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#1089 / SEP 8, 2016 – SEP 14, 2016 vueweekly.com

s g n i n e k a w A al

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AT M I T N I E TS G E U S S EX I S L A U NN A R U O Mosquers Film Festival 11 Alee nominated for a CCMA award 21

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HEY HEATHERS,

PUMP UP THE VOLUME AND MEET

MR. ROBOT. Meet Christian Slater September 23-25 • Edmonton EXPO Centre at Northlands 2016 Edmonton Expo guests include:

Alex Kingston

Carlos Valdes

Carrie Fisher

Elizabeth Jill John Henstridge Marie Jones de Lancie

Natalia Dyer

Shannon Purser

Stephen Amell

Gerhard

EdmontonExpo.com

Jae Lee

Mike Sass

For all the latest updates, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. /edmontonexpo @edmontonexpo @edmontonexpoofficial

* STAN LEE will be appearing Friday and Saturday ONLY. All images are copyright their respective creators. The guest list is subject to change.

2 UP FRONT

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

Milivoj Ceran

Pia uerra


ISSUE: 1089 SEPT 8 – SEPT 14, 2016 COVER ILLUSTRATION: CURTIS HAUSER

LISTINGS

ARTS / 9 MUSIC / 24 EVENTS / 26 ADULT / 28 CLASSIFIED / 28

FRONT

4

City councils are eager to get more women involved, but they ‘don’t step up easily’ // 4

DISH

6

Eats on 118 food tour aims to keep foot traffic up in tough economic times // 6

ARTS

7

Juan Ortiz-Apuy explores consumer objects in “Garden of Earthy Delights”// 7

POP

10

Sean “Massive Damage” Dunster rocks the ring at the Alberta Avenue Community Hall // 10

FILM

11

Director Shalini Kantayya offers an optimistic vision of the future in the documentary Catching the Sun // 11

MUSIC

30

Local country singer Alee nominated for a CCMA //30

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VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

.com/arts UP FRONT 3


FRONT

// POLITICS

A WOMAN'S HESITATION City councils are eager to get more women involved, but they 'don't step up easily'

//Illustration by Matt Fontaine

I

n July, after Jason Kenney began his run for the next leader of Alberta’s Progressive Conservative Party, Marie Renaud, the NDP MLA for St. Albert took to Twitter to ask him about his views on abortion. “Just one question for Mr. Kenney, Pro-choice or not?” she asked. This was followed by a second Tweet which read: “I had an abortion and I thank God I was able to. Who wants to change that?"

Last year, another NDP MLA, Maria Fitzpatrick, spoke to the Alberta legislature about the rape and abuse she suffered at the hands of her late husband. That women are impacted by abortion, rape and domestic violence is nothing new. What has changed, though, is that more women are now speaking out about these deeply personal experiences as elected repre-

sentatives. Women politicians have become increasingly visible in the past few years, with three provinces currently led by female first ministers and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau making a point of appointing an equal number of men and women to his first cabinet “because it’s 2015.” But despite the growing visibility of women in government, they remain underrepresented in politics across the country and particularly here at home. In Edmonton, just one woman, Bev Esslinger, sits on Edmonton’s 12-person city council. Calgary’s city council of 14 only has two women, Druh Farrell and Diane Colley-Urquhart. In both cities, there are initiatives to coax more women into running for council seats. In 2014, the City of Edmonton’s City Council established the Women’s Initiative and the Women’s Advocacy Voice of Edmonton (WAVE) Committee to make sure that women’s voices are heard and to encourage women to become involved in local politics. Women face numerous roadblocks when it comes to running for office. They typically have less disposable income than men, as well as additional responsibilities at home, such as childcare, that make running for office complicated. But Marian Bruin, the supervisor of City of Edmonton’s Community Strategies and Development Branch, says that women are often less willing to run on their own initiative. “What we find is that women need to be invited to run or to participate; they don’t just step up that easily,” she says.

That issue was also identified by Ask Her, a grassroots organization that began by encouraging people to ask the woman in their lives to consider running for Calgary city council. Esmahan Razavi, one of the group’s co-founders, says she’s found that women tend to take longer to decide to run, which makes their campaigns less likely to succeed. “A lot of other candidates will have started campaigning much earlier, so they’ll have the funds necessary to run viable campaigns, and they’ll have the name recognition within the wards that they’re running. When a woman finally decides to run, it’s almost too late,” she says. Women tend to be less confident in their political knowledge and abilities than men, and are consequently less interested in running for office. Although the education and wage gaps for women have narrowed, the gap in political confidence and leadership has not. Even women who are highly qualified to run for office are less likely to do so. In their book The Silent Sex, political scientists Christopher Karpowitz and Tali Mendelberg argue that it’s not that women are naturally uninterested in politics, but rather that they receive subtle and not-so-subtle messages from educational institutions and the media that they aren’t suited to leadership positions and are unlikely to succeed. Organizations like Ask Her and the Women’s Initiative aim to counteract that messaging by building women’s confidence. Ask Her is launching a

campaign school for women, while the newly-expanded Women’s Initiative’s “Opening the Potential Program” connects women with city councillors and local MLAs to learn about everything from campaigning to constituent meetings. Together, these organizations are teaching women about the intricacies of running for office as well as providing them with the encouragement and inspiration they require to run. “We’re also hoping to get more women working on campaigns,” says Kaylin Betteridge, the Women’s Initiative Coordinator and a graduate of the Opening the Potential mentorship program. “One of the things we’ve identified as a barrier to women running is them being able to find strong campaign managers and support.” But why go to all the effort? If women aren’t interested in politics, what’s the value in pouring resources into motivating them? For Razavi, one reason to encourage women to run is that it provides voters with more choices. “When half the population doesn’t run, voters miss out on quite a few potentially qualified candidates with interesting ideas and important things to say," she says. "By encouraging women who wouldn’t normally see themselves as candidates to run, we’re giving voters a better choice.” But it’s not just about the election. It turns out that having more women in office is better for society as a whole. Multiple studies have demonstrated that groups reach decisions differently based on gender composition, CONTINUED ON PAGE 5 >>

Singing from the rainbow song book

A deeply sarcastic response to Pastor Coldwell's fears regarding new education policies

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ell, that didn’t take long. A mere two weeks after Education Minister David Eggen published an open letter to Alberta students letting them know that they have rights that deserve to be respected, religious leaders are stepping forward to remind everyone that that’s actually not the case. Last week, CBC reported the heartwarming tale of a pastor desperately trying to protect his religious flock from the scourge of infidels. It seems that Brian Coldwell, chair of the Independent Baptist Christian Education Society, rejects the government’s new sexual orientation and gender identity guidelines and is taking a stand. While Coldwell’s influence is small—the Society runs two schools in Parkland County with an enroll-

4 UP FRONT

ment of about 200—his responsibility is large. There are souls at stake, you see. And religious freedom. And while he doesn’t say this explicitly in the article, it seems to me that Coldwell believes it is his God-given duty – nay, moral obligation! – to stand up to the dictatorial forces of the Ministry of Education. But Coldwell is a gracious man, one who is not full of a pulsing, seething hate that sits under the surface like a pimple about to pop. No, he tells the reporter (Andrea Huncar, local hero) that he’s not saying that the gay community doesn’t have rights (though actions do speak louder than words), he’s just trying to prevent the queers from infecting his flock with our “rainbow ideology.” Rainbow ideology: both the best

new name for a gay bar and cousin to the equally pernicious “homosexual agenda.” All jokes aside, I think we stand at a crossroads, Queermonton. I have to confess to you that I am unable to play this charade any longer. He’s found us out. Pastor Brian Coldwell: you are right, sir! There is indeed a devilish rainbow ideology and it is headed straight your way. And because I feel badly, Pastor Coldwell – my community has been hiding this from you since at least 2003—I want to make it up to you by coming clean about what exactly rainbow ideology entails. (I suppose it’s supposed to be a secret but it is printed inside the cover of the weekly gay newsletter so I guess it’s not that secret.) Under rainbow ideology, you have

to swear allegiance to the rainbow flag, twice a day. Every time you have gay sex somewhere, you have to put a rainbow flag on the door (which is why you see them on doors at universities. Gay sex is rampant at universities. Never go there). Rainbow ideology doesn’t ascribe to gender neutral washrooms. That’s entry level. No, it doesn’t believe in toilets at all: everyone should do their business in a horse trough, together, preferably in a high visibility area. Finally, rainbow ideology forbids hymns and insists that all religious music instead be drawn from the collected catalogues of Freddie Mercury and Ani DiFranco. What can stop it? Nothing can stop it. Before the government releases the funds to support school boards, Rachel Notley herself dips each

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

cheque into a bubbling cauldron of highly concentrated rainbow ideology. Up to 70 percent of your operating budget—that portion that comes from the province—is already infected. I would suggest that you immediately stop accepting any money from the government. In fact, you should probably burn the rest of your money, too: rainbow ideology is highly contagious and spreads faster than you realize. Burn your schools while you are at it. It’s the only way to be sure. (Remember kids: rainbow ideology isn't actually a thing. Please don't burn down your school.) Good luck and Godspeed, Pastor Coldwell. You’re going to need it. ASHLEY DRYBURGH

ASHLEY@VUEWEEKLY.COM


DYERSTRAIGHT

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Don't celebrate just yet

Although ISIS has lost some major cities recently, Turkey could change the game

T

he word on the streets is that Islamic State (ISIS or ISIL to its many enemies) is going under. In January it lost control of the city of Ramadi in Iraq after a long siege; in June it also lost Fallujah. In March it lost Palmyra to Syrian government troops, and last month it lost Manbij in northern Syria to the US-backed Syrian Kurds after another long siege. These are all places that ISIS took in mid-2014 in its initial surge of conquests (which ended with the proclamation of the Islamic State), or in the subsequent year of slower advances that ended with the capture of Ramadi and Palmyra in May 2015. Since then it has been nothing but retreats—and last week Turkey entered the ground war in Syria as well, to fight Islamic State and “other terrorists”. To cap it all, Abu Mohammed alAdnani, the closest associate of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi and the man who proclaimed him to be the head of a revived Caliphate (“Islamic State”) only 26 months ago, was killed in a US air strike on August 30. He was the organization’s chief propagandist and a senior operational commander, and he will be missed. But the streets on which “the word” about Islamic State’s impending de-

A WOMAN’S HESITATION << CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4

and groups with more women tend to behave more collaboratively and reach decisions that are beneficial for both their own in-group as well as other stakeholders. From a policy standpoint, women are more likely to prioritize the protection of vulnerable segments of the population. The reason for these differences isn’t entirely clear—scholars have spent decades debating whether women are somehow intrinsically kinder, gentler and less competitive than men, or whether these differences are the result of socialization. The modern view, summarized by Susan Howell and Christine Day in their study, “Complexities of the Gender Gap,” is that while biology may play a small role, women’s policy preferences are largely driven by childhood socialization, socioeconomic status and their experiences of inequality. In essence, women’s life experiences lead them to have—at least generally speaking—a different outlook on politics. That 'feminine' perspective, long excluded from the halls of power, has the potential to help decision-making bodies, from corporate boards to city council, make better decisions. Thanks to the Women’s Initiative, women’s voices are already have an impact on city policy. When Bev Esslinger, Edmonton councillor, requested a report on transit safety, Edmonton Transit conducted a survey of riders to determine how safe they felt using transit. They brought their results to WAVE, and the women’s committee pointed out a major

feat is being heard are in Washington, not in the Middle East. People on the ground know that things have not been going well for Islamic State recently, but they remember that just one year ago it was Bashar al-Assad’s regime in Syria that was teetering on the brink of collapse. Russia’s military intervention in Syria last September saved Assad, and it will probably be the Turkish military intervention in Syria this year that saves Islamic State. Not that President Recep Tayyib Erdogan loves Islamic State—he used to let it use Turkey as a transit route for recruits and supplies, but that largely stopped a year ago—but he doesn’t see it as Turkey’s main enemy. For Erdogan, the big threat is the secession of the south-east corner of the country where Kurds (20 percent of Turkey’s population) are the local majority. All the countries next to that corner of Turkey (Iran, Iraq

and Syria) also have Kurdish majorities living along the border, and the Turkish nightmare is for one of those areas to become an independent Kurdish-ruled state. That is exactly what has been happening in northern Syria. The Syrian Kurds made themselves available to Washington as America’s main ally on the ground, and with huge help from American air strikes their army has

to dominate the entire Syrian rebel movement. But he didn’t close it, because he was so keen to overthrow Assad that he backed anybody who was fighting against him. Faced with the threat of an Islamistruled Syria, Washington made a de facto alliance with the Syrian Kurds, and they have served it well in the fight against Islamic State. But that just makes them a bigger threat in Erdogan’s eyes, and so he sent his army into Syria last week. Not very deep into Syria so far, and of course to justify this intervention to the United States Erdogan has said that it is to fight “Islamic State and other terrorists”. But since Turkey always officially refers to Washington’s Kurdish allies in Syria as “terrorists”, it doesn’t take great geopolitical insight to figure out who Turkey’s main target is. Islamic State is well aware of this, which is why it evacuated the border town of Jarablus, where the Turkish

But the streets on which ‘the word’ about Islamic State’s impending defeat is being heard are in Washington, not in the Middle East.

flaw in ETS’s study: they had only surveyed people taking transit, and not those who avoided transit due to feeling unsafe. ETS re-evaluated, and with WAVE’s assistance, ultimately launched an anti-harassment campaign on trains and buses as well as providing additional training to operators and transit security around sexual assault. “It worked out really well, because transit ended up working with WAVE, and it was a really good chance for transit to have a win and for WAVE to have some of their objectives met,” says Betteridge. That collaboration points to the importance of having a variety of perspectives, and Razavi points out that while it’s important to encourage women to run, there’s a need for increased diversity on city councils in general. “I’d also like to see more minorities on city council, and I’d like to see people from different backgrounds, with different types of jobs and from different age groups on city council. Having those different perspectives makes city council more representative of the city itself, and sort of allows everyone to feel that they are represented by city council,” she says. The City of Edmonton’s Opening the Potential program begins on September 8, and Betteridge is hoping to have approximately 50 women and gender-variant participants in this year’s class, from a variety of different backgrounds with a wide range of experiences. ALIX KEMP

driven Islamic State back all along the border. It now controls a deep strip of territory along 80 percent of Syria’s border with Turkey, a proto-state that the Kurds call Rojava. This is entirely Erdogan’s fault. If he had been loyal to Turkey’s alliance with the United States and closed the border with Syria, neither Islamic State or the rival Islamist movement, the Nusra Front, would have grown

army crossed into Syria, without a fight. Why not just step aside and let the Turks make contact with their real target, the Syrian Kurdish army, without wasting everybody’s time? Contact has now been made, and Turkey is busily shelling and bombing Kurdish-led forces in Manbij, the next town south from Jarablus. The coming months will probably see a steady expansion of Turkey’s offensive against the Syrian Kurds, and a corresponding drop in the latters’s military effort against Islamic State. Naively (or was it just fake naivete?), US Secretary of State Ash Carter called on Turkey to stay focused on the fight against Islamic State and not to engage the Kurds. Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim curtly replied that “operations will continue until all terrorist elements have been neutralized, until all threats to our borders, our lands and our citizens are completely over.” So the Syrian Kurds will be busy fighting the Turks, and Islamic State will survive. It is an iron rule of Middle Eastern politics that everybody always betrays the Kurds eventually – and Washington will too. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

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UP FRONT 5


DISH

PREVUE // ECLECTIC

World flavours, right on the avenue

Sun, Sept 11 — Wed, Sept 28 Eats on 118 Alberta Ave, $30 alberta-avenue.com

Eats on 118 food tour aims to keep foot traffic up, especially in tough economic times

A

Melanie Dovale, owner of Passion de France

SPIRITEDAWAY

Vietnamese noodle restaurant, a French patisserie and a specialty calzone shop are just a few of the eateries that Edmontonians can explore as part of a new culinary tour series. Starting September 11, foodies can choose from four food tours—one brunch and three dinner options— that take place throughout the month on 118 Avenue, also known as Alberta Ave. Fifteen restaurants, as well as some coffee shops and bakeries, will be taking part. Dubbed “Eats on 118”, the initiative is a collaboration between the City of Edmonton and the Alberta Avenue Business Association to help businesses in the area during tough economic times. “Based on my past experience as a financier of hospitality businesses, when the economy weakens, restaurants—especially smaller familyowned businesses like the ones we

have on the avenue—feel the pinch first,” says Joachim Holtz, executive director of the Alberta Avenue Business Association. “People just don’t go and eat out as much, and are more selective about how many times they go out.” Holtz says the idea is to bring people from all over the city to the avenue, expose them to the large variety of multicultural restaurants, and help build clientele. On each tour, between 20 to 30 people will have the opportunity to sample several menu items and refreshments, as well as take in some entertainment, from at least four different restaurants. Some of the highlights include El Rancho, which offers Salvadorian food and live Spanish guitar music; a Nigerian restaurant called Koultures; and Handy Bakery, which “makes incredible Portuguese butter tarts ev-

SANAM ISLAM

DISH@VUEWEEKLY.COM

TARQUIN MELNYK// TARQUIN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Suffering bastards

This tiki drink will kick your ass with some great history. Packs a wallop too.

I

eryone raves about,” Holtz says. He also recommends Battista’s Calzone, Passion de France and T&D Noodle House. “People love to try different foods, and food is language for us in many ways,” Holtz says. “It’s a great way to come to the avenue and socialize with the owners, who love telling stories about their business, as well as other people on the tour.” He says there has already been a lot of interest in the food tours from the community, with about 90 tickets sold so far. Ultimately, he hopes Eats on 118 will create exposure for the hospitality business on Alberta Avenue. “We’re looking to create a strong brand to use for future food and dining events on the avenue as well.”

t's increasingly argued that during the decades of bad drinks that preceded the craft revival, tiki drinks were one of the only bastions for craft cocktails. This drink does one better. It helped defeat the Nazis. In 2007, Esquire regaled readers with a tale about a cocktail purportedly invented in 1947, for a hungover bar stewart named Joe Scialom, called, "The Suffering Bar Stewart." The tale was that then a Scotsman mispronounced bar stewart as bastard, and it stuck. A cute anecdote

paired with a potent tiki cocktail. But there's a problem. The Atlantic researched the story in 2010, and discovered that not only did Esquire get the naming of the cocktail backwards, it glossed over a way more fascinating history. As Derek Brown, the author of the Atlantic article noted, as a bartender, he'd always shared the wrong story prior to researching it because, "as with most honest people, I only lie in the absence of truth." In the early 1940's, the Second

World War was being fought on most continents. In Africa, the Battle of El Alamein pitted the allies against Nazi Germany. Embattled British soldiers in Cairo would visit the Shepheard Hotel looking to drink away their stress. Head bartender, Joe Scialom recognized good spirits were scarce and came up with a drink called the Suffering Bastard. Scialom's cocktail was a heady mix of underground-market gin, stolen dark spirits, hand-picked limes, "bitters concocted by the chemist

across the street" and bold ginger beer. Perfect to cure what ails you, especially if it was the commonly available cheap booze, or impending death on a battlefield. Keep in mind that the British were losing the war to Germany at that time. Legendary barman Scialom was known to serve most noted figures of the day. Winston Churchill, Charlton Heston, Charles de Gaulle and the Egyptian King Farouk all sat at his bar. During the Battle of El Alamein, German Marshall Erwin Rommel was optimistically quoted as saying: “I’ll be drinking champagne in the master suite at Shepheard’s soon.” Unfortunately for Rommel he was on the wrong side of history and it was Winston Churchill who got to sip cocktails on the Shepheard's Hotel terrace. So many battle hardened Brits sipped on the Suffering Bastard cocktail during the war that the Shepheard's bar became unofficially known as “Joe’s Bar”. Paste magazine uncovered another fascinating tidbit, in 2015. At the height of the battle, Scialom

received a telegram from the frontline: “Can you please send eight gallons of Suffering Bastard, everyone is really hungover.” Scialom filled every container he could find, dispatching any available taxi's to bring the batch to the British soldiers. The Suffering Bastard hinted at the post-war faux-Polynesian style that would take the world by storm. The cocktail was soon served at  Trader Vics  and other  tiki  bars around the world. Scialom became a bar consultant for Hilton Hotels in the postSecond World War years.

30 ml blended scotch whisky or a peaty whisky 30 ml London dry gin 30 ml ginger beer syrup 15 ml lime juice Combine ingredients in shaker. Add ice and shake hard. Pour over crushed ice in a beer sleeve or tiki mug. Garnish with a bitters float and lime hairs. Peychauds provides a vibrant ice cap colour. Ginger beer syrup: Combine 250ml Fresh ginger juice. 500ml (2:1) Sugar Syrup, 2 tablespoons citric acid in a container. Whisk and store ginger syrup cold. Substitute: bold ginger beer. V

Have you heard? roscato is both sweet and delicious.

for food lovers

© 2016 Palm Bay International, Boca Raton, FL.

6 DISH

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016


ARTS

PREVUE // RETRO MINIMALISM

A CONSUMING CULTURE Juan Ortiz-Apuy explores consumer objects in "Garden of Earthy Delights"

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rt is all about consumption. Once created, it’s free to worm its way through our subconscious with its imagery and message. The same is true for the work of Juan Ortiz-Apuy. Born in Costa Rica, he first moved to Montreal in 2003 to attend Concordia University, later moving on to the Glasgow School of Art and NSCAD University. That education has been an advantage for the artist. It has given him an historical literacy that’s made his primary expression, collage—cut-out images arranged into new forms— sumptuous with detail. He flips through artistic eras like a rolodex, calling upon each, in turn with a pictured familiarity. His latest show, the "Garden of Earthly Delights" now at SNAP Gallery, creates bold, retro-minimalist landscapes, though after a moment of conversation, it’s obvious he’d feel comfortable thrown into debate on just about any canon of the 20th century. “Art history is very important in my practice. I often draw from various movements and periods,” he says. “Traditionally, minimalism has been a constant reference, particularly for its relationship to design and com-

modification, but I also always admired its presentation strategies and theatricality.” That theatricality has taken root in Ortiz-Apuy’s latest garden, subverting consumer images at the intersection of surrealism and advertising. “Commodification is indeed a fascination, but not a good thing. I was interested in the use of fantastical imagery for the exploration of the unconscious mind,” Ortiz-Apuy says. “I feel that’s very much how design and advertising operate, and you can see that reflected through the entire installation.” Like most gardens, Ortiz-Apuy’s developed organically, slow-grown as he took in the sights and sounds of Montreal, exploring second-hand shops to familiarize himself, not just with objects, but the people buying them. Knowledge of those interactions, the consumer relationship, he said, helped to form his own thought patterns within the collage. “Often unconsciously, objects tell us how to approach them and how to interact with them. They create a pattern of behaviour and response. This is the realm of design,” he says.

Until Oct 8 Works by Juan Ortiz-Apuy SNAP Gallery

“It definitely takes on a logic of its own and it actually starts telling me what to do next, like a self-generating system.” Still, theory is one thing, but the time and physical resources the project consumed left the artist up to his ears in magazines. Armed with every issue of National Geographic published since 1918, Ortiz-Apuy set his razor to sculpting the garden. The experience, he added, has left him with a firm appreciation for detail. Time spent on individual images, dissecting to achieve the perfect display has an effect he calls engaging, a word frequently bandied around his work. “I feel that it succeeds in drawing people in. That is always a vital goal for me, to captivate the audience long enough so that they spend time with something,” he says. “It comes down to the idea of animism. I think material culture very much believes in that, and I would hope it makes viewers think about design and objects differently, not as passive inanimate things, but as animate entities with a will of their own.”

SEAN STEELS

ARTS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

// Image supplied

PREVUE // FAMILY FESTIVAL

Party on, 118th Avenue Dance, music, and interactive installations at Kaleido

Fri, Sept 9–Sun, Sept 11 118 Ave, between 90 Street and 94 Street Free

// Photo supplied

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he end of summer in Edmonton may bring the end of warm weather and patio drinking, but it does not mean the end of festival season. The 11th annual Kaleido Family Arts Festival kicks off this week and marks another historic year for the multi-media event. The festival has come a long way in its 11 years, as “it all started with 12 artists in my living room,” says festival co-director Christy Morin. The open-ended festival on 118 Avenue puts heavy emphasis on fluid audience interaction, and spans multiple disciplines including dance, music, and interactive installations. “We didn’t want to compete with the summer festivals and wanted something special, and isolating the festival to one medium would’ve been

limiting," she says. And the formula must be working, because this year the festival boasts fourteen stages across the neighborhood, a central market for local artisans to sell their wares, and food trucks galore. Along with the unique community -oriented atmosphere comes the talented performances and displays. The attractions at this year’s festival range from Chinese Opera to Ukrainian Shumka Dancers, and numerous musical headliners including the Toronto based folk group Birds of Bellwoods. And no festival would be complete without pancake breakfasts and a beer garden. “We wanted to focus on creative open exploration. One minute you can be swing dancing, and the next

you’ll be sipping juice watching stilt walkers,” she says. The newly added Front Porch Music Series utilizes the neighborhoods front porches as mini venues for multiple artists putting a huge emphasis on the community of Alberta Avenue. At the other end of the fame spectrum, acclaimed New York jazz musician Jacques Schwarz-Bart will be lending his talent to the festival this year. This will be his first time in Edmonton. Schwarz-Bart will play his newly composed works, which put a heavy focus on his youth spent in synagogues and the spiritual melodies that come with it. When asked about his interest in this year’s festival, he says he has an appreciation for artistic and cultural exploration, having multiple ethnic backgrounds himself. “It’s clearly a mixture of cultures and traditions, and celebrates the virility of arts among cultures and everything the modern human being should cherish.” JACOB PESARUK

ARTS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

ARTS 7


Canada MADE IN

2016-2017

AN ARTS & CULTURE CELEBRATION FROM ACROSS THE NATION

STRANGE Brew September 18 2 PM • $10* *General admission. Rating: PG

Casavant SHELDON September 20 2 PM • $15* • St. Albert Community Hall *General admission. Refreshments included.

ROYAL Wood

with opening guest JESSICA MITCHELL

September 23 & 24 7:30 PM • $38 BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL presents

Reels RADICAL September 29

7:30 PM • $20 Adult / $15 Student

MONKEYJUNK September 30 7:30 PM • $38

Mohamed FAHMY Media in the Age of Terror October 1 7:30 PM • $42

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

The Arden Theatre Box Office • 780-459-1542 • ardentheatre.com UP TO 20% OFF. THE MORE YOU BUY, THE MORE YOU SAVE.

8 ARTS

ARTS PREVUE // BURLESQUE

'All body types’

Burlesque Festival celebrates the thriving scene

B

urlesque, boylesque, cabaret, singing, dancing, and clown-play, Edmonton boylesque performer Beau Creep flings out subgenres of theatre performance faster than he can take off his clothes. All of that—and probably a lot more—will be on display at this year’s fourth annual Edmonton Burlesque Festival (EFB), as more than 50 performers take it off at the Royal Alberta Museum Sept 8 to 10. Burlesque performers in Edmonton have fought a hard road for the right to bare nipple pasties, but according to Creep, who is also the festival’s president, victory last year over the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission’s “archaic” nude entertainment restrictions also means that the province’s burlesque scene is thriving and open to more people than ever. “There’s so much diversity. You see all walks of life, all body types, all genders, all ethnicities. You see the gamut of people and seeing that much variety being vulnerable and in various states of undress is exciting,” he says, adding that even conservative audience members often get a kick out of the sometimes slapdash routines. “Burlesque is very much a narrative, and it’s very much a satire that’s rooted in commentary," he says. "It’s blatantly sexual in nature, but it’s not really sexual in execution or when you consider that you’re laughing and emotional during these acts.” The people who think they could never go to a burlesque show are usually "the ones that are most entertained,” he says. Calgary-based burlesque performer and EBF headliner Raven Virginia said that many people assume burlesque is just a simple striptease. In fact, most performers have extensive backgrounds in theatre and performance art. She’s spent the last seven years learning everything from the dance’s extensive history to clown classes—all part of mastering burlesque’s complex and engaging seduction. “Ultimately, in burlesque [audience members] need to be entertained in addition to feeling like they’re the only person in the room with you,” Virginia says.“You can really see when a performer has that kind of revelation, when they drop that veneer and

ARTIFACTS

Thurs, Sept 8 — Sat, Sept 10 Edmonton Burlesque Festival Royal Alberta Museum

$25 to $115

allow themselves to be in the moment and allow someone to experience them.” For Virginia, that experience and vulnerability also links closely to gender politics. A major advocate in the six-year battle with the AGLC, she’s probably one of the few women who can say she’s lectured in a commission office on the right to bare her breasts while actively doing so. “I had a baby while this was happening and went to meet with an AGLC officer with a baby on my breast, literally,” she said. Since then, the AGLC has relaxed regulations, bringing burlesque acts back to the main stage. The victory belongs to Alberta’s entire burlesque community, she added. Many fought tirelessly to help the AGLC realize the difference between the nipple pasties and revealing corsets of burlesque performers and the outright nude dancing of strippers. “[The AGLC] try to dumb it down to being women in sexy outfits who do a set group of moves or a set dance piece—the homogenous type of burlesque that will cause people who don’t understand the history of the movement or its feminist roots,” she says. "Essentially what we were trying to do was educate them about sexuality, rape culture, transgender issues, sexism, gender binaries.” A daunting task, but according to Virginia, the struggle has paid off. The macabre battle with the AGLC has bred a new, tougher breed of burlesque performer in the CalgaryEdmonton corridor. Those performers, she says, now have a flavour and culture that is truly all their own “I look at this scene and wonder how they keep putting up shows and persevering. First it was the AGLC, now it’s the economy. I find their dedication really inspiring. I think that bleeds into their performance.”

SEAN STEELS

ARTS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

JASMINE SALAZAR

// JASMINE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

BLUE REVUE / WED, SEPT 14 (6:30 PM)

MAN UP! BOOTCAMP / THU, SEPT 8 (8 PM)

MAKER’S MARKET 3 / SUN, SEPT 11 (1 PM – 3 PM)

A NIGHT AT THE “DIVE IN” / SUN, SEPT 11 (9 PM)

Let’s talk about sex, baby! Or, rather, let’s watch people engage in (sometimes awkward) coitus at Western Canada’s only pornography-based film festival, hosted by your favourite alt-weekly (read: Vue Weekly). Winners get money, audience members get some laughs. It’s all in good fun. (Metro Cinema at the Garneau, $20)

Remember a time when there was no currency? I don’t either, but you can experience something similar at Harcourt’s Maker’s Market, which allows artists and crafts people to meet, barter and exchange work. (Harcourt House Annex Building [10211 – 112 St], free)

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

Can you slay all day in heels? Well, Joshua Wolchansky of Man Up! is up for the challenge of teaching all genders of all ages the art of dancing in heels. Each month, Wolchansky will teach a new number, while you build up your strength, flexibility and confidence. (Dance Code Studio Inc, $20) The cool dudes and dudettes at Black Dog are hosting a movie night atop their Wooftop patio. Take in the sights and sounds of Edmonton’s busiest street, while watching the B-movie Chillerama, which offers something for every bad taste. The event is 18 and over, so keep the kiddies at home. (Black Dog, free)


ARTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

DANCE DIRT BUFFET CABARET • Spazio Performativo, 10816-95 St • milezerodance.com • Curated by impresario Ben Gorodetsky, this series is geared towards presenting emerging artists of various artistic backgrounds, in a variety show format, with an audience that expects experimentation and unusual juxtapositions. Each show contains 6 acts • Sep 15, 9pm • $10 or best offer at the door

EDMONTON BURLESQUE FESTIVAL • Royal Alberta Museum Theater, 12845-102 Ave • edmontonburlesquefest.com • Celebrating all things Burlesque, vaudeville and fabulous. Bringing together over 50 performers for three days • Sep 8-10

FLAMENCO DANCE CLASSES (BEGINNER OR ADVANCED) • Dance Code Studio, 10575-115 St NW #204 • 780.349.4843 • judithgarcia07@gmail.com • Every Sun, 11:30am-12:30pm

SACRED CIRCLE DANCE • Riverdale Hall, 9231-100 Ave • Dances are taught to a variety of songs and music. No partner required • Every Wed, 7-9pm • $10

SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM • 10545-81 Ave •

• Beauty’s Awakening: Drawings by the Pre-Raphaelites and their Contemporaries from the Lanigan Collection; Jul 23-Nov 13 • JASON DE HAAN: Grey to Pink: Jul 23-Nov 13 • BMO Children’s Gallery: Touch Lab: Leave your Mark: Opens Jul 24 • Every Story Has Two Sides: artwork by Damian Moppett and Ron Moppett; Sep 17-Dec 31 • Open Studio Adult Drop-In: Wed, 7-9pm; $18/$16 (AGA member) • All Day Sundays: Art activities for all ages; Activities, 12-4pm; Tour; 2pm • Late Night Wednesdays: Every Wed, 6-9pm

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St, St Albert • 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert.ca • Reconstructions: artwork by Brenda Danbrook; Sep 1-Oct 29 • Art Ventures: Image Transfers! (Sep 17), 1-4pm; drop-in art program for children ages 6-12; $6/$5.40 (Arts & Heritage member) • Ageless Art: Image Transfer (Sep 15), 1-3pm; for mature adults; $15/$13.50 (Arts & Heritage member) • Preschool Picasso: Image Transfers! (Sep 17); for 3-5 yrs; pre-register; $10/$9 (Arts & Heritage member)

BLEEDING HEART ART SPACE • 9132-118 Ave • dave@bleedingheartartspace.com • Artwork by Brandon Atkinson; Sep 10-Oct 15

BOREALIS GALLERY LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY VISITOR CENTRE • 9820-107 St • 780.427.7362 • assembly.ab.ca/visitorcentre/borealis/CD1.html • Canada: Day 1: Explore first steps, first impressions and first experiences as a newcomer to Canada; Aug 27-Dec 4

PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA • 8555 Roper Road • PAA@gov.ab.ca • 780.427.1750 • culture. alberta.ca/paa/eventsandexhibits/default.aspx • Alberta Ballet & the Documentation of Performance: celebrating Alberta Ballet's 50th anniversary; Sep 1-Dec 17

ReynolDs-AlBeRtA museum • 642640 Ave, Wetaskiwin • 780.312.2065 • reynoldsalbertamuseum@gov.ab.ca • history.alberta. ca/reynolds • Stan Reynolds: The Original Canadian Picker - Exhibition: An exhibit that provides insight into Stan Reynolds and his love of history and preserving the past for future generations; Runs until Oct 11 Artists, 10123-121 St • 780.423.1492 • snapartists. com • The Garden of Earthly Delights: artwork by Juan Ortiz-Apuy; Aug 25-Oct 8 • Retrograde: artwork by Jill Ho-You; Aug 25-Oct 8

SPRUCE GROVE ART GALLERY • 35-5 Ave, Spruce Grove • 780.962.0664 • alliedartscouncil.com • Charis Ng; Aug 23-Sep 10

STRATHEARN ART WALK • Park along Strathearn Drive between 89 St 91 St • strathearnartwalk.com • Art show & sale, plus music, food, beer and kids' activities • Sep 10, 12-7pm U OF A MUSEUMS GALLERIES AT ENTERPRISE SQUARE • Main floor, 10230 Jasper Ave • Open: ThuVAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St • visualartsalberta.com • Cattle Call; Jun-Aug • Art + Activism: artwork by Mary Joyce, Paula Kirman and Juan Lopezdabdoub; Aug 31-Nov 26

bugeramathesongallery.com • Water Songs: artwork by Gisa Mayer; Sep 16-30; Artist reception: Sep 16, 6-9pm & Sep 17, 1-4pm

cAvA gAlleRy • 9103-95 Ave • 780.461.3427 • galeriecava.com • Members Art Exhibition: artwork by Jeannette Ouellette, Marc Neal, Françoise Fiset, Sarah Tam, Doris Charest and Patricia Trudeau; Sep 16-Oct 4

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert • 780.460.5990 • vasa-art.com • New Pointillism and Retrospective Journey: artwork by Pat Trudeau; Aug 23-Sep 16

587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Friday Night Stomp!: Swing and party music dance social every Fri; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check web; $10, $2 (lesson with entry) • Swing Dance Social every Sat; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check the Sugar Swing website for info • $10, $2 lesson with entry

CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L’ALBERTA (CAVA) • 9103-95 Ave • 780.461.3427 • savacava.

780.686.4211 • dc3artprojects.com • Storyland: artwork by Tammy Salzl; Sep 9-Oct 15; Opening reception: Sep 9, 5-9pm; Artist talk at 5:30pm

LITERARY

FILM

FAB GALLERY • Fine Arts Building Gallery,1-1 FAB

780.423.3487 • audreys.ca • Pastor Robert Scott "Grace Revolution?" Book Launch; Sep 15, 7pm

Blue Revue • Metro Cinema at the Garneau, 8712-109 St • Presented by Vue Weekly and Steam Whistle! A safe, sex-positive place to celebrate our naughty sides. It features fun and sexy DIY porn submitted from Edmonton and across Canada, which gets screened for and voted on by an adoring audience. Also featuring a performance by River City Revue Burlesque and more • Sep 14, 6:15pm

CINEMA AT THE CENTRE • Stanley Milner Library Theatre, bsmt, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.496.7070 • Film screening every Wed, 6:30pm • Free • Schedule: The Boy and the Beast (Sep 14) CINEMA CAVA • Centre des arts visuels de l'Alberta, 9103-95 Ave • 780.461.3427 • cavalberta@gmail.com • galeriecava.com • Enjoy a repertoire of french movies • First two Wed each month

EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum, 12845-102 Ave • 780.439.5285 • edmontonfilmsociety@gmail.com • royalalbertamuseum. ca/movies • Theme: Favourite Films Forever III • North By Northwest (Sep 12) • 8pm • $3-$30

FROM BOOKS TO FILM • Stanley A. Milner, 7

780.488.4892 • westendgalleryltd.com • 125 Years Of Ukrainian Culture: artwork by Peter Shostak; Sep 10-22

DC3 ART PROJECTS • 10567-111 St •

(University of Alberta) • ualberta.ca/artshows • Graduate Design Group Show: A selection of work by students graduating with a Master of Design degree; Sep 20-Oct 22

FRONT GALLERY • 12323-104 Ave • thefrontgallery. com • Artwork by Matt Petley Jones: A solo show featuring work by Matt Petley Jones, an established landscape artist who uses bright gestural paint-strokes to capture unique Canadian landscapes; Sep 15-Oct 7; Opening reception: Sep 8, 7-9pm

gAlleRy@501 • 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • 780.410.8585 • strathcona.ca/artgallery • The Wild Party: artwork by Jason Carter; Sep 1-Oct 23

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner Library

a fan of VUE Weekly

someone with strong written + verbal communication skills

Come join a dynamic, fast-paced and growing company looking for an enthusiastic Account Manager. We are a place where we want our employees to grow, feel inspired and use their strongest assets to propel their work. Duties + Responsibilites • sell advertising into VUE Weekly and PostVUE Publishing products • be part of an established team, creating great new ideas for revenue and incoming opportunities

LET’S TALK

Send your cover letter and resumé to Joanne Layh at joanne@vueweekly.com

ROUGE POETRY SLAM HOSTED BY BREATH IN POETRY COLLECTIVE • BLVD Supper x Club, 10765 Jasper Ave • Every Tue

SCRAMBLED YEG • Brittany's Lounge, 10225-97 St •

Camp Kuriakos, Sylvan Lake • talesstorytelling.com • Professional development, discussions and readings • Sep 9-11

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112 St • 780.426.4180 • harcourthouse.ab.ca • Ambient Plagues: Artwork by Elaine Whittaker; Aug 4-Sep 23

TALES–Monthly Storytelling Circle • Parkallen

JAKE'S GALLERY • 10441-123 St • karen@jakes-

latitude53.org/patio • Mystic Places: artwork by Joani Tremblay; Aug 4-Sep 10

LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St • 780.990.1161 • landogallery.com • Lando Gallery September Group Selling Exhibition: Artwork by by gallery artists Waclaw Pietucha, Michael Levin, Kristine McGuinty and Rod and Denyse Simair; Sep 7-30

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440-112 St • 780.407.7152 • friendsofuah.org/mcmullen-gallery • InterCity: artwork by Allen Ball and Kim Sala; Sep 10-Oct 30; Opening reception/artists talk: Sep 15 7-9pm MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM • St Albert Place, 5 St Anne Street, St Albert • MuseeHeritage.ca • 780.459.1528 • museum@artsandheritage.ca • Satisfaction Guaranteed; Jun 28-Sep 11

NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS •

11135-65 Ave • Film screening with a discussion to follow • Sep 16, 7pm • Free

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS

9225-118 Ave • 780.474.7611 • volunteer@thenina. ca • Kaleido Family Arts Festival; Sep 9-12 • Yvonne DuBourdieu: Recent Work; Sep 13-15; Opening reception: Sep 15, 6-8pm

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY • 10186-

PAINT SPOT • 10032-81 Ave • 780.432.0240 •

106 St • 780.488.6611 • albertacraft.ab.ca • Crafting Conscience; Jul 9-Oct 1 • Transformation: Hooked Sculptures by Rachelle LeBlanc; Sep 10-Oct 15

paintspot.ca • Naess Gallery: Emergent Life: paintings by Twilla Coates & Ricardo Copado • Artisan Nook: Kaleidoscope: paintings by Sandie Kanak • Aug 30-Oct 11

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave • 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery.com • Robert Christie; Sep 15-Oct 4

10225-97 St NW • 780.691.1691 • There will be different themes each month. • Every 2nd Tue of month, 8:30-10:30pm • $20 (door); 18+ only

TALES ALBERTA STORYTELLING RETREAT •

WHERE TO INVADE NEXT • Westwood Unitarian,

Churchill Sq • 780.422.6223 • youraga.ca • A Parallel Excavation: artwork by Duane Linklater & Tanya Lukin Linklater; Apr 30-Sep 18 • The Unvarnished Truth: Exploring the Material History of Painting; Apr 30-Sep 18

AUDREYS BOOKS • 10702 Jasper Ave •

780.497.0011 • Open Genre Variety Stage: artists from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations • Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm

Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.944.5383 • epl. ca/gallery-at-milner • On the Walls: Wallace Creations: Digital works by Elizabeth Wallace Reid; Sep 1-30 • In the Cases & cubes: Placement: Ceramic works by Terry Hildebrand; Sep 1-30

LATITUDE 53 • Latitude 53, 10242-106 St NW •

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston

hardworking, self motivated and results oriented

eager to grow + develop alongside peers

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • 780.902.5900 • Spoken Word Tuesdays: Weekly spoken word night presented by the Breath In Poetry Collective (BIP); info: E: breathinpoetry@gmail.com

METRO • Metro at the Garneau Theatre, 8712-109 St •

Centre, 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square • themosquers. com • The Mosquers is a film festival that aims to educate, entertain and build bridges through showcasing the diverse Muslim experience. The festival pursues new ways to introduce both Muslims and non-Muslims to the most original and authentic storytelling • Sep 10, 6pm

someone who possesses outstanding sales skills and experience

Are you...

NAKED GIRLS READING • Brittany's Lounge,

framing.com • Sun and Earth: artwork by Jay Bigam; Sep 12-Oct 15; Opening reception: Sep 16, 7-9pm with live music from the Erly Sisters

THE MOSQUERS FILM FESTIVAL • Winspear

someone with a positive attitude

WEST END GALLERY • 10337-124 St •

com • Kids Art Exhibition; Aug 26-Sep 13

Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.496.7000 • epl.ca • Films adapted from books every Fri afternoon at 2pm • Schedule: A Streetcar Named Desire (Sep 9), The Odd Couple (Sep 16) 780.425.9212 • ABBAs KiARostAmi tRiBute: Certified Copy (Sep 11-12) • AfteRnoon teA 2016: Love & Friendship (Sep 18) • ARt Docs 2016: Eva Hesse (Sep 17) • DeDfest: 31 (Sep 8) • fRench AnimAtion: April and the Extraordinary World (Sep 9, 11-12, 17) • iRAniAn film seRies: Barcode (Sep 11) • KIWI KINO: Tickled (Sep 10-11, 14), What We Do in the Shadows (Sep 13) • Quote-A-long seRies 2016: Grease (Sep 10) • REEL FAMILY CINEMA: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (Sep 10), My Neighbor Totoro (Sep 17, 19)

ACCOUNT MANAGER

SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta Print-

Fri, 12-6pm, Sat 12-4pm

BUGERA MATHESON GALLERY • 10345-124 St •

VUE Weekly is seeking some serious professional help!

Community Hall, 6510-111 St • Monthly TELLAROUND: 2nd Wed each month • Sep-Jun, 7-9pm • Free • Info: 780.437.7736; talesedmonton@hotmail.com

THEATRE 24th AnnuAl Die-nAsty soAp-A-thon • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • 780.433.3399 • varsconatheatre.com • The Soap-a-thon is back! Join the whole DN gang and guests from all over the world for 50 straight hours and one phenomenally soapy story! • Sep 16-18 BIG BOOM THEORY 3 : THE EARLY YEARS • Jubilations Dinner Theatre, #2690 8882-170 St • 780.484.2424 • edmonton.jubilations.ca • Watch as Leonard and Sheldon meet for the very first time and witness the start of the Penny/Leonard (or Pennard) romantic saga • Aug 26-Oct 23 • Adult: $67.95 (Wed, Thu, Sun), $77.95 (Fri, Sat); Senior/student: $47.25 (Wed, Thu, Sun)

BOOK OF MORMON • Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave NW • 780.427.2760 • jubileeauditorium.com • Follows the misadventures of a mismatched pair of missionaries, sent halfway across the world to spread the Good Word • Sep 13-18 CHIMPROV • Citadel's Zeidler Hall, 9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • Every Sat, 10pm • $12 (door or buy in adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun

SIMON AND GARFUNKEL STORY • Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615-109 Ave • 780.483.4051 • mayfieldtheatre.ca • The Simon & Garfunkel story tells the fascinating tale of how two young boys from Queens, New York went on to become the world’s most successful music duo of all time • Sep 6-Oct 30

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

VUE Weekly is seeking some serious professional help!

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Vue Weekly requires an Associate Editor to help strengthen our team. We are looking for someone who is knowledgeable and passionate about Edmonton’s arts and cultural community. You are someone who • understands the value of teamwork and collaboration in building a strong publication • is networked in the arts and cultural community and has the ability to develop a set of contributors • has excellent interpersonal and communication skills and is fluent in social media • writes with flair and a sense of humour • has a strong design sense and a desire to produce a visually compelling product The hours are flexible and can be tailored to the needs of the successful candidate. Salary position, with benefits. Weekend work is required. This position reports to the editor of Vue Weekly.

Send your resumé, cover letter and writing samples by Friday, September 30 to Angela Brunschot at angela@vueweekly.com ARTS 9


REVUE // WRESTLING

POP

Massive entertainMent Sean “Massive Damage” Dunster rocks the ring at the Alberta Avenue Community Hall

O

Veteran wrestler Dean Richtor eggs the Monster Pro Wrestling fans on with a pantomime of the provincial title belt he’s about to claim. // Photo by Kevin Pennyfeather

nly a handful of active independent Canadian wrestling promotions can say they’ve been going strong for 14 years with no signs of slowing. Edmonton’s Monster Pro Wrestling, founded by Sean “Massive Damage” Dunster in 2002, just crested that milestone. Once a month at Alberta Avenue Community Hall, Edmonton-based wrestlers and many from around the country throw down in a 20x20 foot ring. Chris “The Irishman” Koenig holds MPW’s Heavyweight Title. The 38-yearold has been pinning opponents in the ring for 19 years. “I'm a brawler,” says Koenig. “I’m kinda the big move, the big punches, the big hits type of guy.” Originally billed as “The Insane Irishman,” Koenig reevaluated his fighting style and dropped the “Insane” after a scare during a match where he blew out both his knees. “I was told by doctors that I would never walk properly again,” says Koenig. “Yet, here I am: heavy weight champ. I honestly did a lot of stupid things that I look back and watch on tape right now going ‘what was I thinking,’ but at the same time as soon as the fans start cheering for it — that’s what I'm thinking.” The oft-questioned authenticity of pro-wrestling rarely crosses the wrestlers’ minds as they perform. Many matches may be guided to fit within a predetermined narrative so that fans keep coming back each month, but that doesn’t diminish the physical and theatrical feats that the wrestlers train at least three days a week to pull off. “I just found out when I got here who I was wrestling,” says Koenig an hour before he was set to defend his Heavyweight Title against Dunster on Saturday. “We haven’t had any time to practice. We haven't had anytime to go over

anything. We haven’t done any of that, so 90 percent of the stuff that you see is called ‘in the ring.’” After stealing Dunster’s spot in the fight and ignoring the technicalities of the match, underhanded wrestler Krazy Kore whacked a 12-year-old referee in the face with a bamboo sword. As if that wasn’t enraging enough for everyone in the room, the ref was also Koenig’s son. The tirade of death threats and slurs Keonig hurled while straddling the turnbuckle in the aftermath would make any wrestler smile, and next month’s grudge match between the two seems unlikely to disappoint. Koenig doesn’t see himself slowing down any time soon either, even though fans often ask when he plans to retire. “My answer is always the same,” he says. “As long as I can keep up with the 18 and 19-years-olds that we’re training right now—which I can. I can still outwrestle them all—until they can outwrestle me, I'm still good to go.” Dunster echoes that feeling wholeheartedly. “When guys tell me I can’t do something, it makes me work for it harder.” After being denied his title fight against Koenig earlier in the event thanks to some shady ring-side politics by the ‘bad guys,’ Dunster slid into the ring for an impromptu tag-team match during the finale. Alongside former WWE pro Harry “British Bulldog Jr.” Smith, Dunster rocked the ring, won the final match, and left 300 fans (toddlers, grandparents and everything in between) in the sold out hall chanting his name. Just like he and his roster of wrestlers at MPW have done for years. “Massive Damage! Massive Damage! Massive Damage!”

KEVIN PENNYFEATHER POP@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // GRAPHIC NOVEL

Where the wonderous things are

Tillie Walden's magic realism draws you into her character's past, but also up into the future

T

o be precocious without being precious? Impressive. A City Inside is already the third graphic novella from up-and-comer Tillie Walden (she’s only 20 and recently graduated from the Center of Cartoon Studies). In just 50 pages, she lowers us through one person’s caverns of escape, longing, fantasy, and pain, only to float us out into a future resolved—a place where “you’ll realize it was enough.” In a counselor’s office, a young woman lies in a soft, beanbag-like bed, drinks some tea, closes her eyes, and sinks into her thoughts. Walden’s drawing of that bed, its patterned surface undulating around the patient, makes us feel that we’re sinking in, too, deeper and deeper, away and away . . . and then it’s not us but “you”—“you

10 POP

grew up in the south . . . you left when you were 15.” The second-person voice pulls us not only into this Ghibli-like world (sunlit spaces outside; cats; a house in the sky; a recurring koi motif) but up—she doesn’t move to the city but up into the sky. What pulls her back down and how she lives after that is best left to you to discover. But Walden’s prose-poem so expressionistically expands this nameless yet so-near-to-us woman’s inner world. The captions are sparing, letting the shadow-and-light images descend, and many stand on their own, as if plucked from a storyboard for a film. Spaces and places reflect the speaker, filling up with her thoughts and desires, like this book itself and perhaps

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

Walden’s hope for it—“its open spaces waiting for you to fill them up with everything you have.” In the metropolis that the woman doesn’t like, commuters are cross-hatched with shadow; two panels later, she’s rising through the clouds, her short hair blowing a little across her face in the wind. There’s a magic-realism sensibility here but also a picture-book immediacy, as when Sendak’s panels in Where The Wild Things Are expand, Max entering the kingdom he’ll make his own before returning home. In Walden’s short but deep-lived book, though, the spaces are so potently rendered that they become places for us to move into for a while, look around, and wonder. BRIAN GIBSON POP@VUEWEEKLY.COM


PREVUE // FESTIVAL

FILM

'We are not there yet'

Muslim Film Fest organizer says Edmonton still struggles with multiculturalism

W

//Photo supplied

ASPECTRATIO

hat was started in 2006 by a rag-tag group of University of Alberta students as a way to battle Islamophobia has since turned into something that's much bigger, and still very much necessary. Now in it’s 10th year, the Mosquers (think the Oscars) Film Festival is bringing Muslim film, culture and insight to the Winspear Centre on September 10th. Mosquers board chair Fatima Faizi is, needles to say but I’ll say it anyway, jazzed. “It is a very cool opportunity to interact and maybe get to know some other people who you might not normally get the chance to speak to,” Faizi says. “The entire night really has the tendency to humanize Muslims more than anything. On top of it all, it is very entertaining.” This year’s event hopes to hit the 1000 attendance mark and Faizi sees this as being very doable. Funnyman Ramy Youssef will host the event and Palestinian/American comedian Amer Zahr will add to the entertainment. Accompanying the short films—which this year will be celebrated with a series of awards— there will also be a fashion show, Islamic art, and an afterparty. While the night is about sharing Muslim culture with those who are not too savvy with it, the film festival will also acts as a bit of an eye opener for those in the know. “At the core of the Mosquers, it really is an outreach effort,” explains Faizi. “I feel like a lot of relevant topics that aren’t so often talked about in the Muslim community are brought up as well though. I think

the Mosquers takes a lot of pride in being a platform to bring those discussion points and topics to light.” In recent weeks there has been several harsh slaps to the face of Edmonton’s supposed ‘open mindedness’ when it comes to cultural and racial temperance and understanding. From Bashir Mohamed’s run it with racism while cycling, to Jesse Lipscombe’s race based verbal attack while ironically filming a pumpup video for the city, certain aspects of the former City of Champions are coming to light. Now, with the introduction of the Soldiers of Odin (a group known for being anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim and anti-Semitic in Europe), the Mosquers couldn’t be more relevant. “You really start to understand the importance of events like the Mosquers,” she says. “It is kind of a wake-up call. We believe that Edmonton is so open minded and welcoming to so many religious faiths, cultures and belief systems. Then you see something like that happen and I realize just how important the work is that I’m doing. And it needs to keep going, because unfortunately, we are not there yet.” But Faizi also knows that the night is a celebration, and she passed on a bit of advice to her board about embracing the accomplishment. “It’s always a very frantic night, but if you ever find a moment to find a spot in the theatre and take it all in,” Faizi says. “You can see how worth it is for an entire year’s to work come together.” TRENT WILKIE

FILM@VUEWEEKLY.COM

BRIAN GIBSON// FILM@VUEWEEKLY.COM

The wants and lusts of the American girl

Diary of a Teenage Girl explores over-the-top emotions, and a seriously messed up family situation

H

er hips and ass swish along in bellbottoms; in voiceover, she declares, “Holy shit. I had sex today.” Only this woman is barely a woman—she’s 15 and keeps a diary by talking into a microphone hooked up to a cassette-tape player—and the man she just slept with is her mom’s 34-year-old rogue of a boyfriend, Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard, nicely undercutting his usual heartthrob roles). It’s San Francisco, 1976, and Minnie Goetze (Bel Powley, revelatory) lives at home with her younger sister Gretel, their newfound-hippie (but more -druggie) mom Charlotte (Kristen Wiig), and cat Domino. But where she lives, how she’s doing in school (flirting with academic probation), even her cartooning aspira-

tions . . . they all seem to melt away in the steamy thoughts and sweaty sheets of sex and hormones and horniness (“Does everyone think about fucking as much as I do?”). Marielle Heller’s The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015), adapting Phoebe Gloeckner’s illustrated novel, shoots us, full-tilt, in among the pinballing wants and lusts of this American adolescent. But is there something altogether too lax, too loose, about her ’70s environment (mom and friends doing coke in the house; Charlotte purporting to be feminist but telling Minnie she should show off her waist more)? On the cusp of Minnie and Monroe’s first time together—and Minnie’s a virgin—there’s a nearpsychedelic swirl of anticipation,

uncertainty, and in-over-her-headness. Minnie can be, by U-turns, frank, eager, and emotionally naive about the sex-first relationships she finds herself in (and then there’s the disturbing way she and best friend Kimmie imagine black men as erotic fantasies . . .). As Patty Hearst’s arrest is covered by the TV news, Charlotte and Monroe debating the Stockholm-syndrome student’s genuine-ness, it’s hard not to see Minnie as someone taken hostage, at times, by her own flaring-up feelings. With Monroe, soon discovering her sexual power, she can dance from coolly adult to faintly needy to hardboiled-dismissive (“Fuck Monroe—he’s just a dirty old man”). But she and Kimmie are sometimes just acting more

worldly-wise than they are, though Minnie’s contemplative enough to hope she’ll one day look back on her “wild teenagehood.” A drifting-away mother, two polar-opposite father-figures, “allconsuming thoughts about sex and men” . . . all of this is even more enlivened by Minnie’s sketches and drawings—Minnie’s inspired by underground comic-artist Aline Kominsky—which can come to funky, raw, ’70s-style life. (These moments are like the animated autobiographic scenes in American Splendor, based on the series by Harvey Pekar, a friend of Kominsky’s husband and artist Robert Crumb.) The mid-’70s, at least in the Bay Area, seems hedonistically atomized here—everyone doing their

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

own pleasure-seeking thing (TDoaTG feels and looks reminiscent, at times, of 1967’s The Graduate and 1972’s Last Tango in Paris). An aciddropping scene, though, soars into a magic-realist, animated trip for Minnie but a sad little freak-out for Monroe, leading to a pathetic low in their relationship. This picture’s as sincere and honest as Minnie can be heartfelt and selfassertive. Bittersweetly raw about young-adult feelings and feeling so not-quite-adult—one sequence crosscuts between Minnie crying in the bath and going down on Monroe in the car—Heller’s work joins Lukas Moodysson’s Show Me Love and Lisa Aschan’s She Monkeys in the modern pantheon of superb female coming-of-age films. V FILM 11


FILM PREVUE // DOCUMENTARY

On the sunny side

Director Kantayya offers an optimistic vision in Catching the Sun

FRI, SEPT 9–THUR, SEPT 15

FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS FRI, MON–THUR 6:45PM SAT 1:15PM & 6:45PM SUN 1:15PM & 6:15PM

RATED: PG

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC

A TALE OF LOVE AND DARKNESS

FRI, WED–THUR 7:00PM & 9:00PM SAT 1:30PM, 3:30PM, 7:00PM & 9:00PM SUN 1:30PM, 3:30PM, 6:00PM & 8:00PM MON–TUE 7:00PM

RATED: PG, MSM

SAT, MON–THUR 9:15PM SUN 4:00PM & 8:30PM

RATED: 14A, CL, N // Photo supplied

PRESENTS

TRAIN TO BUSAN THUR @ 7:00, SAT @ 4:00 KOREAN WITH SUBTITLES METRO BIZARRO

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CERTIFIED COPY SUN @ 4:00, MON @ 7:00

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ROB ZOMBIE'S 31 FRI @ 9:30 18+ LICENSED, NO MINORS

FRENCH, ITALIAN, & ENGLISH WITH SUBTITLES

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I

f you’ve been to a movie theatre or watched anything on YouTube recently, you’ve probably seen the ubiquitous ad for Alberta’s Climate Leadership Plan. Premier Rachel Notley has repeatedly stressed that her government’s response to climate change must work with the people—and within the existing framework—of Alberta’s existing energy industry. But what exactly does an energy industry worker’s place in the future of green energy look like? Catching the Sun offers one possible picture. The documentary, directed by Shalini Kantayya, tells the stories of Chinese and American workers and entrepreneurs in the quickly expanding international solar industry. "The oil economy has created monopolies and concentrated wealth and power in the hands of the few,” Kantayya says. “I was fascinated by the idea that solar power could democratize and decentralize energy in a way that rebuilds the ladder of economic opportunity." Included in Catching the Sun’s cast

of characters are Van Jones, author of The Green Collar Economy, whom President Obama appointed as an advisor on green jobs policy; “Wally” Jiang, a solar entrepreneur benefitting from China’s unprecedented investments in renewable energy; Eddie Wiltz Jr., a young man from a rough neighbourhood who enrolled in the Richmond solar training program when he was eighteen—and many, many others. Some with backgrounds you wouldn't expect, including a Tea Party activist. Following the race between policy makers, business people, and tradespeople to claim a piece of the new market, the film explores who and what will determine the future of renewable energy. For Kantayya, that future looks hopeful. Catching the Sun’s press release includes a disclaimer in bold: “This is not a doom and gloom climate film.” Despite the relative lack of activity on solar initiatives in Alberta, organizer Mike Hudema (Greenpeace) says he hopes that Catching the Sun will demonstrate to its Edmonton audience the potential of solar en-

Tues, Sept 13 (7 pm) Metro Cinema, 12 ergy for creating jobs and revolutionizing the power dynamic of the energy industry. “We can move,” he says, “from an energy system ruled by a few energy companies to one where individuals, communities, First Nations, and Metis settlements are the real power holders and producers.” In keeping with the film’s emphasis on the worker’s perspective and the opportunities of industry, the Edmonton premiere of Catching the Sun will be hosted by Greenpeace, and co-hosted by worker organization Iron and Earth, the Alberta Solar Energy Co-op, Gridworks Energy, Skyfire, NuEnergy, and KubyEnergy, many of whom will have representatives and information available at the event. According to Hudema, “it will be an Edmonton solar showcase before and after the film.” LIZZIE DERKSEN

FILM@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // CLASSICS

Playing favourites

Edmonton Film Society fall season embraces the classics The Edmonton Film Society president Taras Ostashewsky is very excited for the group's fall season, Favourite Films Forever. He loves Hitchcock’s North by Northwest, as well as All About Eve, but the season has some sleepers too. “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir is an overlooked romance,” Ostashewsky says. “It is slightly fantastical but the way it is dealt with is very plausible within the film. It’s one of those movies that strikes you in the heart and you go with it and just love it.” It isn’t the society simply picking their favourite films though. They

12 FILM

can’t all just be Weekend at Bernie’s marathons. “You have to consider that you are actually playing for an audience,” he explains. “You do have to get people through the door. Opening the doors at the museum costs us money. Also, you are kind of at the mercy of what is available and what is in print.” With the digital age upon us, actual film is hard to come by. Ostashewsky points out that as a Society, some think that they have every film ever made at their disposal. This is not so. “People do put forward movies and lo and behold, they aren’t available. Sometimes you just sit there

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

and think wow, how can that be?” With that said, there is still a glut of great films that can be shown. The season starts with North by Northwest on Sept. 12, followed by a Walter Matthau/Jack Lemmon classic The Fortune Cookie on Sept. 19, All About Eve on Sept. 26, Bringing Up Baby starring Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn on Oct. 3, Ninotchka with idols Greta Garbo and Bela Lugosi on Oct. 17, Oscar winner from 1964 Father Goose on Oct. 24, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir on Halloween, and the Hitchcock staple Vertigo on Nov. 7.

TRENT WILKIE

FILM@VUEWEEKLY.COM


SEX

// THE DOC'S PERSPECTIVE

Sexual awakenings

Groping towards a more satisfying sex life—one awkward or joyful moment at a time ing out on the back of your hand, sneaking glimpses of nudie magazines, waking up in a gooey mess, learning how the 'base' system works (first base, etc.), figuring out what the clitoris is, continuously rewinding and re-watching the love scene from Cruel Intentions, realizing you still don’t understand the 'base' system, avoiding embarrassing conversations with parents, and the eventual triumphant loss of the 'v-card.'

// Illustration by Curtis Hauser

I

was eight years old when with innocent curiosity I declared that I felt “warm and excited inside” while watching the music video for “Move This” by Technotronic. Laughing, my slightly older cousin explained that the feeling I described is called “horny.” I’m not even sure that I knew what sex was at that age. I mean, I guess I knew a little. About a year earlier I stumbled across my friends dad’s Playboys, which he inappropriately stored in the main floor half bathroom, prompting a very uncom-

fortable conversation with my mother in which I asked her what the word ‘humping’ meant. But I genuinely didn’t understand sex and I certainly had no concept of myself as a sexual being… that is until I encountered the suggestive lyrics and killer beat of a Congolese-Belgian hip-hop group. Most of us have a story like that. Sweet, innocent, sometimes awkward moments, where driven by instinct we first became aware of sex. Those early moments represent the first phase of sexual awakening, of dis-

covery and curiosity. While we will cyclically re-engage with this phase throughout our lifetimes, our first encounters start young and usually progresses in a pretty typical way. As Freud pointed out, sexual discovery begins in infancy with the realization that it feels nice to touch our genitals. From there, it evolves into the uncomfortable moments of childhood and adolescence that include, in no particular order: realizing you can’t run around naked anymore, entering the world of crushes, practicing mak-

Once the initial hurdles of sexual initiation are surpassed, we enter the next phase of sexual awakening—exploration. Now that there are real, consenting human bodies involved, we revel in the opportunity to explore the fantasies that we’ve curated during our formative years. We hone our skills, try new things, play around with emotional intimacy, strengthen our muscles and stamina, develop an appreciation for rhythm, push boundaries, learn from new partners, expand our repertoire and discover our bodies hidden pleasures. It’s physical. Emotional. Carnal. Awkward. Fun. Liberating. And at times, it’s excessive. Beyond the enjoyment of sexual exploration are the lessons we learn from it, which leads to the next phase—confusion. As we push our boundaries, we also learn our limits. For some, it’s questioning sexual orientation or rebelling against repressed beliefs. For others it’s facing unforeseen consequences, like unexpected pregnancy or an incurable STI. But as distressing as these moments can be, they are powerful opportunities for reflection that ultimately point us in the direction of a more satisfying sex life. I liken this process to the phenomenon of teenage drinking, the pur-

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

pose of which, if I recall correctly, is to get as drunk as possible, as fast as possible. As you get older, you realize that being sloppy drunk on whatever you’ve siphoned out of your parent’s liquor cabinet is gross, and you learn how to drink in moderation. You might also learn that you prefer wine to jaeger-bombs, or that there is immense pleasure in a well-aged peaty scotch. Either way, you become more discriminating about how and what you drink. And so it is with sexual awakening. We must first travail through the exciting realizations of sexual discovery, the gluttony of sexual exploration, and the painful periods of reflection, in order to arrive at the final stage—ownership. And with this phase comes informed liberation, the freedom to enjoy sex without shame or guilt, comfort with our bodies and their functions, and the knowledge and ability to achieve intense erotic pleasure. Our lives are punctuated with moments of sexual awakening. Some are sweet and romantic. Some are erotic and sensual. Others are funny and awkward. And some are purely primal. The stories that follow will, in no particular order, encompass parts of the journey I've just described. Enjoy.

TAMI-LEE DUNCAN

Tami-lee Duncan is a Registered Psychologist in Edmonton, specializing in sexual health. Please note that the information and advice given above is not a substitute for therapeutic treatment with a licensed professional. For information or to submit a question, please contact tami-lee@ vueweekly.com. Follow on Twitter @ SexOlogyYEG.

SEX 13


SEX // EXPLORATION

Pretty boy, sexy woman

I recognized a wholeness in myself that night—and a complexity in other women

// Illustration by Jessica Hong

T

Dude, I’m not ready to be a dad.

To learn more about the PALS program, visit

edmontonhumanesociety.com 14 SEX

he first time I had sex with a woman was also, really, the first time I touched a woman. It was October. I was twenty-two. My basement suite had flooded and I was sleeping on the couch beside the fireplace in a big house that my friend Anna shared with four or five other people. I’d been there for about two weeks when we biked downtown one night to see Dan Savage speak at the Winspear and—spurred on by his advice to the audience—I asked Anna if she wanted to have sex with me. I had gotten my hair cut that afternoon, about as short as it had ever been. I looked like a pretty boy. I met Anna on Whyte Avenue on the way home from the salon and she looked at me with a combination of surprise and gratification no man has ever indicated in my presence and asked to run her hand over the back of my head. I spent a couple of afternoons knitting on the floor in her room while Anna did homework before I got up the nerve to sleep over in her bed. I was used to mens’ bodies. I had never been physically affectionate with my girlfriends; even if I’d been attracted to many of them, I didn’t like women, in general. I prided myself on being different from other women, on getting along with men, on the masculine nature of my own sexual interest in women. Anna’s body felt familiar from what I knew of my own. It was soft and fit reciprocally against mine. The strength with which she held my face or pushed down on my pelvis made sense—not like the way men’s strength was impossible to mentally calibrate or measure. Her mouth was soft and tasted like toothpaste. Her hair was soft and smelled like almonds and fell on my

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

shoulders in a breathtaking cool and slippery way that made me feel as if I had long hair. Her skin was so soft that when I started running my hands along her stomach and thighs, too shy to look at what I was doing, I thought at first that I was touching very smooth fabric. She went down on me right away and when I asked if I could return the favour she smiled and nodded, but I realized immediately that I was afraid of hurting her. The tight-petaled flower analogy I had been making fun of all my life suddenly seemed apt. She was beautiful. At this point, ironically, by a long chain of coincidences, I had a strapon with me and Anna wanted me to use it. When she’d taken off my shirt and I had buckled up the black leather harness around my hips and under my ass, she gave me the same look she’d given me on the street. She pointed to the mirror. The curves and muscles of my body looked proportional, like a painting. My short hair made me look somehow innocent. I had never felt so attractive in my life. And when we were collapsed with our arms around each other an hour later it struck me that I felt almost as thrilled that Anna wanted to sleep with me as sleep with me. Anna is still one of my closest friends. They no longer identify as a woman, and though it’s difficult to explain how this changes or doesn’t change our relationship, the fact remains that the first time I had sex with Anna transformed the way I think about myself and other women. I recognized a wholeness in myself that night—and a complexity and wholeness in other women that I had been uninterested in and maybe even unaware of before.

LIZZIE DERKSEN


// ACCEPTANCE

THE PLACE FOR MUSIC

Tinsel Tunes: An Evening with Matt Dusk and Friends Saturday, November 26 Genre: Jazz

// © Adobe Stock / Nisimo

Still fucking

Women in their 30s share their sexual awakenings

P

opular culture might tell us that women’s “last fuckable day” is sometime in their 40s or 50s, but based on the stories below, that’s when women are hitting their stride. Here, three women share stories from their 30s about their own sexual awakenings. “It wasn’t until I found myself divorced at the age of 34 that I discovered myself sexually,” says A. “A decade of the same old routine had left me disinterested and resentful. That’s no environment for explorations in ecstasy. Once the dark cloud had moved on and I began dating (and dating and dating), I learned that the right partner and an open mind were the key. I think it was my second partner after divorce that unlocked the door. It was a simple experience, really. He was giving me oral on a bed. Dissatisfied with his performance, he pulled me to the edge of the bed. He stood up, looked around the room and, “Ah ha!” He pulled up a swivel chair, sat on it, and got back to work. It gave him free movement and the leverage to do the job properly. Maybe it was the result or the ingenuity. Maybe it was the simple act of trying something.” Clearly, it was the swivel chair. Sometimes a sexual awakening isn’t necessarily about sex. “I was almost forty years old when I discovered the word for my sexuality: graysexual.

It's a fairly recent term and I viewed it with suspicion at first, but it was a relief to finally have an accurate label I could use. It was a real 'a-ha' moment for me because I finally felt like there was nothing wrong with me or my sexuality.” Feeling wrong is something shared by C, too. But in her case, transgression was the key. “I was 35 when I discovered I liked to top. I once jokingly slapped my girlfriend’s ass and she responded by wiggling her ass at me as if to say, ‘you can do that again.’ So I did. And then I pulled her over to the couch, bent her over the arm, pulled her pants down, and really went to town. I kept stopping and asking her if she was enjoying it. She told me to shut up and keep going. So I did. (What can I say? I live to please a lady.) It was so intense: I felt like I wanted to rip her apart and she just kept taking it. Whenever I touched her, I felt like I was on fire. I loved the feeling of power it gave me, but I enjoyed even more how much pleasure she got out of it. She woke up a part of me I didn’t know was there—my desire to dominate. When she eventually stood up, she told me she didn’t realize she had been waiting for someone to do that to her. I guess it was an ‘a ha!’ moment for her, too.”

Katherine Jenkins

Saturday, November 19 Genre: Classical/Vocal

Box Office: 780-449-3378 www.festivalplace.ab.ca

ASHLEY DRYBURGH

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SEX 15


FOLLOW @HIVEDMONTON

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Grab your cape & join the Heroes for Zero! Register at www.hivedmonton.com/events/aids-walk

WHERE

WHEN

McIntyre Park 104 Street & 83 Avenue Edmonton AB

September 17, 2016 Registration at 5pm Walk and Run at 6:10pm

WHY

Help us reach our fundraising goal of $85,000 going to

support people living with HIV right here in Edmonton

AIDS WALK & SUPERHERO RUN 25th anniversary

EDMONTON

Join Nancy Carlson (Global TV) and Mike Chalut of The Bounce as they host the stage Family Friendly Beer Gardens sponsored by Yukon Brewing Entertainment by The Retrofitz Best drag show in Edmonton by the Imperial Sovereign Court of the Wildrose

@hivedmonton

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VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SEP 14, 2016

SEX 17


SEX // CONFUSION

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Party in the big city

// Steven Teeuwsen

That night taught me that as much as I thought I knew, I didn’t know anything. And really, I still don't.

I

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was 17 or 18 living in Elmira, Ont. The Kids in the Hall were just finishing their CBC run, I liked the Rheostatics (and Paul Quarrington), and somewhere in London, Ont., Justin Bieber was being born. My parents were tight lipped about sex and my high school, well, it was basic. Sure it had sexual education, but it didn’t cover actual sexuality. I was privy to sexual acts, but the idea of how different people are when it comes to being sexual was just shapes in a fog. Let me put it this way, up until I started dating when I was 15, my knowledge of sexuality was told to me by the likes of Def Leppard, Poison and fucking Motley Crue. Yes, fucking Motley Crue. You see what I was working with. Anyway. A friend and I were invited to the big city (Kitchener) to go to a party. The majority of the night is a bit of a blur but one series of events I’ll never forget. I found myself in the basement playing strip poker with three girls. I recognized one of them from playing high school rugby as she played as

well. She was a couple inches taller than I and was beautifully monolithic. The other two were random friends. It didn’t take long until the four of us were just in our underwear. I was doing my best to pretend to be very interested in the game. Then, it happened. The two girls across from me started kissing. At first it was tender then it ramped up. I think I heard teeth hitting each other. I was stupefied. I remember them getting up and moving to a couch, and I turned to my left to look at the rugby girl but she was already getting up and walking towards me. There she was in her underwear, looking down at me. I had no idea what was going to happen until she said, “Well, time for you to go.” Then she picked me up, carried me out of the room, gave me my clothes and closed the door in my face. I stood there in shock for several minutes. Before I started putting on my clothes, I heard giggles and laughing and various swooning sounds coming

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

from behind the door. The situation was one of sheer awesomeness. It wasn’t until the ride home, trying to explain it to my friend, that things started to make sense. Now, this may seem rudimentary to some, but as a white CIS dude who was brought up in Cape Breton in the early eighties, this was like getting hit in the mind with a bat made out of wizard dreams. Seeing women lust after each other, then realizing that I was a fifth wheel (fourth would suggest usefulness), was extremely liberating. Having a first hand account of women being openly sexual in an honest (non-pornographic) way taught me more about femininity and womanhood than any sex-ed class or Poison ballad ever could. It taught me that girls like sex too. It taught me that sexuality is wonderfully fluid. And most importantly, it taught me that as much as I thought I knew, I didn’t know anything. Still don’t. TRENT WILKIE


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SEX 19


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MUSIC

PREVUE // COUNTRY AWARDS

// Photo supplied

A

lee, pronounced ‘alley’ (like Sally), is learning a lot from her success. Born Alexandra Adamoski, the Edmonton grown country music singer has recently been nominated for a Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) award in the rising star category. In the past she has won several Alberta Country Music Awards (and even a CCMA performance award voted on by fans), but this one is especially exciting. “The craziest thing that I didn’t see coming is that the crowds keep on growing,” Alee says. “I’ve even met some fans that have tattoos of my lyrics. It’s scary to think that there are

people that are putting permanent things on themselves and I’m directly related to that. It’s very cool.” With success comes both personal and artistic evolution. While some artists may try to force change into their music as their career grows, Alee doesn’t fix what isn’t broke. Although she knows that the world isn't all baby-smiles and cotton candy dolphins, she does her best to keep things wholesome. “I’ve been raised around a big family,” she explains. “There is a lot of different music out there, and even some pop music can get into some adult terminology. I try to keep it very

family based. I just try to bring a positive light into everything. It is what music is good for.” And when she's with friends and family, keeping it positive isn't a chore. “The cool thing is, when working with other people, you almost lose that whole want to be political,” Alee continues. “When you are sitting in a room with people and you are laughing and having fun, you lose that sense of needing to say certain things.” Originally a solo artist, Alee has spent the last bit of her career with studio bands, various collaborators and on the road surrounded by a lot of creative people.

Recently, she has started work on her next album and has gone back to being the sole source of creation. This may seem like an easy transition as she is re-visiting her roots, but time's the revelator (to borrow a line from Gillian Welch), and there can be levels of difficulty with any kind of change. “I’ve come back to writing on my own which has been a very scary experience,” she says. “Reliving it all, having all that pressure of doing it all on your own. I’ve been discovering a lot about myself and my sound and it’s been an adventure.” She takes pride in her ability to

CJSRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR Superpower your radio! On September 20th at 6:45pm, the 1978 classic will screen at Metro Cinema, following a live broadcast by CJSR in the lobby. Admission by donation, $10 suggested. FunDrive runs Oct 28–Nov 5. VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

adapt, to learn and to grow as much as needed. With that in mind, what tidbit of information would she be able to share with a like-minded country musician who hopes to take to the road and chase their dreams? “It’s best to write what you want to write and then decide later it is something you want to share,” Alee says. Anything else? “You cannot survive on A&W four times a day,” she laughed. The CCMA Awards Show will be held at the Budweiser Gardens in London, Ontario on Sunday, Sept. 11.

TRENT WILKIE

MUSIC@VUEWEEKLY.COM

EDMONTON’S LISTENER SUPPORTED VOLUNTEER POWERED CAMPUS COMMUNITY R A D I O S TAT I O N

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MUSIC JASMINE SALAZAR // JASMINE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

BILLY BOB THORNTON AND THE BOXMASTERS / FRI, SEPT 9 (7:30 PM)

You probably know Billy Bob Thornton best for his Academy Awardwinning movies such as Sling Blade—or maybe you know him as Angelina Jolie’s former hubby—but he’s also a music man having released five studio albums. His music is described as a mix of British invasion influences, LA rock and southern styles, but simply put: it’s alt-country rock. (Festival Place, $65.50)

CHIXDIGGIT / FRI, SEPT 9 (8 PM)

There’s much to celebrate if you’re Calgary’s Chixdiggit, who’s commemorating its 25th year as a band, with its sixth album, 2012, which highlights a full year of touring for this punk-rock band. (Brixx Bar & Grill, $20)

MOBINA GALORE / FRI, SEPT 9 (8:30 PM)

Mobina Galore, a female punk duo from Winnipeg, MB, plays an aggressive punk set that beats their male counterparts. (The Almanac, $10)

G W MYERS / SAT, SEPT 10 (4 PM)

This Edmonton native plays a mean bass guitar, slack key guitar, ukulele, steel guitar... do I need to continue? (Black Dog, free)

FORESTER / SAT, SEPT 10 (8 PM)

Blow up the balloons, call the caterers, and pop the champagne, local rock outfit Forester is releasing its first full-length album, Vanity, at this show. With performances from the Unfortunates, Worst Days Down and Dusty Tucker. (Brixx Bar & Grill, $10)

PUNCH DRUNK CABARET / SAT, SEPT 10 (9 PM)

Mix some rockabilly, outlaw country and steampunk swing into a Libbey and shake vigourously for five minutes. By the two minute mark, Edmonton’s Punch Drunk Cabaret should come out. If not, repeat directions. (Shakers Roadhouse [15004 Yellowhead Trail], $10)

CUT HIP HOP AWARDS 2016 / SUN, SEPT 11 (5 PM)

Edmonton will host this year’s annual CUT Hip Hop Awards, presented by Canadian Urban Television, which showcases the diverse hip-hop and R&B talent in Canada. The red carpet is at 5 pm (so dress formal) and award show starts at 7 pm. (Winspear Centre, $20 – $50)

22 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

WIL / SUN, SEPT 11 (8 PM)

By the time folk-rock singer-songwriter William Mimnaugh, or better known by his stage name WiL, comes through Edmonton his six-song EP, Songs, will have been released, which means you have two days to learn the lyrics to all the songs. Good luck! (Mercury Room, $20 in advance, $23 at the door)


PREVUE // ELECTRO

// NEW SOUNDS

Clearing the decks

Junior Boys started from scratch for Big Black Coat Thu, Sept 17 (8 pm) W/ Egyptrixx, Borys Starlite Room, $20

These boys ain't junior... // Photo supplied

W

hen it comes to interviews, Jeremy Greenspan of electropop duo Junior Boys has one customary rule: "If anyone is interviewing me from a specific city, I like to be near someone from that city," Greenspan says over the phone from his hometown of Hamilton, ON. With that in mind, in order for that statement to have any weight that would mean Greenspan would have to be around someone from Edmonton during the time of our interview. But, not surprisingly, Greenspan came through by having loafed around at his friend's—and former Edmontonian—Oliver Knutton's clothing store, O's Clothes, for our scheduled chat. Greenspan and bandmate Matt Didemus are gearing up for their second round of tour dates, which kicks off on Sept 9 in Montreal and ventures out to the Canadian prairies (Winnipeg, Regina, and Edmonton), United States and finally

Mexico, for their sixth studio album, Big Black Coat. Much of the Junior Boys' albums have leaned more towards an intimate synth-pop aesthetic, fleshed out by Greenspan's lush vocals and light R&B disposition. But, Big Black Coat, which was released earlier this year, comes five years after 2011's It's All True, and reveals a departure from those sounds established on their first three records—Last Exit (2004), So This Is Goodbye (2006) and Begone Dull Care (2009)—towards heavier electronics that are redolent of early Detroit techno and house music. That techno sound was not a deliberate decision, says Greenspan, noting that he doesn't typically have a preconceived plan when it comes to writing new material for a record. Instead, Greenspan ascribes that techno restoration to a sense of "nostalgia" as a way of acknowledging those roots of electronic music.

"It's hard to know what motivates you to make changes in your sound... There wasn't much of a vision in terms of [this album]. I don't really do too much thinking," Greenspan says with a wry laugh. "I just get down to work and throw things at the wall and see what we like." Despite the nods to Detroit techno, Big Black Coat is still characteristically a Junior Boys record with its subdued, introverted lyric structure and Greenspan's lush falsetto— singing higher than would normally be considered his range. There's still tons of R&B flavours across the 11 tracks ("I always listen to a lot of R&B," Greenspan says) that the saturation of industrial techno never becomes too pervasive. As for the almost half-decade break between albums? Greenspan did not anticipate that long of a break. He and Didemus had hoped to release another album shortly after It's All True but they had a change of heart. "We just didn't like any of that material, so we didn't release it. At the same time, I was working on Jessy Lanza's record, and I was much committed to that at the time and much more excited about that," he says. "When that came out and did so much better than I would have thought that's when I felt reenergized to do other stuff. So, I scrapped everything we had [previously] done and we started Big Black Coat fresh."

ngel Olsen made her musical method very well-known after her debut release of Strange Cacti in 2011—she wanted every new recording to offer a strange and unfamiliar sound she could explore. With her new, quiet release of My Woman, she has accomplished just that. It opens with “Intern,” a new shadowy '80s synth lullaby that can put the listener both at ease and sweet sorrow. The song is the only of its kind and sets the mood of the album perfectly. My Woman has the same shoegazey punch as her critically acclaimed sophomore Burn Your Fire For No Witness, but offers something fresh and exciting for the 29-year-old musician. Her unequalled voice shines on songs like “Never Be Mine,” and “Woman” and is complemented immensely by the backing band. Next to “Intern,” “Not Gonna Kill You,” (with its time-changing punk rock feel) stands out as the most surprising song on the record. “Sister,” is also one of the most powerful songs on the record. The song beautifully lingers on a jazzy chord progression with a strong backing bass rift until it explodes into a tasty mellow psych guitar solo. It’s hard to match the same nostalgic feel that her second album possessed, but Olsen has certainly outdone herself with My Woman.

ixteen years ago Paul Reddick sang a line that drilled itself into my brain and has remained there ever since. The setup was night, driving, somewhere desolate, rural, with a woman in the car, smoking and listening to blues. Then the refrain “All the world in silhouette, with Sleepy John Estes and a cigarette.” Somehow it was perfect. Since then vocalist and harmonica player Reddick has continued to hone his poetry skills, indulge his passion for bird watching, and make great blues-based music. Ride The One is his fifth album and his first for Stony Plain. It was produced by Colin Cripps (Blue Rodeo) who also plays guitar as does Steve Marriner from MonkeyJunk. Although the album is subtitled 'Blues is a Beautiful Landscape,' this recording moves away from Reddick’s blues roots and edges toward rock. Two guitars, bass, drums, occasional keyboards and Reddick’s harp and vocals both sounding like they have been recorded through the same microphone, which gives a live feeling to the proceedings. Of the eleven all original tracks only one, the closing "Moon and Star," which is Reddick alone with his harp, sounds like a traditional blues recording.

JASMINE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MUSIC@VUEWEEKLY.COM

RWDOULL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

JASMINE SALAZAR

ANGEL OLSEN

PAUL REDDICK

A

S

My Woman // Jagjaguwar

STEPHAN BOISSONNEAULT

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

Ride the One // Stony Plain Records

BOB DOULL

MUSIC 23


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CAFE BLACKBIRD A Dude

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Music Album Release (electronic/folk/rock), The Musicians of Robin Hood Association and special guests; 6pm; $10 (adv), $15 (door)

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with Rhubarbs, Johnson from Accounting, Quasar; 8pm; $5; All ages COOK COUNTY SALOON

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Moonshiners Jam Night with Rockin' Rod; Every Thu, 7pm; No minors

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No minors EDMONTON PUBLIC LIBRARY –Strathcona Branch Cayley Thomas

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FRI SEP 9 THE ALMANAC Mobina

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VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

Generation; 9:30pm

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UNITARIAN CHURCH OF EDMONTON Meet the

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The Man In Black - A one man show tribute to Johnny Cash Featuring Gene Gebo (country); 7:30pm; $41 (adv) DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY Wed

open mic with host Duff Robison; 8pm FESTIVAL PLACE Chip

Taylor and Carrie Rodriguez; 7:30-9:30pm; $31-$35 FILTHY MCNASTY'S Mother

Cluckin’ Wednesdays GAS PUMP Karaoke;

9:30pm

TILTED KILT PUB AND EATERY Live music

Wednesday's; Every Wed

cafehaven.ca CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK 99, 23349 Wye Rd, Sherwood Park CARROT COFFEEHOUSE 9351118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464153 St, 780.424 9467 CASK AND BARREL 10041104 St; 780.498.1224, thecaskandbarrel.ca CENTRAL SENIOR LIONS CENTRE 11113-113 St CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 CHVRCH OF JOHN 10260-103 St, 780.884.8994, thechvrchofjohn. com COMMON 9910-109 St CONVOCATION HALL Old Arts Building, University of Alberta, music.ualberta.ca DENIZEN HALL 10311-103 Ave, 780.424.8215, thedenizenhall. com DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834 DV8/MAMA'S PIZZA 7317-101 Ave NW EDMONTON PUBLIC LIBRARY– STRATHCONA BRANCH 8331-104 St EL CORTEZ 10322-83 Ave NW, elcortezcantina.com EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE 10220-103 St NW, 780. 424.0077, yourgaybar.com FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 FIDDLER'S ROOST 7308-76 Ave, 780.439.9788, fiddlersroost.ca FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave, 780.916.1557 GAS PUMP NIGHT CLUB & BAR 10166-114 St

HILLTOP PUB 8220 106 Ave HOLY TRINITY ANGLICAN CHURCH 10037-84 Ave NW, 780.433.5530, holytrinity.ab.ca HORIZON STAGE 1001 Calahoo Rd, Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995, horizonstage.com HUMMINGBIRD BISTRO CAFE 8336-160 Ave, 780.401.3313, hummingbirdbistro.ca IRISH SPORTS CLUB 12546-126 St, 780.453.2249 J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JUBILEE AUDITORIUM 1145587 Ave NW, 780.427.2760, jubileeauditorium.com KELLY'S PUB 10156-104 St NW, 780.451.8825, kellyspubedmonton.com L.B.’S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEAF BAR AND GRILL 9016-132 Ave, 780.757.2121 LIZARD LOUNGE 11827 St. Albert Tr, 780.451.9180, facebook.com/ The-Lizard-Lounge MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 10086 MacDonald Dr NW, mcdougallunited.com MKT FRESH FOOD AND BEER MARKET 8101 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.2337 MERCER TAVERN 10363 104 St, 587.521.1911 MERCURY ROOM 10575-114 St MOONSHINERS 5202-50 St, Stony Plain MUTTART HALL 10050 Macdonald Dr, 780.633.3725 NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN 10524 Jasper Ave, 780.756.9045, theneedle.ca NEWCASTLE PUB 8170-50 St, 780.490.1999

NEW WEST HOTEL 15025-111 Ave NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535109A Ave O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 O'MAILLES IRISH PUB 104, 398 St Albert Rd, St Albert ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 PALACE CASINO 8882-170 St NW, 780.444.2112, palacecasino. com PINT–DOWNTOWN 10125-109 St NW PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave THE PROVINCIAL PUB 160, 4211-106 St RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780.457.3118 ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH 10209-123 St NW ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235-101 St SANDS INN & SUITES 12340 Fort Rd, sandshoteledmonton.com SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Yellowhead Inn, 15004 Yellowhead Trail SHERLOCK HOLMES–DOWNTOWN 10012-101 A Ave, 780.426.7784, sherlockshospitality.com SHERLOCK HOLMES–U OF A 8519-112 St, 780.431.0091, sherlockshospitality.com SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM 8882-170 St, 780.444.1752, sherlockshospitality.com SIDELINERS PUB 11018-127 St SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810-124 St, 587.521.6328 SNEAKY PETE'S 12315-118 Ave SPARK CENTRE 2257 Premier Way #116 Sherwood Park

SEP/16

Ehnes (violin), Andrew Armstrong (piano); 7:30pm; $20-$55

SEP/17

DJs

SEP/19

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Late Fee;

NOTHING BUT THIEVES TIMBRE CONCERTS AND STARLITE ROOM PRESENT

JUNIOR BOYS STARLITE ROOM IS PROUD TO PRESENT

CASTLE W/ TEKARRA, & DEMISE

SEP/20

LIVE NATION.COM PRESENTS

THE DANDY WARHOLS W/ GUESTS

SEP/23 SOLD OUT

THE STARLITE ROOM PRESENTS

SEP/24

UBK PRESENTS

BILLIARD CLUB Why wait

Wednesdays: Wed night party with DJ Alize every Wed; no cover

ONES TO WATCH PRESENTS

W/ EGYPTRIXX, BORYS

WINPSEAR CENTRE ESO &

Winspear Overture Tour; 12-1pm

PERCEPTUAL DISTORTION

W/ CIVIL TWILIGHT, THE WRECKS

Classical ROBERTSON-WESLEY UNITED CHURCH James

STARLITE ROOM PROUDLY PRESENTS

W/ PUGNACIOUS, ETOWN BEATDOWN, SLUMLORD, CORVUS THE CROW, TYRANT

Karaoke; 9pm

MILLENCOLIN W/ SUCH GOLD

ALL OUR BASS BELONG TO YOU FEATURING KRNE, IVY LAB, GREAZUS, DIV/DIV

THE STARLITE ROOM IS A PRIVATE VENUE FOR OUR MEMBERS AND THEIR GUESTS. IF YOU REQUIRE A MEMBERSHIP YOU CAN PURCHASE ONE AT THE VENUE PRIOR TO / OR AFTER THE DOOR TIMES FOR EACH SHOW.

Every Wed PINT DOWNTOWN Wild

Wing Wednesdays at the Pint with DJ Thomas Culture; Every Wed, 10pm RANCH ROADHOUSE

DJ Shocker and Seelo Mondo; Every Wed

VENUEGUIDE 9910 9910B-109 St NW, 780.709.4734, 99ten.ca ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179 THE ALMANAC 10351-82 Ave, 780.760.4567, almanaconwhyte. com ARCADIA BAR 10988-124 St, 780.916.1842, arcadiayeg.com ARDEN THEATRE 5 St Anne St, St Albert, 780.459.1542, stalbert.ca/ experience/arden-theatre ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 780.432.4611, atlantictrapandgill.com THE AVIARY 9314-111 Ave, 780.233.3635, facebook.com/ arteryyeg BAILEY THEATRE 5041-50 St, Camrose, 780. 672.5510, baileytheatre.com BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 1042582 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLVD SUPPER X CLUB 10765 Jasper Ave BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB 322682 St, 780.462.1888 BOURBON ROOM 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert THE BOWER 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.423.425; info@thebower.ca BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 THE BUCKINGHAM 10439 82 Ave, 780.761.1002, thebuckingham.ca CAFE BLACKBIRD 9640-142 St NW, 780.451.8890, cafeblackbird.ca CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523,

SEP/10

ST. BASIL'S CULTURAL CENTRE 10819-71 Ave NW, 780.434.4288, stbasilschurch. com STUDIO 96 10909-96 St NW SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 1292397 St, 780.758.5924 STANLEY MILNER LIBRARY THEATRE 7 Sir Winston Churchill Square STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave TAVERN ON WHYTE 10507-82 Ave, 780.521.4404 TILTED KILT PUB AND EATERY 17118-90 Ave TIRAMISU 10750-124 St TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 10014-81 Ave NW, 780.433.1604, trinity-lutheran. ab.ca TWIST ULTRA LOUNGE 10324-82 Whyte Ave UNION HALL 6240-99 St NW, 780.702-2582, unionhall.ca UNITARIAN CHURCH OF EDMONTON 10804-119 St NW UPTOWN FOLK CLUB 7308-76 Ave, 780.436.1554 VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO–St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 VIDA LATIN NIGHT CLUB 10746 Jasper Ave, 780.951.2705 WILD EARTH BAKERY– MILLCREEK 8902-99 St, wildearthbakery.com WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours.com YARDBIRD SUITE 11 Tommy Banks Way, 780.432.0428 YEG DANCE CLUB 11845 Wayne Gretzky Dr

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

SEP/9

STARLITE ROOM PROUDLY PRESENTS

CHIXDIGGIT

W/ THE OLD WIVES, THE REAL SICKIES, A GENTLEMANS PACT

SEP/10

STARLITE ROOM PROUDLY PRESENTS

FORESTER CD RELEASE

W/ THE UNFORTUNATES, WORST DAYS DOWN, DUSTY TUCKER

SEP/15

LURED POKEMON GO DANCE PARTY

POKEDANCE PARTY

W/ TYRONE S, PANDABOI, MIIELZ4REEALZ

SEP/16

STARLITE ROOM PROUDLY PRESENTS

TEENAGE BOTTLEROCKET W/ THE BLAME ITS & MORE

SEP/22

STARLITE ROOM PROUDLY PRESENTS

THE DIRTY NIL W/ GUESTS

SEP/23

STARLITE ROOM IS PROUD TO PRESENT

CHRON GOBLIN W/ THE MOTHERCRAFT, WAINGRO, SLEEP DEMON

SEP/24

STARLITE ROOM PROUDLY PRESENTS

THE BRAINS W/ KMAN & THE 45S

MUSIC 25


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

COMEDY AZUCAR Supper Club Comedy Night • 13062-50 St • With a comedian from LA as the headliner and Brent Ehtun opening • Sep 14, 7:30pm • $5

Black Dog Freehouse • 10425-82 Ave • Underdog Comedy Show • Every Thu

Century Casino • 13103 Fort Rd • 780.481.9857 • Open Mic Night: Every Thu; 7:30-9pm

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Fri-Sat: 8:30pm • Danny Acappella; Sep 9-10

FOOD ADDICTS • Alano Club (& Simply

Fort Saskatchewan 45+ Singles Coffee Group • A&W, 10101-88 Ave, Fort Saskatchewan • 780.907.0201 (Brenda) • A mixed group, all for conversation and friendship • Every Sun, 2pm

Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Information Night • Habitat for Humanity Prefab Shop, 14135-128 Ave • 780.451.3416 ext. 236 • vbatten@hfh.org • hfh.org/volunteer/ vin • Learn about taking the next steps and what opportunities are available at Habitat for Humanity • Every 3rd Thu of the month, excluding Dec; 6-7pm • Free

Lotus Qigong • SAGE downtown 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.695.4588 • Attendees can raise their vital energy with a weekly Yixue practice • Every Fri, 2-3:30pm • Free Monday Mingle • Hexagon Board Game

Northern Alberta Wood Carvers Association • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-106

Best Comedy Night in Edmonton". Stand up comedy open mic hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm (8:30pm sign-up)

Empress Ale House • 9912-82 Ave • Empress Comedy Night: Highlighting the best stand-up Edmonton has to offer. New headliner every week • Every Sun, 9pm • Free Iliza Shlesinger • River Cree Resort & Casino, Enoch • Sep 10, 9pm • $25 and up Max Amini • Arden Theatre, St Albert • Sep 10, 8pm • $30-$75

Rouge Lounge • 10111-117 St • Comedy Groove every Wed; 9pm

Groups/CLUBS/meetings Aikikai Aikido Club • 10139-87 Ave, Old Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue, Thu; 7-9pm

Amnesty International Edmonton • 8307-109 St • amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org • edmontonamnesty.org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug, Dec) • Free

Argentine Tango Dance at Foot Notes Studio • Foot Notes Dance Studio (South side), 9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@ shaw.ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pmmidnight • $15

Babes In Arms • The Carrot, 9351-118 Ave • A casual parent group • Every Fri, 10am-12pm

DeepSoul.ca • 780.217.2464; call or text for Sunday jam locations • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins on Les Paul Standard guitars; Pink Floydish originals plus great Covers of Classics: some FREE; Twilight Zone Lively Up Yourself Tour (with DJ Cool Breeze); all ages

Drop-In D&D • Hexagon Board Game Café, 10123 Whyte Ave • 780.757.3105 • info@thehexcafe.com • thehexcafe.com • An epic adventure featuring a variety of pre-made characters, characters that guests can make on their own, or one that has already been started. Each night will be a single campaign that fits in a larger story arc. For all levels of gamers and those brand new or experienced to D&D • Every Tue, 7pm • $5

Edmonton Needlecraft Guild • Avonmore United Church Bsmt, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue ea month, 7:30pm

EDMONTON OUTDOOR CLUB (EOC) • edmontonoutdoorclub.com • Offering a variety of fun activities in and around Edmonton • Free to join; info at info@edmontonoutdoorclub.com

26 AT THE BACK

Introduction to Fertility Awareness

St Paul's United Church • 11526-76 Ave

Waskahegan Trail Association Guide Hike • waskahegantrail.ca • Mactaggart

Sanctuary; Superstore Calgary Trail NW corner parking lot, 5019 Calgary Trail; 780.642.6372; Sep 11, 8:50am-3pm • Kopp Lake A35 to A34; Superstore Calgary Trail NW corner parking lot, 5019 Calgary Trail; 780.468.4331; Sep 18, 9am3pm • Mill Creek Ravine; Superstore Calgary Trail NW corner parking lot, 5019 Calgary Trail; 780.756.3623; Sep 24, 9am-3pm

Wiccan Assembly • Ritchie Hall, 7727-98 St • The Congregationalist Wiccan Assembly of Alberta meets the 2nd Sun each month (except Aug), 6pm • Info: contact cwaalberta@gmail.com

LECTURES/Presentations

Connie's Comedy comes to Moonshiners • 5202-50 St, Stony Plain • Dinner and show

DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • Voted "Vue Weekly

DBG Crafters Fall Sale • Devonian Bo-

Dementia Workshop • Old Timers Cabin, 9430 Scona Rd • 780.450.4802 • edmonton@carp. ca • Topics include "What is Dementia?", "Reducing the Risk", and "Living with Dementia" • Sep 29, 9am-1pm • $10 (includes a light lunch)

Pride Centre of Edmonton • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • Drop in hours: Mon, Wed 4-7pm; Fri 6-9pm; Closed Sat-Sun and Holidays • JamOUT: Music mentorship and instruction for youth aged 12-24; Every other Tue, 7-9pm • Equal Fierce Fit & Fabulous: recreational fitness program, ages 12-24; every other Tue, 6-8pm, every other Tue • Queer Lens: weekly education and discussion group open to everyone; every Wed, 7-8:30pm • Mindfulness Meditation: open to everyone; every Thu, 6-6:50pm • Men's Social Circle: A social support group for all male-identified persons over 18 years of age in the LGBT*Q community; 1st and 3rd Thu each month; 7-9pm • TTIQ (18+ Trans* Group): 2nd Mon of the month, 7-9pm • Art & Identity: exploring identity through the arts, a wellness initiative; Every other Fri, 6-9pm • Edmonton Illusions: cross-dressing and transgender group 18+; 2nd Fri of each month, 7-9pm • Movies & Games Night: Every other Fri, 6-9pm • Thought OUT: Altview’s all-ages discussion group; every Sat, 7-9pm • Seahorse Support Circle: facilitated meet up for families with trans and gender creative kids aged 5-14; 2nd Sun of the month, 3-5pm • Men Talking with Pride: Social discussion group for gay and bisexual men; Every Sun, 7-9pm

Community League • 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); Meet every Tue starting in Sep, 7-9pm except last Tue ea month; Contact: Mark 780.437.1136 or Antonio 780.463.5331 or email: yclubtoastmasters@gmail.com

780.483.5999 • Quinn Dahle; Sep 7-11

with Andrew Albert and Scott Belford co-headlining • Sep 23, 7pm (dinner), 9pm (show) • Tickets available at YEGLive

the rocks & the adults come out to play. Exploring the science behind Science Fiction, fantasy, video games, & more • Sep 15, 7-10pm • $17 (adv), $23 (door + GST)

Y Toastmasters Club, • Queen Alexandra

Cafe, 10123 Whyte Ave • 780.757.3105 • info@ thehexcafe.com • thehexcafe.com • Meet new gamers. Go to the event solo or with a group • Every Mon, 5-11pm • $5 (one drink per person)

Comic Strip • Bourbon St, WEM •

Illusions Social Club • Pride Centre, 10608-105 Ave • 780.387.3343 • pridecentreofedmonton.org • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month, 7-9pm

org; reader1@shaw.ca

Done Cafe), 10728-124 St • 780.718.7133 (or 403.506.4695 after 7pm) • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm

St • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

• ASAC, 7219-106 St (Side Door) • Find out what they never taught you in sex ed • Sep 14, 7-9pm • Free

Open Door Comic Creator Meetings

Glass ​Blowing ​C​lasses ​• Pixie Glassworks,

• Happy Harbor Comics, 10729-104 Ave • 780.452.8211 • happyharborcomics.com • Open to any skill level. Meet other artists and writers, glean tricks of the trade and gain tips to help your own work, or share what you've already done • 2nd and 4th Thu of every month, 7pm

Open House Seniors Programs •

9322-60 Ave • 780.436.4460 • pixieglassworks. com/pages/classes • Offering three levels in each of: hollow body work, implosions, sculpture, pipe-making and beads. Call to book. No classes on holidays • Every Mon, Wed-Thu, 6-9pm • $150

Great Expeditions Travel Slide • St. Luke’s Anglican Church, 84240-95 Ave • 780.469.3270 (Gerry Staring), 780.435.6406 (John Woollard), 780.454.6216 (Sylvia Krogh) • South East Asia by Donna Hamar (Oct 3) • First Mon of the month, 7:30pm • $3 donation (guests are asked to bring snacks to share); evryone welcome

Strathcona Place 55+ Centre, 10831 University Ave • 780.433.5807 • Come and learn about our New &amp; Exciting Seniors programs • Sep 16, 11am-1pm

Organization for Bipolar Affective Disorder (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm

Nerd Nite #28 • The Needle Vinyl Tavern, 10524 Jasper Ave • edmonton.nerdnite.com • Featuring nerdy presentations with food and drinks. Lectures include: "Smart polymers & you: better sensors, stronger muscles, and more effective drugs" by Dr. Michael Serpe, "Culture, body mods, and the stories we inscribe into our flesh" by Dr. Katie Biittner, "‘Don’t be nervous, but the whole country is watching…’ Confessions of an Olympic Broadcaster" by Mark Connolly • Sep 21, 8pm (show) • $20 (adv), $25 (door - if available); 18+ only

0651, obad@shaw.ca; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

Schizophrenia Society Family Support Drop-in Group • Schizophrenia Society of Alberta, 5215-87 St • 780.452.4661 • schizophrenia.ab.ca • The Schizophrenia Society of Alberta offers a variety of services and support programs for those who are living with the illness, family members, caregivers, and friends • 1st and 3rd Thu each month, 7-9pm • Free

Scrambled YEG • Brittany's Lounge, 1022597 St • 780.497.0011 • Open Genre Variety Stage: artist from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations • Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm Seventies Forever Music Society • Call 587.520.3833 for location • deepsoul.ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY (TOPS) • Grace United Church annex, 6215-104 Ave • 780.479-8667 (Bob) • bobmurra@telus.net • Low-cost, fun and friendly weight loss group • Every Mon, 6:30pm Toastmasters • Chamber Toastmasters Club: 6th floor, World Trade

Centre, 9990 Jasper Ave; Contact: 780.462.1878/ RonChapman@shaw.ca (Ron Chapman); 780.424.6364/dkorpany@telusplanet.net (Darryl Korpany); Meet every Thu from Sep-Jun, 6-7:45pm • Club Bilingue Toastmasters Meetings: Campus St. Jean: Pavillion McMahon; 780.667.6105 (Willard); clubbilingue.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 7pm • Fabulous Facilitators Toastmasters Club: 2nd Fl, Canada Place Rm 217, 9700 Jasper Ave; Carisa: divdgov2014_15@outlook.com, 780.439.3852; fabulousfacilitators.toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 12:05-1pm • N'Orators Toastmasters Club: Lower Level, McClure United Church, 13708-74 St: meet every Thu, 6:45-8:30pm; contact vpm@norators.com, 780.807.4696, norators.com • Terrified of Public Speaking: Norwood Legion Edmonton, 11150-82 St NW; Every Thu until Jun, 7:30-9:30pm; Free; contact jnwafula@yahoo.com; norwoodtoastmasters.org • Upward Bound Toastmaster Club: Rm 7, 6 Fl, Edmonton Public Library–DT: Meets every Wed, 7-8:45pm; Sep-May; upward.toastmastersclubs.

Paula Simons: Digital Disruption and the Discourse of Democracy • Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Square • epl.ca/speakerseries • With a knack for getting to the heart of the story, Paula will share how the world of journalism has and is evolving, especially in the midst of our social media revolution, and how these two worlds converge • Sep 15, 7-8:30pm

The Power to Decide: The Role of Women in Creating a Sustainable Future • Telus International Center, University of Alberta, 1104-87 Ave • 780.988.0200 • conference@acgc.ca • Sep 16, 6:30-9pm • $20 (adults), $10 (youth and low income); available at Eventbrite

Women Grow Networking Series • St. Albert Rugby Club, 51 Riel Dr • lisette. womengrow@gmail.com • universe.com/events/ edmonton-women-grow-signature-networkingevent-tickets-1FRCBS/edit • Connecting aspiring and current professionals in the cannabis industry • Sep 8, 7-9pm • $25 (adv), $35 (standard), $40 (door)

QUEER Evolution Wonderlounge • 10220-103

St • 780.424.0077 • yourgaybar.com • Mon: Drag Race in the White Room; 7pm • Wed: Monthly games night/trivia • Thu: Happy hour, 6-8pm; Karaoke, 7-12:30am • Fri: Flashback Friday with your favourite hits of the 80s/90s/2000s; rotating drag and burlesque events • Sat: Rotating DJs Velix and Suco • Sun: Weekly drag show, 10:30pm

G.L.B.T.Q Seniors Group • S.A.G.E Bldg, main floor Cafe, Or in confidence one-on-one in the Craft Room • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance. One-onone meetings are also available in the craft room • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: Tuff69@telus.net

• 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

Team Edmonton • Various sports and recreation activities • teamedmonton.ca • Bootcamp: Garneau School, 10925-87 Ave; Most Mon, 7-8pm • Swimming: NAIT Swimming Pool, 11665-109 St; Every Tue, 7:30-8:30pm and every Thu, 7-8pm • Water Polo: NAIT Swimming Pool, 11665-109 St; Every Tue, 8:30-9:30pm • Yoga: New Lion's Breath Yoga Studio, #301,10534-124 St; Every Wed, 7:30-9pm • Taekwondo: near the Royal Gardens Community Centre, 4030-117 St; Contact for specific times • Abs: Parkallen Community League Hall, 6510-111 St; Every Tue, 6-7pm and Thu, 7:15-8:15pm • Dodgeball: Royal Alexandra Hospital Gymnasium; Every Sun, 5-7pm • Running: meet at Kinsmen main entrance; Every Sun, 10am • Spin: Blitz Conditioning, 10575-115 St; Every Tue, 7-8pm• Volleyball: Stratford Elementary School, 8715-153 St; Every Fri, 7-9 • Meditation: Edmonton Pride Centre, 10608-105 Ave; 3rd Thu of every month, 5:30-6:15pm • Board Games: Underground Tap & Grill, 10004 Jasper Ave; One Sun per month, 3-7pm • All Bodies Swim: Bonnie Doon Leisure Centre, 8468-81 St; One Sat per month 4:30-5:30pm

Woodys Video Bar • 11723 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6557 • Mon: Massive Mondays features talented comedians • Tue: Domestic bottle beer special only $3.75 all night long • Wed: Jugs of Canadian and Kokanee for $13; Karaoke with Shirley from 7pm-12:30am • Thu: Highballs on special only $3.75 all night long; Karaoke with Bubbles 7pm12:30am • Fri: Comming soon: DJ Arrow Chaser's new TGIF Party • Sat: Pool Tournement, 4pm; Jager shots on special only $4; Coming soon, DJ Jazzy SPECIAL EVENTS 2016 Harvest of the Past & Harvest Food Festival • Ukrainian Cultural Hertiage Village, located 25 minutes or 50 km (30 miles) east of Edmonton along Highway 16, just 3 km (1.8 miles) east of Elk Island National Park • history.alberta.ca/ ukrainianvillage • See the Village one last time for the season and witness an old-fashioned threshing bee complete with vintage farm equipment and grain deliveries to the historic elevator • Sep 11, 9am-5pm • Regular admission

9th Annual Kenya Run for Water • Emily Murphy Park, 11904 Emily Murphy Park Rd • info@icchange.ca • icchange.ca/9th-annual-kenyarun-water • A 5 or 10 km walk/run and a 100m water relay. Proceeds go to support the expansion of ICChange's Kenya Ceramic Project • Sep 11, 9am-12pm

Annual Fall Bazaar • Strathcona Place 55+ Centre, 10831 University Ave • 780.433.5807 • Sep 9-10, 9am

Callingwood Cornfest • Marketplace at Callingwood, 178 St & 69 Ave • info@callingwoodmarketplace.com • bit.ly/2b9MhST • A family event in Edmonton that raises funds for the Edmonton Firefighter’s Burn Treatment Society • Sep 10, 125pm • Free (corn is by donation and games, food and activities are ticketed. Tickets can be purchased at the ticket tent on-site)

DARK MATTERS • Telus World of Science, 11211-142 St • telusworldofscienceedmonton. ca • An 18+ event, where the science is served on

VUEWEEKLY.com | sep 8 – sep 14, 2016

tanical Garden • devonian.ualberta.ca • Handmade crafts from the bounty of the fall garden. Products are handmade by the Devonian Botanic Garden’s Crafters Association, many with materials harvested at the DBG. Proceeds support programs and special projects at the Garden • Sep 24-25 • Free (to attend craft sale), regular admission (those who want to visit the garden as well)

Edmonton Comic & Entertainment Expo • Edmonton Expo Centre, 7515-118 Ave • info@edmontonexpo.com • edmontonexpo.com • A three-day celebration of all things pop culture • Sep 23-25

Edmonton Photo Fair – Photographic Swap Meet • Wingate Inn - Edmonton West, 18220-110 Ave • Featuring a sale of camera equipment, both used and new. Featuring film/digital camera, lenses, accessories, book, classic and antique camera • Sep 18, 10am-3pm • $3 (adult), free (kids)

Fall Community Clothing Swap 2016 • Variant Edition Comics & Culture, 10116-151 St NW • dleblanc@variantedmonton.com • An entire weekend of swapping. Attendees will donate items (CDs, DVDs, clothing, toys, etc) and find items for themselves • Sep 10-11

Fall Family Festival • Devonian Botanical Garden • devonian.ualberta.ca • Fun, crafts and games for the whole family in the splendor of the fall Garden. Make your own fall-themed crafts together. Enjoy a beverage and bake a yummy apple by the Grebe Pond • Sep 11, 12:30-3:30pm • Regular admission

Fruit Growers Festival • Devonian Botanical Garden • devonian.ualberta.ca • Sample the abundance of fruits that can be grown. Experts from the Fruit Growers Association will be on hand to answer questions about fruit-growing in Alberta, and guest speakers will discuss the challenges and pleasures of fruit growing on the prairies. Also: fruit sampling and more • Sep 18, 11am-3pm • Regular admission Kaleido Family Arts Festival • 118 Ave • kaleidofest.ca • Kaleido welcomes arts and cultural experiences with multi-arts collaborative performances in music, dance, theatre, film, literary and visual arts with performances on rooftops, sides of buildings, back alleys, parks and found spaces • Sep 9-11 • Free (donations accepted)

Metal Art Show and Sale • ReynoldsAlberta Museum • history.alberta.ca/reynolds • Featuring artists who work primarily with metals. The art will include: unique pieces composed primarily of carbon steel, stainless steel or Damascus steel, pieces created from recycled steel machinery, decorative yet functional tools (knives, etc.),novel toys and other whimsical items made primarily from steel • Sep 17-18

Photographer’s Drop-in Morning • Devonian Botanical Garden • devonian.ualberta.ca • A chance to capture the early morning light and stillness of the Garden, before it opens to the public for the day. For all levels • Sep 24, 7:30-10am • Regular admission (valid for the full day) Step 'n Stride • Rundle Park (ACT Centre), Entrance at 118 Ave & Abbottsfield Rd • 780.425.6400 • erae@parkinsonalberta.ca • parkinsonalberta.ca • An annual fundraising effort to provide the support, services, education and essential funds for research that make every day better for those with Parkinson disease and the people who care for them • Sep 10, 9am-4pm • Register and collect pledges online or by using the Step 'n Stride form

Stop the Injustice Dinner and Auction • Meridian Banquet Hall, 4820-76 Ave • 780.485.9995 • missionofmercy.ca/dinner-auction • Sep 9, 5:30-9:30pm • $45

Western Canada Fashion Week • Arts Barns • sandrawcfw@gmail.com • westerncanadafashionweek.com • A nationally recognized fashion and design event • Sep 15-24

What the Truck?! • Churchill Square • team@whatthetruck.ca • whattheruck.ca • Sep 25, 2-7pm

YEG Market • 152 St and Stony Plain Road • yegmarket.com • Featuring a different theme each week. Included is fresh fruit, veggies, crafts and more • Ever Fri, 4-8pm, May 27-Sep 16 • Free


FREEWILLASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Two seven-year-old girls showed me three tricks I could use to avoid taking myself too seriously and getting too attached to my dignity. I'm offering these tricks to you just in time for the letting-go phase of your astrological cycle. Trick #1: Speak in a made-up language for at least ten minutes. Example: "Groftyp hulbnu wivgeeri proot xud amasterulius. Quoshibojor frovid zemplissit." Trick #2: Put a different kind of shoe and sock on each foot and pretend you're two people stuck in a single body. Give each side of you a unique nickname. Trick #3: Place an unopened bag of barbecue-flavored potato chips on a table, then bash your fist down on it, detonating a loud popping sound and unleashing a spray of crumbs out the ends of the bag. Don't clean up the mess for at least an hour. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In accordance with the astrological omens, I suggest you spend less energy dwelling in profane time so you expand your relationship with sacred time. If that's of interest to you, consider the following definitions. PROFANE TIME happens when you're engulfed in the daily grind. Swarmed by a relentless flurry of immediate concerns, you are held hostage by the chatter of your monkey mind. Being in SACRED TIME attunes you to the relaxing hum of eternity. It enables you to be in intimate contact with your soul's deeper agenda, and affords you extra power to transform yourself in harmony with your noble desires and beautiful intentions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): About 1.7 million years ago, our human ancestors began using primitive hand axes made from rocks. This technology remained in use for over 60,000 generations before anyone invented more sophisticated tools and implements. Science writer Marcus Chown refers to this period as "the million years of boredom." Its slow pace contrasts sharply with technology's brisk evolution in the last 140 years. In 1880, there were no cars, planes, electric lights, telephones, TVs, or Internet. I surmise that you're leaving your own phase of relatively slow progress, Gemini. In the coming months, I expect your transformations will progress with increasing speed -starting soon. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Prediction #1: You will attract truckloads of good luck by working to upgrade and refine the way you communicate. Prediction #2: You will tickle the attention of interesting people who could ultimately provide you with clues you will need to thrive in 2017. #3: You will discover secrets of how to articulate complicated feelings and subtle ideas that have been locked inside you. Pre-

diction #4: You'll begin a vibrant conversation that will continue to evolve for a long time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You know you have a second brain in your gut, right? (If not, read this: http://bit.ly/secondbrain.) During the past three weeks, I have been beaming telepathic instructions toward this smart part of you. Here's an edited version of the message I've been sending: "Cultivate your tenacity, darling. Build up your stamina, sweetheart. Feed your ability to follow through on what you've started, beautiful. Be persistent and spunky and gritty, my dear." Alas, I'm not sure my psychic broadcasts have been as effective as I'd hoped. I think you need further encouragement. So please summon more fortitude and staying power, you gutsy stalwart. Be staunch and dogged and resolute, you stouthearted powerhouse. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Is "Big Bang" the best term we can come up with to reference the beginning of the universe? It sounds violent and messy -- like a random, accidental splatter. I would much prefer a term that suggests sublime elegance and playful power -- language that would capture the awe and reverence I feel as I contemplate the sacred mystery we are privileged to inhabit. What if we used a different name for the birth of creation, like the "Primal Billow" or the "Blooming Ha Ha" or the "Majestic Bouquet"? By the way, I recommend that you consider those last three terms as being suitable titles for your own personal life story in the coming weeks. A great awakening and activation are imminent. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The last few weeks have been fraught with rich plot twists, naked dates with destiny, and fertile turning points. I expect there will be further intrigue in the near future. A fierce and tender decision at a crossroads? The unexpected arrival of a hot link to the future? A karmic debt that's canceled or forgiven? In light of the likelihood that the sweet-and-sour, confusing-and-revelatory drama will continue, I encourage you to keep your levels of relaxed intensity turned up high. More than I've seen in a long time, you have the magic and the opportunity to transform what needs to be transformed. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the coming days, you will have more than your usual access to help and guidance. Divine interventions are possible. Special dispensations and charmed coincidences, too. If you don't believe in fairy dust, magic beans, and lucky potions, maybe you should set that prejudice aside for a while. Subtle miracles are more likely to bestow their gifts if your reasonable theories don't get in

ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

JONESIN’ CROSSWORD

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“Your Daily Allowance” -- some ration-al terms.

the way. Here's an additional tip: Don't get greedy. Use the openings you're offered with humility and gratitude. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When my daughter Zoe was growing up, I wanted her to be familiar with the origins of ordinary stuff that she benefited from. That's why I took her to small farms where she could observe the growth and harvest of organic food crops. We visited manufacturing facilities where cars, furniture, toys, and kitchen sinks were built. She saw bootmakers creating boots and professional musicians producing songs in recording studios. And much more. I would love it if you would give yourself comparable experiences in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. It's an excellent time to commune with the sources of things that nurture you and make your life better. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Unless you were brought up by a herd of feral donkeys, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to embark on your second childhood. Unless you're allergic to new ideas, the foreseeable future will bring you strokes of curious luck that inspire you to change and change and change your mind. And unless you are addicted to your same old stale comforts, life will offer you chances to explore frontiers that could expose you to thrilling new comforts. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): These days, my dear, your eccentric beauty is even more unkempt than usual. I like it. It entertains and charms me. And as for your idiosyncratic intelligence: That, too, is messier and cuter and even more interesting than ever before. I'm inclined to encourage you to milk this unruly streak for all its potential. Maybe it will provoke you to experiment in situations where you've been too accepting of the stagnant status quo. And perhaps it will embolden you to look for love and money in more of the right places. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I'm giving you an ultimatum, Pisces: Within the next 144 hours, I demand that you become at least 33 percent happier. Fifty percent would be even better. Somehow you've got to figure out what you can do to enhance your sense of well-being and increase your enjoyment of life. I'm sort of joking, but on the other hand I'm completely serious. From my perspective, it's essential that you feel really good in the coming days. Abundant pleasure is not merely a luxury, but rather a necessity. Do you have any ideas about how to make this happen? Start here: 1. Identify your four most delightful memories, and re-enact them in your imagination. 2. Go see the people whose influences most thoroughly animate your self-love. V

Across

1 “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” topic, presumably 4 Dance in a pit 8 Chickens, ducks, and such 13 Org. which still has not detected any signals from outer space 14 “My mistake!” 15 In a whirl 16 Like a centaur or mermaid 18 Pastime requiring careful movements 19 Abbr. in a military address 20 Like many trollish comments 21 Flora and fauna 22 Qualifies to compete in a tournament 25 Beehive St. capital 27 “American Horror Story: Freak Show” enclosure 28 Steaming mad 30 “Waterfalls” group 32 Company shares, for short 33 Mandarin hybrid used in Asian cuisine 34 Facebook meme often paired with a non-sequitur image 39 Gardener’s gear 40 Pioneering filmmaker Browning 41 ___-mo 42 Common soap opera affliction 44 Marooning spot 47 “Amazing!” 48 Assistance 53 Trivial Pursuit edition 55 Elvis’s disputed middle name 56 “I Ching” philosophy 57 Hardly happy with 58 Bygone lemon-lime soda 60 “Next to Me” singer ___ Sande 61 Rice from New Orleans 62 “Lord of the Rings” creatures 63 Passenger car 64 Insects with a waggle dance 65 “___ & Oh’s” (Elle King hit)

7 Buying channel on TV 8 Marinated meat in a tortilla 9 Dunkable dessert 10 Fell apart, as a deal 11 Allow 12 Kidnapping gp. of the ‘70s 13 Email folder that’s often automatically cleared 17 Move swiftly 21 Dick in the Pro Football Hall of Fame 23 Soup follower 24 Roman called “The Censor” 26 You’re looking at it 29 “Heavens to Betsy!” 31 Austin and Boston, for two 32 Late Pink Floyd member ___ Barrett 34 “Austin Powers” verb 35 “Jeopardy!” in a box, e.g. 36 How some medicines are taken 37 Baby bronco 38 Adjusts, as tires 43 Naomi Watts thriller set for November 2016 45 Gender-neutral term for someone of Mexican or South American heritage, say 46 Establishes as law 49 “Common Sense” pamphleteer 50 “Fame” actress Cara 51 A and E, but not I, O, or U 52 “Easy ___ it!” 54 “The Lion King” lioness 57 “Au revoir, ___ amis” 58 Arm-raised dance move that some say looks like sneezing 59 “Brokeback Mountain” director ©2016 Jonesin' Crosswords

Down

1 Attack, tiger-style 2 Drive or putt 3 Short pulse, in Morse code 4 Hood or Washington 5 Extra somethin’-somethin’ 6 Word after parking or safe

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

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SEX-OLOGY

TAMI-LEE DUNCAN // TAMI-LEE@vueweekly.com

This guilty heart needs to confess

But there are many consequences to unburdening yourself, including hurting your loved one Question: I’ve been married to my wife for 30 years. She’s seen me through a lot of rough times— drug and alcohol addiction, unemployment, health issues, and family problems. She’s been amazing and I’ve honestly never appreciated her more. Sadly, despite this, a few years ago I cheated on her with her best friend. It happened twice, once while she was upstairs passed out, and then another time about a year later. I can’t tell her, because she would definitely leave me. But it’s eating me up inside. What do I do? Answer: Societal lessons of right and wrong tend to dictate that when we make a mistake, we must take full responsibility and willingly accept the consequences. However, the decision of whether or not to confess to infidelity is not a black and white moral issue, but rather a nuanced grey. Lets start by exploring the two main options.

The honesty argument: When I go to the doctor, the physician has an obligation to provide me with information about the risks and benefits of any treatment, so that I can provide my informed consent. And I have the right to decline, even if it means confronting other challenges. The same is true in relationships. We collect information about our partners and ultimately decide whether or not to proceed in the relationship. To deprive someone of vital information is to deprive them of their right to choose what is right for them, and to deprive ourselves of the knowledge that they are actively choosing you. The deception not only threatens trust, but also equality, respect, and security. Plus, honesty means not having to remember a lie. The “don’t tell” perspective: Two wrongs don’t make a right. A confession will cause untold pain to multiple people and destroy many relationships. Why should everyone

suffer for the mistake of one person? The important thing is that we learn from mistakes and those lessons don’t necessarily require formal punishment. In fact, the excruciating realization of our fallibility is often punishment enough, especially if it is accompanied by honest selfreflection and a commitment to not repeat the mistake. A hard lesson learned and compassionately sparing loved ones from additional hurt makes it easier to put the guilt aside and live comfortably. As with most issues of moral ambiguity, the answer comes with an examination of the subjective circumstances and our personal values. Our ability to reconcile and act in accordance with these values is what allows us to find peace when seeking absolution for wrongdoing. Those whose values emphasize honesty will feel relief in confession even if facing painful unwanted consequences, while others may easily assuage

a nagging conscience if it ensures a secure family unit for their children. The challenge comes when our actions do not reflect our own sense of right and wrong, but rather are motivated by fear. This leads us to twist into mental contortions as we desperately try to justify our choices in an effort to avoid accountability and consequence. Given what you’ve described, it sounds like you don’t have the luxury of living guilt free while keeping the affair a secret. So lets explore the moral grey… The partial, context driven confession: The guilt is overpowering and fear of getting caught causes ceaseless paranoia. There would be relief in confessing, but elements of the story would be too destructive and would distract from the primary objective of showing her that you are penitent, have learned from your mistakes, and are committed to rebuilding the rela-

tionship. Distilling the narrative down to the bare bones may be sufficient to unburden the conscience, without causing massive devastation. Identify the most salient parts: I cheated. It was a physical. I was drunk. I’ve felt awful about it. I’ve been afraid to tell you because I’m terrified to lose you. I’ll do anything to rebuild. I don’t normally recommend active deception in any circumstance—in fact, I’m an honesty kind of person— but this partial confession might be the middle ground that let’s you get back to what matters… loving your wife. V Tami-lee Duncan is a Registered Psychologist in Edmonton, specializing in sexual health. Please note that the information and advice given above is not a substitute for therapeutic treatment with a licensed professional. For information or to submit a question, please contact tami-lee@vueweekly.com. Follow on Twitter @SexOlogyYEG. Dan savage savagelove@vueweekly.com

MILK MONEY

My husband left the picture recently, and I’m now a single mom supporting an infant in Toronto. I work a retail job and am drowning financially. I hooked up with a guy I met on Tinder, and I didn’t warn him that I’m still nursing because I didn’t even think of it. Luckily, he really got off on it—so I was spared the awkwardness of “Eww, what is coming out of your tits?!” Afterward, he joked about there being a market for lactating women in the kink world. My questions: If I find someone who will pay me to suckle my milk, is that prostitution? And if I advertise that I’m willing to be paid, can I get into trouble for that? The possibility of making some money this way is more appealing every day. TRULY IN TROUBLE

Allowing clients to suckle her breasts is, of course, sex work,” said Angela Chaisson, a partner at Toronto’s Paradigm Law Group. “But sex work is legal for everyone in Canada, new moms included. The new sex work laws here—the 2014 ‘Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act,’ an Orwellian title for a draconian piece of legislation—prohibit sex work close to where minors might be. So if she’s engaging in sex work close to kids, she is risking criminal charges.” No one wants sex work going on around minors, of course—on or around minors—so that’s not what makes the ‘Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act’ an Orwellian piece of bullshit. Laws regulating sex work in Canada were rewritten after Terri-Jean

30 AT THE BACK

Bedford, a retired dominatrix and madam, took her case to the courts. The Supreme Court of Canada ultimately ruled—unanimously—that criminalizing sex work made it more dangerous, not less, and consequently the laws on the books against sex work violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. But instead of decriminalizing sex work, Parliament made it legal to sell sex in Canada but illegal to buy it, aka the “end demand” approach to stamping out sex work. “By making a sex worker’s body the scene of a crime,” writes sex worker and sex-workers-rights activist Mike Crawford, “the ‘end demand’ approach gives cops full license to investigate sex workers, leaving sex workers vulnerable to abuse, extortion, and even rape at the hands of the police.” Chaisson, who helped bring down Canada’s laws against sex work, doesn’t think selling suckling will get you in trouble, TIT. “But Children’s Aid Society (CAS) would investigate if they felt there was a child in need of protection,” said Chaisson. “So the safest thing would be for her to stick to out calls only and to keep the work away from kids and anywhere they might be.” To avoid having to worry about CAS or exactly where every kid in Canada is when you see a client while still making some money off your current superpower, TIT, you could look into the emerging online market for human breast milk. There are more ads from breast milk fetishists (204) at OnlyTheBreast.com (“Buy, sell, or donate breast milk with our discreet clas-

sifieds system”) than there are from new parents seeking breast milk for their infants (159). Good luck!

HUBBY'S PORN

My husband and I have a pretty good sex life considering we are raising three kids, we both work full time, and I’m going to school. We have sex four to five times a week, sometimes daily. Before we married, it never occurred to me to check what he was looking at online. Now I can’t stop. I know he looks at porn and masturbates. I never check his phone or his Facebook or anything like that, just what he has googled. How can I let go and be more confident and believe that, regardless of his personal habits, he still wants me? He says it’s not personal, it’s when I’m not available, and it’s a good way to take a nap. I trust him and don’t think he’s doing anything wrong, but how do I feel okay with it? SEES PROBLEMS ON UNDERSTANDING SPOUSE'S ELECTRONICS You don’t have a good sex life, SPOUSE, you have a great sex life. You two are raising three kids, you’re getting sex on an almost daily basis, and at least one of you is getting naps? You’re the envy of all parents everywhere. It’ll put your mind at ease if you remind yourself now and then that no one person can be all things to another person—sexually or in any other way—and that the evidence your husband still wants you is running down your leg four to five times per week. Now please pass the paper/tablet/phone to your husband, SPOUSE, I have something

to say to him. Hey, Mr. SPOUSE, here’s a handy life hack for you: CLEAR YOUR FUCKING BROWSER HISTORY. Use the “private browsing” or “incognito” setting in your web browser, and spare your wife—and yourself—future scrutiny and smut shaming.

CUCKOLDING

My husband and I have a pretty good sex life. Via text I asked my (gay) husband of 10 years if he had any sexual fantasies he hadn’t shared with me. He replied, “I want to cheat on you.” I was out of town when we had this text exchange. He wrote the next morning to apologize. He said he was tipsy when I texted him and didn’t mean what he said. I explained that I wasn’t upset but turned on. If he wanted to sleep with other people, he could, provided it was someone safe and not someone in our social circle. The idea of being cheated on, frankly, appeals to me. (That makes me a gay cuckold, correct?) I even told him I jerked off about it already. He did not react the way I expected. He got upset and said he thinks about cheating on me only when he’s drunk and he would never want to do it in real life and he’s angry that I would want him to. Advice? CHUMP UNDER CLOUD KEEPING SILENT Years ago, my then-boyfriend cheated on me while I was out of town. He didn’t like my reaction when he confessed (“Was he cute? Can we have a three-way?”) and got angry at me for not being angry with him. We wound up having a fun three-

VUEWEEKLY.com | sep 8 – sep 14, 2016

some with the other guy shortly before we broke up for other reasons, CUCKS, and I suspect the day will come when your husband fucks someone else—if he hasn’t already—with your permission, which means it’ll be cuckolding, not cheating. Just apologize for now, roll your eyes when he’s not looking, and bide your time. And speaking of gay cuckolds… Way, way back in 2008, a reader asked why I described cuckolding as a straight male fetish. “The cuckolding fetish is the boner-killing lemons of straight male sexual/paternal insecurity turned into deliciously perverted bonerade,” I responded. “Gay sex doesn’t make babies, only messes (which is all straight sex makes 99.98 percent of the time). Which may explain why, as a general rule, gay men aren’t as threatened when our partners are ‘taken’ by other men.” But gay cuckolding has emerged as a porn genre over the last few years—right after marriage equality was achieved in the United States (hmm)—and now sex researchers David Ley and Justin J. Lehmiller are looking into it. So if you’re a gay cuckold—an experienced gay cuck or just someone who fantasizes about it—please take a few minutes to fill out this anonymous survey in the name of both science and your kink: tinyurl.com/gaycuck. Listen to my podcast, Savage Lovecast, every week at savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter


VUECLASSIFIEDS 130.

Coming Events

Meet, Mix, & Mingle September 9; 5:30 - 8:30 pm On the Rocks $5, get a free beverage

Speed Dating - Date n’ Dance Salsa Sat Sep 10 at 7:00 pm to 9:15 pm Foot Notes Dance Studio LTD, 9708 45 Ave NW

Speed Dating - Date n’ Dash @ BRU Sep 13 at 7:00 pm to 9:30 pm BRU Coffee + Beer House, 11965 Jasper Ave

Speed Dating - Date n’ Dash 50+ Sep 24 at 7:00 pm to 9:30 pm Fionn MacCool’s Edmonton, 4485 Gateway Blvd

Speed Dating Date n’ Dash 33-43y F, 37-47y M Sep 17 at 7:00 pm to 9:30 pm Kasbar, 10444 82 Ave

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Little Green Thumbs Volunteer Opportunity Sustainable Food Edmonton is looking for volunteers to help with a Little Green Thumbs indoor school garden and engage children in activities for one hour every couple of weeks during school hours from late fall to June. For more info, please email lgtcoordinator @sustainablefoodedmonton.org.

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 – SEP 14, 2016

To Book Your Classifieds, Call 780.426.1996 or email classifieds@vueweekly.com 1600.

Volunteers Wanted

The Alberta Wildfire Donation Centre, operated by ADRA Canada, continues to meet the needs of residents affected by the wildfire. We are located at 17306 129 Avenue NW in Edmonton. Volunteers are encouraged to help sort through donations Sundays to Thursdays from 10 AM-5 PM. Please sign up at: http://bttr.im/cmdah.

2005.

Artist to Artist

Call for Artists An annual event held on Strathearn Drive Parkland. Welcomes all types of artists $50 fee for a 10`x 10` space (includes table and chair) www.strathearnartwalk.com

ENJOY ART ALWAYZ www.bdcdrawz.com Check the site every two weeks for new work!

GOLDEN ACRYLIC LECTURE/DEMO Samantha Williams-Chapelsky, GOLDEN Working Artist and Educator, will be presenting the amazing family of GOLDEN Acrylic products at The Paint Spot, Friday, November 4, 7-9:30PM. An excellent opportunity to learn, play, and take away samples! The $10 fee holds a seat for you, and is returned to you as a coupon. More info: www.paintspot.ca. Register in person, by phone, or online.

3100. Appliances/Furniture Old Appliance Removal Removal of unwanted appliances. Must be outside or in your garage. Rates start as low as $30. Call James @780.231.7511 for details

is currently

HIRING EXPERIENCED TATTOO ARTISTS AT BOTH KINGSWAY MALL AND MILLWOODS TOWN CENTRE LOCATIONS

(TATTOO MANAGER POSITION AVAILABLE) • Full time • Tiered commission • Full family health and dental benefits • Custom tattoo studios • Apply in person or email portfolio. www.dragonfxtattoo.com

780.468.6881

AT THE BACK 31


THE STUDIO

32 SAY NO MORE, SAY NO MORE!

VUEWEEKLY.com | SEP 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SEP 14, 2016

1089: Sexual Awakenings  

Vue Weekly - Issue 1089 - 2016-09-08

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