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Culture of cold

Winter Cities Shake-up addresses Edmonton's northern urban experience International Print Exhibition: Canada and Japan // 6 Scott Cook’s Further Down The Line // 15


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ISSUE: 1112 • FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

INTERNATIONAL PRINT EXHIBITION // 6 DAHLMERS REALM // 13

FRONT // 4 DISH // 5 ARTS // 6 SNOW ZONE // 10 FILM // 12 MUSIC // 13

MAYA ANGELOU : AND STILL I RISE // 12

SCOTT COOK’S FURTHER DOWN THE LINE // 15 vapes | e-cigs | pipes | papers | detox | bongs | seeds

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ARTS // 9 MUSIC // 16 EVENTS // 18 ADULT // 20 CLASSIFIED // 21 FOUNDING EDITOR / FOUNDING PUBLISHER RON GARTH PRESIDENT / PUBLISHER ROBERT W DOULL . . . . . rwdoull@vueweekly.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER / ACCOUNT MANAGER JOANNE LAYH . . . . . . . . . . joanne@vueweekly.com EDITOR ANGELA BRUNSCHOT . . . .angela@vueweekly.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR JENNY FENIAK . . . . . . . . . . . .jenny@vueweekly.com STAFF WRITERS LEE BUTLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lee@vueweekly.com TRENT WILKIE . . . . . . . . . . trentw@vueweekly.com LISTINGS HEATHER SKINNER . . . . . . listings@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION MANAGER CHARLIE BIDDISCOMBE . . charlie@vueweekly.com PRODUCTION STEVEN TEEUWSEN. . . . .stevent@vueweekly.com CURTIS HAUSER . . . . . . . . curtish@vueweekly.com ACCOUNT MANAGERS JAMES JARVIS. . . . . . . . . . . . james@vueweekly.com GARRY HOUGH . . . . . . . . . . . garry@vueweekly.com NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE DPS MEDIA..416.413.9291..dbradley@dpsmedia.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER MICHAEL GARTH . . . . . . .michael@vueweekly.com

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JUPITERGRASS.CA UP FRONT 3


FRONT POLITICALINTERFERENCE

Ricardo Acuña // ricardo@vueweekly.com

Wildrose showing its true colours

Alberta's right-of-centre party cries foul over health care aid wages, but stays silent on CEO salaries

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lberta’s Wildrose Party, in particular leader Brian Jean and finance critic Derek Fildebrandt, loves to throw around expressions like 'hardworking families,' 'out of work Albertans,' and 'union bosses' when criticizing how the current Alberta government is dealing with the province’s struggling economy. The value judgements are pretty evident. Hardworking families and out of work Albertans are good and generally being victimized by the economy. The government and union bosses are bad and greedy and at least partly responsible for the province’s current financial woes. Digging a little deeper reveals some troubling realities about whose interests exactly members are promoting and protecting when they use those expressions, and who they are actually blaming for the difficult times many Albertans are facing. Recently, a mediator recommended a very modest wage increase for the Health Care Aides (HCA) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) covered under the Auxiliary Nursing Agreement. Under the agreement,

DYERSTRAIGHT

these HCAs and LPNs—who had been without an agreement since 2015—will receive wage increases of 1.2 and 0.8 percent in each year of the agreement. These are not particularly easy or well-paid jobs by anybody’s standards. For an HCA currently earning around $20 an hour, for example, this will mean a total raise of about forty c e n t s per hour. T h e s e are the folks who provide bathing, grooming, toileting, feeding, and other support services to the elderly, disabled, acute and chronically ill patients. LPNs are a little better compensated, because of the greater training and clinical expertise involved, but their raise still amounts to only about eighty-eight cents an hour. These people certainly work hard for their pay, and it is certainly work that Albertans

overall value and would agree should be properly compensated. You might be surprised, therefore, to learn these folks do not actually fit the Wildrose Party’s definition of what constitutes a hard-working Albertan that is struggling to make ends meet. For Jean and Fildebrandt these folks are part of the problem.

Fildebrandt went one step further, suggesting these raises were a way for the NDP government to “pad the pocket of its union bosses.” This clarification by Fildebrandt is actually quite helpful, however. Now the next time you hear Fildebrandt, Jean, or even Jason Kenney use the expression 'union bosses' in a pejorative way, you will know exactly who they are talking about: the HCA getting paid $20 an hour to feed, toilet, and wipe the butt of your elderly parent or grandparent. The Wildrose press release containing the quotes above was unequivocal in its efforts to draw a line or connection between these raises and the plight of Albertans, calling the raises “a slap in the face to struggling Albertans,” and an “insult to the more than 100,000 Albertans who have lost work since 2015.” What is perhaps most telling, however, is that the Wildrose will

These people certainly work hard for their pay, and it is certainly work that Albertans overall value and would agree should be properly compensated. “This would be a completely indecent move at a time when thousands of hardworking families are worried about how they’re going to heat their homes or put food on the table,” Jean says in a release. Because clearly someone working in health care for $20 an hour is neither working hard or struggling to make ends meet.

call a thirty-nine cent raise to an HCA an insult to out of work Albertans, but did not say a peep when the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives released its annual report on CEO compensation back in January. Apparently there is absolutely no problem with the CEOs of Suncor and Encana making $12.2 million and $11.2 million a year respectively. Blaming underpaid health workers for unemployment in Alberta while ignoring the multi-million dollar salaries of the CEOs who have actually laid people off makes clear exactly whose interests the Wildrose Party is out to promote and defend, who they want to see prosper in Alberta, and how warped their sense of issues and priorities actually is. At least now they have made that clear. V Ricardo Acuña is the executive director of the Parkland Institute, a non-partisan, public policy research institute housed at the University of Alberta. The views and opinions expressed are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Institute.

GWYNNE DYER // GWYNNE@vueweekly.com

Nuclear ban for North Korea unenforceable The regime is repressive, but Kim Jong-un is likely pursuing nuclear technology for deterrence

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his guy, he’s like a maniac, OK? He wiped out the uncle. He wiped out this one, that one. I mean, this guy doesn’t play games. And we can’t play games with him. Because he really does have missiles. And he really does have nukes.” So spoke President Donald Trump in Iowa in January. North Korea flight-tested a ballistic missile on the night of February 11 that landed off Japan’s west coast, so what will he do now? What can he do? And is North Korea’s 33-year-old dictator, Kim Jong-un, really a maniac? South Korea's foreign ministry certainly thinks so: “North Korea’s repeated provocations show the Kim Jong-un regime’s nature of irrationality, maniacally obsessed in its nuclear and missile development.” The same word was used a great deal after North Korea tested nuclear weapons in January and September of last year. But why would it be maniacal, or even irrational, for the North Korean leader to want nuclear-tipped missiles that can reach the United States? After all, the United States not only has nuclear-tipped missiles that can reach North Korea; it has enough of them to eradicate the country 20 times over. If it is not maniacal for the United

4 up front

States to have them, why is it maniacal for the North Koreans? Because American leaders are responsible, they explain, whereas Kim Jong-un is a maniac. Begging your pardon, but isn’t that argument rather circular? The United States is the only country that ever developed nuclear weapons with the deliberate intention of using them. It was at the end of the Second World War, when tens of millions had already been killed, and moral restraints had largely been cast aside. But the United States never used its nukes again, even when it still had a monopoly on them—and all the other known nuclear powers got them in the name of deterrence: stopping somebody else from using nuclear weapons on them. The Soviet Union developed them to deter the United States from launching a nuclear strike. Britain and France got them to deter the Soviet Union. China got them to deter all of the above. And Pakistan and India each developed them

because they suspected the other country was working on them. Only Israel developed nuclear weapons for use against enemies who did not already have them (and it still refuses to confirm their existence, although it is common knowledge in the strategic com-

could do that whenever it wanted, and it is not maniacal to take out a little insurance against it. The North Korean regime is brutally repressive and given to foaming at the mouth over minor slights. But since it has actually kept the peace for 64 years (while the United States has f o u g h t three large wars and many small ones), it is hard to maintain that it is maniacally aggressive. So why say it? Because if you don’t characterise North Korea as insanely dangerous, then you cannot justify forbidding it to have ballistic missiles (which several dozen other countries have) and nuclear warheads (which nine countries have, and another four had briefly before giving them up). Since none of the great powers want North Korea to have them, and they control the United Nations Security Council, they have managed to get special UN bans on both ballistic missiles and nuclear

If you don’t characterise North Korea as insanely dangerous, then you cannot justify forbidding it to have ballistic missiles

munity). But Israel got them out of fear that its people would be “driven into the sea” if it lost a conventional war, back in the 1960s when it was conceivable that it could lose such a war. The intention was still defensive. So why can’t the rest of the world believe that North Korea is doing this in order to deter an American nuclear attack? North Koreans have lived sixty-five years with the knowledge that the United States

VUEWEEKLY.com | feb 16 – feb 22, 2017

weapons for North Korea. Maintaining that the Pyongyang regime are maniacs is part of the programme, but it does frighten those who are not in on the joke. It would be better if the ban worked, since the world has more than enough nuclear powers already. However, the ban is essentially unenforceable, and the heavens will not fall if North Korea does get a few nuclear-tipped ICBMs one of these days. It will never have very many, and they will not be used for some lunatic “first strike” on countries that are tens of times more powerful. They will be for deterrence, only to be launched as an act of revenge from the grave. Just like everybody else’s. What can President Trump do about this? He could try bribing North Korea into suspending its work on missiles and bombs. That worked once before, but not for very long. There is really nothing useful to be done. And what will he say about it? Nobody knows, probably including him. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.


DISH FEATURE // BAKERIES

Edmonton isn't there yet, but local bakery experts do see improvements

Jennifer Stang opened La Boule in December 2016 // JProcktor

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en years ago, you would have been hard-pressed to find fresh croissants in Edmonton on a Saturday morning. You might have been able to buy them at Bon Ton Bakery and a handful of other small shops. If you were really desperate, there were always the clamshell packages at the supermarket—or Pillsbury Crescents. These days, Edmonton’s pastry scene is rapidly expanding. Local bread and pastry options have never been better, thanks to pioneering businesses like Duchess Bake Shop and Bonjour Boulangerie. Building on these successes, within the past three months alone, three new shops—La Boule Patisserie, Macarons and Goodies, and a storefront location for popup darling Moonshine Donuts—have opened their (oven) doors. The market for better baked goods “only had one way to go—because it was so small,” Todd Barraclough, baker and owner of Brio Bakery, says. “We’re a city of a million people.” Barraclough, who attended the San Francisco Baking Institute and whose recipes are based on the method developed at Tartine bakery in San Francisco, has been selling bread and croissants at the downtown farmers’ market every Saturday since May 2016. Giselle Courteau, co-owner of Duchess, remembers doing market research before opening her shop in 2009 and discovering that Calgary, with its similar population, had sev-

eral times the number of independent bakeries Edmonton had. Opening Duchess, with its Paris and Tokyo inspired menu and decor, seemed like a sure shot, but the dearth of similar businesses in Edmonton surprised Courteau. “We were fairly confident,” she says laughing, adding she was also “slightly worried.” Alan Dumonceaux, chair of the baking program at NAIT and team manager of Baking Team Canada 2016, thinks the Internet—especially social media—exposes people to both diversity and a previously-unknown calibre of bread and pastry, thus creating new local demand. “A lot of people don’t know what really good quality baking is,” Dumonceaux says. Courteau doesn’t entirely agree. “Edmontonians are very well travelled,” she says, “and very adventurous.” She found an eager and informed market for Duchess as soon as the shop opened. Now, seven years later, Edmontonians’ context for artisan pastry can be located a little closer to home. Jennifer Stang, who opened La Boule in December 2016, isn’t even thinking about trying to recreate a Parisian patisserie. She graduated from the culinary—not the baking—program at NAIT, and her focus is on innovation, not upholding a traditional standard. “I went to Paris once and I never went into a patisserie there,” she says. “I find it hilarious that we get compared.”

Regardless of the new bakeries’ differing approaches, Dumonceaux says he’s seen “an improvement in the quality with more independents.” He notes that the relative cost and convenience of chain supermarket bakeries have a major influence on the buying habits and expectations of the average Edmontonian shopping for a loaf of bread

or a danish. For many people, Edmonton’s urban design makes grocery shopping without a car impossible and bulk-buying at supermarkets becomes the norm. But Barraclough emphasizes that, both in producing and shopping for food, “there are more ways to do it.” Along with the spate of new businesses, Dumonceaux has seen

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

growth and improvement at established bakeries like Bon Ton and Bonjour and expects to see further evolution as more new bakeries open. Courteau agrees. “For us, the more pastry shops there are, the better," she says. “We’re trying to stick together.” Cooperation is important for independent bakeries and patisseries in Edmonton, which still supply only a small corner of the market for baked goods. The ubiquity of small bakeries in many cities in Europe marks one of the starkest contrasts between a city like Paris, famous for its pastry, and Edmonton, where most people still buy their daily bread from a large grocery store. Ming Chung, bakery manager at the Sobeys store in Millwoods Common, says his store bakes and sells approximately 100 loaves of white bread every day—and that isn’t counting other varieties of baked goods produced in-store, or any of the pre-packaged bread also available at Sobeys. In comparison, Brio Bakery sells about one 150 loaves of bread total every week. Recalling a recent trip to Paris, Dumonceaux points out that he paid the equivalent of $11 for a small lemon tart at Pierre Herme, while a lemon tart of comparable quality at Duchess costs about $7. Courteau, the woman responsible for those affordable lemon tarts, makes frequent pastry reconnaissance trips herself. “We always come home feeling like what we have in Edmonton is pretty damn good,” she says.

LIZZIE DERKSEN

DISH@VUEWEEKLY.COM

treat that special someone

DISH 5


ARTS

PREVUE // PRINT

Alberta's concept-based art contrasts with Japan's focus on technique in joint print exhibit

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n a bid to showcase Canada’s rich print culture, internationally decorated print artist Liz Ingram curated the “International Print Exhibition: Canada and Japan” with the help of April Dean, executive director of the Society of Northern Alberta Print-Artists. The exhibition includes art from 120 artists, featuring 82 prints from Canadians, and 75 from Japanese creators. It first debuted at the Kyoto Municipal Museum last October, with the Japanese art selected by the Kyoto Print Exhibition Executive Committee. It’s now on display for Edmontonians to take in the diverse artwork. “Edmonton, specifically, has a really long and vibrant history of print making and really sort of progressive ideas in print making,” Dean says. The Canadian prints were selected by Dean and Ingram, using a mixture of invitations to artists they knew, and open calls for submissions to include artists outside their immediate network. “We probably could have programmed twice as many [artists] really easily,” Dean says. “I’m certain there are incredible artists working in Canada whose work we’re not familiar with, just because the country is so expansive.” The exhibition is part of a series coordinated with artists from Japan and one other country every two years since 2001, in an attempt to showcase the local trends in print artwork. Unfortunately, Dean says, “to be totally inclusive across Canada just ended up being impossible for us.” Instead, they did their best within limitations to assemble a representative cross-section of Canadian print culture, albeit one a bit biased towards Albertan creators.

Opens Thurs., Feb. 16 Enterprise Square, admission by donation

Hope Chest memories 2 // Supplied, Michiko Suzuki.

“If they had asked curators in Quebec, or potentially on the east coast, or maybe even in Vancouver, they might have had a very different show,” Dean says. In both the Japanese and Canadian portions of the exhibit, Dean says modern techniques clash with the old

to create new styles of prints, unique to the art of our times. “Layers of digital printing or digital manipulation combine with more traditional practices,” she says. “It’s being used throughout the exhibition in a lot of different ways and a lot of innovative ways.” Much of that innovation comes

from a cultural approach that spreads between artists working in distinct regions. “Print artists from Alberta seem to be interested in this marriage between their idea, or their concept, or their philosophy, and the way that the image is being produced, so there’s a real synthesis between idea and me-

KEVIN PENNYFEATHER ARTS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

TIMMY MacDONALD

EMILY JAN

Rhythms of the Earth

dium,” Dean says. “It’s not necessarily about technique, but it’s about the right expression of an idea though the technique.” Contrasting that approach is what she describes as the decidedly technique-focussed works from Japan. “There are some wood engravings in the Japanese portion of the exhibit that are really incredible,” Dean says. “The attention to detail, and the real sort of soundness of craft is really mesmerizing.” An example of this comes from some of Akira Kurosaki’s work. While his work is rooted in many famous Japanese print approaches from the 20th century, Dean views his woodblock prints as a modern attraction that print appreciators will look forward to seeing. “He's using this traditional technique, but his works feels incredibly contemporary to me in their use of colour and the sort of abstraction and shape they have,” she says. “They have a ton of energy in them.” (As the chairman of the Kyoto Print Exhibition Executive Committee, Kurosaki also organized the exhibit.) Both the Canadian and Japanese prints will be displayed for the duration of the exhibition, but additional programming and workshops will be scheduled on the fly within the exhibition space, too. Check the University of Alberta’s Museum website throughout the exhibition’s run for more information.

A Simple Perversion

After The Hunt

A CELEBRATION OF BLACK HISTORY MONTH

The Carrot Community Arts Coffeehouse | 9351 – 118 Ave, Edmonton | (780) 471-1580 | thecarrot.ca

THURSDAY, FEB 16 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

SATURDAY, FEB 18 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

THURSDAY, FEB 23 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

GALLERY OPENING

ADJE DRUM WORKSHOP

POETRY SLAM

Generations of Afro-Latino Art: A Basquiat Tribute Inspired by the renowned NYC artist Jean Michele Basquiat and curated by Pedro Rodriguez De Los Santos! The Gallery Opening features artwork, live poetry readings, and projections.

Move to the Rhythms of the Earth! Drumming Workshop led by Prince Stanley Ebun Koledoye. Ages 10+ welcome! Space is limited. RSVP at events@thecarrot.ca

Join the Edmonton Spoken word community as they compete for glory and cash prizes at The Carrot’s first poetry event of the year!

We are creating a chalk art project for this spring. If you are a chalk artist please contact us events@thecarrot.ca

6 ARTS

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE TO ATTEND.

Photo © Eric Tschaeppeler, 2014

FREE

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

BOTH EXHIBITIONS RUN UNTIL FEBRUARY 24, 2017 HARCOURT 3rd Floor, 10215 112 Street, Edmonton harcourthouse.ab.ca HOUSE ARTIST RUN CENTRE


PREVUE // THEATRE

A change in the wind

Chinook Series welcomes Black Arts Matter and Canada's first deaf arts festival to the stage

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s the Chinook Series enters its second year, the three-headed festival is focusing on one thing: creating a space for artists who have not been adequately represented on Edmonton stages. As if three distinct production crews weren’t enough (the festival is a co-production of Azimuth Theatre, Fringe Theatre Adventures, and Workshop West Playwrights’ Theatre), Chinook is bringing in Chris Dodd of Sound Off—Canada’s first deaf arts festival—and Nasra Adem of Black Arts Matter to round out the lineup. “We’re so unique in how we partner and we’re so unique in how we program,” says festival director Murray Utas. “I just think it’s wonderful that now we’re—in our diversity of the programming— probably going to have a very unique audience come through this building. And I like that. I like being able to mix in the lobby, and everybody hangs out and has a good time together.” Sound Off includes a deaf mime comedy troupe from Winnipeg, a physical theatre piece from Regina, and a special edition of Edmonton’s own Rapid Fire Theatresports.

Since opening last week, the Arts Barns staff has already noticed positive reactions from audience members—many of them firsttime theatregoers. One gentleman responded very strongly, Utas says, conveying to the organizers that he felt like he was a part of something for the first time in years. Black Arts Matter brings dance workshops, spoken word, panel discussions, and jazz performances to the Arts Barns. In curating this festival-within-a-festival, Adem sought to include a wide variety of Black artists—whether they’ve been in Edmonton for two months or 10 generations. “By reaching out to different African communities in the city I’ve been able to help them bring forth the different iterations of blackness,” Adem says. “I think a lot of the time we get fit into a monolith, like there’s just one way to be [black]. And I wanted the root of Black Arts Matter to be a dispelling of that myth.” Edmonton is slowly awakening to the realities faced by its black communities, with a local Black

Until Sun., Feb. 19 ATB Financial Arts Barns, $25 (show) or $15 (workshop) Lives Matter chapter and the city’s Make It Awkward anti-bigotry campaign. “We have to bring forth the ugly truths,” Adem says. “And I definitely wanted to encourage the artists to bring forth those truths—the truths that are rooted in Edmonton.” Still, Edmonton's Youth Poet Laureate stresses the performances of Black Arts Matter aren’t all about pain and prejudice. Many audience members have been surprised at how joyous and celebratory the shows are. Ultimately, the Chinook Series has positioned itself as a first step in bringing marginalized Edmonton artists into mainstream spaces. “I think the artists, now they have a knowing inside them that’s like: ‘Hey, I belong here. Hey, this can also be mine. And I’m actually needed. And my art is actually necessary in these spaces.’”

BRUCE CINNAMON

ARTS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Edmonton's Youth Poet Laureate, Nasra Adem // Supplied

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VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

ARTS 7


ARTS

INTERVIEW // VISUAL ARTS

Calm in the maelstrom

Jacob Amon isn't paying any attention to politics. He’s focused on creating.

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Jacob Amon // Supplied, Edmonton Arts Council

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acob Amon was an artist for a long time before he showed anyone his work. He moved to Canada from Sudan at 17, and remembers having the itch to create then. At the time he was creating as a way of perpetuating an internal dialogue. Now, the multidisciplinary artist is working on a set of 20 visual arts pieces focused on settlement and newcomers in Edmonton, and recently received a Cultural Diversity in the Arts project grant and an Edmonton Artists’ Trust Fund award. For Amon, art is about education— self education, worldly education, whatever. It's about learning outside and inside. “I’m always thinking internally and talking to myself about it and how I relate to it," he says. "A lot of my work is abstract and for me [its meaning] is all there, I can see it ... sometimes I explain it to people." As for what is going on south of the border, Amon says he doesn’t really pay attention to politics. He's focused solely on creating. “I try to keep my art pure from other things,” Amon explains. “Art, in general though, always has it’s own meaning. We can create something that [people] can relate to, something going on, politics or what not. But I be-

Bridging Eastern and Western sounds with acoustic and electronic rhythms

NIYAZ featuring AZAM ALI March 18 7:30 PM • $42

The Arden Theatre Box Office • 780-459-1542 •

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

lieve it is meant to overcome all that, to stand alone and be positive. Yes, I could create a piece that displays a negative scene, but the idea of looking at this negative, unpleasant image... I believe the idea is to teach us, to make us aware. As an artist, I look at a negative piece and I can get a lot of positive things out of it.” He's also focused on learning the business side of art, and tackling the practical problem of reaching an audience. He's currently in the process of developing a website. While Amon is excited to show his work to more people, he's also not sure what to expect. “I’m sharing my art with the world,” he says, and laughs, seeming a little embarrassed. “I just do art. I never tried to make it a professional thing. That is why now, I’m just realizing that is an area to grow.”

TRENT WILKIE

TRENTW@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Editor's note: This profile is the second in a series highlighting Edmonton artists and cultural contributors from the seven countries involved in the now suspended United States travel ban. If you have suggestions for this series, please send them to arts@vueweekly.com.

2016-2017

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DANCE

BOREALIS GALLERY • 9820-107 St • Storytellers: Alberta and the Great War; Feb 17-May 22

THE CARROT • 9351-118 Ave NW • artsontheave. org • Generations of Afro–Latino Art: A Basquiat Tribute: artwork by Jean Michele Basquia; Feb 16 CAVA GALLERY • 9103-95 Ave • 780.461.3427 • galeriecava.com • La bande dessinée au musée: un défi; Jan 13-Feb 18 (University of Alberta) • ualberta.ca/artshows • Miriam Rudolph, MFA Printmaking / Angela Snieder, MFA Printmaking; Feb 21-Mar 18

FRONT GALLERY • 12323-104 Ave •

CANADA'S BALLET JORGEN - SWAN LAKE •

Marie-Anne Gaboury • Rubaboo Visual Art Exhibition; artwork by David Garneau, Lana Whiskeyjack, Arsan Buffin, Brandon Atkinson, Dawn Marie Marchand and MJ Belcourt Moses; Jan 30-Mar 25

Arden Theatre, 5 St. Anne Street, St Albert • stalbert.ca/ exp/arden/events/canadas-ballet-joergen-swan-lake • Feb 24, 7:30-9:30pm • $68 (adult), $55 (child 2-17yrs) senior(65+)

DANCE CLASSES WITH GOOD WOMEN DANCE COLLECTIVE • Muriel Taylor Studio at Ruth Carse Centre for Dance, 11205-107 Ave • info@ goodwomen.ca • goodwomen.ca/classes • Every Tue, Thu, Fri; 10-11:30am • $15 (drop-in), $65 (5 class pack), $100 (10 class pack)

REFLECTIONS • Timms Centre for the Arts, 8703-112 St • 780.472.7774 • citieballet.ca • Choreography: Yukichi Hattori and Kiera Keglowitsch • Feb 24-25, 7:30pm; Feb 26, 2:30pm SUBARTIC IMPROVISATION & EXPERIMENTAL ARTS • Spazio Performativo, 10816-95 St • milezerodance.com • Dance, music, and visual artists performing together for the first time within an improvisational framework. Six to eight artists for each event• Feb 23, 8pm • $15 or best offer at the door

SUGAR SWING BALLROOM OPEN HOUSE • Sugar Swing Ballroom, 10019-80 Ave NW • 587.786.6554 • dance@sugarswing.com • sugarswing.com • A new home for jazz, dancing, and music! Guests can check out swing dance as well as Edmonton's newest event rental space • Feb 24-26, 6:30-8:30pm • Free (Fri night stomp, Sat daytime tour/ taster, Sun tour/taster), $18 (Sat night stomp)

suggestions from the audience who get to experience a brand new story unfold in front of them, complete with impromptu songs, dance breaks and show-stopping numbers • Every Fri, starting Jan 20-Jul 30, 11pm

U OF A MUSEUMS GALLERIES AT ENTERPRISE SQUARE • Main floor, 10230 Jasper Ave •

AH, ROMANCE! A REVUE OF SONG, DANCE & OTHER PASSIONATE MUSINGS • Varscona

Open: Thu-Fri, 12-6pm, Sat 12-4pm • International Print Exhibition–Canada and Japan; Feb 16-Mar 25; Opening reception: Feb 16, 7-9pm; Free (RSVP)

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St

FAB GALLERY • Fine Arts Building Gallery,1-1 FAB

BALLETBOYZ • Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave • 780.455.9559 • albertaballet50.com • Ten dancers deliver a stunning display of athleticism, sensitivity and visceral storytelling • Feb 24-25

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE • 11211-142 St • telusworldofscienceedmonton.com • Free-$117.95 • Activities, demonstrations, experiments • Wild Africa; until June 26 • Angry Birds Universe; until Apr 17

Albert • 780.460.5990 • vasa-art.com • Release and Discovery - An Introspective: artwork by Pat Wagensveld; Jan 31-Feb 25

780.423.3487 • audreys.ca • Local author Robert Bhatia "Passage Across the Mersey" Launch; Feb 23, 7pm

AUTHOR SIGNING FOR LEMONS ON VENUS •

BUST • Roxy on Gateway, 8529 Gateway Blvd •

AUDREYS BOOKS • 10702 Jasper Ave •

GALERIE CITE • La Cite Francophone, 8627 Rue

Chapters Strathcona, 10504-82 Ave • Author signing by Brad Glenn • Feb 18, 12-4pm

GALLERY@501 • 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • 780.410.8585 • strathcona.ca/artgallery • Canadianisms: A Half Decade Inspired by Canada: artwork by Brandy Saturley; Jan 6-Feb 26

EDMONTON POETRY BROTHEL • Mama's

GALLERY U • 9206-95 Ave • 780.913.5447 •

Gin Joint, 11723 Jasper Ave • Featuring guest performances from some of Edmonton's finest; a dress-up night of music, burlesque, and spoken word • Feb 26, 9pm • $20 (adv, YEGLive), $25 (door)

contact@galleryu.ca • galleryu.ca • Reflecting Black: Ceramic work by Aba Garbrah; Jan 31-Mar 28; All ages

IVAN COYOTE: KRAFT SINGLES FOR EVERYONE • Horizon Stage, 1001 Calahoo Road, Spruce

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-112

Grove • 780.962.8995 • horizonstage.com • Touching on subjects such as being an ex-Catholic queer, the dynamics of small town big families, and what we truly inherit from the blood that runs in our veins • Feb 22, 7:30pm • $25

St • 780.426.4180 • harcourthouse.ab.ca • After the Hunt: artwork by Emily Jan; Jan 26-Feb 25

JEFF ALLEN ART GALLERY (JAAG) • Strathcona Place Senior Centre, 10831 University Ave, 109 St, 78 Ave • 780.433.5807 • seniorcentre.org • For the Love of Art: artwork by local artists; Jan 19-Feb 23 JUBILEE AUDITORIUM • 11455-87 Ave NW • coordinator@albertasocietyofartists.com • albertasocietyofartists.com • Fire: a group exhibition of Albertan artists exploring this element; Jan 10-Mar 1

POETRY SLAM • The Carrot, 9351-118 Ave NW • artsontheave.org • A poetry slam featuring some of Edmonton’s finest poets • Feb 23, 7-9pm

ROUGE POETRY SLAM HOSTED BY BREATH IN POETRY COLLECTIVE • BLVD Supper x Club, 10765 Jasper Ave • Every Tue

UPPER CRUST CAFÉ • 10909-86 Ave •

LATITUDE 53 • Latitude 53, 10242-106 St NW • latitude53.org • MADE presents Sheltered + Exposed: design for Alberta’s winter life; Feb 16-Apr 1

780.422.8174 • strollofpoets.com • The Poets’ Haven Reading Series • Most Mon (except holidays), 7pm, Sep-Mar; presented by the Stroll of Poets Society • $5 (door)

FILM

LANDO GALLERY • 103, 10310-124 St • 780.990.1161 • landogallery.com • February Group Selling Exhibition: artwork by Linny D Vine, Steven Friedman and Cindy Revell; until Feb 28

THEATRE

OSCAR NOMINATED SHORTS • Rec Room, 1725-

LOFT ART GALLERY • 590 Broadmoor Blvd,

Trinity, 10037-84 Ave • grindstonetheatre.ca • This completely improvised musical comedy is based on the

99 St • edmontonfilmfest.com • Watch all nominees in two categories, followed by the live Academy Awards • Feb 21 (6:30pm & 9pm), Feb 23 (6:30pm & 8:30pm), Feb 26 (6:30pm) • Free-$15 (door)

METRO • Metro at the Garneau Theatre, 8712-109 St • 780.425.9212 • Black History Month; all through Feb • AFTERNOON TEA: The English Patient (Feb 19) • BEACH PARTY DOUBLE FEATURE: For Those Who Think Young (Feb 19), Beach Blanket Bingo (Feb 19) • GATEWAY TO CINEMA: Moonlight (Feb 22) • REEL FAMILY CINEMA: Kubo and the Two Strings (Feb 18) • SCIENCE IN THE CINEMA: How to Train Your Dragon (Feb 25)

11 O'CLOCK NUMBER • Basement Theatre at Holy

Sherwood Park • artsoc@telus.net • artstrathcona. com • Sat-Sun, 12-4pm (closed Easter weekend) • Artwork by 12 local artists

MUTTART CONSERVATORY • 9626-96a Ave

Sherwood Park • 780.449.4443 • artstrathcona.com • Open: Fri-Sun • Artwork by gallery members; Mar-Apr

• karenbishop.ca/earths-laughter.html • Earth's Laughter; Feb 17-Mar 31

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY •

NINA HAGGERTY CENTRE FOR THE ARTS •

• Melcor Cultural Centre, 35-5th Ave, Spruce Grove • 780.962.0664 • alliedartscouncil.com • Rotation - Gallery; Jan 21-May 5 • Samantha Thompson; Jan 24-Feb 17 • Instructor's Show; Feb 21-Mar 17

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.422.6223 • youraga.ca • Season to Season, Coast to Coast: A Celebration of the Canadian Landscape: artwork by Emily Carr, Dorothy Knowles, Cornelius Krieghoff, John McKee and more; Until Feb 20 • A Story We Tell Ourselves About Ourselves: artwork by Hannah Doerksen; Until Feb 20 • Survival Guide; Jan 28-May 7 • Clocks for Seeing: Photography, Time and Motion; Feb 18-Jun 18 • Fischli and Weiss/Ibghy and Lemmens; Feb 18-Jun 18 • BMO CHILDREN'S GALLERY: Touch Lab: Leave your Mark; until Apr 9 • WEEKLY DROP-IN ACTIVITIES: Tours for Tots, Every Wed, 10-11am • Youth Workshops, ages 13-17, Every Thu, 4-6pm • Kids’ Open Studio, Every Sat, 1-3pm • Spring ArtBreak Camp Mar 27-31 • Exhibition Tours; Every Sat-Sun, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm • Art for Lunch; 3rd Thu of the month, 12:10-12:50pm • VIBE; 3rd Fri of the month, 5-9pm

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19 Perron St, St Albert • 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert. ca • Creative Endeavours: artwork by Gene & J Marg Brenda; Feb 2-Apr 8

Theatre Troupe. Rob’s kicked out after his wife discovers him with a blow up doll wearing her dress. He connects with his brother while his brother's wife connects with his wife • Feb 16-Mar 4 (Thu-Sat) • $50-$55

CANOE2017 THEATRE FESTIVAL • Backstage Theatre, ATB Financial Art Barns, 10330 – 84 Ave • 780.477.5955 • workshopwest.org • This year's CANOE Theatre Festival is entirely dedicated to black theatre artists from Canada, Africa and the United States • Feb 9-19

CHIMPROV • Citadel's Zeidler Hall, 9828-101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • Every Sat, 10pm • $15 (door or buy in adv at TIX on the Square) • Until Jun

DIE-NASTY • Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • die-nasty.com • Live improvised soap opera. Join the Die-Nasty family REBORN, a season of great artists, earth-shaking discovery, glorious music, hilarious hijinx and Machiavellian intrigue • Every Mon, 7:309:30pm • Oct 17-May 29 • $18 or $13 with a $40 membership; at the door (cash) or at tixonthesquare. com. Season passes are available at the door (cash or

THE GOVERNMENT INSPECTOR • Timms Centre for the Arts, 8703-112 St • ualberta.ca/artshows • By Nikolai Gogol/ Adapted by David Harrower. In this political satire, a case of mistaken identity goes comically awry, revealing a town gripped by corruption, greed and self-deception • Feb 9-18 • $12 (student, evening), $25 (adult, evening), $22 (senior, evening); $12 (student, matinee), $20 (adult matinee), $18 (senior, matinee); $5 (Wed preview); 2 for 1 (Mon)

HMS PINAFORE • Capitol Theatre, Fort Edmonton Park, 7000-143 St • operanuova.ca • Opera NUOVA presents Essgee’s version of Gilbert & Sullivan classic operetta • Feb 22-26 • $15-$26 (online or by phone) KINKY BOOTS • Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, 11455-87 Ave • 780.427.2760 • jubileeauditorium. com • Kinky Boots is Broadway’s huge-hearted, highheeled show. With songs by Grammy and Tony-winning pop icon Cyndi Lauper, this musical celebration is about friendships, and the belief that you can change the world when you change your mind. Inspired by true events, Kinky Boots takes you from a gentlemen’s shoe factory in Northampton to the glamorous catwalks of Milan • Feb 14-19 SOUND OFF: A DEAF THEATRE FESTIVAL • Studio Theatre, ATB Financial Arts Barns, 10030-84 Ave • 780.409.1910 • soundofffestival.com • The first of its kind in Canada, SOUND OFF brings Deaf artists from across the country to showcase their talents, stories and the beauty of American Sign Language • Feb 16-19

THEATRESPORTS • Citadel's Zeidler Hall, 9828101A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30pm and 10pm • Sep-Jun • $15

Plain • multicentre.org • Buffalo Corral: artwork by Heather Shillinglaw; Jan 9-Mar 4

AJ OTTEWELL GALLERY • 590 Broadmoor Blvd,

ALLIED ARTS COUNCIL OF SPRUCE GROVE

BUYING THE MOOSE • Performed by the St. Albert

FOOTLOOSE • John L. Haar Theatre, 10045-156 St • Presented by MacEwan University. Ren is prepared for the inevitable period of adjustment at his new high school when he and his mother move from Chicago to a small farming town. What he isn't prepared for is a ban on dancing instituted by the local preacher who is determined to exercise control over the town's youth that he cannot command in his own home • Feb 8-18 • Tickets available at Tix on the Square

MULTICULTURAL CENTRE PUBLIC ART GALLERY (MCPAG)–Stony Plain • 5411-51 St, Stony

ACUA GALLERY & ARTISAN BOUTIQUE • 953487 St • 780.488.8558 • info@acuarts.ca • acuarts.ca • Signature Artist Series: artwork by Char Vanderhorst and Sophia Podryhula-Shaw; Feb 3-23

10186-106 St • 780.488.6611 • albertacraft.ab.ca • Citizens of Craft; Jan 21-Apr 22 • The Recipients; Jan 14-Feb 18

theatrenetwork.ca • Several months after the Fort McMurray Fire, a controversial call at a peewee hockey game propels two couples into dangerous territory. A darkly funny comedy about two families, whose lives are intrinsically tied to Alberta’s boom and bust economy • Feb 9-26, 8pm (Tue-Sat), 2pm (Sun)

EXPANSE FESTIVAL • 780.454.0583 • azimuththeatre.com • Art is community. Art is collaboration. Art is commitment. Three companies, three festivals, one series. Azimuth Theatre‘s Expanse, Workshop West Playwrights’ Theatre Canoe, and Fringe Theatre Adventures’ Edmonton Fringe come together to present two weeks of live performance this winter with the Chinook Series • Feb 9-19

MACEWAN UNIVERSITY • City Centre Campus, 7-266 • amatejko@icloud.com • I Don't Want To Die in the Digital Age/Windows of Light and Text; Oct 31-Feb 21

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM • St Albert Place, 5 St Anne Street, St Albert • MuseeHeritage.ca • 780.459.1528 • museum@artsandheritage.ca • 1867 Rebellion and Confederation–A Travelling Exhibition developed by the Canadian Museum of History; Jan 24-Mar 26

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS

BELLO • La Cité Francophone, 8627 Rue Marie-Anne Gaboury • Based on stories from the 1920's Mennonite Ukraine using rhythm and rhyme, Bello is set in a fable-like world where hard times and struggle are part of daily life, but the healing powers of humour, love and family ultimately flourish • Feb 17 (7pm in English), Feb 18 (11am in English, 2pm in French) • $19 (adults), $16 (seniors/students); available at bookings@ concretetheatre.ca, or at the door (cash/credit)

LITERARY

thefrontgallery.com • InFocus Photo Exhibition; Throughout Feb

Theatre, 10329-83 Ave • An amazing company of artists brings a fresh new twist to some of musical theatre's most romantic moments • Feb 16-25 • $34 (adults), $29 (students/seniors), $20 (Sat matinees), Pay-what-you-can (Tue)

cheque) for $400 with a reserved seat

9225-118 Ave • 780.474.7611 • volunteer@thenina. ca • Year of the Artist 2017; Feb 14-Mar 2

PAINT SPOT • 10032-81 Ave • 780.432.0240 • paintspot.ca • Naess Gallery: Thank You Conservation: encaustic paintings by Jordan Pearson • Artisan Nook: Collect & Re-Imagine: collaged-materials pieces by Shawn Zinyk & Linda Stanford • Until Feb 18

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave • 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery.com • Artwork by Giuseppe Albi; Feb 9-Feb 25 PICTURE THIS GALLERY • 959 Ordze Rd, Sherwood Park • 780.467.3038 • picturethisgallery. com • The Winter Art Show; Nov 17-Feb 28 ROOTS ON WHYTE COMMUNITY BUILDING LOBBY GALLERY • 8135-102 St • Ocean & Land: artwork by Amanda Schutz; until Mar 3

RUTHERFORD LIBRARY (GALLERIA SPACE) • 90 Ave NW • 780.940.3925 • liuba@ualberta.ca • Invitations 2017: BA History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture, and Bachelor of Fine Arts students; Feb 17-Mar 7; Opening reception: Feb 17, 5pm

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • scottgallery. com • The Human Face; Feb 4-25

SNAP GALLERY • Society of Northern Alberta PrintArtists, 10123-121 St • 780.423.1492 • snapartists. com • Insigators: artwork by Guillermo Trejo & How Many Reasons Do You Need?: artwork by Marie Winters; Feb 2-Mar 4

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

ARTS 9


SNOW ZONE

SNOW ZONE // CONFERENCE

// Steven Teeuwsen

Winter Cities Shake-up conference addresses Edmonton's northern urban experience

A

s citizens of a northern city, most Edmontonians know just as much about winter as a bastard boy named Snow. But sometimes people forget, and fall into a nasty winter funk. The Winter Cities Shake-Up conference aims to help out. Focusing on winter in the areas of business, design, and culture, the conference is a professional look at thriving in a winter city. A good portion of the population tends to stay inside during the frozen months. Below-zero temperatures are detrimental to outdoor physical transportation and activities. The conference will focus on changing this perspective. Former Edmontonian Robin Mazumder, currently a PhD candidate in cognitive neuroscience at the University of Waterloo, will explore how urban design impacts mental health. Before leaving Alberta, Mazumder worked as a mental health occupational therapist, an active urban placemaker, and taught courses on mental health at MacEwan University. Remember that big pop-up snowball fight? That was him, too.

10 SNOW ZONE

Mazumder is speaking as part of Winter Urban Design: Perspectives from Health Care, Placemaking and Psychology panel and is excited that the City of Edmonton has made the WinterCity strategy a priority. He hopes that after releasing the new winter design guidelines, Edmonton can take its place as a leader among northern urban centres. VUE Weekly: What makes you want to take part in the conference? Robin Mazumder: Beyond the fact that it gets me back to Edmonton, which I love and miss dearly, I'm just thrilled to participate in a conversation that I think needs to happen in Canada. We need to recognize that we have special needs as a winter country, which shapes how we design our cities. I'm excited to bring my lens on how winter, urban design, and mental health intersect. VW: From a design perspective, what are some of Edmonton’s biggest hurdles when it comes to winter transportation for pedestrians, cyclists and public transit users? RM: For pedestrians, I think the biggest issue may be sidewalk snow clear-

Robin Mazumder // Supplied

ance more than design. I mean, I guess you could design heated sidewalks, but that would be a costly endeavour which I'm sure city council wouldn't be a fan of. The other option is to have the city responsible for sidewalk maintenance. I know that it might seem like a waste of money to some and that there is a snow angel program, but people with mobility issues shouldn't have to rely on the benevolence of their neighbours to move around their city freely and safely.

Everyone deserves to get around their city in a dignified manner, and there isn't much dignity in being restricted in getting around your community because your neighbour is lazy and doesn't shovel their sidewalk. In terms of cycling infrastructure, I'm excited to see how the pilot rolls out in downtown Edmonton, particularly in the winter. I think that for transit, one of the biggest issues is that transit users can get cold while waiting for a bus to come. My thoughts are that this can be remedied with heaters at bus stops or a more rapid bus service. [For example], a bus coming every five to 10 minutes. The latter would likely be more cost effective. VW: What is one thing that Edmonton does well when it comes to winter transportation? RM: I think the city does a decent job of maintaining the river valley trail system, which many people use for commuting, in addition to recreation. VW: Which speakers are you most interested in seeing? RM: I'm sharing a session with Dr. Karen Lee who is a doctor who has some interesting perspectives on urban design and health. Since I have worked

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

Thurs., Feb. 16 to Sat., Feb.18 Shaw Convention Centre $150 plus as an occupational therapist, I'm very interested in her insights as a health care professional. I'm also excited to hear Tyler Golly, who is a good friend of mine. He is a real rock star when it comes to active transportation and Edmonton is very lucky to have him. Other conference events include an opening reception at Latitude 53, a presentation on the Icehotel—the hugely successful undertaking in a Swedish village 200 km north of the Arctic Circle, a winter fashion show, downtown fat bike tours, as well as a flying canoe race. Conference speakers include comedian Steve Patterson, Swedish sculptor/designer Arne Bergh, Berlinbased lighting architect Sabine De Schutter, and Professor of Structural Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Chris Tuan.

TRENT WILKIE

TRENTW@VUEWEEKLY.COM


Snow Days Midweek Ski & Board Package Sunday through Thursday 30% off room & lift tickets. NOT APPLICABLE December 23 - January 1, 2017, February 17 - 19, 2017, March 24 - April 2, 2017 and April 14 - 16, 2017 inclusive. Some conditions apply. Package cannot be combined with any other package offers or discounts. Package must be pre-sold with a minimum of 24 hour advance booking and cannot be purchased in Jasper. Minumum of 1 Adult lift ticket must be purchased.

Jasper Inn & Suites 98 Geikie St., Jasper, AB. Reservations: 1 (800) 661-1933 bestwesternjasperinn.com Each Best Western® branded hotel is independently owned and operated.

Available On Line Purchase your 17/18 Seasons Pass at 16/17 prices and ride the rest of this season for FREE!

Activities at Hawrelak Park during the Silver Skate Festival, Febraury 11 and 12. Top to bottom: Skate races on the five hectare lake, Jill Duffy playing frisbee, Zuzana and Izabela on the snow slide, and Eileen Heidler—lead artist for the Edmonton snow sculpture team. // JProcter

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

SNOWVALLEY.CA

Phone: 780 - 434 - 3991

SNOW ZONE 11


FILM REVUE // BIOPIC

Colourful life of an icon

Personal stories are the highlight in Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise

FRI, FEB 17–THUR, FEB 23

PATERSON

TONI ERDMANN

FRI: 9:15PM, SAT: 3:30 & 9:15PM SUN: 3:30 & 9:00PM MON TO THURS: 9:15PM

FRI: 7:00 & 9:30PM SAT: 1:15, 7:00 & 9:30PM SUN: 1:15, 6:15 & 8:30PM MON TO THURS: 7:00 & 9:30PM

RATED: 18A, SC

RATED: PG, CL

LION

FENCES

FRI & MON TO THURS: 6:45PM SAT: 1:00 & 6:45PM SUN 1:00 & 6:30PMT MON TO THURS: 6:45PM

SAT & SUN: 3:45PM

RATED: PG, CL

RATED: PG, NRFYC

PRESENTS

SILENCE THUR @ 6:30 BLACK HISTORY MONTH / OSCAR NOMINATED

FEB 16 - FEB 22 AFTERNOON TEA

THE ENGLISH PATIENT SUN @ 1:00

MOONLIGHT THUR @ 9:30, MON @ 9:30, WED @ 7:00 - FREE FOR STUDENTS WITH VALID ID

BEACH PARTY DOUBLE FEATURE!

OSCAR NOMINATED

THE SALESMAN FRI @ 7:00, FRI @ 9:30, SAT @ 4:15, SAT @ 9:30, SUN @ 4:00, MON @ 1:30, MON @ 7:00, TUES @ 9:30, WED @ 9:30

BEACH BLANKET BINGO SUN @ 7:00 FOR THOSE WHO THINK YOUNG SUN @ 9:15 LIVE MUSIC BY THE TSUNAMI BROTHERS

PERSIAN WITH SUBTITLES

REEL FAMILY CINEMA / OSCAR NOMINATED

KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS SAT @ 2:00 FREE ADMISSION FOR KIDS 12 & UNDER BLACK HISTORY MONTH

MAYA ANGELOU AND STILL I RISE SAT @ 7:00

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

GOOD HAIR MON @ 4:00 OSCAR NOMINATED

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA TUES @ 6:45

Metro Cinema at the Garneau: 8712-109 Street WWW.METROCINEMA.ORG

// Supplied

I

f Black History Month is a time to tell stories of lives too long overlooked or overshadowed, then Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise tells some damn fine stories—even if they're ones that are very familiar. By the time she died, Angelou had been a singer, dancer, civil rights organizer, journalist, writer, director, and touring speaker. She worked with Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, recited her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at President Clinton’s inauguration, and was championed by Oprah. This colourful life and its seeming iconic stature sometimes overwhelm Bob Hercules and Rita Coburn Whack’s documentary. It opens like a tribute (“Maya Angelou, 1928-2014”) and its first archival footage clip—the famous tanks stopping in Tiananmen Square—is a stretch, as if trying to link Angelou to liberation-movements beyond the United States. But then

come the stories. There’s her Alabama small-town childhood memory of Uncle Willie hidden in a crate of potatoes and onions whenever the Klan rode in (or he might be accused of raping a white girl). Her recollection of being raped at the age of seven by her mother’s boyfriend, who was so badly beaten soon after Maya told her brother that she didn’t speak for five years, certain her words had killed the man. Her casual reminiscence about losing her virginity at 16 in San Francisco: “Is that all there is? And he said, ‘Yeah.’ And I said, ‘OK. Bye.’” There and elsewhere—as with an ’80s spoken-word performance about a black woman’s practiced “survival” laughter—Angelou’s a fantastic storyteller. Yet Hercules and Whack dedicate so much time to her life and relationships, they don't get to her writing until the final 45 minutes (even then it’s mostly about her famous debut memoir). It’s doubtful any big-name documentary about a black male activist and writer would focus so much on his life, children, and marriages. (Compare the just-released documentary I Am Not Your Negro, which imaginatively continues a book James Baldwin—a friend of Angelou—never finished). From her civil rights-era work to her African travels, Angelou’s made a prism here for the politicized black-American experience in the second half of the 20th century.

12 FILM

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

Fri., Feb. 18 (7 pm) Directed by Bob Hercules, Rita Coburn Whack Metro Cinema at the Garneau, $12  And yet there are curious cracks in this documentary's subject-turnedmonument: her startling flash of combativeness when she chastises a girl in a studio-audience for disrespectfully calling her “Maya” to preface her question; this creative, reflective writer’s inflexible stance on the n-word, denying it can be reclaimed by African-Americans because it can only be fixed, frozen— it’s “vulgar ... poison.” By the end, though, the film’s all too admiring. Angelou’s anecdote about reprimanding Tupac Shakur on-set for swearing seems to glint with that “sanctimoniousness” in her work that critic Hilton Als noted. Her inauguration poem’s played up like a championship moment in a sports biopic. The interview parade of stars and celebrities is capped by the Clintons—Hillary notes of Angelou at the inauguration (a remark all the more cringing given her recent election-defeat): “It was a phenomenal woman at a moment in history when she belonged.” Too intent to cement her as an idol, And Still I Rise just won’t let stories tell the whole picture. BRIAN GIBSON

FILM@VUEWEEKLY.COM


MUSIC PREVUE // METAL

Touring and a new record are keeping Dahlmers Realm busy in 2017

D

ahlmers Realm’s upcoming album, Up The Dosage, is a culmination of 10 years on the grind. Blood, sweat, and whiskey has fueled them through do-it-yourself touring, lineup changes, and periods of hiatus. Lead singer/guitarist Addison Bartholomew and bassist/vocalist Dale Dahlmer have lived the Dahlmers Realm lifestyle for a decade, with lead guitarist Andy Martin and drummer BJ “Dr. Veerjay” Gingelle joining along the way. Bartholomew says he wrote the most challenging songs of his career in the most recent sessions. “These guys figured that shit out instantly ... It’s hard to find anybody that you can play like that with. We could never break up just because of that.” The addition of Gingelle two years ago was a catalyst of inspiration and increased output. His highly technical style helped reinvigorate the creative juices of the four-piece group. “The last two years, thanks to him, have been very productive,” Dahlmer says of the percussionist. “He’s really helped us take our shit to the next level. The last couple years with him, we’ve been more productive than the last five.” Being in the same room together to jam can be a challenge, as they all live in different parts of Eastern Alberta. Each member of the group had a home unit available to self-record Up The Dosage. This was paramount as the band's last release, The Sun Never Sets On A Badass fell short of sonic expectations. Studio time they would’ve paid thousands for in the past is now easily accessed for a fraction of the cost at home.

“We’ve put out albums with good songs but nothing really with the sound quality that it deserved—or for what it cost us,” Bartholomew says. New songs like “From The Grave” and “Cocaine Eyes” were prepared meticulously and sent to Royal Tusk’s Quinn Cyrankiewicz, who is mixing the finished demos. Lead single “From The Grave” is jazz-metal mixed with hard rock and “Cocaine Eyes” is one of the patented party anthems. Each song on Up The Dosage varies in style and genre, keeping new and longtime fans on their toes at shows.

Andy Martin, BJ Gingelle, Dale Dahlmer, Addison Bartholomew (left to right). // Supplied, Dana Zuk Photography

Sat., Feb. 18 (8 pm) Dahlmers Realm—opening for All Else Fails The Forge, $12 in advance “The biggest thing with all our new songs is it’s 10 years later. It’s not 2007 anymore,” Dahlmer says of the growth. “We’re not little kids anymore. It’s more of a sophisticated sound—we found our G-spot.”

LEE BUTLER

LEE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

.com

The live performance has always been the focal point of Dahlmers Realm’s presentation. This was another reason why the members weren’t happy with their previous release The Sun Never Sets On A Badass. “That whole album does no justice to us as a live band at all,” Bartholomew explains. “That’s why we want to do these singles as soon as they’re fuckin’ ready and I think people will eat it up.” Now that Dahlmers Realm has linked up with Distilled Entertainment out of California, there are increased opportunities to bring the band's in-your-face live show to a broader audience. Currently in the works is a tour with metal heavyweights Carnifex, Six Feet Under and Dyscarnate. Most recently, Dahlmers Realm earned the right to play Armstrong Metal Fest 2017 by winning a people’s choice vote. With Up The Dosage set for late summer release, and an upcoming show with All Else Fails, Dahlmer feels very confident.

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

MUSIC 13


MUSIC PREVUE // WORLD MUSIC

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very time Caleb Hart plays a gig, he feels overwhelmed and humbled. He’s still a little shocked to find people actually paying to hear his music. “I know it sounds like these little things to others, but to me it's priceless," says the Tasman Jude frontman . Grande Prairie’s island-soul man spent the 2016 holiday season playing solo shows on the West Coast in support of his Christmas EP, White Diamonds— with time off playing in the snow with Victoria BC hip-hop crew Illvis Freshly. Hart’s guest vocals on Illvis Freshly’s new release Illennials and his current solo work—which goes beyond his reggae reputation—finds the 25-yearold singer embracing a broader palette that draws from a reservoir of hip-hop, pop, roots, folk and island soul. "The foundation of my career has been co-writing,” Hart says. “Which is an incredible experience and gives you a massive open-minded view toward songwriting—if you allow it to." Last year, Hart and Derek Wilder of Tasman Jude picked up the Best

Emerging Artist award at the Edmonton Folk Festival and also the Western Canadian Music Award for World Artist of the Year. In the past three years Hart and Wilder have had a hot schedule, releasing three studio recordings and performing more than 500 shows worldwide. "In the last year and a half or so I have really been focusing on my solo stuff, even though the first nine months of 2016 was very much Tasman Jude oriented,” Hart explains. “[This] included touring Australia, recording the new album Gold, releasing it, touring festivals, and so on. So we had decided early in the year that once the album was released in August we were going to take an indefinite hiatus." After a short tour of Hawaii, Hart returned to the West Coast to headline a series of shows with Vancouver world rootsman Buckman Coe— backed by Victoria soul reggae outfit The Royal Youths. Hart next heads to Australia for several weeks, but not before he checks in for one last solo acoustic performance, opening for the

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MAR 4

UFC 209

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14 MUSIC

//Supplied

Caleb Hart's island-soul vibes continue in his upcoming solo work

FEB 23

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VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

Joey Landreth Trio at The Almanac on Saturday February 25. "I was four-years-old when I knew I wanted to be a singer for the rest of my life,” Hart says, “so for 21 years I have been pursuing this. I started playing the djembe at seven; I started writing songs at 10. The songs on the first Tasman Jude album Green, the verses are actually written by me when I was 11." Hart enthusiastically embraces a fresh solo career which he joyously refers to as “I Love Caleb Hart.” The ex-pat Tobagonian will release a new recording this summer. Hart believes a unexplainable incident set him onto the right path, crediting a spiritual epiphany he experienced after arriving in Canada when he was 18. “That's why my music is so consciously directed,” Hart explains. “That's why I'm trying to be an inspiration to people and bring hope through my music. Because I love what I do and I want to spread love while I'm doing it."

DAVE O RAMA

MUSIC@VUEWEEKLY.COM


PREVUE // COUNTRY

Getting through this 'shit storm of a world'

Scott Cook's release Further Down the Line pushes back against digital downloads with a thoughtful booklet

S

cott Cook could be called the Stompin’ Tom Connors of Alberta. He’s been all over the place and back, and written a song about it. With his newest release Further Down the Road, he’s done his best to sum up all the roads he's walked in a booklet. This series of stories and pictures is full of heart and reflection. “My books have been getting bigger over the years, as a deliberate push back against the move toward download cards,” Cook says. “They're shaped like credit cards—where's the poetry in that? I've always loved having something beautiful to hold and read, like we had with LPs.” Further Down the Road does not tell a singular story, but offers a collection of moments and feelings unto themselves. It's many years of living on the road, many years of words, and many years of memories. “My career's taken a turn for the better in the past couple years, to where it actually feels like a career rather than just playing hooky,” Cook says. “I find myself in the strange position of having younger artists ask me the sort of questions I was curious about when I started out." This introductory essay actually started out as letters of advice to a couple younger artists, but that changed. "I realized that it wanted to grow into something bigger," Cook says about the booklet's inception. "There are strong parallels between what keeps an independent artist going through all the indignities and defeats the road entails, and what keeps all of us hoping and believing through the shit storm of this world.” It is this inspiration that drove the book. As for music, Cook lists Greg Brown, John Prine, and Pete Seeger as some of his influences, but the most

meaningful influences in his life are far more approachable. “Most of my heroes are my good friends,” Cook says. “Most of the music I hear is right in front of me. Most of the CDs I listen to are ones I've swapped for. I don't really seek out new music online. There's so much interesting work being done under the radar.” The album itself is filled with creativity and mood, moving from a love song personifying Alberta to "Fellas, Get Out of the Way," a song about how pervasively women are objectified. His song lyrics seem more like a poetic philosophy than just words. As it turns out, that isn't just a coincidence. "I studied philosophy in university, and I've always enjoyed entertaining other points of view," says Cook. "Personally, I've subscribed to so many different world views throughout my life, and changed my mind so many times, I can sympathize with just about anybody. And I can see the shadow of everything I reject inside my own heart. The more I travel, and the more people I meet, the more I think we're not so different." TRENT WILKIE

TRENTW@VUEWEEKLY.COM

// Supplied, Chad Kirvan

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VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

MUSIC 15


MUSIC

WEEKLY

EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

THU FEB 16 BLUES ON WHYTE Studebaker John & The Hawks; 9pm BLVD SUPPER X CLUB B**ch A

Little, Wine A lot (house, hiphop and reggae music); Every Thu; No cover BOHEMIA Artzy Flowz Presents:

THE REC ROOM Karaoke with live band, The Nervous Flirts; Every other Thu, 7pm SANDS INN & SUITES Karaoke

Thursdays with JR; Every Thu, 9pm-1am SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Big

Daddy Thursday Jam. With host Randy ‘Big Daddy’ Forsberg; 7pm SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Live Blues

every Thu: rotating guests; 7-11pm SQUARE 1 COFFEE Singer/

Songwriter Open Mic (individual performer format, first-come, first served); Every

Artz Collective; 7pm; Entry by donation (suggested $5-$10)

ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Duff

Robison; 8:30pm; $5 BLUES ON WHYTE Studebaker John & The Hawks; 9pm

9pm No minors LION'S HEAD PUB Steve

Arsenault; 8pm MERCURY ROOM Johnny 2

LA CITÉ FRANCOPHONE The King's Sonatas; 12-1pm; Free

BRITTANY'S LOUNGE Scrambled YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artists from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations; Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm

NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN

DJs

CAFE BLACKBIRD Swing Tunes

NEW WEST HOTEL Brad

For Sweeties; 7:30pm; $92 (valentines package), $17 (cover)

O'BYRNE'S IRISH PUB

Karaoke/DJ ; Every Thu-Sat, 9pm

Happy Hour featuring The Peddletones; 5:30pm • The Wild, with Forester and The Unfortunates, guests; $20 (adv) Ferguson; 9pm Edmonton's best solo

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northlands.com

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SATURDAY, FEB 18

stage

ARCADIA BAR Matt Potter with Carly Reirson; 9pm; $5

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ARDEN THEATRE The

Karaoke; Every Thu, 7pm FIDDLER'S ROOST Acoustic

Circle Jam; 7:30-11:30pm FIONN MACCOOL'S–SKYVIEW

Michael Chenoweth; 8pm; Free HUMMINGBIRD BISTRO CAFE Bistro Jazz; Every Thu,

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Stage–Thursday Nights; Every Thu KRUSH ULTRA LOUNGE

Open stage with host Naomi Carmack; 8pm every Thu LB'S PUB Open Jam hosted by

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FRIDAY, FEB 24

NAKED CYBERCAFÉ Thu open

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Classical WINSPEAR CENTRE Cultures of

China Festival of Spring; 7pm; $10-$68

musicians

Harpoonist & The Axe Murderer; 7:30-9:30pm; $34

Monkeys Uncle; 9pm

ON THE ROCKS Jellybean; 9pm

Robison; 8:30pm; $5

CARROT COFFEEHOUSE Live

PALACE CASINO WOW; 9:30pm

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Hair of

music every Fri; all ages; 7pm; $5 (door)

ROGERS PLACE Garth Brooks

CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK

CENTURY CASINO–ST. ALBERT

Dirt Road Angels; 9pm; Free

Joint Chiefs; 9pm

Wide Mouth Mason; 7:30pm; $48 (adult), $45 (seniors/youth) DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY Mark EL CORTEZ SWEAT - the nudisco dance party in the Tequila Cellar; 9pm; No cover

ON THE ROCKS Salsa Rocks: every Thu; dance lessons at 8pm; Cuban Salsa DJ to follow

FRI FEB 17 ARDEN THEATRE Measha

Brueggergosman: Songs of Freedom; 7:30pm; $62

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

Scott; 9pm SANDS INN & SUITES Karaoke

DOW CENTENNIAL CENTRE

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Thu

THE COMMON The Common Uncommon Thursday: Rotating Guests each week

ROSE & CROWN PUB Andrew

with entertainment, Every Fri

Mcgarrigle (folk); 9pm

Main Fl: Rock N' Roll, Funk & Soul with DJ Modest Mike; Every Thu; Wooftop Lounge: Dear Hip Hop with Freshlan; Underdog: Underdog Comedy Show

ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Duff

DENIZEN HALL Champ City Soundtrack; Every Fri-Sat

DJs

music

16 MUSIC

THE COMMON Quality Control Fridays with DJ Echo & Freshlan

EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE

CAFE BLACKBIRD Sean Woods;

FEB 17 - 18

Remo, Noosh, Fingertips & guests; Underdog: Rap, House, Hip-Hop with DJ Babr; every Fri

playing the best in hip-hop, dance and classics; Every Fri-Sat, 9pm; No cover

BRITTANY'S LOUNGE Scrambled YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artists from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations; Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm

JONATHAN KITE

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Late Fee; Every Fri; Wooftop: Selection Fridays with

EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR Resident DJs

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Call 780.481.YUKS FOR TICKETS & INFO .....................................................................

Classical

Fingers & The Deformities with The Dabs and Screaming Radio; 8pm; $10 (adv)

BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB

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COMEDY AT THE CENTURY CASINO

Braithwaite and Chris Whiteley; 7pm (doors), 8pm (show); $24 (members), $28 (guests)

FIONN MACCOOL'S– DOWNTOWN Michael

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Pack AD, I Am Machi, Tallest To Shortest & Debutaunt; 8pm; $18 (adv, YEGLive); No minors HAVE MERCY Resident DJs

playing outlaw country, rock and retro classics; Every FriSat, 10pm; No cover

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE The SHERLOCK HOLMES– DOWNTOWN Jake Buckley;

the Dog: the Tsunami Brothers; 4-6pm; no cover BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Eclectic music for dining by Jamie Philp and Christine Hanson; 7-10pm; Cover by donation BLUES ON WHYTE Studebaker John & The Hawks; 9pm BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB

9pm

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SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

CAFE BLACKBIRD The Will

Joanne Janzen; 9pm

Cramer Experience; 8pm; $12

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CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK

Bands: live music; Every Fri

Monkeys Uncle; 9pm

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Moontricks, The Outlier; 9pm; $25; 18+ only

Drum Workshop; 1-2pm; RSVP events@thecarrot.ca • Sat Open mic; 7pm; $2

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every Fri with local musicians UPTOWN FOLK CLUB

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CASK AND BARREL Trent Buhler (of Pal Joey); 4-6pm; No cover CENTURY CASINO–EDMONTON

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IRONGATE PUB Bryant Sailor;

Dirt Road Angels; 9pm; Free


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UNION HALL Eat Sleep Rave Repeat; 9pm; 18+ only

8pm; $10 (adv)

UPTOWN FOLK CLUB

Jamming; Every Sun, 2pm; No minors

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Winterfest 2017 featuring live music and more; 6pm; $20-$40

DV8 The Galacticas with White

YARDBIRD SUITE Diana

Label Demo and Tooth and Nail; 8pm; No minors

Braithwaite and Chris Whiteley; 7pm (doors), 8pm (show); $24 (members), $28 (guests)

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EMPRESS ALE HOUSE Bands

at the Empress: this week featuring Ben Spencer and Bramwell Park; Every Sat, 4-6pm; Free; 18+ only THE FORGE ON WHYTE All Else Fails CD release and 10 year anniversary; 8pm; $12 (adv, YEGLive); No minors GAS PUMP Saturday Jam; 3-7pm & 10pm GERMAN CANADIAN CULTURAL CENTRE EBS February

Valentine's Dance with the Rusty Reed Band; 7pm; $10 (EBS members), $20 (guests) HAVE MERCY Resident DJs

playing outlaw country, rock and retro classics; Every FriSat, 10pm; No cover IRONGATE PUB Bryant Sailor;

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every Sat NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN

Madchild with DJ Dow Jones, Joseph Rose and more; 2pm; $25 (adv) • February Fling Thomas Culture and DJ Queerbait with host Vanity Fair; 8pm; $10 (door) NEW WEST HOTEL Early:

Saturday Country Jam (country); Every Sat, 3pm • Later: Brad Ferguson; 9pm ON THE ROCKS Jellybean; 9pm PALACE CASINO WOW; 9:30pm PARKVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Northern Lights Folk Club: Karen Savoca, Pete Heitzman, Shari Ulrich; 7pm (doors), 8pm (show); $23 (adv), $27 (door)

Classical WINSPEAR CENTRE Pixar in

Concert; 2:30pm & 7:30pm; $24 (17 and under); $39-$59 (general)

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Chris Bruce spins

britpop/punk/garage/indie; Every Sat; Wooftop: Sound It Up! with DJ Sonny Grimezz spinning classic hip-hop and reggae; Underdog: hip-hop open Mic followed by DJ Marack

DRAKE HOTEL Sunday

THE FORGE ON WHYTE GRL PWR, Amy Hef and The Fronts; 8pm; $10 (adv), $12 (door); No minors ROGERS PLACE Garth Brooks HAVE MERCY YEG Music

presents “Compete With The Beat”; Every Sun, 6pm; $10 MAMA'S GIN JOINT Sunday Jam out in your Jammies; Every Sun, 3-10pm; Free MOONSHINERS Sunday Noon

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Sunday Brunch Koreen Perry; 11am; No cover NEWCASTLE PUB Sunday Soul

Service: acoustic open stage; Every Sun, 3pm O’BYRNE’S Open mic every

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THE COMMON Get Down It's Saturday Night: House and disco and everything in between with Wright & Wong, Dane

Calls; 9pm

EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR Resident DJs

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE The

playing the best in hip-hop, dance and classics; Every Fri-Sat, 9pm; No cover ENVY NIGHT CLUB Resolution

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Rotating DJs Velix and Suco; every Sat MERCER TAVERN DJ Mikey

Wong every Sat THE PROVINCIAL PUB Saturday

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ON THE ROCKS The Last SANDS INN & SUITES Open

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Wrong Here Tour; 9pm; 18+ only

Classical CITY HALL Swing 'n Skate;

Every Sun until Feb 26, 1-4pm; Free WINSPEAR CENTRE Pixar in Concert; 2:30pm & 7pm; $24 (17 and under); $39-$59 (general)

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Zyppy; Every Sun GAS PUMP Kizomba-DJ; 8pm

NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Happy Hour featuring Wares; 5:30pm • Electric Audrey 2; 9pm; No cover

Floor: Chris Bruce spins britpop/ punk/garage/indie; Every Tue

NEW WEST HOTEL 4’s A Crowd;

with resident DJs

9pm PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL Wild Rose Old Tyme

Fiddlers Association: Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm SIDELINER’S PUB Singer/

Songwriter Monday Night Open Stage; Hosted by Celeigh Cardinal; Every Mon (except long weekends), 8:30pm

DJs BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: Substance with Eddie

Lunchpail TAVERN ON WHYTE Classic

GAS PUMP Karaoke; 9:30pm HORIZON STAGE Ivan Coyote:

Scrambled YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artists from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations; Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm • Wednesday Night Jazz; Every Wed, 9pm

NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Big Dreamer Jam featuring Ella Coyes and Jasper Smith; 8pm

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Crazy Dave's Rock & Roll Renegade Jam; 7:30pm

9pm

THE ALMANAC Sunday Song

CHA ISLAND Karaoke Monday

SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE

Stage Hosted by Rhea March; Every Sun, 6:30-10pm; Free

DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB Karaoke

Billy Talent: Afraid of Heights Tour; 6pm; $60.50

MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH

night; Every Mon, 9pm; Free

BLIND PIG PUB Blind Pig Pub

DOW CENTENNIAL CENTRE Will

STARLITE ROOM Banners

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE The

Joint Chiefs; 9pm SHERLOCK HOLMES– DOWNTOWN Jake Buckley;

9pm SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM

Joanne Janzen; 9pm STARLITE ROOM Infected

Mushroom 'Return To The Sauce' DJ Set; 9pm; $30.95; 18+ only

Jam with Forever 51; Every Sun, 3-6:30pm BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ Sunday Jazz

RANCH ROADHOUSE DJ

MKT FRESH FOOD AND BEER MARKET 8101 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.2337 MERCER TAVERN 10363 104 St, 587.521.1911 MERCURY ROOM 10575-114 St NAKED CYBERCAFÉ 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN 10524 Jasper Ave, 780.756.9045, theneedle.ca NEW WEST HOTEL 15025-111 Ave O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 O'MAILLES IRISH PUB 104, 398 St Albert Rd, St Albert ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 PALACE CASINO 8882-170 St NW, 780.444.2112, palacecasino. com PARKVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 9135-146 St NW PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 10860-57 Ave THE PROVINCIAL PUB 160, 4211-106 St RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St ROGERS PLACE 10220-104 Ave NW ROSE AND CROWN 10235-101 St SANDS INN & SUITES 12340 Fort Rd, sandshoteledmonton.com SHAKERS ROADHOUSE Yellowhead Inn, 15004 Yellowhead Trail

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main

CENTRAL SENIOR LIONS CENTRE 11113-113 St CENTURY CASINO–EDMONTON 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CENTURY CASINO–ST. ALBERT 24 Boudreau Rd, St. Albert, 780.460.8092 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 COMMON 9910-109 St CONVOCATION HALL Old Arts Building, University of Alberta, music.ualberta.ca DENIZEN HALL 10311-103 Ave, 780.424.8215, thedenizenhall. com DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB 1111387 Ave NW, devaneyspub.com DOW CENTENNIAL CENTRE 8700-84 St, Fort Saskatchewan DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834 DV8/MAMA'S PIZZA 7317-101 Ave NW EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR 8230 Gateway Blvd, elcortezcantina.com EMPRESS ALE HOUSE 9912-82 Ave NW ENVY NIGHT CLUB West Edmonton Mall, 8882 170 St EVOLUTION WONDERLOUNGE 10220-103 St NW, 780. 424.0077, yourgaybar.com FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park,

MAR/18 THE REAL MCKENZIES CONCERTWORKS.CA PRESENTS

25 YEAR ANNIVERSARY TOUR W/ THE ISOTOPES

MAR/24 TRUCKFIGHTERS W/ WE HUNT BUFFALO, GREENLEAF, THE MOTHERCRAFT CONCERTWORKS.CA PRESENTS

MAR/25 THE ZOLAS ALL AGES MRG CONCERTS PRESENTS

W/ GUESTS

MAR/27 DESPISED ICON, CARNIFEX CONCERTWORKS.CA PRESENTS

W/ FALLUJAH, RINGS OF SATURN, LORNA SHORE

MAR/31 AMORPHIS W/ SWALLOW THE SUN CONCERTWORKS.CA PRESENTS

Shocker and Seelo Mondo; Every Wed

VENUEGUIDE ARCADIA BAR 10988-124 St, 780.916.1842, arcadiayeg.com ARDEN THEATRE 5 St Anne St, St Albert, 780.459.1542, stalbert.ca/ experience/arden-theatre ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL 7704 Calgary Trail South, 780.432.4611, atlantictrapandgill.com BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 1042582 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLIND PIG PUB 32 St Anne St, St Albert BLVD SUPPER X CLUB 10765 Jasper Ave BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BORDERLINE SPORTS PUB 322682 St, 780.462.1888 BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 10225-97 St, 780.497.0011 CAFE BLACKBIRD 9640-142 St NW, 780.451.8890, cafeblackbird.ca CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca CAFFREY'S IN THE PARK 99, 23349 Wye Rd, Sherwood Park CARROT COFFEEHOUSE 9351118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASK AND BARREL 10041104 St; 780.498.1224, thecaskandbarrel.ca

W/ GUESTS

Music Wednesdays At Noon: John Mahon and Sylvia Shadick-Taylor, clarinet and piano; 12:10-12:50pm; Free

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Main Floor: DJ Late Fee; Every Wed

780.449.3378 FIDDLER'S ROOST 7308-76 Ave, 780.439.9788, fiddlersroost.ca FIONN MACCOOL'S–DOWNTOWN 10200-102 Ave FIONN MACCOOL'S–SKYVIEW 13580-137 Ave THE FORGE ON WHYTE 1054982 Ave (Whyte Ave) GAS PUMP NIGHT CLUB & BAR 10166-114 St GERMAN CANADIAN CULTURAL CENTRE 8310 Roper Rd NW HAVE MERCY SOUTHERN TABLE + BAR 8232 Gateway Blvd, havemercy.ca HORIZON STAGE 1001 Calahoo Rd, Spruce Grove, 780.962.8995, horizonstage.com JT'S BAR AND GRILL 1107 Knottwood Road East JUBILEE AUDITORIUM 1145587 Ave NW, 780.427.2760, jubileeauditorium.com LA CITE FRANCOPHONE 8627 Rue Marie-Anne Gaboury L.B.’S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LION'S HEAD PUB 4440 Gateway Blvd MAMA'S GIN JOINT 11723 Jasper Ave, 780.705.0998, mamasginjoint.com MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH 10086 MacDonald Dr NW, mcdougallunited.com

DENIZEN HALL Larger than Life;

FUZION! ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS

Classical

Session: Hot Club Edmonton; 7:30pm (door)/8pm (show); $5

DJs

John & The Hawks; 9pm

MAR/10 JORDAN SUCKLEY

TAVERN ON WHYTE Karaoke;

DJs

Blues Jam hosted by Dylan Farrell Band; Every Mon, 8:30pm (sign up)

UBK PRESENTS

Bill Country Jam; 7:30pm

YARDBIRD SUITE Tuesday

BLUES ON WHYTE Studebaker

MAR/3 KRANE W/ SLIINK, DIV/DIV

SHAKERS ROADHOUSE 4 Dollar

FIDDLER'S ROOST Open Stage; HAVE MERCY Have Mercy

W/ FAILURE ANTHEM, CITIZEN ZERO, CYPHER 16, SMASH INTO PIECES

THE PROVINCIAL PUB Karaoke

with guests Tor Miller; $20; 18+ only

7-11pm

MAXIMALISM USA & CANADA TOUR 2017

Wednesday

Stroet and the Backyard Band; 3pm; $2

Brunch - Acellorosa; 9am2:30pm; Cover by donation

CONCERTWORKS.CA PRESENTS

presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; Guests and newcomers always welcome; every Wed, 7pm; $2 (donation, per person), free coffee available

Wives; 9pm

Scott; 9pm

FEB/27 AMARANTHE

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL Acoustic Bluegrass jam

SUN FEB 19

ROSE & CROWN PUB Andrew

W/ WILLIAM CONTROL

9pm

ROGERS PLACE Garth Brooks

BLUES ON WHYTE Vegas

THE HOMECOMING TOUR: CURTAIN CALL

NEEDLE VINYL TAVERN Happy Hour featuring Malibu Suite; 5:30pm • Hewson Grey with Evergreen; 8pm; No cover

Metal Phil from CJSR's Heavy Metal Lunchbox

jam every Tue; 9:30pm

MRG CONCERTS PRESENTS

with Josh Sahunta and Millie; 7pm; $10 (adv), $14 (door)

Fri-Sat

O’BYRNE’S Guinness Celtic

FEB/26 ANDY BLACK ALL AGES

MERCURY ROOM Jonathan Roy

Y AFTERHOURS Live DJs; Every

Wooftop: Metal Mondays with

W/ TOR MILLER

MAMA'S GIN JOINT Wednesday Karaoke; Every Wed, 9pm; Free

Offishall; 9pm; $35 (adv), $40 (door)

THE REC ROOM Kardinal

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

9pm

LIVENATION.COM PRESENTS

Kraziness with host Ryan Kasteel; 8pm-2am

MON FEB 20

NEW WEST HOTEL 4’s A Crowd;

FEB/22 BANNERS

KRUSH ULTRALOUNGE Karaoke

TAVERN ON WHYTE Soul, motown, funk, R&B and more with DJs Ben and Mitch; every Sat; 9pm-2am

SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE 9797 Jasper Ave SHERLOCK HOLMES–DOWNTOWN 10012-101 A Ave, 780.426.7784, sherlockshospitality.com SHERLOCK HOLMES–WEM 8882-170 St, 780.444.1752, sherlockshospitality.com SIDELINERS PUB 11018-127 St SMOKEHOUSE BBQ 10810-124 St, 587.521.6328 SQUARE 1 COFFEE 15 Fairway Drive STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 SUGAR FOOT BALLROOM 10545-81 Ave TAVERN ON WHYTE 10507-82 Ave, 780.521.4404 TIRAMISU 10750-124 St UNION HALL 6240-99 St NW, 780.702-2582, unionhall.ca UPTOWN FOLK CLUB 11150-82 St, 780.436.1554 WILD EARTH BAKERY– MILLCREEK 8902-99 St, wildearthbakery.com WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 WOODRACK CAFE 7603-109 St, 780. 757.0380, thewoodrackcafe. com Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours.com YARDBIRD SUITE 11 Tommy Banks Way, 780.432.0428

SKIITOUR W/ MOONTRICKS, THE OUTLIER ASTRAL HARVEST WITH CONCERTWORKS & TRUE CHANNEL PRESENT

Every Tue-Wed

ON THE ROCKS Karaoke Wednesdays hosted by ED; Every Wed, 9pm

ALL SHOWS 18+ UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED

UBK PRESENTS

FEB/18 INFECTED MUSHROOM ‘RETURN TO THE SAUCE’ DJ SET

HAVE MERCY Whiskey

JT'S BAR AND GRILL Karaoke;

MAMA'S GIN JOINT Tuesday Open Mic; Every Tue, 9pm; Starts Jan 3; Free

FEB/17

GAS PUMP Karaoke; 9:30pm

NEW WEST HOTEL 4’s A Crowd;

LB'S PUB Tuesday Night Open Jam Hosted by Darrell Barr; 7-11pm; No charge

MAIN ROOM

DUGGAN'S BOUNDARY Wed open mic with host Duff Robison; 8pm

Kraft Singles for Everyone; 7:30pm; $25; All ages Every Tue-Wed

WWW.STARLITEROOM.COM

BRITTANY'S LOUNGE

JT'S BAR AND GRILL Karaoke;

FIDDLER'S ROOST Fiddle Jam Circle; 7:30-11:30pm

TICKETS FOR STARLITE ROOM SHOWS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT

Wives; 9pm

TUE FEB 21 BRITTANY'S LOUNGE Scrambled YEG: Open Genre Variety Stage: artists from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations; Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm

10030 - 102 STREET

BLUES ON WHYTE Vegas

Wednesdays Live Piano Karaoke featuring the Fab Tiff Hall; Every Wed, 8:30pm

Wives; 9pm

Starliteroom starlitetoomyeg

WED FEB 22

hip-hop with DJ Creeazn every Mon; 9pm-2am

BLUES ON WHYTE Vegas

StarliteRoom

EL CORTEZ MEXICAN KITCHEN + TEQUILA BAR Taco Tuesday

THE STARLITE ROOM IS A PRIVATE VENUE FOR OUR MEMBERS AND THEIR GUESTS. IF YOU REQUIRE A MEMBERSHIP YOU CAN PURCHASE ONE AT THE VENUE PRIOR TO / OR AFTER THE DOOR TIMES FOR EACH SHOW.

LOWER HALL (BRIXX)

VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

ALL SHOWS 18+ ONLY

FEB/25 HEARTS OF FUNK TOUR ASTRAL HARVEST PRESENTS

W/ QDUP & EVERYMAN

MAR/10 ILLY W/ GUESTS MAR/11 THE DREADNOUGHTS MRG CONCERTS PRESENTS

STARLITE ROOM IS PROUD TO PRESENT

W/ KMAN & THE 45’S, THE PREYING SAINTS, ATD

MAR/17 THE COURTNEYS W/ GUESTS SWEATY PALMS PRESENTS

MAR/28 LISA LEBLANC W/ GUESTS

STARLITE ROOM IS PROUD TO PRESENT

MUSIC 17


EVENTS WEEKLY EMAIL YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO: LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM FAX: 780.426.2889 DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

COMEDY 47th Annual Beverly Heights Variety Show • Beverly Heights Hall, 4209-111 Ave • An evening of adult comedy. Featuring a production entitled "150 Years from Eh to Zed" • Every Fri-Sat, 7:30-10:30pm; Feb 24-Mar 25 • $20 (via 780.471.3600)

Big Rock Presents: Devaney’s Comedy Night • Devaney's, 11113-87 Ave • 780.433.6364 • stephen.f.mcgovern@ gmail.com • Weekly open-mic hosted by Stephen McGovern • Every Wed, 8:30pm • Free

drop-in LARP • Jackie Parker Park • westernwinds.summerfrost.ca • Battle games and fighter practice using provided safe weapon boffer • An exciting way to get exercise while meeting new people with similar passions • Every Sat, 1:15pm • Free

EDMONTON OUTDOOR CLUB (EOC) • edmontonoutdoorclub.com • Offering a variety of fun activities in and around Edmonton • Free to join; info at info@ edmontonoutdoorclub.com

Edmonton Stamp Club • St. Joseph High School, 10830-109 St, main floor cafeteria • edmontonstampclub.com • Get into a new hobby. Featuring circuit books, catalogues and packets that can be browsed and lectures • Feb 27; Mar 13, 20 Fertility Awareness Charting Circle • Remedy Cafe, 8631-109 St • faccedmonton@gmail.com • fertilityawarenesschartingcircle.org • First Mon each month (Oct-Jun), 6:30-8:30pm • $10 (suggested donation) • RSVP at faccedmonton@gmail.com

Flamenco Dance Classes (Beginner or Advanced) • Dance Code Studio,

Black Dog Freehouse • 10425-82 Ave • Underdog Comedy Show • Every Thu

10575-115 St NW #204 • 780.349.4843 • judithgarcia07@gmail.com • Every Sun, 11:30am-12:30pm

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertain-

FOOD ADDICTS • Alano Club (& Simply

ment Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Fri-Sat: 8:30pm • Bob Angeli; Feb 16-18 • Bob Beddow; Feb 24-25

Comedy On the Rocks • On the Rocks, 11740 Jasper Ave • A weekly comedy show featuring changing headliners and more • Every Sun, 7-8:45pm Comic Strip • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999 • Ruben Paul; Feb 14-19 • Julian McCullough; Feb 23-26

El Comedy • El Cortez Mexican Kitchen + Tequila Bar, 8230 Gateway Blvd • Hosted by Dion Arnold with weekly headliners & guest comics • Every Wed, 7pm (door), 7:30pm (show) • No cover

Empress Ale House • 9912-82 Ave • Empress Comedy Night: Highlighting the best stand-up Edmonton has to offer. New headliner every week • Every Sun, 9pm • Free

The Game's afoot • Shell Theatre, Dow Centennial Centre, 8700-84 St, Fort Saskatchewan • 780.992.6400 • shelltheatre. ca • Something’s afoot as the plot twists and turns in this comedy thriller. At the end of it all, will you know ‘who done it?’ or will you be too busy laughing from this hilarious script? • Feb 24-25, 7:30pm • $18 (adult), $15 (seniors/youth)

Groups/CLUBS/meetings Aikikai Aikido Club • 10139-87 Ave, Old Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue, Thu; 7-9pm

Argentine Tango Dance at Foot Notes Studio • Foot Notes Dance Studio (South side), 9708-45 Ave • 780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Argentine Tango with Tango Divino: beginners: 7-8pm; intermediate: 8-9pm; Tango Social Dance (Milonga): 9pm-12 • Every Fri, 7pm-midnight • $15

Brazilian Zouk Dance Classes

• Spazio Performativo, 10816-95 St NW • 780.974.4956 • hello@ludiczouk.com • ludiczouk.com/buy • Every Wed, Jan 18-Jun 28, 7-8:30pm • $20 (drop-in, at the door); discount on classes online

DeepSoul.ca • 780.217.2464; call or text for Sunday jam locations • Every Sun: Sunday Jams with no Stan (CCR to Metallica), starring Chuck Prins and Les Paul Standard; Pink Floyd-ish originals plus great covers of classics: some free; Twilight Zone Lively Up Yourself Tour (with DJ Cool Breeze); all ages Drop-In D&D • Hexagon Board Game Café, 10123 Whyte Ave • 780.757.3105 • info@ thehexcafe.com • thehexcafe.com • An epic adventure featuring a variety of pre-made characters, characters that guests can make on their own, or one that has already been started. Each night will be a single campaign that fits in a larger story arc. For all levels of gamers and those brand new or experienced to D&D • Every Tue & Wed, 7pm • $5

18 at the back

Done Cafe), 10728-124 St • 780.718.7133 (or 403.506.4695 after 7pm) • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm

Fort Saskatchewan 45+ Singles Coffee Group • A&W, 10101-88 Ave, Fort Saskatchewan • 780.907.0201 (Brenda) • A mixed group offering conversation and friendship • Every Sun, 2pm

Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Information Night • Habitat for Humanity Prefab Shop, 14135-128 Ave • 780.451.3416 ext. 236 • vbatten@hfh.org • hfh.org/volunteer/vin • Learn about taking the next steps and what opportunities are available at Habitat for Humanity • Every 3rd Thu of the month, excluding Dec; 6-7pm • Free

LGNYEG • Happy Harbor Comics, 10729-104 Ave NW • happyharborcomics.com • Events may include guest speakers, movie nights, board game nights, video game nights and much more • First Thu of the month, 7-9pm • Free

Lotus Qigong • SAGE downtown 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.695.4588 • Attendees can raise their vital energy with a weekly Yixue practice • Every Fri, 2-3:30pm • Free Monday Mingle • Hexagon Board Game Cafe, 10123 Whyte Ave • 780.757.3105 • info@thehexcafe.com • thehexcafe.com • Meet new gamers. Go to the event solo or with a group • Every Mon, 5-11pm • $5 (one drink per person)

Northern Alberta Wood Carvers Association • Duggan Community Hall, 3728-106 St • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

Open Door Comic Creator Meetings • Happy Harbor Comics, 10729-104 Ave • 780.452.8211 • happyharborcomics.com • Open to any skill level. Meet other artists and writers, glean tricks of the trade and gain tips to help your own work, or share what you've already done • 2nd and 4th Thu of every month, 7pm

Organization for Bipolar Affective Disorder (OBAD) • Grey Nuns Hospital, Rm 0651, obad@shaw.ca; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

Painting for Pleasure • McDougall United Church, 10086 Macdonald Drive (south entrance) • 780.428.1818 • karenbishopartist@gmail.com • mcdougallunited.com • A weekly group for those who like to paint, draw or otherwise be creative on paper • Every Thu, 10am-noon

Roda de Capoeira • Capoeira Academy, #103-10324-82 Ave • capoeiraacademy.ca • Brazil's traditional game of agility and trickery • Every Sat, 2:30pm • Free • All ages

Sacred Circle Dance • Riverdale Hall,

9231-100 Ave • Dances are taught to a variety of songs and music. No partner required • Every Wed, 7-9pm • $10

Schizophrenia Society Family Support Drop-in Group • Schizophrenia Society of Alberta, 5215-87 St • 780.452.4661 • schizophrenia.ab.ca • The Schizophrenia Society of Alberta offers a variety of services and support programs for those who are living with the illness, family members, caregivers, and friends • 1st and 3rd Thu each month, 7-9pm • Free

Scrambled YEG • Brittany's Lounge, 10225-97 St • 780.497.0011 • Open Genre Variety Stage: artist from all mediums are encouraged to occupy the stage and share their creations • Every Tue-Fri, 5-8pm Seeing is Above All • Acacia Hall, 10433-83 Ave NW • 780.554.6133 • Instruction into the meditation on the Inner Light. Learn a simple technique that will lift you above life's stresses • Every Sun, 5pm • Free Seventies Forever Music Society • Call 587.520.3833 for location • deepsoul. ca • Combining music, garage sales, nature, common sense, and kindred karma to revitalize the inward persona • Every Wed, 7-8:30pm

Sugar Foot Ballroom • 10545-81 Ave • 587.786.6554 • sugarswing.com • Friday Night Stomp!: Swing and party music dance social every Fri; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check web; $10, $2 (lesson with entry) • Swing Dan ce Social every Sat; beginner lesson starts at 8pm. All ages and levels welcome. Occasional live music–check the Sugar Swing website for info • $10, $2 lesson with entry TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY (TOPS) • Grace United Church annex, 6215-104 Ave • 780.479-8667 (Bob) • bobmurra@telus.net • Low-cost, fun and friendly weight loss group • Every Mon, 6:30pm Toastmasters

• Chamber Toastmasters Club: 6th floor, World Trade Centre, 9990 Jasper Ave; Contact: 780.462.1878/RonChapman@shaw.ca (Ron Chapman); 780.424.6364/dkorpany@ telusplanet.net (Darryl Korpany); Meet every Thu from Sep-Jun, 6-7:45pm • Club Bilingue Toastmasters Meetings: Campus St. Jean: Pavillion McMahon; 780.667.6105 (Willard); clubbilingue. toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 7pm • Conquer Your Fear of Public Speaking: Norwood Legion, 11150-82 St; 780.902.4605; norwoodtoastmasters.org; Every Thu, Oct 13Jun 29, 7:30-9:30pm; Guests are free • Fabulous Facilitators Toastmasters Club: 2nd Fl, Canada Place Rm 217, 9700 Jasper Ave; Carisa: divdgov2014_15@outlook. com, 780.439.3852; fabulousfacilitators. toastmastersclubs.org; Meet every Tue, 12:05-1pm • Generating Power Speakers: EPCOR Tower, 10423-101 St NW: Meeting will take place on the 8th floor, 780.392.5331 (Phil); 1st and 3rd Tue each month, 12:05-1:05pm • N'Orators Toastmasters Club: Lower Level, McClure United Church, 13708-74 St: meet every Thu, 6:45-8:30pm; contact vpm@ norators.com, 780.807.4696, norators.com • Norwood Toastmasters: Legion, 11150-82 St NW; Every Thu, 7:30-9:30pm • Terrified of Public Speaking: Norwood Legion Edmonton, 11150-82 St NW; Every Thu until Jun, 7:30-9:30pm; Free; contact jnwafula@yahoo.com; norwoodtoastmasters. org • Y Toastmasters Club: Queen Alexandra Community League, 10425 University Ave (N door, stairs to the left); 780.437.1136 (Mark) or 780.463.5331 (Antonio); yclubtoastmasters@gmail.com; Meet every Tue, 7-9pm except last Tue each month

LECTURES/Presentations 2017 Curatorial Lecture Series: Curling in Alberta • Royal Alberta Museum, 12845-102 Ave • 780.453.9100 • royalalbertamuseum.ca • Curling has long been a beloved Canadian winter pastime. Explore how the innovations of Albertans Ole and Herb Olson revolutionized curling in the 20th century • Feb 22, 7-8pm • Free

Alberta Women Entrepreneurs' Learning Day - Building a Resilient Business • MacEwan University, Robbins Health Learning Centre, Building 9 Main Floor • 1.800.713.3558 • info@awebusiness.com • Supporting women entrepreneurs through skills training and community networking. Hear from industry experts, learn best practices to grow the business, and expand your tool kit through various workshops • Feb 22, 9:30am-4:30pm • $143.54 (full day + lunch); available at Eventbrite

Canada's Odyssey: A Country Based on Incomplete Conquests • Law Centre, Rooms 231 & 237 • ccsedu@ ualberta.ca • Political Science Professor Peter Russell will speak on how the failure of English-speaking Canada to eliminate French and Aboriginal communities before Confederation is key to Canada being a multinational and multicultural world leader • Feb 27, 121:30pm • Free (RSVP at bit.ly/PRuss)

Forward Thinking Speaker Series: A Conversation about Reconciliation • Ramada Hotel Kingsway, 11834 Kingsway Ave • Hosted by TRC Commissioners Chief Wilton Littlechild and Dr. Marie Wilson. Moderated by Honourary Witness Shelagh Rogers. As witnesses and collectors of survivor testimonies during the TRC, they played an important role in improving access to the truth about residential schools that has been kept from the people of Canada for so long • Feb 28, 7-8:30pm • Tickets available via Eventbrite

Glass ​Blowing ​C​lasses ​• Pixie Glassworks, 9322-60 Ave • 780.436.4460 • pixieglassworks.com/pages/classes • Offering three levels in each of: hollow body work, implosions, sculpture, pipe-making and beads. Call to book. No classes on holidays • Every Mon, Wed-Thu, 6-9pm • $150

Opera 101 Edmonton Opera's Elektra • 9804 Jasper Ave • edmontonopera.com • Grab a drink and follow Elektra's journey through history, including its origins in Greek drama and adaptation into opera's greatest psychological thriller • Feb 22, 7-9pm • Free (RSVP at Eventbrite)

TEDxUalberta 2017 Conference • Citadel Theatre, 9828-101A Ave • tedxualberta.com/rebootedx • Featuring local leaders and innovators on the big stage to discuss innovation in Edmonton - whether this be in technology, business, education, healthcare, arts, or global issues • Feb 25, 2-8pm • $60$80 (available through the Citadel Theatre) • Ages 10+

QUEER Affirm Group • garysdeskcom@hotmail. com • mcdougallunited.com • Part of the United Church network supporting LGBTQ men and women • Meet monthly at Second Cup, Edmonton City Centre for coffee and conversation at 12:30pm; Special speaker events are held throughout the year over lunch at McDougall Church Evolution Wonderlounge • 10220103 St • 780.424.0077 • yourgaybar.com • Mon: Drag Race in the White Room; 7pm • Wed: Monthly games night/trivia • Thu: Happy hour, 6-8pm; Karaoke, 7-12:30am • Fri: Flashback Friday with your favourite hits of the ’80s/’90s/2000s; rotating drag and burlesque events • Sat: Rotating DJs Velix and Suco • Sun: Weekly drag show, 10:30pm

G.L.B.T.Q Seniors Group • S.A.G.E Bldg, main floor Cafe, Or in confidence oneon-one in the Craft Room • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance. One-on-one meetings are also available in the craft room • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: Tuff69@telus.net

Pride Centre of Edmonton • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • Drop in hours: Mon, Wed 4-7pm; Fri 6-9pm; Closed Sat-Sun and Holidays • JamOUT: Music mentorship and instruction for youth aged 12-24; Every other Tue, 7-9pm • Equal Fierce Fit & Fabulous: recreational fitness program, ages 12-24; every other Tue, 6-8pm, every other Tue • Queer Lens: weekly education and discussion group open to everyone; every Wed, 7-8:30pm • Mindfulness Meditation: open to everyone; every Thu, 6-6:50pm • Men's Social Circle: A social support

VUEWEEKLY.com | feb 16 – feb 22, 2017

group for all male-identified persons over 18 years of age in the LGBT*Q community; 1st and 3rd Thu each month; 7-9pm • TTIQ (18+ Trans* Group): 2nd Mon of the month, 7-9pm • Art & Identity: exploring identity through the arts, a wellness initiative; Every other Fri, 6-9pm • Edmonton Illusions: cross-dressing and transgender group 18+; 2nd Fri of each month, 7-9pm • Movies & Games Night: Every other Fri, 6-9pm • Thought OUT: Altview’s all-ages discussion group; every Sat, 7-9pm • Seahorse Support Circle: facilitated meet up for families with trans and gender creative kids aged 5-14; 2nd Sun of the month, 3-5pm • Men Talking with Pride: Social discussion group for gay and bisexual men; Every Sun, 7-9pm

Team Edmonton • Various sports and recreation activities • teamedmonton. ca • Bootcamp: Garneau School, 10925-87 Ave; Most Mon, 7-8pm • Swimming: NAIT Swimming Pool, 11665-109 St; Every Tue, 7:30-8:30pm and every Thu, 7-8pm • Water Polo: NAIT Swimming Pool, 11665-109 St; Every Tue, 8:30-9:30pm • Yoga: New Lion's Breath Yoga Studio, #301,10534-124 St; Every Wed, 7:30-9pm • Taekwondo: near the Royal Gardens Community Centre, 4030-117 St; Contact for specific times • Abs: Parkallen Community League Hall, 6510-111 St; Every Tue, 6-7pm and Thu, 7:15-8:15pm • Dodgeball: Royal Alexandra Hospital Gymnasium; Every Sun, 5-7pm • Running: meet at Kinsmen main entrance; Every Sun, 10am • Spin: Blitz Conditioning, 10575-115 St; Every Tue, 7-8pm• Volleyball: Stratford Elementary School, 8715153 St; Every Fri, 7-9 • Meditation: Edmonton Pride Centre, 10608-105 Ave; 3rd Thu of every month, 5:30-6:15pm • Board Games: Underground Tap & Grill, 10004 Jasper Ave; One Sun per month, 3-7pm • All Bodies Swim: Bonnie Doon Leisure Centre, 8468-81 St; One Sat per month 4:30-5:30pm Yoga with Jennifer • 780.439.6950 • ThreeBattles.com • A traditional approach with lots of individual attention. Free introductory classes • Tue evenings & Sat mornings

SPECIAL EVENTS 2017 Capital Classic Pond Hockey Tournament • Hawrelak Park, 9330 Groat Road • An old-fashioned 3-on-3 round robin done Canadian style in the great outdoors– next to a beer tent • Feb 18, 9am-5pm

Africian Mud Cloth Workshop • The Carrot, 9351-118 Ave NW • artsontheave.org • Work together with your family and friends to create a community mud cloth • Feb 25, 1-4pm • RSVP at events@ thecarrot.ca • Suitable for ages 10+ Family Day with the Rutherfords • Rutherford House Provincial Historic Site, 11153 Saskatchewan Drive NW • 780.427.3995 • Rutherford.House@gov. ab.ca • rutherfordhousehistoricsite.org • Explore one of Edmonton's elegant, historic houses, and join in historical games with the costumed interpreters, sample a treat made in the historic kitchen and make an old-fashioned craft • Feb 20, 12-4pm • Free

Ice Castles • Hawrelak Park, 9330 Groat Road • icecastles.com/edmonton • Guests are invited to not only view the beauty of the structure, but also to squeeze, squish and crawl through parts of the stunning Narnialike display • Dec 30-Mar 1, 3-10pm (closed Tue except during the Silver Skate Festival) • $9.95-$12.95 (available online)

Opera Brunch - Elektra • Royal Glenora Club, 11160 River Valley Road • edmontonopera.com • Enjoy a hearty, delicious meal accompanied by the cast of Elektra on special performances catered to please • Feb 26, 11am-12pm • $85 (adult), $35 (child) Silver Skate Festival 2017 • Hawrelak Park, 9930 Groat Road • silverskatefestival.org/go • Rooted in Dutch winter traditions, the festival combines sport (especially skating), arts and culture, and recreation • Feb 10-20, 12-8pm • Free Winefest Edmonton • Shaw Conference Centre, Hall D, 9797 Jasper Ave • 1.866.228.3555 • dakota@celebratewinefest. com • celebratewinefest.com/edmonton.html • A wonderland of wines, where attendees will sample from a delicious array of wines from all over the world • Feb 17-18 • $84$89 • Attendees must be legal drinking age


FREEWILLASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): By my estimates, 72 percent of you Aries are in unusually good moods. The world seems friendlier, more cooperative. Fifty-six percent of you feel more in love with life than you have in a long time. You may even imagine that the birds and trees and stars are flirting with you. I'm also guessing that 14 percent of you are weaving in and out of being absurdly, deliriously happy, sometimes without any apparent explanation. As a result of your generosity of spirit, you may be the recipient of seemingly impossible rewards like free money or toasted ice cream or unconditional tenderness. And I bet that at least ten percent of you are experiencing all of the above. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I am launching a campaign to undo obsolete stereotypes about you Bulls. There are still backwards astrologers out there who perpetrate the lie that many of you are stingy, stolid, stubborn slowpokes. As an antidote, I plan to heighten everyone's awareness of your sensual, soulful sweetness, and your tastefully pragmatic sensitivity, and your diligent, dynamic productivity. That should be easy in the coming weeks, since you'll be at the height of your ability to express those superpowers. Luckily, people will also have an enhanced capacity to appreciate you for who you really are. It will be a favourable time to clarify and strengthen your reputation. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Will Giovanni surreptitiously replace Allesandra's birth control pills with placebos? Will Camille take a hidden crowbar to her rendezvous with the blackmailer? Will Josie steal Jose's diary and sell it on eBay? Given the current astrological omens, you may have an unconscious attraction to soap opera-type events like those. The glamour of melodrama is tempting you. But I'm hoping and predicting that you will express the cosmic currents in less toxic ways. Maybe you'll hear a searing but healing confession after midnight in the pouring rain, for instance. Perhaps you'll break an outworn taboo with ingenious grace, or forge a fertile link with a reformed rascal, or recover a lost memory in a dusty basement. CANCER (June 21-July 22): All naturally-occurring matter on earth is composed of 92 basic elements arranged in various combinations. Since some of these appear in trace amounts, they took a long time for humans to discover. In the 18th and 19th centuries, chemists were exuberant when they tracked down seven of the 92 in a single location: an underground mine on the Swedish island of Ytterby. That small place was a mother lode. I'm predicting a metaphori-

ROB BREZSNY FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

cally similar experience for you, Cancerian: new access to a concentrated source that will yield much illumination.

ous and dour in order to shed the ancient burden. In fact, just the opposite is true. Trust blithe and rowdy spirits.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The next four weeks will be an excellent time to upgrade your understanding of the important characters in your life. In fact, I suspect you will generate good fortune and meaningful synchronicities whenever you seek greater insight into anyone who affects you. Get to know people better, Leo! If there are intriguing acquaintances who pique your curiosity, find out more about them. Study the oddballs you're allergic to with the intention to discern their hidden workings. In general, practice being objective as you improve your skill at reading human nature.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your lessons in communication are reaching a climax. Here are five tips to help you do well on your "final exam." 1. Focus more on listening for what you need to know rather than on expressing what you already know. 2. Keep white lies and convenient deceptions to a bare minimum. 3. Tell the truth as strong and free as you dare, but always—if possible—with shrewd kindness. 4. You are more likely to help your cause if you spread bright, shiny gossip instead of the grubby kind. 5. Experiment with being unpredictable; try to infuse your transmissions with unexpected information and turns of phrase.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1787, English captain Arthur Phillip led an eight-month naval expedition to the southeastern part of the continent now known as Australia. Upon arrival, he claimed the land for England, despite the fact that 250,000 Aboriginal people were living there, just as their ancestors had for 2,000 generations. Two hundred years later, an Aboriginal activist named Burnum Burnum planted the Aboriginal flag on the White Cliffs of Dover, claiming England for his people. I encourage you to make a comparably artful or symbolic act like Burnum's sometime soon, Virgo—a ritual or gesture to assert your sovereignty or evoke a well-deserved reversal or express your unconquerable spirit. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The ancient Roman rhetorician Quintilian authored a twelve-volume textbook on the art of oratory. As ample as it was, it could have been longer. "Erasure is as important as writing," he said. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that counsel should be a rewarding and even exciting theme for you in the coming weeks. For the long-term health of your labor of love or your masterpiece, you should focus for a while on what to edit out of it. How could you improve it by making it shorter and more concise? SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Do you know about the long-running kids' show Sesame Street? Are you familiar with Big Bird, the talking eight-feet-tall yellow canary who's one of the main characters? I hope so, because your horoscope is built around them. In the Sesame Street episode called Don't Eat the Pictures, Big Bird solves a riddle that frees a 4,000-year-old Egyptian prince from an ancient curse. I think this vignette can serve as a model for your own liberation. How? You can finally outwit and outmaneuver a very old problem with the help of some playful, even childlike energy. Don't assume that you've got to be relentlessly seri-

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The meaning of the Latin phrase crambe repetita is "cabbage reheated, twice-cooked." I urge you to avoid partaking of such a dish in the coming weeks, both literally and figuratively. If you're truly hungry for cooked cabbage, eat it fresh. Likewise, if you have a ravenous appetite for stories, revelations, entertainment, and information—which I suspect you will—don't accept the warmedover, recycled variety. Insist on the brisk, crisp stuff that excites your curiosity and appeals to your sense of wonder. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here's your mantra for the next three weeks: "I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life." Say this out loud 11 times right after you wake up each morning, and 11 more times before lunch, and 11 more times at bedtime. "I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life." Whenever you do this little chant, summon an upflow of smiling confidence -- a serene certainty that no matter how long the magic might take, it will ultimately work. "I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life." Don't let any little voice in your head undermine your link to this simple truth. Lift your heart to the highest source of vitality you can imagine. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): "We cannot simply sit and stare at our wounds forever," writes Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. "We must stand up and move on to the next action." That's your slightly scolding but ultimately inspirational advice, Pisces. According to my astrological analysis, you have done heroic work to identify and investigate your suffering. You have summoned a tremendous amount of intelligence in order to understand it and further the healing. But right now it's time to turn your focus to other matters. Like what? How about rebirth? V

JONESIN’ CROSSWORD

MATT JONES JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

“Hide Your Kids”— they’re in there somewhere.

Across

1 Baker’s buy 6 Group of periods 9 Pet sounds? 13 Threepio’s mate 14 McDonald’s Corporation mogul Ray 15 “Dog Barking at the Moon” painter Joan 16 Maintain the same speed as 18 Tree of Knowledge garden 19 Converse with the locals in Rome, e.g. 21 NBC show since ‘75 24 Lilly of pharmaceuticals 25 Undersized 26 Size in a portrait package 28 It keeps going during the Olympics 31 “You’re not ___, are you?” 32 Guy with a lot of food issues? 33 “Chandelier” singer 36 What regular exercise helps maintain 40 Layer of lawn 41 Mid-sized jazz combo 42 Blue material 43 Clunky footwear 44 Home of Titian’s “Venus of Urbino” 46 Muhammad Ali’s boxing daughter 49 Soundless communication syst. 50 U.K. tabloid, with “The” 51 “Hmmm ... I’m thinking ...” 56 Contends 57 What each of the entries with circles reveals 61 To be in France 62 Lago contents 63 Country divided since 1948 64 Hair band of the 1980s 65 He played Clubber Lang in “Rocky III” 66 Gift on the seventh day of Christmas

9 Audrey Tautou’s quirky title role of 2001 10 Chamillionaire hit that doesn’t actually have “Dirty” in the title 11 Lose one’s mind 12 Cher’s partner 14 “The Bridge on the River ___” 17 Hit with a barrage 20 Concede 21 Exchanges 22 Cheesy chip flavor 23 Bridges of film 27 “Stacks of wax” 28 Cabinet contents 29 Departed 30 “Entourage” agent Gold 32 Werewolf’s tooth 33 Long haulers 34 Onetime Trooper and Rodeo maker 35 John who was Gomez Addams 37 Acquired relative 38 Dove noise 39 Abbr. stamped on a bad check 43 Place for supplies, sometimes 44 “Back in the ___” (Beatles song) 45 The gold in Goldschlager, e.g. 46 What “-phile” means 47 Curly-tailed canine 48 Like xenon, as gases go 49 On the ocean 52 “Taken” star Neeson 53 Caltech grad, perhaps 54 Letter-shaped bolt link 55 Site with the tagline “Discover the expert in you” 58 Glass on the radio 59 “Steal My Sunshine” band 60 “___ Boot” (1981 war film) ©2017 Jonesin' Crosswords

Down

1 Chatter away 2 Poet’s palindrome 3 Brunched, say 4 Absorbs, with “up” 5 Unbelievable cover? 6 “CHiPs” costar Estrada 7 Bread at an Indian restaurant 8 Eight, to Ernst

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DAN SAVAGE SAVAGELOVE@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ASEXUAL PROBLEMS

I’ve been reading your advice column in The Coast in Halifax for a while, and it seems that most solutions to relationship problems revolve around sex. Everyone wants it or needs it, we should fuck before dinner, or we can spice up our sex life in this certain way to be happy. What about someone who doesn’t want to have sex, ever? I’ve asked other people for advice, and the answer is usually “take one for the team,” have sex to keep them happy. Is that the only way I could find happiness in a relationship? It’s not something I want to do—but at this point, I don’t see any other options. ALL ALONE ACE I’m a sex-advice columnist. Consequently, AAA, people tend to write me when sex (needing it, wanting it, getting it but not the kind you want, etc.) is the problem, and sex (in some new and improved form) is often-but-not-always the solution. I also get and respond to questions from asexuals, and I’ve urged sexuals not to regard asexuals as defective—or, for that matter, to view committed-but-sexless relationships as defective. So long as both people in the relationship are content and happy, it’s a good and healthy and functional rela-

tionship, whether the sex is vanilla or spicy or non-existent. Strictly companionate marriages can be good marriages. As for “taking one for the team,” that’s not advice given only to asexuals. A woman who’s married to a foot fetishist, for instance, may be advised to “take one for the team” and let her husband perv on her feet. A vanilla guy married to a woman corrupted by Fifty Shades of Grey (it’s baaaaaack) may be advised to “take one for the team” and tie the wife up once in a while. And while there are certainly lots of asexuals out there taking one for the team—having sex to please/ keep/shut up their partners (or allowing their partners to seek sex elsewhere)—you know who doesn’t have to take one for the team, ever? Asexuals with other asexuals. Dating another asexual is the other option, the obvious option, and may be the best option for you, AAA. (Don’t want to take one for the team, ever? Don’t draft anyone onto your team who wants one, ever.) A quick Google search brings up several asexual dating sites: Asexualitic. com, AsexualMatch.com, Ace-Book. net, AsexualPals.com. You can also choose to identify as asexual—and search for other asexuals—on mainstream dating sites like OkCupid and Match.

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I can already hear you composing your response, AAA: Asexuals are just one percent of the population. There are 400,000 people in Halifax, which means there are 3,999 other asexuals. Sounds like a lot, but most will be too young, too old, or unappealing for political or personal reasons (loves Kevin O’Leary, hasn’t seen Moonlight, picks their nose with an oyster fork). And a significant chunk of that number may not be aware— yet—that they’re asexual. So realistically, AAA, your local dating pool is much smaller than 3,999. But! Good news! There are 7.5 billion people on the planet! And 75 million of them are asexual! I have a good friend with a unique array of kinks—a crazy, specific, and rare constellation of kinks—and he cast a wide net on kink dating apps. After he met someone on the other side of the world with all the same kinks and they hit it off via Skype and the guy provided my friend with references (put my friend in touch with friends who could vouch for him), my friend flew to the other side of the world to go on a first date. Two months later, he went back, stayed for a few months, and then moved abroad to be with Mr. Kink Match On The Other Side Of The World. My friend did things people are typically advised against—who gets on a 12-hour flight to go on a first date?—because he knew there weren’t many lids out there for his particular pot. Asexuality isn’t a kink, I realize, but you can and should cast a wide net, AAA, like my kinky expat friend. Don’t let geography limit you in your search. You may not be able to afford to do what my friend did—fly halfway around the world for a first date—but you can get your ass to the next province over if you hit it off with an asexual in New Brunswick or Quebec. Good luck.

CELIBATE UNTIL 30?

I’m a 22-year-old lesbian living in Utah. I’m finally going back to college this fall. I have autism (high functioning), and I couldn’t handle going to school full-time while working. Thus I will be stuck living at my parents’ house, as I couldn’t afford rent and living expenses on my own. The problem is, my parents are super Republican and religious. While I live at home, I can’t date (they are against me being gay), I can���t drink, and I can’t watch movies with swears. They also force me to participate in daily scripture study, which I hate. I don’t know what to do. I can’t be myself or have any fun while I live at home because I’m afraid my parents will kick me out. But I can’t afford to move out, either. I’m shy and socially nervous, so I don’t have any friends who could help me out, and I can’t see living with roommates who are strangers. I’ll be 29 by the time I graduate, and I don’t want to live like this for that long. Any advice? Maybe I could work something out with my parents, but they are set in their ways and I don’t want to hurt them. UNDER THEIR AUTHORITARIAN HOMOPHOBIA If they were just enforcing “their rules” about booze in their house, that would be one thing. But requiring your adult daughter not to date anyone, or not to be a lesbian at all, is just mean. (A lot of insane religious people believe homosexuality is an act, not an identity, so someone who isn’t currently having gay or lesbian sex isn’t actually gay or lesbian. By that standard, I haven’t been gay for hours.) And leveraging their daughter’s autism and social isolation and economic dependence against her in order to control her? Meaner still.

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You say you don’t want to hurt your parents—you’re a good daughter—but it’s clear your shitty parents don’t care if they hurt you. Typically my advice would be to tell your mean and shitty parents what they want to hear—to feel free to lie to them under duress— and then lean on your friends, do your own thing outside of the house, and be careful not to get caught. But that’s not an option for you. So you’ll have to ask yourself what you value more: freedom now or getting your degree sooner rather than later. If it’s your freedom, move out, get a job, go to community college, and take your time getting that degree. If it’s getting your degree before turning 30, knuckle under, spend a lot of late nights “studying in the library,” and go to the student resource center on your campus and ask if there are any campus services/support groups for students on the autistic spectrum. Who knows? You might meet some people who you could see yourself living with, as roommates and friends, and be able to get out of your parents’ house sooner rather than later. P.S. You’re in Utah, UTAH. If there’s an LGBT student group on your campus, go to the meetings and share your story. You might meet a gay Mormon boy with parents like yours—shitty and mean—who could use a fake girlfriend until he graduates, and you could use a fake boyfriend until you move out of mom and dad’s. On the Lovecast, two tricky pregnancies: savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter


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Provincial Archives of Alberta - PR1965.0023/1

ALBERTA & the GREAT WAR 1914: War is declared in Europe. Not yet 10 years old, the young province of Alberta sends its sons and daughters overseas while those who remain at home struggle with a challenging new reality. Alberta & the Great War is an immersive, interactive exhibit that explores the impact of the conflict both abroad and at home. Connect with people and stories, objects and experiences as you learn more about Alberta and the “war to end all wars.”

February 17 to May 22, 2017 Free, nonticketed event Borealis Gallery Legislative Assembly Visitor Centre Edmonton Federal Building 9820 – 107 Street

#ABWWI 24 SMELL YA LATER!

assembly.ab.ca VUEWEEKLY.com | FEB 16 – FEB 22, 2017

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1112: Culture of Cold