished idea and we have each written our parts; other ones tend to start as a small piece from another member and we craft them together. The goal is always to find a groove with each other and make it sound organic.” The members of Mauno recorded Rough Master in a variety of spaces. Most of the rhythm tracks were recorded by Oliver Nicol in a “Halifax basement” and by Mike Wright at The Drones Club in Montreal. “The rest of the recording we did from our respective bedrooms. It felt comfortable and intimate being

able to finish the album in our own living space. Our good friend and collaborator Alex ‘Shep’ Sheppard, or 'The Shep' mixed it and helped us tie together all of the disparate recording techniques, spaces and mind-sets. He added cohesion,” says Niemi whose Finnish grandfather Mauno is the namesake of the band. On Rough Master, the duality and interplay of the two guitarists creates volatility within the compositions, making them difficult for the listener to predict. Mauno’s compositions can first caress your ear like a gentle breeze before quickly mutating into a lurching dust devil possessing many faces. In addition

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

to their main instruments, Mauno’s members also incorporate cello, piano, synthesizers, elements of noise and an array of percussive devices, including vibraphone, to produce a rich and complex arrangement that at times borders on theatrical. “We treat the live performance as a completely different medium than the recorded material. It takes on a totally different energy and sound while still staying true to the core ideas of the songs. We listen to each other pretty intensely on stage and what we’re hearing can change night to night.”

DAVE O RAMA

MUSIC@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MUSIC 13


MUSIC

10442 whyte ave 439.1273 10442 whyte ave 439.1273 GORD DOWNIE SECRET PATH

LP

PREVUE // SCENE BUILDING

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The hosts get punished with a beer spit ‘prize’ at Rockin’ 4 Dollars. // Supplied photo by Matt Foster

Random rewards

Rockin’ 4 Dollars always ends with a hockey handshake

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hat was started in Halifax 11 years ago, has now spread to Edmonton. Rockin’ 4 Dollars (R4D) is a game show with rock and roll sensibilities. Hosted and produced by Craig Martell (along with Ben Sir and Curt Blandy), R4D showcases local musical talent Mondays at The Buckingham. “They have it in Calgary as well, but we all do our own thing,” Martell says. “We do various takes on the same idea. Each city makes it their own.” Martell was at the original R4D in Halifax when it first started all those years ago, and keeps connections with the show in Calgary. He knows the concept well. The bands (eight to ten of them) only play three song sets. One song is a cover chosen by Martell. At the end

Happy Hour Shows!

THURS  •  OCT 20

THE NEEDLE WILL HAVE LIVE MUSIC FROM 5:30-6:30 PM (NO COVER!)

HH:

JENNY BANAI

happy hour specials 4-7 PM

HG - 7PM:

$4 Yellowhead $5 Select Wine

BLUES (H)

BARSNBANDS.COM SOUL SUNDAYS: A JOE COCKER TRIBUTE WITH

KEEP IT GREASY HG - 1PM:

JETS (A)

T  •  25

HH:

HAPPY HOUR ACT

W  •  26

T  •  27

KING MUSKAFA

+ STAFF PUMPKIN CARVING CONTEST

FE:

BILLIE ZIZI

FRUIT LOOP:

“MOON OF HONEY” ALBUM RELEASE

SPOOKTACULAR

KARIMAH

BRUNCH MUSIC:

MADDISON KREBS

F  •  28 THE CREEPSHOW RAYGUN COWBOYS

HH:

TROY SNATERSE (ALTAMEDA SOLO)

HH:

HG - 7:30PM:

HH:

THE GOATS

S  •  29

BRUTAL YOUTH

DANIELLE DEIGHTON

TUES • NOV 1

FE:

OS:

HALLOWEEN DJ DANCE PARTY

+ GRAND PRIZE DRAW HH:

DANIELLE FRENCH

TATAM REEVES BIG DREAMER JAM HH:

LIA COLE

W  •  2 HH:

SEVEN SUNS

ROCK AND ROLL SING-A-LONG

MITCHMATIC BEBOP CORTEZ

+ ROCKSTAR COSTUME PARTY HG - 8PM: HH:

M  •  31

FE:

AMY VAN KEEKEN’S

+ COSTUME PARTY

CANUCKS (A)

CAPITALS (H)

THE LADIES OF MERCY FUNK

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FEATURED EVENT OPEN STAGE (8 PM) HOCKEY GAME HAPPY HOUR (5:30–6:30 PM)

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Calgary R4D,” Martell says. “What we do, is everyone in the bar lines up single file and does a hockey handshake line with the band [that just finished their set]. It's funny because what I’ve noticed is when we have a band that has never played before, and we announce that [the hockey handshake line] is happening, everyone just kind of laughs because it is a goofy idea.” It is when the bands realize that this isn't a joke, but a way to have everyone connect on the same page, that is the real beauty of R4D. “It is so meaningful, because these artists now have 100 people telling them how amazing their set was,” Martell adds. “It is a great way to get people to connect.”

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of the night, the bands spin a large wheel in which they can win prizes or money (from $200 to $1000) or nothing. The leftover prizes or money is carried over to next week. There is no ‘musical’ winner. “I don’t like competition within art, it doesn’t make sense to me,” says Martell. “It is apples and oranges, always." Another interesting quirk of the game is that the bands are not announced until they take the stage. The event itself, and going even if you don't recognize any of the bands, is part of the fun. “I want people to say, 'I’m going anyway,'" says Martell. He also hopes to keep the event fun and inclusive. That’s why he has each band end their set with a hockey line handshake. “We borrowed this idea from the

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

18+ / MUSIC AT 10PM / $20 AT THE DOOR / $15 ADVANCED TICKETS TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT YEGLIVE.CA

10524 JASPER AVE • THENEEDLE.CA


JASMINE SALAZAR JASMINE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

OUR LADY PEACE / THU, OCT 20 (6 PM)

Does this rock band really need an introduction? If you don’t know who this band is you are a bad Canadian. (Shaw Conference Centre, $55)

CHECK OUT THE REST OF MUSIC NOTES ONLINE AT VUEWEEKLY.COM/MUSIC

HALLOWEEN

BILLIE ZIZI / FRI, OCT 21 (8 PM)

10524 JASPER AVE THENEEDLE.CA

WEEKEND

It’s midnight and you’re sitting in your room alone, waiting for your “shit-for-brains” lover to call. It’s Billie Zizi’s latest album, Moon of Honey, playing in the background offering major bedroom vibes with its heady mix of dirty soul, jazz pop sounds. With the Sumner Brothers and Karimah. (The Needle, $15 in advance, $20 at the door)

KANE & POTVIN / FRI, OCT 21 (7:30 PM)

Kane & Potvin is what happens when late ‘80s/ early ‘90s bands Northern Pikes (Bryan Potvin) and Grapes of Wrath (Kevin Kane) get together to make some major rock tunes. (Festival Place, $20)

PURITY RING / FRI, OCT 21 (8 PM)

Lush dream pop from Edmonton’s own Purity Ring, who are making a stop in the capital region during its North American tour for 2015’s album release, another eternity. (Winspear Centre, $28)

OCTOBER 28

+ + ROCKSTAR COSTUME CONTEST OCTOBER 28 •VINYL $20 ADVANCE THE NEEDLE TAVERN 18+ / MUSIC AT 9PM / $25 AT THE DOOR / $20 ADVANCED TICKETS • TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT YEGLIVE.CA

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+ COSTUME CONTEST OCTOBER 29 • $15 ADVANCE

OCTOBER 29

THE NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN 18+ / MUSIC AT 9PM / $20 AT THE DOOR / $15 ADVANCED TICKETS TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT YEGLIVE.CA

10524 JASPER AVE • THENEEDLE.CA

THE RECKONING

Halloween Party

Sat, October 29 @ 9pm Get your tickets now TheRecRoom.com

South Edmonton Common The Rec Room is owned by Cineplex Entertainment L. P.

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

MUSIC 15


MUSIC

WEEKLY

EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

THU OCT 20 ARCADIA BAR Up The Arcadia

Jam; 1st and 3rd Thu of each month; 9-10:30pm; Free ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Open mic

with Stan Gallant BAILEY THEATRE–CAMROSE The

Black Hyenas & Rocky Horror Picture Show; 8pm; $12.50 (adult) $10 (student) at the Bailey Box Office or online BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Erin Costelo;

8-10pm; $15 BLUES ON WHYTE Reverend

Raven and the Chain Smoking Altar Boys; 9pm BLVD SUPPER X CLUB B**ch A Little, Wine Alot (house, hip-hop and reggae music); Every Thu; No cover BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB Kara-

oke Thursdays; Every Thu; Free BRITTANY'S LOUNGE Scrambled

YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artist from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations • Every Tue- Fri, 5-8pm

BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB Live

MERCURY ROOM The Tourist Company with Lusitania Lights; 8pm; $10-$12

DJs

MOONSHINERS Moonshiners

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Thu

Jam Night with Rockin' Rod; Every Thu, 7pm; No minors NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Happy

Hour featuring Jenny Banai; 5:30pm NEW WEST HOTEL Joe

MacDonald; 9pm NORTH GLENORA HALL Jam by Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers every Thu; 7pm

Main Fl: Rock N' Roll, Funk &

Soul with DJ Modest Mike; Every Thu; Wooftop Lounge: Dig It - Electronic, Roots & Rare Grooves; Underdog: Underdog Comedy Show THE COMMON The Common

Uncommon Thursday: Rotating Guests each week HAVE MERCY Slam Back

music; Every Fri; Free

bands playing hits from the 60s to today; Every Fri-Sat

BOURBON ROOM Live music each

LB'S PUB Stiletto (rock/pop/indie);

week with a different band each week; 8pm BRITTANY'S LOUNGE Scrambled

YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artist from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations • Every Tue- Fri, 5-8pm BRIXX BAR Fuzion! Takeover;

9pm; 18+ only

music

Thursdays hosted by DJ Thomas Culture & DJ Fuzzy Dice; Every Thu, 9pm

CAFE BLACKBIRD Jon Brooks;

RICHARD’S PUB Soul Train Live-

ON THE ROCKS Salsa Rocks:

music; 9pm

every Thu; dance lessons at 8pm; Cuban Salsa DJ to follow

O’BYRNE’S IRISH PUB Live

Single and couple dance; Every Thu, 7:30-10:30pm; Free

8pm; $15 CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK Live

Eliza Doyle–It Ain’t What It Seems Tour; 7pm; $10

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE House

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Live music every Fri; all ages; 7pm; $5 (door)

Function Thursdays; 9pm

CASINO EDMONTON M*A*R*S

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Big Daddy

FRI OCT 21

CASINO YELLOWHEAD 5 on the

SEWING MACHINE FACTORY

Thursday Jam. With host Randy Big Daddy Forsberg; 7pm

APEX CASINO Persons of Interest;

(vintage rock and roll); 9pm Side (pop); 9pm

9pm; Free

CENTURY CASINO Honeymoon

Our Lady Peace and I Mother Earth with Edwin; 6pm; $55

ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Amie Weyes and the Atta Boys; 9pm

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Live Blues

THE AVIARY Jesse Roper; $14 (at

Suite; 7pm (door); $49.95 (at Century Casino and Ticketmaster); No minors

SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE

every Thu: rotating guests; 7-11pm

Blackbyrd)

TAVERN ON WHYTE Open stage

Norman Foote; 7pm; $20 (adult) $10 (child) $55 (family of 4 - call to reserve) at the Bailey Box Office or online

with Michael Gress (fr Self Evolution); every Thu; 9pm-2am

BAILEY THEATRE–CAMROSE

DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY The Rural

Routes; 9pm DV8 C.E.O & Company; 9pm;

$10; No minors FARGOS CAPILANO Connor

McGowan; 6-8pm; Free

Edmonton's best solo musicians ON THE ROCKS Mustard Smile;

9pm PALACE CASINO Blackboard

Jungle; 9:30pm RENDEZVOUS PUB Black

Mourning Light Metal Festival; $25-$60 RIVER CREE–The Venue Dwight

Yoakam with special guest "The Dungarees"; 7pm (doors), 9pm (show); Tickets start at $59.50 SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Brent Lee

(country); 9pm; $10 (adv), $15 (door); No minors SHERLOCK HOLMES– DOWNTOWN Doug Stroud; 9pm

Tippy Agogo and Riley Murphy present Music in Portraits; 7-10pm; $20 TIRAMISU BISTRO Live music

every Fri with local musicians WILD EARTH BAKERY– MILLCREEK Live Music Fridays;

Each Fri, 8-10pm; $5 suggested donation

FESTIVAL PLACE Suzanne Ogrinc

WINSPEAR CENTRE Purity Ring;

northlands.com

- Lock’s “Tapestry Live – The Carole King Songbook”; 7:309:30pm; $31-$35

8pm; $28-$38 WOODRACK CAFÉ Conscious

Collective; 7-8:30pm; No cover, donations welcome

FIDDLER'S ROOST Acoustic Circle

Jam; 7:30-11:30pm

YARDBIRD SUITE Conference Call; 7pm (door), 8pm (show); $24 (members), $28 (guests)

HUMMINGBIRD BISTRO CAFE

Bistro Jazz; Every Thu, 7:30pm; Free KRUSH ULTRA LOUNGE Open

stage with host Naomi Carmack; 8pm every Thu L.B.'S PUB Open Jam hosted by

Cody Forsberg; 7-11pm LIZARD LOUNGE Jam Night;

Every Thu, 7-11pm

TILTED KILT PUB AND EATERY

Karaoke Thursday's; Every Thu WINSPEAR CENTRE The

Strumbellas with special guest The Zolas; 8pm; $28-$32.50 WOODRACK CAFÉ Birdie on a

Branch; 2nd Thu of every month, 7-8:30pm; No cover (donations welcome)

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Oliver Swain Trio; 8:30-10:30pm; $15 BLUES ON WHYTE Reverend

Raven and the Chain Smoking Altar Boys; 9pm BOHEMIA Strange Charm,

FESTIVAL PLACE The Canadian

Guitar Quartet; 7:30-9:30pm; $31-$35 • Kane and Potvin; 7:30-9:30pm; $20 FIONN MACCOOL'S–DOWNTOWN

Andrew Scott; 5pm

Medical Pilot, Dogs Mercury; 8:30pm; $10-$15

HAVE MERCY Live music featuring Edmonton's best cover

HAVE MERCY SOUTHERN TABLE + BAR 8232 Gateway Blvd HILLTOP PUB 8220 106 Ave HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN CHURCH 10037-84 Ave NW, 780.433.5530, holytrinity.ab.ca HORIZON STAGE 1001 Calahoo Rd, Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995, horizonstage.com HUMMINGBIRD BISTRO CAFE 8336-160 Ave, 780.401.3313, hummingbirdbistro.ca IRISH SPORTS CLUB 12546-126 St, 780.453.2249 J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JUBILEE AUDITORIUM 1145587 Ave NW, 780.427.2760, jubileeauditorium.com KELLY'S PUB 10156-104 St NW, 780.451.8825, kellyspubedmonton.com L.B.’S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEAF BAR AND GRILL 9016-132 Ave, 780.757.2121 LIZARD LOUNGE 11827 St. Albert Tr, 780.451.9180, facebook.com/ The-Lizard-Lounge MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 10086 MacDonald Dr NW, mcdougallunited.com MKT FRESH FOOD AND BEER MARKET 8101 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.2337 MERCER TAVERN 10363 104 St, 587.521.1911 MERCURY ROOM 10575-114 St MUTTART HALL 10050 Macdonald Dr, 780.633.3725 NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN 10524 Jasper Ave, 780.756.9045, theneedle.ca NEWCASTLE PUB 8170-50 St, 780.490.1999

NEW WEST HOTEL 15025-111 Ave NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535109A Ave OASIS CENTRE 10930-177 St NW O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 O'MAILLES IRISH PUB 104, 398 St Albert Rd, St Albert ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 PALACE CASINO 8882-170 St NW, 780.444.2112, palacecasino. com PARKVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 9135-146 St NW PINT–DOWNTOWN 10125-109 St NW PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave THE PROVINCIAL PUB 160, 4211-106 St RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780.457.3118 ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH 10209-123 St NW ROGERS PLACE 102 St NW ROSE AND CROWN 10235-101 St SEWING MACHINE FACTORY 9562-82 Ave SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Yellowhead Inn, 15004 Yellowhead Trail SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE 9797 Jasper Ave SHERLOCK HOLMES–DOWNTOWN 10012-101 A Ave, 780.426.7784, sherlockshospitality.com SHERLOCK HOLMES–U OF A 8519-112 St, 780.431.0091, sherlockshospitality.com SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM 8882-170 St, 780.444.1752, sherlockshospitality.com SIDELINERS PUB 11018-127 St

Classical CONVOCATION HALL ECM+’s Generation2016 Canadian Tour; 8-10pm; $25 (general), $20 (student/senior), $15

VENUEGUIDE

OCT 21 & 22

FRI OCT 21

Honeymoon SUITE FRI NOV 4

MacDonald; 9pm O'BYRNE'S IRISH PUB

SPARK CENTRE Bill Bourne with

EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE

PLATINUM BLONDE

SEBASTIAN BACH THE WILD!

SUN NOV 6

Buckcherry

COMING SOON: SHANNEYGANOCK, CHARLIE MAJOR, CANADA’S TRIBUTE TO ABBA AND MORE! TICKETS AVAILABLE AT CENTURY CASINO AND TICKETMASTER

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EDMONTON.CNTY.COM 13103 FORT RD • 643-4000 16 MUSIC

NEW WEST HOTEL Joe

with guests; 7:30pm; $8

Karaoke; Every Thu, 7pm

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Hour featuring Kayla Patrick; 5:30pm • Moon of Honey Album Release, featuring Billie Zizi with The Sumner Brothers and Karimah; 8pm; $15 (adv), $20 (door)

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM Jake

DENIZEN HALL Taking Back Thursdays: weekly punk, alternative and hardcore music; Every Thu, 8pm

DONOVAN DESCHNER

NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Happy

Buckley; 9pm

Thu; 7pm

Call 780.481.YUKS FOR TICKETS & INFO .....................................................................

with Double Experience, Unban Jaceand System to Chaos; 8pm; $10 (adv), $12 (door)

CAFE BLACKBIRD Adri Meeks CAFÉ HAVEN Music every

COMEDY AT THE CENTURY CASINO

9pm; No minors MERCURY ROOM Silent Script

ALL SAINTS' ANGLICAN CHURCH 10035-103 St NW THE ALMANAC 10351-82 Ave, 780.760.4567, almanaconwhyte. com ARCADIA BAR 10988-124 St, 780.916.1842, arcadiayeg.com ARDEN THEATRE 5 St Anne St, St Albert, 780.459.1542, stalbert.ca/ experience/arden-theatre ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 780.432.4611, atlantictrapandgill.com THE AVIARY 9314-111 Ave, 780.233.3635, facebook.com/ arteryyeg BAILEY THEATRE 5041-50 St, Camrose, 780. 672.5510, baileytheatre.com BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 1042582 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLVD SUPPER X CLUB 10765 Jasper Ave BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB 322682 St, 780.462.1888 BOURBON ROOM 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert THE BOWER 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.425; info@thebower.ca BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 THE BUCKINGHAM 10439 82 Ave, 780.761.1002, thebuckingham.ca CAFE BLACKBIRD 9640-142 St NW, 780.451.8890, cafeblackbird.ca CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca

CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK 99, 23349 Wye Rd, Sherwood Park CARROT COFFEEHOUSE 9351118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464153 St, 780.424 9467 CASK AND BARREL 10041104 St; 780.498.1224, thecaskandbarrel.ca CENTRAL SENIOR LIONS CENTRE 11113-113 St CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 CHVRCH OF JOHN 10260-103 St, 780.884.8994, thechvrchofjohn. com COMMON 9910-109 St CONVOCATION HALL Old Arts Building, University of Alberta, music.ualberta.ca CROWN AND ANCHOR 15277 Castle Downs Rd DENIZEN HALL 10311-103 Ave, 780.424.8215, thedenizenhall. com DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB 1111387 Ave NW, devaneyspub.com DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834 DV8/MAMA'S PIZZA 7317-101 Ave NW EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR 8230 Gateway Blvd, elcortezcantina.com EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE 10220-103 St NW, 780. 424.0077, yourgaybar.com FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 FIDDLER'S ROOST 7308-76 Ave, 780.439.9788, fiddlersroost.ca GAS PUMP NIGHT CLUB & BAR 10166-114 St

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810-124 St, 587.521.6328 SNEAKY PETE'S 12315-118 Ave SPARK CENTRE #124, 2257 Premier Way, Sherwood Park ST. BASIL'S CULTURAL CENTRE 10819-71 Ave NW, 780.434.4288, stbasilschurch. com STUDIO 96 10909-96 St NW SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 1292397 St, 780.758.5924 STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave TAVERN ON WHYTE 10507-82 Ave, 780.521.4404 TILTED KILT PUB AND EATERY 17118-90 Ave TIRAMISU 10750-124 St TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 10014-81 Ave NW, 780.433.1604, trinity-lutheran. ab.ca TWIST ULTRA LOUNGE 10324-82 Whyte Ave UNION HALL 6240-99 St NW, 780.702-2582, unionhall.ca UPTOWN FOLK CLUB 11150-82 St, 780.436.1554 VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO–St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 VIDA LATIN NIGHT CLUB 10746 Jasper Ave, 780.951.2705 WILD EARTH BAKERY– MILLCREEK 8902-99 St, wildearthbakery.com WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 WOODRACK CAFE 7603-109 St, 780. 757.0380, thewoodrackcafe. com Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours.com YARDBIRD SUITE 11 Tommy Banks Way, 780.432.0428


(NME Members)–available at newmusicedmonton.ca or the door

MKT FRESH FOOD AND BEER MARKET Live Local Bands every

DJs

NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Brunch

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Late Fee; Every Fri; Wooftop: DJ Remo & Guests; Underdog: Rap, House, Hip-Hop

Sat; this week: Campfire Hero’s with Maddison Krebs; 12:30pm; No cover NEW WEST HOTEL Early: Saturday

with DJ Babr; every Fri

Country Jam (country); Every Sat, 3pm • Later: Joe MacDonald; 9pm

THE BOWER Strictly Goods: Old

OASIS CENTRE Jazz at the

school and new school hip hop & R&B with DJ Twist, Sonny Grimez, and Marlon English; every Fri THE COMMON Quality Control

Fridays with DJ Echo & Freshlan EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR Resident DJs

Oasis; 8pm ON THE ROCKS Mustard Smile;

9pm PALACE CASINO Blackboard

Jungle; 9:30pm PARKVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

playing the best in Hip Hop, Dance, Indie Dance, T40 & Classics; Every Fri-Sat; 9pm; No cover

Northern Lights Folk Club: Jez Lowe & Chloe Albert; 7pm (door), 8pm (show); $23 (adv), $27 (door)

EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE

RENDEZVOUS PUB Black

Flashback Friday; Every Fri MERCER TAVERN Movement

Fridays; 8pm NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Time

Mourning Light Metal Festival; $25-$60 RIVER CREE–The Venue Dwight

Yoakam with special guest "The Dungarees"; 7pm (doors), 9pm (show); Tickets start at $59.50

Warp Late Night Throwback Dance Party with DJs Joses Martin & Thomas Culture VJ Owen; Every Fri, 11:30pm; $5 (door)

ROGERS PLACE John Fogerty:

THE PROVINCIAL PUB Friday

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Ryan

Rollin' On The River; 7:30pm; $20-$145

Nights: Video Music DJ; 9pm-2am

Langlois & The Revelation (folk/ roots/world); 9pm; $10

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE Artzy Flowz: featuring DJs and artists teaming up; 9pm

SHERLOCK HOLMES– DOWNTOWN Doug Stroud; 9pm

VIDA LATIN NIGHT CLUB Electric

Buckley; 9pm

Fridays; Every Fri, 9pm; No minors

STARLITE ROOM Stiff Little

Y AFTERHOURS Freedom Fridays

SAT OCT 22

SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM Jake

Open Stage; Hosted by Celeigh Cardinal; Every Mon (except long weekends), 8:30pm

DJs

BOURBON ROOM Acoustic singer

BLUES ON WHYTE Reverend

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE RetroActive Radio: With LL

BRITTANY'S LOUNGE Scrambled

Raven and the Chain Smoking Altar Boys; 9pm DANCE CODE STUDIO Flamenco

Guitar Classes; Every Sun, 11:30am-12:30pm DIVERSION LOUNGE Sunday

Night Live on the South Side: live bands; Free; All ages; 7-10:30pm HAVE MERCY Local Spotlight

Sundays featuring up and coming as well as established YEG bands; Every Sun, 9pm NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Soul

Sunday: Tribute to Joe Cocker with Keep It Greasy; 8pm; $5 no cover with student ID or Proserve) O’BYRNE’S Open mic every Sun;

9:30pm ON THE ROCKS Dylan Farrell Band with Josh Sahunta; 7-11:30pm; $5 RENDEZVOUS PUB Black

Cool Joe TAVERN ON WHYTE Classic Hip

hop with DJ Creeazn every Mon; 9pm-2am

TUE OCT 25 BLUES ON WHYTE The Travelling

Band; 9pm BRITTANY'S LOUNGE Scrambled

YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artist from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations • Every Tue- Fri, 5-8pm

Circle; 7:30-11:30pm GAS PUMP Karaoke; 9:30pm HAVE MERCY King of Tuesdays

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE The

L.B.'S PUB Tue Variety Night Open

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL Acoustic Bluegrass jam

stage with Darrell Barr; 7-11pm; No charge

YARDBIRD SUITE Laila Biali Trio;

MERCURY ROOM Koo Koo Kanga

7pm (door), 8pm (show); $24 (members), $28 (guests)

ALL SAINTS' ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL Pro Coro Canada:

Roo with Ben Spencer; 6pm; $15-$18 NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Happy

NEW WEST HOTEL Trick Ryder;

RED PIANO BAR Wed Night Live:

every Tue; 9:30pm SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Crazy

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ A night of Latin Jazz; 8:30-10:30pm; $20 BLUES ON WHYTE Reverend

Raven and the Chain Smoking Altar Boys; 9pm BOHEMIA Gary Debussy with Big

Evil and Zebra Pulse; 9pm; $10; 18+ only BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB Live

music; Every Sat; Free BOURBON ROOM Live music each

7:30-10:30pm; Starting at $40

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Chris Bruce spins

Britpop/Punk/Garage/Indie; Every Sat; Wooftop: Sound It Up! with DJ Sonny Grimezz spinning classic Hip-Hop and Reggae; Underdog: Hip Hop open Mic followed by DJ Marack THE BOWER For Those Who

ROBERTSON WESLEY UNITED CHURCH Bach; 3pm WINSPEAR CENTRE Pro Coro

Canada: Flame and Shadow; 2:30pm; $25-$30

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Late Fee; Every Sun

MON OCT 24 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Wooftop:

Metal Mondays with Metal Phil from CJSR's Heavy Metal Lunchbox BLUES ON WHYTE The Travelling

Band; 9pm CAFE BLACKBIRD Edmonton

THE COMMON Get Down It's

FIDDLER'S ROOST Open Stage;

Saturday Night: House and disco and everything in between with Wright & Wong, Dane

HAVE MERCY Mississippi

Band; 8pm; $15 CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK Live

music; 9pm CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Sat Open

mic; 7pm; $2 CASINO EDMONTON M*A*R*S

(vintage rock and roll); 9pm

EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR Resident DJs

playing the best in Hip Hop, Dance, Indie Dance, T40 & Classics; Every Fri-Sat; 9pm; No cover EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE

CASINO YELLOWHEAD 5 on the

Rotating DJs Velix and Suco; every Sat

Side (pop); 9pm

KELLY'S PUB 104 Street Beats;

CROWN AND ANCHOR The

Every Sat, 10pm; No minors

Shufflehounds; 9pm; No cover

MERCER TAVERN DJ Mikey Wong

DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY The Rural

every Sat

Routes; 9pm

THE PROVINCIAL PUB Saturday Nights: Indie rock and dance with DJ Maurice; 9pm-2am

Mondays featuring Dylan Farell Band; Every Mon, 8:30pm (sign-up) KELLY'S PUB Open stage; Every NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Happy

Hour featuring Jeff Hendrick; 5:30pm

Monday PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL Wild Rose Old Tyme

RED PIANO BAR Swingin'

HAVE MERCY Live music

featuring Edmonton's best cover bands playing hits from the 60s to today; Every Fri-Sat LB'S PUB Carling Undercover

(rock/pop/indie); 9pm; No minors LEAF BAR AND GRILL Live

music; 9:30pm

Y AFTERHOURS Release

Saturdays

SUN OCT 23 BAILEY THEATRE–CAMROSE The Bailey Buckaroos; 2pm; $15 at the Bailey Box Office or online

Classical

YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday

MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH

Classical JUBILEE AUDITORIUM Turandot;

7:30-10:30pm; Starting at $40

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Chris Bruce spins Britpop/

Music Wednesdays at Noon: Hiromi Takahashi and Leanne Regehr (oboe and piano); 12:1012:50pm; Free

DJs

OCT/29

HALLOWEEN

PINT DOWNTOWN Wild Wing

EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR Taco Tuesday with

Wednesdays at the Pint with DJ Thomas Culture; Every Wed, 10pm

UBK PRESENTS

MEFJUS

NOV/5

FUZION! ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS

NOV/10

PRESENTED BY EDMONTON’S NEXTGEN WITH CANADIAN WESTERN BANK

VOLUNTEER PARTY

VINI VICI

W/ GUESTS

NEXTGEN CITY JAM W/ ALUNA GEORGE & GUESTS

NOV/11

UBK PRESENTS

NOV/12

LIVENATION.COM PRESENTS

NOV/15

LIVENATION.COM PRESENTS

SKIITOUR & LUCA LUSH THE STRUTS

W/ GUESTS

COLEMAN HELL W/ RIA MAE

NOV/18

MRG CONCERTS & FOURCE ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT

DRAGONETTE W/ LOWELL

Wednesdays: Wed night party with DJ Alize every Wed; no cover

Punk/Garage/Indie; Every Tue

W/ GUESTS

W/ KASRA - CONRANK - ZEKE BEATS IN NIGHT OF THE LIVING BASSHEADS

BILLIARD CLUB Why wait

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Late Fee; Every Wed

BOY & BEAR THE ROCKY HORROR STEAMPUNK BALL W/ LILITH FAIR AS DR. FRANK N. FURTER

THE STARLITE ROOM IS A PRIVATE VENUE FOR OUR MEMBERS AND THEIR GUESTS. IF YOU REQUIRE A MEMBERSHIP YOU CAN PURCHASE ONE AT THE VENUE PRIOR TO / OR AFTER THE DOOR TIMES FOR EACH SHOW.

RANCH ROADHOUSE DJ Shocker

and Seelo Mondo; Every Wed

OCT/21

FREE ENTRY BEFORE 11PM

OCT/22

STARLITE ROOM IS PROUD TO PRESENT

BLACK MASTIFF

OCT/27

UBK PRESENTS

OCT/28

STARLITE ROOM IS PROUD TO PRESENT

MR. BILL LIKE PACIFIC

W/ RARITY, BROADSIDE, CALLING ALL CAPTAINS

Mondays; 8-11pm SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Monday Jam with $4 Bill; Every Mon, 8-11pm

FUZION! TAKEOVER W/ BAD GUYS (UK), THE MOTHERCRAFT, DJAGG WIRE

ON THE ROCKS Killer Karaoke

TAVERN ON WHYTE Soul,

GAS PUMP Saturday Jam; 3-7pm

Live music Wednesday's; Every Wed

MRG CONCERTS & FOURCE ENTERTAINMENT PRESENT

DRESS CODE IN EFFECT: COSTUME OR FORMAL. NO JEANS OR SWEATS. NO PROPS.

9pm

Psyturdays: various DJs; 9pm Motown, Funk, R&B and more with DJs Ben and Mitch; every Sat; 9pm-2am

TILTED KILT PUB AND EATERY

with guests; 8pm (doors), 9pm (show); $25; 18+ only Session: Grumpy Dan and The Jazz Curmudgeons; 7:30pm (door), 8pm (show); $5

HALLOWEEN

NEW WEST HOTEL Trick Ryder;

Magness; 7:30-9:30pm; $37-$41

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE

STARLITE ROOM Boy & Bear

OCT/28

Mon, 9pm

FESTIVAL PLACE Janiva

The Dabs, Neiva Nyx and guests; 8pm; No minors

Dave's Rock & Roll Renegade Jam; 7:30pm

Roll Jam with Gator & Friends; 7:30pm

STIFF LITTLE FINGERS

7-11pm

Fiddlers Association: Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm

DV8 Bad Communicators with

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Rock n'

ON THE ROCKS Turn't Up Tuesday

BRIXX BAR Black Mastiff with

CAFE BLACKBIRD Pete Turland

hosted by dueling piano players

DJ Bad Fad

night; Every Mon, 9pm; Free

guests Bad Guys and more; 9pm (doors); $10; 18+ only

9pm

DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Karaoke

Know...: Deep House and disco with Junior Brown, David Stone, Austin, and guests; every Sat

THE PROVINCIAL PUB Karaoke

O’BYRNE’S Guinness Celtic jam

Ukulele Circle; 6pm; Free

week with a different band each week; 9pm

presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; Guests and newcomers always welcome; every Wed, 7pm; $2 (donation, per person), free coffee available Wednesday

Series 2: Martin Karlicek, piano; 7:30pm

OCT/25

9pm

Hour featuring Infinity Trio; 5:30pm • Big Dreamer Jam featuring Dana Wylie; 8pm

MUTTART HALL ERS Main

JUBILEE AUDITORIUM Turandot;

Hour featuring Troy Snaterse; 5:30pm • A Fun Night Out to Support the Biletski FamilyThe Fronts; 8pm; $75 (adv)

LIVENATION.COM PRESENTS

W/ THE REAL SICKIES

NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Happy

NEW WEST HOTEL Trick Ryder;

Sunday Happening Jam featuring The Todd James Band; 4pm

OCT/22

Kraziness with host Ryan Kasteel; 8pm-2am

featuring host Naomi Carmack and guest; 9pm; No cover

$15 (adv)

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair of the Dog: Braden Gates; 4-6pm; no cover

HAVE MERCY Whiskey

RICHARD'S PUB Mark Ammar's Sunday Sessions Jam; Every Sun, 4-8pm

YARDBIRD SUITE Parker Abbott

CONVOCATION HALL Intriguing Melodies: presented by the Edmonton Chinese Philharmonica; 7:30pm

GAS PUMP Karaoke; 9:30pm

KELLY'S PUB Open Stage:

TWIST ULTRA LOUNGE Mikey

Classical

DV8 Chaos Disorder and Panic with The Washout and guests; 8pm; No minors

KRUSH ULTRALOUNGE Karaoke

ARCADIA BAR Taylor Brostrom with guests; 9pm; $10

BAILEY THEATRE–CAMROSE Lion, Bear, Fox; 8pm; $25 (adult) $15 (student) at the Bailey Box Office or online

DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY Wed open mic with host Duff Robison; 8pm

FIDDLER'S ROOST Fiddle Jam

UNION HALL The Fall Fete; 10pm;

Weyes and the Atta Boys; 9pm

YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artist from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations; Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm • Wednesday Night Jazz; Every Wed, 9pm

with Live Elvis Impersonator; Every Tue

Classical

Trio; 7pm (doors), 8pm (show); $22 (members), $26 (guests)

songwriter jam; Every Wed, 8pm

Shukov; 8pm; $10 (adv)

9pm; Free

ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Amie

9pm

Wednesdays Live Piano Karaoke featuring the Fab Tiff Hall; Every Wed, 8:30pm

THE BUCKINGHAM Mauno with

Stayin' Alive - Male Voices Concert; 2:30pm; $30 (adult), $25 (student/senior)

APEX CASINO Persons of Interest;

BLUES ON WHYTE Sam Spades;

Mourning Light Metal Festival; $25-$60

Fingers with guests The Real Sickies; 7pm (doors); $37.50; 18+ only Wong and his lineup of guest DJs

WED OCT 26

BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Sunday Jazz Brunch - PM Bossa; 9am2:30pm; Cover by donations. Please bring cash for the musicians

NOV/12 SAVAGE HENRY AND THE STARLITE ROOM IS PROUD TO PRESENT

INFAMOUS ONE POUNDERS

SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE The

1975; 7pm; $45

W/ THE PREYING SAINTS, THE NIELSENS

SHERLOCK HOLMES–U OF A

Open Mic Night hosted by Adam Holm; Every Mon SIDELINER’S PUB Singer/

Songwriter Monday Night

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

MUSIC 17


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

COMEDY Black Dog Freehouse • 10425-82 Ave • Underdog Comedy Show • Every Thu

Century Casino • 13103 Fort Rd • 780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:30-9pm

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Fri-Sat: 8:30pm • Marvin Krawczyk; Oct 21-22 • Bob Angeli; Oct 28-29

Comic Strip • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999 • Eddie Ifft; Oct 19-23 • J Chris Newberg; Oct 26-30 • Bret Ernst; Nov 2-6 • Piff the Magic Dragon Special Presentation; Nov 10-13

Danny Bhoy commonwealth comedian • Enmax Hall, Winspear Centre, 4 Sir

Brazilian Zouk Dance • Spazio Performativo, 10816-95 St • 780.974.4956 • hello@ludiczouk.com • ludiczouk.com • Drop in and check out a totally painless partner dance class. No partner required • Every Wed, Sep 28Dec 7, 6:30-8pm

DeepSoul.ca • 780.217.2464; call or text for Sunday jam locations • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins on Les Paul Standard guitars; Pink Floydish originals plus great Covers of Classics: some FREE; Twilight Zone Lively Up Yourself Tour (with DJ Cool Breeze); all ages

Drop-In D&D • Hexagon Board Game Café, 10123 Whyte Ave • 780.757.3105 • info@ thehexcafe.com • thehexcafe.com • An epic adventure featuring a variety of pre-made characters, characters that guests can make on their own, or one that has already been started. Each night will be a single campaign that fits in a larger story arc. For all levels of gamers and those brand new or experienced to D&D • Every Tue, 7pm • $5

Drop-In Dance & Movement Classes • Spazio Performativo, 10816-95 St • admin@ milezerodance.com • milezerodance.com • Drop-in classes. For all ages and experience levels. Mon-Thu & Sun • Runs until Dec 18, 10am-5pm • $15 (regular), $12 (members), $100 (10-class card)

EDMONTON OUTDOOR CLUB (EOC)

Winston Churchill Square • 780.428.1414 • winspearcentre.com • Oct 23, 8pm • $39.50$45.50

• edmontonoutdoorclub.com • Offering a variety of fun activities in and around Edmonton • Free to join; info at info@ edmontonoutdoorclub.com

DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • Voted "Vue

Edmonton Stamp Club • St. Joseph

Weekly Best Comedy Night in Edmonton". Stand up comedy open mic hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm (8:30pm sign-up)

El Comedy • El Cortez Mexican Kitchen + Tequila Bar, 8230 Gateway Blvd • Hosted by Dion Arnold with weekly headliners & guest comics • Every Wed, 7pm (door), 7:30pm (show) • No cover Empress Ale House • 9912-82 Ave • Empress Comedy Night: Highlighting the best stand-up Edmonton has to offer. New headliner every week • Every Sun, 9pm • Free

The Irrelevant Show • Muttart Hall, MacEwan Alberta College Campus, 10050 McDonald Dr • An evening of all-new comedy sketches and songs for CBC’s award-winning, sketch comedy, radio program • Oct 21, 7:30pm • $30

laugh for life gala 2016 • Enmax Hall, Winspear Centre, 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square • 780.428.1414 • winspearcentre. com • Featuring comedian Mark Lowry • Oct 22, 7pm • $57.50-$79.50

Odd Wednesday • Sewing Machine

High School, 10830-109 St, main floor cafeteria • edmontonstampclub.com • Get into a new hobby. Featuring circuit books, catalogues and packets that can be browsed and lectures • Oct 24, 7:30-9:30pm

Flamenco Dance Classes (Beginner or Advanced) • Dance Code Studio, 10575-115 St NW #204 • 780.349.4843 • judithgarcia07@gmail.com • Every Sun, 11:30am-12:30pm

FOOD ADDICTS • Alano Club (& Simply Done Cafe), 10728-124 St • 780.718.7133 (or 403.506.4695 after 7pm) • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm

Fort Saskatchewan 45+ Singles Coffee Group • A&W, 10101-88 Ave, Fort Saskatchewan • 780.907.0201 (Brenda) • A mixed group, all for conversation and friendship • Every Sun, 2pm

Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Information Night • Habitat for Humanity Prefab Shop, 14135-128 Ave • 780.451.3416 ext. 236 • vbatten@hfh.org • hfh.org/volunteer/vin • Learn about taking the next steps and what opportunities are available at Habitat for Humanity • Every 3rd Thu of the month, excluding Dec; 6-7pm • Free

Rouge Lounge • 10111-117 St • Comedy

Lotus Qigong • SAGE downtown 15

Wes Barker • Festival Place, 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park • 780.449.3378 • festivalplace.ab.ca • Magic, comedy and stunts. • Oct 22, 7:30pm • $20

Groups/CLUBS/meetings Aikikai Aikido Club • 10139-87 Ave, Old Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue, Thu; 7-9pm

Amnesty International Edmonton

Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.695.4588 • Attendees can raise their vital energy with a weekly Yixue practice • Every Fri, 2-3:30pm • Free

Monday Mingle • Hexagon Board Game Cafe, 10123 Whyte Ave • 780.757.3105 • info@thehexcafe.com • thehexcafe.com • Meet new gamers. Go to the event solo or with a group • Every Mon, 5-11pm • $5 (one drink per person)

Northern Alberta Wood Carvers Association • Duggan Community Hall,

• 8307-109 St • amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org • edmontonamnesty.org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug, Dec) • Free

3728-106 St • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

Argentine Tango Dance at Foot Notes Studio • Foot Notes Dance Studio

10729-104 Ave • 780.452.8211 • happyharborcomics.com • Open to any skill level. Meet other artists and writers, glean tricks of the trade and gain tips to help your own work, or share what you've already done • 2nd and 4th Thu of every month, 7pm

(South side), 9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pm-midnight • $15

Babes In Arms • The Carrot, 9351-118 Ave • A casual parent group • Every Fri, 10am-12pm

BOARD GAMES NIGHT • Carrot Community Arts Coffeehouse, 9351-118 Ave • Oct 25, 7-9pm

18 AT THE BACK

Open Door Comic Creator Meetings • Happy Harbor Comics,

Organization for Bipolar Affective Disorder (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm 0651, obad@shaw.ca; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

Roda de Capoeira • Capoeira Academy, #103-10324-82 Ave • capoeiraacademy.ca • Brazil's traditional game of agility and trickery • Every Sat, 2:30pm • Free • All ages

Sacred Circle Dance • Riverdale Hall, 9231-100 Ave • Dances are taught to a variety of songs and music. No partner required • Every Wed, 7-9pm • $10

Schizophrenia Society Family Support Drop-in Group • Schizophrenia Society of Alberta, 5215-87 St • 780.452.4661 • schizophrenia.ab.ca • The Schizophrenia Society of Alberta offers a variety of services and support programs for those who are living with the illness, family members, caregivers, and friends • 1st and 3rd Thu each month, 7-9pm • Free

Scrambled YEG • Brittany's Lounge, 10225-97 St • 780.497.0011 • Open Genre Variety Stage: artist from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations • Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm

Seventies Forever Music Society

Factory, 9562-82 Ave • debutantescomedy@ gmail.com • thedebutantes.ca • A sketch (and other) comedy showcase featuring local, national and international acts. Hosted by the Debutantes • Every 2nd Wed starting Oct 12, 8:30-11pm • $5 Groove every Wed; 9pm

Painting for Pleasure • McDougall United Church, 10086 Macdonald Drive (south entrance) • 780.428.1818 • karenbishopartist@gmail.com • mcdougallunited.com • Welcomes artists to join this weekly group who like to paint, draw or otherwise be creative on paper • Every Thu, 10am-noon

• Call 587.520.3833 for location • deepsoul. ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm

Sugar Foot Ballroom • 10545-81 Ave • 587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Friday Night Stomp!: Swing and party music dance social every Fri; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check web; $10, $2 (lesson with entry) • Swing Dance Social every Sat; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check the Sugar Swing website for info • $10, $2 lesson with entry

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY (TOPS) • Grace United Church annex, 6215-104 Ave • 780.479-8667 (Bob) • bobmurra@telus.net • Low-cost, fun and friendly weight loss group • Every Mon, 6:30pm

Toastmasters • Chamber Toastmasters Club: 6th floor, World Trade Centre, 9990 Jasper Ave; Contact: 780.462.1878/RonChapman@shaw.ca (Ron Chapman); 780.424.6364/dkorpany@ telusplanet.net (Darryl Korpany); Meet every Thu from Sep-Jun, 6-7:45pm • Club Bilingue Toastmasters Meetings: Campus St. Jean: Pavillion McMahon; 780.667.6105 (Willard); clubbilingue.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 7pm • Conquer Your Fear of Public Speaking: Norwood Legion, 11150-82 St; 780.902.4605; norwoodtoastmasters.org; Every Thu, Oct 13Jun 29, 7:30-9:30pm; Guests are free • Fabulous Facilitators Toastmasters Club:

2nd Fl, Canada Place Rm 217, 9700 Jasper Ave; Carisa: divdgov2014_15@outlook. com, 780.439.3852; fabulousfacilitators. toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 12:05-1pm • Generating Power Speakers: EPCOR Tower, 10423-101 St NW: Meeting will take place on the 8th floor, 780.392.5331 (Phil); 1st and 3rd Tue each month, 12:05-1:05pm • N'Orators Toastmasters Club: Lower Level, McClure United Church, 13708-74 St: meet every Thu, 6:45-8:30pm; contact vpm@ norators.com, 780.807.4696, norators.com • Terrified of Public Speaking: Norwood Legion Edmonton, 11150-82 St NW; Every Thu until Jun, 7:30-9:30pm; Free; contact jnwafula@ yahoo.com; norwoodtoastmasters.org • Y Toastmasters Club: Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); 780.437.1136 (Mark) or 780.463.5331 (Antonio); yclubtoastmasters@gmail.com; Meet every Tue starting in Sep, 7-9pm except last Tue each month

Waskahegan Trail Association Guide Hike • waskahegantrail.ca • Blackfoot Islet Lake: Superstore Calgary Trail NW corner parking lot, 5019 Calgary Trail NW; Oct 23, 9am-3pm

Wiccan Assembly • Ritchie Hall, 7727-98 St • The Congregationalist Wiccan Assembly of Alberta meets the 2nd Sun each month (except Aug), 6pm • Info: contact cwaalberta@gmail.com

LECTURES/Presentations Edmonton Podcasting MeetUp • Variant Edition, 10132-151 St NW • 780.452.9886 • variantedmonton.com • Oct 23, 1pm

Glass ​Blowing ​C​lasses ​• Pixie Glassworks, 9322-60 Ave • 780.436.4460 • pixieglassworks.com/pages/classes • Offering three levels in each of: hollow body work, implosions, sculpture, pipe-making and beads. Call to book. No classes on holidays • Every Mon, Wed-Thu, 6-9pm • $150

The Honourable Paul Hellyer • Central Lions Recreation Centre, 11113-113 St • He will outline a bold plan to create a powerful stimulus to revive the economy, build a new environmentally sustainable infrastructure nationwide, elevate the health sector, create new jobs and more • Oct 26, 6:30-9:30pm

QUEER Affirm Group • garysdeskcom@hotmail. com • mcdougallunited.com • Part of the United Church network supporting LGBTQ men and women • Meet monthly at Second Cup, Edmonton City Centre for coffee and conversation at 12:30pm; Special speaker events are held throughout the year over lunch at McDougall Church

Evolution Wonderlounge • 10220103 St • 780.424.0077 • yourgaybar.com • Mon: Drag Race in the White Room; 7pm • Wed: Monthly games night/trivia • Thu: Happy hour, 6-8pm; Karaoke, 7-12:30am • Fri: Flashback Friday with your favourite hits of the 80s/90s/2000s; rotating drag and burlesque events • Sat: Rotating DJs Velix and Suco • Sun: Weekly drag show, 10:30pm G.L.B.T.Q Seniors Group • S.A.G.E Bldg, main floor Cafe, Or in confidence oneon-one in the Craft Room • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance. One-on-one meetings are also available in the craft room • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: Tuff69@telus.net

Illusions Social Club • Pride Centre, 10608-105 Ave • 780.387.3343 • pridecentreofedmonton.org • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7-9pm Pride Centre of Edmonton • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • Drop in hours: Mon, Wed 4-7pm; Fri 6-9pm; Closed Sat-Sun and Holidays • JamOUT: Music mentorship and instruction for youth aged 12-24; Every other Tue, 7-9pm • Equal Fierce Fit & Fabulous: recreational fitness program, ages 12-24; every other Tue, 6-8pm, every other Tue • Queer Lens: weekly education and discussion group open to everyone; every Wed, 7-8:30pm • Mindfulness Meditation: open to everyone; every Thu, 6-6:50pm • Men's Social Circle: A social support group for all male-identified persons over 18 years of age in the LGBT*Q community; 1st and 3rd Thu each month; 7-9pm • TTIQ (18+ Trans* Group): 2nd Mon of the month, 7-9pm • Art & Identity: exploring identity through the arts, a wellness initiative; Every other Fri, 6-9pm • Edmonton Illusions: cross-dressing and transgender group 18+; 2nd Fri of each month, 7-9pm • Movies & Games Night: Every other Fri, 6-9pm • Thought OUT: Altview’s all-ages discussion group; every Sat, 7-9pm • Seahorse Support Circle: facilitated meet up for families with trans and gender creative kids aged 5-14; 2nd Sun of the month, 3-5pm • Men Talking with Pride: Social discussion group for gay and bisexual men; Every Sun, 7-9pm

St Paul's United Church • 11526-76 Ave • 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

Team Edmonton • Various sports and recreation activities • teamedmonton. ca • Bootcamp: Garneau School, 10925-87 Ave; Most Mon, 7-8pm • Swimming: NAIT Swimming Pool, 11665-109 St; Every Tue, 7:30-8:30pm and every Thu, 7-8pm • Water Polo: NAIT Swimming Pool, 11665-109 St; Every Tue, 8:30-9:30pm • Yoga: New Lion's Breath Yoga Studio, #301,10534-124 St; Every Wed, 7:30-9pm • Taekwondo: near the Royal Gardens Community Centre, 4030-117 St; Contact for specific times • Abs: Parkallen Community League Hall, 6510-111 St; Every Tue, 6-7pm and Thu, 7:15-8:15pm • Dodgeball: Royal Alexandra Hospital Gymnasium; Every

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

Sun, 5-7pm • Running: meet at Kinsmen main entrance; Every Sun, 10am • Spin: Blitz Conditioning, 10575-115 St; Every Tue, 7-8pm• Volleyball: Stratford Elementary School, 8715153 St; Every Fri, 7-9 • Meditation: Edmonton Pride Centre, 10608-105 Ave; 3rd Thu of every month, 5:30-6:15pm • Board Games: Underground Tap & Grill, 10004 Jasper Ave; One Sun per month, 3-7pm • All Bodies Swim: Bonnie Doon Leisure Centre, 8468-81 St; One Sat per month 4:30-5:30pm

SPECIAL EVENTS Alberta Heritage Savings Trust Fund Public Meeting • Edmonton Federal Building, 2nd floor, 9820-107 St • committees@assembly.ab.ca • assembly. ab.ca • A public meeting. The public is encouraged to attend the meeting and take part in the discussion about the status and future of the Fund • Oct 27, 7-9pm 8 Free

Are You Afraid of the Dark? Halloween Haunting at the Museum • 6426-40 Ave, Wetaskiwin •780.312.2065 • history.alberta.ca/reynolds • The lights are out but staff are there, haunting the gallery and looking for guests. Tour the gallery in the dark, play hauntingly funny games and have a fright • Oct 29, 8pm

Boo at the Zoo • Edmonton Valley Zoo • valleyzoo.ca • Science experiments, crafts, extinct animal graveyard, Witch’s Den • Oct 23, 11am-4pm Edmonton Fall Home Show • Edmonton EXPO Centre, 7515-118 Ave • edmontonfallhomeshow.com • The show for every home. From renovation overhaul to brand-new build, and DIY do-over to one-day décor dreams. The event comes complete with more than 200 trusted brands and local companies • Oct 21-23 • $5-$12 (kids 12 and under are free) Edmonton Ski Club Winter Equipment Sale @ Edmonton Ski & Snowboard Show • Edmonton EXPO Centre • edmontonskiclub.com • Find newto-you equipment at unbeatable prices • Oct 22-23

Game-A-Lot 2016 • St. Albert Family Resource Centre, St Albert • gamealot.ca/wp • A two and a half days of table top gaming madness. Featuring Board games, dice, cards, strategy and more. Friendly for the families • Oct 21-23 • $30 (weekend), $20 (single day) Headless Hallowe’en • Carrot Community Arts Coffeehouse, 9351-118 Ave • 780.471.1580 • volunteer@thecarrot.ca • thecarrot.ca • Trick or treat?! Prizes for best costume. Join in for fire pits, marshmallows, music, games, and more spooky fun. A licensed event • Oct 29, 7pm • Free Lost Mummy • Muttart Conservatory, 9626-96A St • 311 • edmonton.ca • Get into the Halloween spirit by dressing up in costume and come for fun crafts and activities. Perfect for those looking for a less frightful Halloween • Oct 30, 11am-3pm

Refinery Danse Macabre • Art Gallery of Alberta • youraga.ca/refinery • Celebrate the darker side of Refinery this Halloween with Danse Macabre–The Dance of the Dead. Taking inspiration from current exhibitions, this Refinery late-night art party conjures ideas of morality and mortality. Revel in the pleasures of life while being seduced by darkness at your AGA’s elegant Halloween party • Oct 29, 9pm • $45/$35 (AGA Members/$22.50 Ultra)

Rocky Horror Steampunk Ball • Starlite Room, 10030-102 St NW • bit. ly/2eyURzI • Gather up your fishnets and gold shorts, don your best party attire, and brush up on your Transylvanian Twist. Featuring Punch Drunk Cabaret and Lilith Fair as Dr. Frank N. Furter. 18+ only • Oct 28, 9pm • $40 (online at starliteroom.ca or at Blackbyrd Myoozik)

Sustainability Awareness Week • University of Alberta • sustainability.ualberta. ca/saw • A chance to explore dozens of social, environmental and economic challenges and solutions • Oct 24-28, 11:30am-8pm • Free (some require registration)


FREEWILLASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the 1980s, two performance artists did a project entitled A Year Tied Together at the Waist. For 12 months, Linda Montano and Tehching Hsieh were never farther than eight feet away from each other, bound by a rope. Hsieh said he tried this experiment because he felt very comfortable doing solo work, but wanted to upgrade his abilities as a collaborator. Montano testified that the piece "dislodged a deep hiddenness" in her. It sharpened her intuition and gave her a "heightened passion for living and relating." If you were ever going to engage in a comparable effort to deepen your intimacy skills, Aries, the coming weeks would be a favorable time to attempt it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming weeks would you prefer that we refer to you as "voracious"? Or do you like the word "ravenous" better? I have a feeling, based on the astrological omens, that you will be extra super eager to consume vast quantities of just about everything: food, information, beauty, sensory stimulation, novelty, pleasure, and who knows what else. But please keep this in mind: Your hunger could be a torment or it could be a gift. Which way it goes may depend on your determination to actually enjoy what you devour. In other words, don't get so enchanted by the hypnotic power of your longing that you neglect to exult in the gratification when your longing is satisfied. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When the wind blows at ten miles per hour, a windmill generates eight times more power than when the breeze is five miles per hour. Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect there will be a similar principle at work in your life during the coming weeks. A modest increase in effort and intensity will make a huge difference in the results you produce. Are you willing to push yourself a bit beyond your comfort level in order to harvest a wave of abundance? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cuthbert Collingwood (17481810) had a distinguished career as an admiral in the British navy, leading the sailors under his command to numerous wartime victories. He was also a goodnatured softie whose men regarded him as generous and kind. Between battles, while enjoying his downtime, he hiked through the English countryside carrying acorns, which he planted here and there so the "Navy would never want for oaks to build the fighting ships upon which the country's safety depended." (Quoted in Life in Nelson's Navy, by Dudley Pope.) I propose that we make him your role model for the coming weeks. May his example inspire you to be both an effective warrior and a tender

ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

soul who takes practical actions to plan for the future. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Eighteenth-century musician Giuseppe Tartini has been called "the godfather of modern violin playing." He was also an innovative composer who specialized in poignant and poetic melodies. One of his most famous works is the Sonata in G Minor, also known as the Devil's Trill. Tartini said it was inspired by a dream in which he made a pact with the Devil to provide him with new material. The Infernal One picked up a violin and played the amazing piece that Tartini transcribed when he woke up. Here's the lesson for you: He didn't actually sell his soul to the Devil. Simply engaging in this rebellious, taboo act in the realm of fantasy had the alchemical effect of unleashing a burst of creative energy. Try it! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The planets have aligned in a curious pattern. I interpret it as meaning that you have cosmic permission to indulge in more self-interest and self-seeking than usual. So it won't be taboo for you to unabashedly say, "What exactly is in it for me?" or "Prove your love, my dear" or "Gimmeee gimmeee gimmee what I want." If someone makes a big promise, you shouldn't be shy about saying, "Will you put that in writing?" If you get a sudden urge to snag the biggest piece of the pie, obey that urge. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the course of her long career, Libran actress Helen Hayes won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony. Years before all that glory poured down on her, she met playwright Charles MacArthur at a party in a posh Manhattan salon. Hayes was sitting shyly in a dark corner. MacArthur glided over to her and slipped a few salted peanuts into her hand. "I wish they were emeralds," he told her. It was love at first sight. A few years after they got married, MacArthur bought Hayes an emerald necklace. I foresee a metaphorically comparable event in your near future, Libra: peanuts serving as a promise of emeralds. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Welcome to the Painkiller Phase of your cycle. It's time to relieve your twinges, dissolve your troubles, and banish your torments. You can't sweep away the whole mess in one quick heroic purge, of course. But I bet you can pare it down by at least 33 percent. (More is quite possible.) To get started, make the following declaration five times a day for the next three days: "I am grateful for all the fascinating revelations and indispensable lessons that my pain has taught me." On each of the three days after that, affirm this truth five times: "I have learned all I can from my pain, and therefore no longer need its

JONESIN’ CROSSWORD

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“Will Ya Look at the Time?” -- it’s a little off.

reminders. Goodbye, pain." On the three days after that, say these words, even if you can't bring yourself to mean them with complete sincerity: "I forgive everybody of everything." SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For the foreseeable future, you possess the following powers: to make sensible that which has been unintelligible . . . to find amusement in situations that had been tedious . . . to create fertile meaning where before there had been sterile chaos. Congratulations, Sagittarius! You are a first-class transformer. But that's not all. I suspect you will also have the ability to distract people from concerns that aren't important . . . to deepen any quest that has been too superficial or careless to succeed . . . and to ask the good questions that will render the bad questions irrelevant. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the past eleven months, did you ever withhold your love on purpose? Have there been times when you "punished" those you cared about by acting cold and aloof? Can you remember a few occasions when you could have been more generous or compassionate, but chose not to be? If you answered yes to any of those questions, the next three weeks will be an excellent time to atone. You're in a phase of your astrological cycle when you can reap maximum benefit from correcting stingy mistakes. I suggest that you make gleeful efforts to express your most charitable impulses. Be a tower of bountiful power. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1415, a smaller English army defeated French forces at the Battle of Agincourt in northern France. Essential to England's victory were its 7,000 longbowmen -- archers who shot big arrows using bows that were six feet long. So fast and skilled were these warriors that they typically had three arrows flying through the air at any one time. That's the kind of high-powered proficiency I recommend that you summon during your upcoming campaign. If you need more training to reach that level of effectiveness, get it immediately. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let's imagine your life as a novel. The most recent chapter, which you'll soon be drawing to a close, might be called "The Redemption of Loneliness." Other apt titles: "Intimacy with the Holy Darkness" or "The Superpower of Surrender" or "The End Is Secretly the Beginning." Soon you will start a new chapter, which I've tentatively dubbed "Escape from Escapism," or perhaps "Liberation from False Concepts of Freedom" or "Where the Wild Things Are." And the expansive adventures of this next phase will have been made possible by the sweet-and-sour enigmas of the past four weeks. V

Across

1 Language in which many websites are written 5 Favreau’s “Swingers” costar 11 Internet connection problem 14 “Summertime” from “Porgy and Bess,” e.g. 15 Where tigers may be housed 16 Notre Dame coach Parseghian 17 Vessel even smaller than the one for shots? 19 Airline based in Stockholm 20 Marching band event 21 Capulet murdered by Romeo [spoiler alert!] 23 Prepare lettuce, perhaps 24 Community org. with merit badges 26 “Let It Go” singer 27 Gallagher of Oasis 28 Badtz-___ (penguin friend of Hello Kitty) 30 She voices Dory 31 Bow (out) 32 Component of a restaurant’s meat-eating challenge? 34 Reveal accidentally 35 “I like 5 p.m. better than 11 p.m. for news”? 39 “CSI” theme song band, with “The” 42 National who lives overseas, informally 43 Dye holders 44 Word said by Grover when close to the camera 45 Canning needs 46 Marker, e.g. 47 Hawk’s high hangout 48 Big baking potatoes 50 It may be printed upside-down 52 Nyan ___ 53 What the other three theme entries do? 57 Scarfed down 58 Accessed, with “into” 59 Pomade, e.g. 60 Primus frontman Claypool 61 Tony and Edgar, for two 62 Website specializing in the vintage and handmade

6 Heavenly creature, in Paris 7 Contract ender? 8 Wu-Tang member known as “The Genius” 9 Ground-cover plant 10 Inquisitive 11 French explorer who named Louisiana 12 Body of water between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan 13 It’s filled at the pump 18 Just a ___ (slightly) 22 Sing like Ethel Merman 23 Nestle ___-Caps 24 Bond, before Craig 25 Naturally bright 28 Sole syllable spoken by the geek on “American Horror Story: Freak Show” (and Beaker on “The Muppets”) 29 Working 30 Cable channel launched in 1979 32 Arcade machine opening 33 “Vaya con ___” 35 Spiral-shaped 36 Get rusty 37 Some newsbreaks 38 Certain allergic reaction 39 Never existed 40 Coiffures 41 Rock worth unearthing 44 Windham Hill Records genre 46 “Rubbish!” 47 Pokemon protagonist Ketchum 49 Bi- times four 50 Like Scotch 51 Flanders and his name-diddlyamesakes 54 Org. for analysts 55 Home of “Ask Me Another” 56 Double agent, e.g. ©2016 Jonesin' Crosswords

Down

1 “Black Forest” meat 2 Portishead genre 3 Mosque adjunct 4 Winner’s wreath 5 Competed (for)

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

AT THE BACK 19


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AT THE BACK 21


SEX-OLOGY

tami-lee duncan tami-lee@vueweekly.com

Trump’s ‘locker room talk’ #NotOkay Sexology columnist bids farewell, but not without some parting shots at the Donald

D

onald Trump. The very fact of his existence makes me irrepressibly angry. Somehow this week, that anger reached a whole new level when I heard the Republican nominee gleefully describe how his celebrity status entitles him to sexually molest women. Even more preposterous and offensive was his dismissive “locker room talk” excuse, suggesting that all men talk that way, and his egregiously misogynistic denials of the many accusations from women who he allegedly violated. I fucking hate that guy. But even as I actively will Mr. Trump to suffer in eternal hellfire with no one but Rosie O’Donnell to keep him company, I can see one silver lining of his disgusting existence; the media storm has created a platform for us to talk about sexual assault. As with the public discussions of cases involving Bill Cosby, Jian Ghomeshi, and

Brock Turner etc., the social conversation has once again focused in on the parameters of consent, rape culture, and the systemic misogyny that has long been used to justify casual sexual abuse and subjugation. Most importantly, it has created opportunity for innumerable women to broadcast their own experiences of sexual assault, shedding even more light on the pervasiveness of sexual predation, tearing holes in the distorted logic we’ve historically used to excuse it, and creating a virtual support group for victims everywhere with #NotOkay. There is a profound benefit from an honest and accepting social discourse about sex. For the past two years I have had the privilege of writing for Vue Weekly, and while I’ve greatly enjoyed the stage it’s given me to proselytize about social injustice, more than anything

I’ve valued the opportunity to hear and answer your questions. When I look back at the various inquiries I’ve received, I am filled with a deep compassion and empathy, and I am struck by the consistency of which my response included the words “that’s pretty normal.” The thing is that most of the sexual issues that people face are “normal”. Whatever the difficulty, it is often the case that the “problem” is not inherent, but rather the result of a belief or idea that leads to shame, embarrassment, unrealistic expectations, unfavourable comparisons, ridiculous social standards, or the internal friction that arises from living inauthentically. What better way to combat these issues than cultivating an accepting, honest, and open social dialogue about sex? Every day I meet with people and hear their heartbroken accounts of difficulty, and it is my job to help

them to deconstruct the issue and work to improve it. Every day, I tell people that their issue is common and that they have nothing to be ashamed of. This reassurance is necessary because we have neglected to educate people on the realities of sex. And I’m not just talking about institutional failures in sex education, but also the disservice we do when we only speak of sex in polarities— conversations about sex do not have to occur in secretive hushed tones or with the enthusiasm of a character from Sex in the City. There is a whole unsensational middle ground that we neglect, creating a blind spot for healthy understanding and discourse. The fact is that we shouldn’t need a political controversy to trigger conversation. How amazing would it be if there was no awkwardness surrounding sex? If we could stroll into a doctors office and shame-

lessly ask for an STI screen, or if we casually sat down and chatted with our friends about fluctuating sex drive and an occasionally unresponsive penis… How much healthier would we be if we talked about sex with the same informality that we talk about a knee or elbow? Remove the stigma, remove the shame, have an honest conversation—we’ll all be better off. But in the meantime, if you have a concern or if you ever need to talk, you know where to find me. My door is always open. V Tami-lee Duncan is a Registered Psychologist in Edmonton, specializing in sexual health. Please note that the information and advice given above is not a substitute for therapeutic treatment with a licensed professional. For information or to submit a question, please contact tami@transcendpsychological.com. Follow on Twitter @SexOlogyYEG. Dan savage savagelove@vueweekly.com

THE TRUMP TALK

Waiting to pay for my groceries at the market this evening, this guy, stinking of booze, says to my 9-year-old daughter, “Sweetheart, can you put the divider thing there for me?” First, why is some leering grown man calling my child “sweetheart”? He then thumps two huge bottles of vodka down on the belt. I move closer to my daughter; he then reaches his hand over me and wraps his hand around her arm, saying, “Now, you be nice to your Mommy, sweetie.” I pluck his hand off. “Do not touch my child,” I say. My other hand is pressed against my daughter’s ribs, and I can feel her heart POUNDING. “You have a beautiful daughter,” he says. The cashier, whom we know, a guy, looks at me, eyebrows up. I roll my eyes. So pissed. We leave. “I hated that man,” my daughter says once we get in the car. “He smelled bad, I wanted to hit him, if anyone ever does that to me again I’m going to scream.” Here we effing go: “Sometimes you have to be hypervigilant,” I tell my daughter, “because some gross men out there feel they are entitled to touch us.” And then I share my story: “When I was a little girl…” I don’t even remember the first time it happened to me. I don’t remember the last time some pervert rubbed up against me. But that’s what you have to deal with when you are a girl. We have to learn to brush this shit off, to make sure that this endless assault course of predators doesn’t take one bit of your pride, your confidence, or your sense of peace as you walk through this world. I am so angry. We should call this the “Trump

22 AT THE BACK

Talk.” The depressing conversation that every parent needs to have with their little girl about revolting, predatory, entitled men. The Trump Talk. Mother And Daughter Discuss Enraging Realities I’m sorry about what happened to your daughter at the grocery store—I’m sorry about what was done to your daughter by that entitled asshole at the grocery store— but I’m glad you were there with her when it happened. The author Kelly Oxford, in response to Donald Trump’s horrific comments about sexually assaulting women, called on women to tweet about their first assaults under the hashtag #notokay. Oxford’s post went viral— more than a million women responded—and reading through the seemingly endless thread, I was struck by how many women were alone the first time they were assaulted. Oxford herself was alone the first time it happened to her: “Old man on a city bus grabs my ‘pussy’ and smiles at me. I’m 12.” A lot of women I know, including some very close friends, were your daughter’s age the first time it happened to them, MADDER, but they were alone. Tragically, many assumed that they had done something wrong, that they had invited this on themselves somehow, and most didn’t go to their parents for fear of getting into trouble. And when it inevitably happened again, some became convinced they were indeed to blame, that they were bringing this on themselves somehow, because they thought it wasn’t happening to anyone else, just them.

So thank God you were there with your daughter, MADDER, there to pull that asshole’s hand off of her, there to protect her from worse, and there to help her process the experience. And in that car ride home you inoculated your daughter with your message (you are a human being and you have a right to move through this world unmolested) before gross predators could infect her with theirs (you are only an object and we have a right to touch you). I want to live in a world where this sort of thing doesn’t happen to anyone’s daughter, MADDER, but until we do: Every little girl should be so lucky as to have a trusted adult standing by ready to intervene when it does happen. I only wish the grocery store clerk had intervened, too. Regarding your suggestion, MADDER, I’ve received roughly 10 million emails begging me to do for Donald Trump what I did for Rick Santorum: My readers and I redefined santorum (“the frothy mixture of lube and fecal matter that is sometimes the byproduct of anal sex”) and some wanted us to do the same for Trump. People even sent in suggestions: trump is the streak of shit a large turd sometimes leaves on the bottom of the toilet bowl; trump is the snot that sometimes runs out of your nose when you’re giving a blowjob; a trump is a guy so hopelessly inept in bed that no woman (or man) wants him, no matter how rich he is. The suggested new meanings all struck me as trivial and snarky—and I don’t think there’s anything trivial about the racism, sexism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, and violence that Trump has mainstreamed and normalized, and I’m not inclined to snark about it.

And, besides, “trump” already has a slang meaning: It means “to fart audibly” in Great Britain—and that definition is already in the Oxford English Dictionary. And it frankly didn’t seem possible to make Donald Trump’s name any more revolting than he already has. If I may paraphrase the amazing letter the New York Times sent to Trump after he demanded they retract a story about the women he’s assaulted: Nothing I could say in my sex column could even slightly elevate the feelings of disgust decent people experience whenever they hear his name. Mr. Trump, through his own words and actions, has already redefined his last name. But then your e-mail arrived, MADDER, and I set aside the column I was already working on to rush your idea into print. Because your suggestion— that parents call the conversation they need to have with their daughters about predatory and entitled men the “Trump Talk”—is just as fitting and apt as the “frothy mixture” definition of santorum. It’s not trivial and it’s not snarky. It has gravitas, MADDER, and here’s hoping “Trump Talk” isn’t just widely adopted, but universally practiced. Because no little girl who gets groped on a bus or in a grocery store or on a subway or in a classroom should ever have to wonder if she did something wrong.

BIPARTISAN RELATIONS

Big fan, longtime reader and listener, and I need your help. How in the hell can a bipartisan relationship survive this election? Things have gotten so heated that my husband and I recently exploded in an ugly argument. I know I’m not fighting fair— calling him stupid and irresponsible

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

for supporting Trump—and I’m being a shitty partner, and he’s being shitty in response by spouting Clinton conspiracy theories. A huge part of it is that he’s someone who lives to disagree—a true contrarian—and our current political environment has been like manna from heaven for his sense of humour. What advice do you have? We’ve been together for ages and have survived other elections and issues. But, as you know, this one’s different. Struggling After Debate Unlike your husband, SAD, I don’t think there’s anything funny about Donald Trump. I’m going to enjoy watching him lose the election, and I’m going to enjoy watching his hotels and golf courses go out of business one by one, but our politics and public life have been sickened by the poison that is Donald Trump. It’s going to take years for us to recover, SAD, and I just don’t see the humour in it. And personally, SAD, I wouldn’t be able to climb into bed with someone who was planning to vote for Donald Trump. I would be out the door. But if you can’t leave because you love him despite his moral and political bankruptcy, or because leaving isn’t an option for you financially, avoid the subject for the next three weeks, don’t take whatever bait your husband throws out, and try not to gloat too much when Hillary hands Donald his ass on November 8. V On the Lovecast, Dan chats with a law professor about advanced sexual directives: savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter


ALBERTA-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS •• auctions •• AUTO/TOOL/SURPLUS AUCTION. Saturday, October 22, 10 a.m. Autos, tools, trailers, surplus, benches, tents, pressure washers. Scribner Auction, 121 - 15 Ave. (Hiway 14) Wainwright, Alberta. 780-842-5666; www.scribnernet.com. DOMINION GRAPHICS AUCTION. 4451 - 61 Ave. SE, Calgary, Alberta. Tuesday, October 25, 2016, 11 a.m. Selling digital printing & laminating equipment, screen printing, engraving & 3D printer, mechanical, sheet metal & wood working tools, forklift and office equipment. See www. montgomeryauctions.com. 1-800391-6963.

•• career training •• MEDICAL TRAINEES needed now! Hospitals & doctor’s offices need certified medical office & administrative staff! No experience needed! We can get you trained! Local job placement assistance available when training is completed. Call for program details! 1-888-627-0297. ACCOUNTING & PAYROLL trainees needed! Learn to process payroll & use Quickbooks now! No experience needed! Local training gets you job ready asap! Call for details! 1-888-748-4130.

•• coming events •• 26TH ANNUAL Red Deer Christmas Antique Show & Sale. Oct. 22 & 23. Sat. 10 - 5 & Sun. 10 - 4. Westerner Exposition Grounds. Over 350 Sales Tables. Canadiana furniture and collectibles. Carswell’s 403-343-1614.

•• employment •• opportunities SPRUCE POINT PARK Association is accepting applications for the position of Park Manager (Seasonal May 1 - September 15). Spruce Point Park campground and marina facility is located on Lesser Slave Lake approximately 285 kms northwest of Edmonton, Alberta near the Hamlet of Kinuso. For complete package and details call 780-775-3805 or 780-8050801 or email: sprucepointpark@ gmail.com. Closing date: December 15, 2016. INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT SCHOOL. Hands-On Tasks. Start Weekly. GPS Training! Funding & Housing Available! Job Aid! Already a HEO? Get certification proof. Call 1-866-399-3853 or go to: iheschool.com. PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Troyer Ventures Ltd. is a privately owned energy services company servicing Western Canada. All job opportunities include competitive wages, comprehensive benefits package and room for advancement. We are accepting applications at multiple branches for: Professional Drivers (Class 1, 3) and Swampers. Successful candidates will be self-motivated and eager to learn. Experience is preferred, but training is available. Valid safety tickets and current drivers abstract are required. For more information and to apply, please visit our website at: Troyer.ca INTERESTED IN the Community Newspaper business? Alberta’s weekly newspapers are looking for people like you. Post your resume online. FREE. Visit: awna. com/for-job-seekers. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! Indemand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available.

VUEWEEKLY.com | OCT 20 – OCT 26, 2016

Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

•• equipment •• for sale A-STEEL SHIPPING CONTAINERS. 20’, 40’ & 53’. 40’ insulated reefers/freezers. Modifications in offices, windows, doors, walls, as office, living work-shop, etc., 40’ flatrack/bridge. 1-866-528-7108; www.rtccontainer.com.

•• for sale •• METAL ROOFING & SIDING. 37+ colours available at over 55 Distributors. 40 year warranty. 48 hour Express Service available at select supporting Distributors. Call 1-888-263-8254. BEAUTIFUL SPRUCE TREES 4-6 feet, $35 each. Machine planting: $10/tree (includes bark mulch and fertilizer). 20 tree minimum order. Delivery fee $75-$125/ order. Quality guaranteed. 403-820-0961. STEEL BUILDING SALE. “Blowout Sale On Now!” 21X23 $4,998. 25X25 $5,996. 27X27 $6,992. 32X35 $9,985. 42X45 $14,868. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036; www. pioneersteel.ca. SAWMILLS from only $4,397 Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free info & DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext 400OT.

MORE AWNA CLASSIFIEDS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT VUEWEEKLY.COM/ CLASSIFIED AT THE BACK 23


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1095: Princess Death  

Vue Weekly - Issue 1095 - 2016-10-20

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