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April 2011

SPRINGING INTO ACTION


table of contents 2 Compliance Corner Paid internships 4 National Commodore Club Coach Franklin’s reception in Atlanta 7 More from McGugin By the numbers

8

8 My Game Sophomore tennis player Ryan Lipman 0 Greens and Grades 1 Senior golfer Megan Grehan 13 My Turn: Rod Williamson Winning on two fronts

5 Spring Football Practice 1 Black & Gold game set for April 17 6 Women’s Basketball Reunion 1 NCC hosts reception for alumni

15

17 Strength in Familiarity

19

Defensive end returns as strength coach

19 Basketball Wrap-Up Snapshot of the 2010-11 seasons 1 David Williams Q&A 2 Vice Chancellor’s monthly piece

10

23 April Calendar This month’s athletic schedule To submit a letter to Commodore Nation, you can e-mail: commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu or write to Commodore Nation, 2601 Jess Neely Drive, Nashville, TN 37212. Letters should include the writer’s name and address and may be edited for clarity and space.

vucommodores.com

24 Last Shot Basketball seniors honored

VUCOMMODORES.COM

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

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table of contents 2 Compliance Corner Paid internships 4 National Commodore Club Coach Franklin’s reception in Atlanta 7 More from McGugin By the numbers

8

8 My Game Sophomore tennis player Ryan Lipman 0 Greens and Grades 1 Senior golfer Megan Grehan 13 My Turn: Rod Williamson Winning on two fronts

5 Spring Football Practice 1 Black & Gold game set for April 17 6 Women’s Basketball Reunion 1 NCC hosts reception for alumni

15

17 Strength in Familiarity

19

Defensive end returns as strength coach

19 Basketball Wrap-Up Snapshot of the 2010-11 seasons 1 David Williams Q&A 2 Vice Chancellor’s monthly piece

10

23 April Calendar This month’s athletic schedule To submit a letter to Commodore Nation, you can e-mail: commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu or write to Commodore Nation, 2601 Jess Neely Drive, Nashville, TN 37212. Letters should include the writer’s name and address and may be edited for clarity and space.

vucommodores.com

24 Last Shot Basketball seniors honored

VUCOMMODORES.COM

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

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COMPLIANCE

COR NER Q: A:

Top Spin is a women’s tennis student-athlete who also is studying pre-law. She has been offered a paid internship by a local law firm here in town. Can she accept the internship and be paid as well?

Editorial

Publisher: Vanderbilt University Editor-in-Chief: Chris Weinman

Director of Communications: Rod Williamson

Yes. According to NCAA Bylaw 12.4.1, compensation can be paid to a studentathlete: (a) Only for work actually performed; and (b) At a rate commensurate with the going rate in that locality for similar services.

Designers: Jeremy Teaford

Chris Weinman

Digital Image Specialist: Julie Luckett Turner VU Photography: Mary Donaldson

Daniel Dubois Steve Green Joe Howell

Compliance questions? Please contact: Candice Lee George Midgett Director of Compliance Compliance Coordinator 615/322-7992 615/322-2083 candice.lee@vanderbilt.edu george.d.midgett@vanderbilt.edu John Peach Andrew Turner Compliance Coordinator Recruiting/Compliance Coordinator 615/343-1060 615/322-4543 john.w.peach@vanderbilt.edu andrew.turner@vanderbilt.edu

Jenny Mandeville Anne Rayner John Russell Susan Urmy

Contributors: Laina Balafas

Andy Boggs Sterling Frierson Larry Leathers George Midgett Ryan Schulz Jennifer Stevens Donald Turnbaugh

Administrative

Chancellor: Nicholas S. Zeppos Vice Chancellor for University Affairs: David Williams II Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs: Beth Fortune

Vanderbilt University’s Mission, Goals and Values Vanderbilt University is a center for scholarly research, informed and creative teaching, and service to the community and society at large. Vanderbilt will uphold the highest standards and be a leader in the quest for new knowledge through scholarship, dissemination of knowledge through teaching and outreach, and creative experimentation of ideas and concepts. In pursuit of these goals, Vanderbilt values most highly intellectual freedom that supports open inquiry, and equality, compassion and excellence in all endeavors. Vanderbilt University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-action university. ON THE COVER: Football spring practice photo by John Russell, VU Photography POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to National Commodore Club, 2601 Jess Neely Drive, Nashville, TN 37212. SUBSCRIPTION: To subscribe to Commodore Nation, please contact Chris Weinman by phone at 615/343-0019 or by e-mail at commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu ADVERTISEMENT: To advertise with Commodore Nation, please contact Vanderbilt IMG Sports & Entertainment Properties. Jeff Miller, general manager 615/322-4468; jeff.miller@imgworld.com

Commodore Nation is printed using recycled paper.

2

APRIL 2011

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C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

3


COMPLIANCE

COR NER Q: A:

Top Spin is a women’s tennis student-athlete who also is studying pre-law. She has been offered a paid internship by a local law firm here in town. Can she accept the internship and be paid as well?

Editorial

Publisher: Vanderbilt University Editor-in-Chief: Chris Weinman

Director of Communications: Rod Williamson

Yes. According to NCAA Bylaw 12.4.1, compensation can be paid to a studentathlete: (a) Only for work actually performed; and (b) At a rate commensurate with the going rate in that locality for similar services.

Designers: Jeremy Teaford

Chris Weinman

Digital Image Specialist: Julie Luckett Turner VU Photography: Mary Donaldson

Daniel Dubois Steve Green Joe Howell

Compliance questions? Please contact: Candice Lee George Midgett Director of Compliance Compliance Coordinator 615/322-7992 615/322-2083 candice.lee@vanderbilt.edu george.d.midgett@vanderbilt.edu John Peach Andrew Turner Compliance Coordinator Recruiting/Compliance Coordinator 615/343-1060 615/322-4543 john.w.peach@vanderbilt.edu andrew.turner@vanderbilt.edu

Jenny Mandeville Anne Rayner John Russell Susan Urmy

Contributors: Laina Balafas

Andy Boggs Sterling Frierson Larry Leathers George Midgett Ryan Schulz Jennifer Stevens Donald Turnbaugh

Administrative

Chancellor: Nicholas S. Zeppos Vice Chancellor for University Affairs: David Williams II Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs: Beth Fortune

Vanderbilt University’s Mission, Goals and Values Vanderbilt University is a center for scholarly research, informed and creative teaching, and service to the community and society at large. Vanderbilt will uphold the highest standards and be a leader in the quest for new knowledge through scholarship, dissemination of knowledge through teaching and outreach, and creative experimentation of ideas and concepts. In pursuit of these goals, Vanderbilt values most highly intellectual freedom that supports open inquiry, and equality, compassion and excellence in all endeavors. Vanderbilt University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-action university. ON THE COVER: Football spring practice photo by John Russell, VU Photography POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to National Commodore Club, 2601 Jess Neely Drive, Nashville, TN 37212. SUBSCRIPTION: To subscribe to Commodore Nation, please contact Chris Weinman by phone at 615/343-0019 or by e-mail at commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu ADVERTISEMENT: To advertise with Commodore Nation, please contact Vanderbilt IMG Sports & Entertainment Properties. Jeff Miller, general manager 615/322-4468; jeff.miller@imgworld.com

Commodore Nation is printed using recycled paper.

2

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

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ATLANTA RECEPTION FOR COACH FRANKLIN – MARCH 10, 2011

C O M M O D O R E C LU B

COR N E R

Vanderbilt Football Head Coach James Franklin was the special guest at a reception on Thursday, March 10 at the Georgia World Congress Center attended by Vanderbilt alumni from the Atlanta area and hoops fans attending the 2011 Southeastern Conference Men’s Basketball Tournament.

PHONE: 615/322-4114 • ONLINE: vanderbilt.edu/ncc

Patricia and Richard Abelson – Brentwood Mary and John Anthony – Brentwood Jennifer Baltimore – Nashville Brent Blue – Jackson, Wyo. Mary Virginia and Wade Botts – Orlando, Fla. Andrea and Andrew Bowers – Cherry Hill, N.J. Ellen and Frederick Boyer – Dayton, Ohio Lolly and Allen Brown – Nashville David Bubbus – Little Rock, Ark. Bill Bullington – Athens, Ala. Stacey and Robert Burton – Greenwich, Conn. Charles Chitty – Chattanooga Donna Coker – Hendersonville Stephen Cragon – Birmingham, Ala. A.K. Dettwiller – Nashville George Dettwiller – Nashville Kim Dettwiller – Nashville Allison and Samuel Dillard – Nashville Kevin Dolohanty – Chesterfield, Mo. Deborah and Duane Donahoo – Knoxville Susan and David Drummond – Nashville Lea and Jason Farese – Oxford, Miss. Jason Fernandez – Silver Spring, Md. Meg and Richard Freeman – Franklin Maryclaire and Lloyd Goodman – Villanova, Pa. Kevin Grady – Atlanta Alexa and Andrew Halbert – Chicago Cynthia and Brad Hammond – Atlanta Kathy and Jeffrey Hard – Alpharetta, Ga. Jacqueline and Lawrence Heard – Valrico, Fla. Andrew Heiman – Nashville Ryan Hobbs – Atlanta Stephanie and William Holby – Atlanta Ann Hollis – Nashville Kristen and Michael Horner – Macon, Ga. Gayle and Samuel Howard – Greenville, S.C. Stacy Huppert – Nashville Melodye Jenkins – Hendersonville Jonathan Juhl – Glendale Heights, Ill. Mary Kain – Nashville William Keeling – Atlanta Deborah and Frank Krajovic – Dunwoody, Ga. Carol and Paul Kurtz – Athens, Ga. Lisa Lachenmyer and Cathy Pardue – Mount Juliet Laurie and Thomas Lee – Nashville Meredith and Jeffrey Little – Fitchburg, Wis. Melissa and Frank Lorge – North Little Rock, Ark. Shana and Bill Magruder – Atlanta Matthew Mahoney – Charlotte, N.C.

4

APRIL 2011

NCC 101

Membership renewals should be in to the NCC office by May 31 to ensure that you receive all appropriate ticket and parking benefits. Football and basketball season ticket renewals that are located in NCC priority sections will not be processed without the proper NCC membership level. If you have questions regarding your NCC membership or to renew, visit the nationalcommodoreclub.com or call 615/322.4114.

Arthur Malone – Birmingham, Ala. Linda and Dennis Mazar – Westampton, N.J. Sheila and Richard McCarty – Nashville Benjamin Merrill – Nashville Lisa Bouchard and William Morgan – Franklin Deborah and Jerry Ogg – Pulaski Cathy and Steven O’Sheal – Birmingham, Ala. Lauren Pence – Chicago Natasha and Ronal Petroff – New Albany, Ohio Stephen Puckett – Charlotte, N.C. Lee Pulley – Germantown Jean and Joe Richardson – Chattanooga Dana Richens – Atlanta Mr. and Mrs. Charles Russell – Asheville, N.C. Daniel Ryan – Nashville Susan and Mike Salato – Nashville Mickey Sanker – Burns Brownie and Karl Schmid – Franklin Pennie and Joseph Smith – Toney, Ala. Lee Ann and Gary Spehar – North Canton, Ohio Linda and Patrick Still – Nashville Tawny and Charles Tapp – Brentwood Edward Turner – Dallas James Turner – Huntsville, Ala. Patti and Jan Peter van Eys – Nashville Helene Vaughn – Nashville Rachael and Reinhard Waldinger – San Antonio, Texas Elizabeth and Kevin Warren – Joelton Pearson Weems – Atlanta Frank Wheeler – Pine Bluff, Ark. Betsy and Frank Williams – Columbia Rebecca and Spence Wilson – Memphis Tyler Winston – Nashville Chris Woods – Minneapolis, Minn. Jack Wotton – Atlanta James Zimmerman – Cincinnati, Ohio

ANITRA MORELAND

Below are the names of NCC members who joined in February. We welcome you and look forward to seeing you at Commodore games and events this year.

Why should I renew my NCC membership before May 31st?

ANITRA MORELAND

WELCOME NEW NCC MEMBERS

Head Football Coach James Franklin with football parents Lisa Bridges (left) and Mary Beth Greenstone

Head Football Coach James Franklin with football alumni Sam Allen (’58), Sam Donaldson (’57) and Tom Archbold (’60)

Football alumni Kirk Williams (’97) and Ainsley Battles (’00)

NCC members Chris (’05) and Kristen (’05) Heath

NEW FOOTBALL PARKING OPTIONS

BLACK & GOLD SPRING GAME – SUNDAY, APRIL 17 For the first time in more than a decade, Vanderbilt’s main spring attraction will feature a game-like atmosphere. Many attractions around Vanderbilt Stadium are planned with the Black & Gold Spring Game. Vandyville, with an extensive tailgate area and numerous kids activities, will be available to fans starting at 3 p.m., three hours prior to kickoff. Pre-game autograph sessions also are being planned.

vucommodores.com

In response to fan feedback, Vanderbilt Athletics and the National Commodore Club have developed a new parking plan for the 2011 football season. In an effort to maximize the flat lot spaces near the stadium and expand the available tailgating lots, new giving levels starting at $150 have been created. The new lots will be designated Lot 1A, Lot 3 and Lot 4 and will be available to NCC members who join or renew their membership by May 31, 2011, at the corresponding levels and also purchase their 2011 football season tickets. Those levels are: * Lot 1 – $3,000+ * Lot 1A – $1,500 – $2,999 (NEW) * Lot 2 – $500 – $1,499 * Lot 3 – $250 – $499 (NEW) * Lot 4 – $150 – $249 (NEW)

Log on to nationalcommodoreclub.com to view the new parking map.

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

5


ATLANTA RECEPTION FOR COACH FRANKLIN – MARCH 10, 2011

C O M M O D O R E C LU B

COR N E R

Vanderbilt Football Head Coach James Franklin was the special guest at a reception on Thursday, March 10 at the Georgia World Congress Center attended by Vanderbilt alumni from the Atlanta area and hoops fans attending the 2011 Southeastern Conference Men’s Basketball Tournament.

PHONE: 615/322-4114 • ONLINE: vanderbilt.edu/ncc

Patricia and Richard Abelson – Brentwood Mary and John Anthony – Brentwood Jennifer Baltimore – Nashville Brent Blue – Jackson, Wyo. Mary Virginia and Wade Botts – Orlando, Fla. Andrea and Andrew Bowers – Cherry Hill, N.J. Ellen and Frederick Boyer – Dayton, Ohio Lolly and Allen Brown – Nashville David Bubbus – Little Rock, Ark. Bill Bullington – Athens, Ala. Stacey and Robert Burton – Greenwich, Conn. Charles Chitty – Chattanooga Donna Coker – Hendersonville Stephen Cragon – Birmingham, Ala. A.K. Dettwiller – Nashville George Dettwiller – Nashville Kim Dettwiller – Nashville Allison and Samuel Dillard – Nashville Kevin Dolohanty – Chesterfield, Mo. Deborah and Duane Donahoo – Knoxville Susan and David Drummond – Nashville Lea and Jason Farese – Oxford, Miss. Jason Fernandez – Silver Spring, Md. Meg and Richard Freeman – Franklin Maryclaire and Lloyd Goodman – Villanova, Pa. Kevin Grady – Atlanta Alexa and Andrew Halbert – Chicago Cynthia and Brad Hammond – Atlanta Kathy and Jeffrey Hard – Alpharetta, Ga. Jacqueline and Lawrence Heard – Valrico, Fla. Andrew Heiman – Nashville Ryan Hobbs – Atlanta Stephanie and William Holby – Atlanta Ann Hollis – Nashville Kristen and Michael Horner – Macon, Ga. Gayle and Samuel Howard – Greenville, S.C. Stacy Huppert – Nashville Melodye Jenkins – Hendersonville Jonathan Juhl – Glendale Heights, Ill. Mary Kain – Nashville William Keeling – Atlanta Deborah and Frank Krajovic – Dunwoody, Ga. Carol and Paul Kurtz – Athens, Ga. Lisa Lachenmyer and Cathy Pardue – Mount Juliet Laurie and Thomas Lee – Nashville Meredith and Jeffrey Little – Fitchburg, Wis. Melissa and Frank Lorge – North Little Rock, Ark. Shana and Bill Magruder – Atlanta Matthew Mahoney – Charlotte, N.C.

4

APRIL 2011

NCC 101

Membership renewals should be in to the NCC office by May 31 to ensure that you receive all appropriate ticket and parking benefits. Football and basketball season ticket renewals that are located in NCC priority sections will not be processed without the proper NCC membership level. If you have questions regarding your NCC membership or to renew, visit the nationalcommodoreclub.com or call 615/322.4114.

Arthur Malone – Birmingham, Ala. Linda and Dennis Mazar – Westampton, N.J. Sheila and Richard McCarty – Nashville Benjamin Merrill – Nashville Lisa Bouchard and William Morgan – Franklin Deborah and Jerry Ogg – Pulaski Cathy and Steven O’Sheal – Birmingham, Ala. Lauren Pence – Chicago Natasha and Ronal Petroff – New Albany, Ohio Stephen Puckett – Charlotte, N.C. Lee Pulley – Germantown Jean and Joe Richardson – Chattanooga Dana Richens – Atlanta Mr. and Mrs. Charles Russell – Asheville, N.C. Daniel Ryan – Nashville Susan and Mike Salato – Nashville Mickey Sanker – Burns Brownie and Karl Schmid – Franklin Pennie and Joseph Smith – Toney, Ala. Lee Ann and Gary Spehar – North Canton, Ohio Linda and Patrick Still – Nashville Tawny and Charles Tapp – Brentwood Edward Turner – Dallas James Turner – Huntsville, Ala. Patti and Jan Peter van Eys – Nashville Helene Vaughn – Nashville Rachael and Reinhard Waldinger – San Antonio, Texas Elizabeth and Kevin Warren – Joelton Pearson Weems – Atlanta Frank Wheeler – Pine Bluff, Ark. Betsy and Frank Williams – Columbia Rebecca and Spence Wilson – Memphis Tyler Winston – Nashville Chris Woods – Minneapolis, Minn. Jack Wotton – Atlanta James Zimmerman – Cincinnati, Ohio

ANITRA MORELAND

Below are the names of NCC members who joined in February. We welcome you and look forward to seeing you at Commodore games and events this year.

Why should I renew my NCC membership before May 31st?

ANITRA MORELAND

WELCOME NEW NCC MEMBERS

Head Football Coach James Franklin with football parents Lisa Bridges (left) and Mary Beth Greenstone

Head Football Coach James Franklin with football alumni Sam Allen (’58), Sam Donaldson (’57) and Tom Archbold (’60)

Football alumni Kirk Williams (’97) and Ainsley Battles (’00)

NCC members Chris (’05) and Kristen (’05) Heath

NEW FOOTBALL PARKING OPTIONS

BLACK & GOLD SPRING GAME – SUNDAY, APRIL 17 For the first time in more than a decade, Vanderbilt’s main spring attraction will feature a game-like atmosphere. Many attractions around Vanderbilt Stadium are planned with the Black & Gold Spring Game. Vandyville, with an extensive tailgate area and numerous kids activities, will be available to fans starting at 3 p.m., three hours prior to kickoff. Pre-game autograph sessions also are being planned.

vucommodores.com

In response to fan feedback, Vanderbilt Athletics and the National Commodore Club have developed a new parking plan for the 2011 football season. In an effort to maximize the flat lot spaces near the stadium and expand the available tailgating lots, new giving levels starting at $150 have been created. The new lots will be designated Lot 1A, Lot 3 and Lot 4 and will be available to NCC members who join or renew their membership by May 31, 2011, at the corresponding levels and also purchase their 2011 football season tickets. Those levels are: * Lot 1 – $3,000+ * Lot 1A – $1,500 – $2,999 (NEW) * Lot 2 – $500 – $1,499 * Lot 3 – $250 – $499 (NEW) * Lot 4 – $150 – $249 (NEW)

Log on to nationalcommodoreclub.com to view the new parking map.

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

5


JR. National Commodore Club

More from McGugin

Hoopsters put on charity tournament in April Spend a day with your favorite Commodore basketball players at Vanderbilt’s Buzzkill: “Dores for Nets 2011” 3-on-3 basketball tournament for third through eighth graders on April 17 at Memorial Gym. The money raised will help purchase mosquito nets for the children of Africa to help stop the spread of malaria on the continent. Malaria kills a child every 30 seconds and there are 350 million to 500 million cases of malaria illnesses per year. Malaria is 100% preventable and treatable. More information about the event, which is being organized by senior Joe Duffy, can be found at: http://www.buzzkillfoundation.org/BUZZKILL/Vanderbilt.html

Turner, Lee honored as SEC Greats A pair of Commodore legends were honored last month as “SEC Greats” during the league’s two basketball championships. Jeff Turner starred for the Commodores from 1981-84. He was All-SEC and Academic All-SEC in 1984, and he still ranks among the school’s all-time Top 25 career

scorers with 1,271 points. The 6-foot-9 southpaw hit 51 percent of his field goal attempts during his college career. Turner was a member of the United States’ Olympic Gold Medal team in 1984 and went on to a 10-year NBA career, starting with New Jersey and concluding with seven seasons with the Orlando Magic. Candice (Storey) Lee was a four-year letterwinner for the Commodores and helped lead the team to three NCAA Tournament appearances and the 2002 SEC Tournament Championship. The former Gatorade Player of the Year in Alabama, Lee graduated from Vanderbilt in 2000 with a Bachelor of Science degree and then went on to receive her master’s degree in education from Vanderbilt in 2002. Lee has served as Vanderbilt’s Senior Woman Administrator and Compliance Director since 2004, overseen the operation of Vanderbilt’s women’s basketball program since 2008 and in July began overseeing Vanderbilt Student Services.

Baseball on TV seven times in April

By The

NUMBERS 1

loss in the first 20 games of the 2011 season for the Vanderbilt baseball team, which was ranked No. 1 by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association on March 14.

3

consecutive years that Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of Education & Human Development has been ranked No. 1 by U.S. News & World Report.

6

of the nation’s best women’s lacrosse teams converge on Vanderbilt’s campus May 5-7 for the 2011 American Lacrosse Conference Tournament.

7

Commodore teams ranked in the Top 25 of their respective sport in mid-March: baseball, bowling, lacrosse, men’s basketball, women’s golf and both men’s and women’s tennis teams.

19

assists against zero turnovers in the final three games of the season for junior point guard Brad Tinsley.

29

Keeping up with the Commodore baseball team will get a little easier this month. Vanderbilt is scheduled for seven television appearances in April, including three of the Dores’ six road SEC games. The schedule includes five regional broadcasts on CSS and FSN, as well as a pair of national dates on ESPN2.

strikeouts by the Vanderbilt pitching staff in a series win at Arkansas as the Commodore hurlers allowed only four Razorback runs all weekend.

4/2 . . at Auburn . . . . . . . . . . 4/8 . . vs. Alabama. . . . . . . . 4/16 . . at South Carolina . . . . 4/17 . . at South Carolina . . . . 4/23 . . vs. LSU. . . . . . . . . . . . 4/24 . . vs. LSU. . . . . . . . . . . . 4/30 . . vs. Tennessee. . . . . . .

pins—a perfect game—achieved by the Commodore bowlers in a Baker game (five players rotate through the 10 frames) at their own Music City Classic last month.

vucommodores.com

CSS CSS CSS ESPN2 FSN ESPN2 CSS

300

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

7


JR. National Commodore Club

More from McGugin

Hoopsters put on charity tournament in April Spend a day with your favorite Commodore basketball players at Vanderbilt’s Buzzkill: “Dores for Nets 2011” 3-on-3 basketball tournament for third through eighth graders on April 17 at Memorial Gym. The money raised will help purchase mosquito nets for the children of Africa to help stop the spread of malaria on the continent. Malaria kills a child every 30 seconds and there are 350 million to 500 million cases of malaria illnesses per year. Malaria is 100% preventable and treatable. More information about the event, which is being organized by senior Joe Duffy, can be found at: http://www.buzzkillfoundation.org/BUZZKILL/Vanderbilt.html

Turner, Lee honored as SEC Greats A pair of Commodore legends were honored last month as “SEC Greats” during the league’s two basketball championships. Jeff Turner starred for the Commodores from 1981-84. He was All-SEC and Academic All-SEC in 1984, and he still ranks among the school’s all-time Top 25 career

scorers with 1,271 points. The 6-foot-9 southpaw hit 51 percent of his field goal attempts during his college career. Turner was a member of the United States’ Olympic Gold Medal team in 1984 and went on to a 10-year NBA career, starting with New Jersey and concluding with seven seasons with the Orlando Magic. Candice (Storey) Lee was a four-year letterwinner for the Commodores and helped lead the team to three NCAA Tournament appearances and the 2002 SEC Tournament Championship. The former Gatorade Player of the Year in Alabama, Lee graduated from Vanderbilt in 2000 with a Bachelor of Science degree and then went on to receive her master’s degree in education from Vanderbilt in 2002. Lee has served as Vanderbilt’s Senior Woman Administrator and Compliance Director since 2004, overseen the operation of Vanderbilt’s women’s basketball program since 2008 and in July began overseeing Vanderbilt Student Services.

Baseball on TV seven times in April

By The

NUMBERS 1

loss in the first 20 games of the 2011 season for the Vanderbilt baseball team, which was ranked No. 1 by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association on March 14.

3

consecutive years that Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of Education & Human Development has been ranked No. 1 by U.S. News & World Report.

6

of the nation’s best women’s lacrosse teams converge on Vanderbilt’s campus May 5-7 for the 2011 American Lacrosse Conference Tournament.

7

Commodore teams ranked in the Top 25 of their respective sport in mid-March: baseball, bowling, lacrosse, men’s basketball, women’s golf and both men’s and women’s tennis teams.

19

assists against zero turnovers in the final three games of the season for junior point guard Brad Tinsley.

29

Keeping up with the Commodore baseball team will get a little easier this month. Vanderbilt is scheduled for seven television appearances in April, including three of the Dores’ six road SEC games. The schedule includes five regional broadcasts on CSS and FSN, as well as a pair of national dates on ESPN2.

strikeouts by the Vanderbilt pitching staff in a series win at Arkansas as the Commodore hurlers allowed only four Razorback runs all weekend.

4/2 . . at Auburn . . . . . . . . . . 4/8 . . vs. Alabama. . . . . . . . 4/16 . . at South Carolina . . . . 4/17 . . at South Carolina . . . . 4/23 . . vs. LSU. . . . . . . . . . . . 4/24 . . vs. LSU. . . . . . . . . . . . 4/30 . . vs. Tennessee. . . . . . .

pins—a perfect game—achieved by the Commodore bowlers in a Baker game (five players rotate through the 10 frames) at their own Music City Classic last month.

vucommodores.com

CSS CSS CSS ESPN2 FSN ESPN2 CSS

300

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

7


My Game Sophomore Ryan Lipman was named the ITA’s Ohio Valley Freshman of the Year in 2010. The Nashville native is having another stellar season for Coach Ian Duvenhage’s men’s tennis team. Lipman’s mother, the former Lisa Tamborello (’85, at left), was a four-year letterwinner at Vanderbilt after a high school career that included two Texas high school state doubles championships. Lipman discussed his game—family support, sibling rivalry and homecourt advantage.

Ryan

Lipman

On getting his start in tennis at a young age: “I was two years old. My parents both played tennis, and they would go out and hit with each other in the neighborhood. They would bring me out and hit balls to me, and that’s how I got started playing.” On his mother playing tennis at Vanderbilt: “It influenced me to keep playing tennis because she wanted me to enjoy the sport, but it didn’t really have an effect on me going to Vanderbilt. I grew up a fan because she played tennis here, but as far as her being a student-athlete here, it didn’t affect my decision.”

On his favorite things about playing tennis and playing at VU: “My favorite thing about playing tennis is winning. I love to win. I hate to lose. And my favorite thing about playing at Vanderbilt is being close to home and having lots of family and friends coming out to support the team and me, and being a part of the community.”

STEVE GREEN

On growing up with a sibling who also is successful in tennis: “It’s a little bit competitive because all the tournaments that I played in the past, he tries to play in those and do better than I did. As far as competition between us, there is really not any because I am four years older than he is and we’ve never competed against each other. It’s been really good growing up with a sibling who plays the same sport because we’ve been able to practice with each other and share some of our troubles with the sport.”

On how he gets ready for a match: “I usually like to keep it low-key. I’ll go into the locker room and hang out with the guys. About 15-20 minutes before the match starts I like to get in the zone and listen to my music, which is something up-beat, up-tempo—usually rap. I go through certain things I want to accomplish throughout the match.” On the biggest match he’s ever been involved in: “I would say the biggest match I’ve played in was the Kalamazoo Super National Finals (18’s). I got my butt kicked, but there were a lot of people there and it was a lot of fun.” On the pro he’d most like to play against: “Roger Federer. At the U.S. Open. Growing up, Roger Federer was my favorite player.” n Editor’s note: After closing the regular season with three home matches, the Commodore men’s tennis team will travel to the 2011 Southeastern Conference Championships in Gainesville, Fla., on Thursday, April 21.

8

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

9


My Game Sophomore Ryan Lipman was named the ITA’s Ohio Valley Freshman of the Year in 2010. The Nashville native is having another stellar season for Coach Ian Duvenhage’s men’s tennis team. Lipman’s mother, the former Lisa Tamborello (’85, at left), was a four-year letterwinner at Vanderbilt after a high school career that included two Texas high school state doubles championships. Lipman discussed his game—family support, sibling rivalry and homecourt advantage.

Ryan

Lipman

On getting his start in tennis at a young age: “I was two years old. My parents both played tennis, and they would go out and hit with each other in the neighborhood. They would bring me out and hit balls to me, and that’s how I got started playing.” On his mother playing tennis at Vanderbilt: “It influenced me to keep playing tennis because she wanted me to enjoy the sport, but it didn’t really have an effect on me going to Vanderbilt. I grew up a fan because she played tennis here, but as far as her being a student-athlete here, it didn’t affect my decision.”

On his favorite things about playing tennis and playing at VU: “My favorite thing about playing tennis is winning. I love to win. I hate to lose. And my favorite thing about playing at Vanderbilt is being close to home and having lots of family and friends coming out to support the team and me, and being a part of the community.”

STEVE GREEN

On growing up with a sibling who also is successful in tennis: “It’s a little bit competitive because all the tournaments that I played in the past, he tries to play in those and do better than I did. As far as competition between us, there is really not any because I am four years older than he is and we’ve never competed against each other. It’s been really good growing up with a sibling who plays the same sport because we’ve been able to practice with each other and share some of our troubles with the sport.”

On how he gets ready for a match: “I usually like to keep it low-key. I’ll go into the locker room and hang out with the guys. About 15-20 minutes before the match starts I like to get in the zone and listen to my music, which is something up-beat, up-tempo—usually rap. I go through certain things I want to accomplish throughout the match.” On the biggest match he’s ever been involved in: “I would say the biggest match I’ve played in was the Kalamazoo Super National Finals (18’s). I got my butt kicked, but there were a lot of people there and it was a lot of fun.” On the pro he’d most like to play against: “Roger Federer. At the U.S. Open. Growing up, Roger Federer was my favorite player.” n Editor’s note: After closing the regular season with three home matches, the Commodore men’s tennis team will travel to the 2011 Southeastern Conference Championships in Gainesville, Fla., on Thursday, April 21.

8

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

9


By Donald Turnbaugh

JOHN RUSSELL

Senior golfer an academic ace

enjoys the classes so she kept doing more and going at a high rate. She has also taken part in an internship working for the Pasta Shop, helping the marketing department. Her golf has stayed very consistent and she has avoided any sort of slump. She has remained around the 76 range in a sport where many college athletes either drop off or decide to go pro early on. She also has done something very few people can claim: be named to two more NGCA AllAmerican Scholar Teams. “Megan is very competitive and would not settle for a drop in her performance,” Kevin said about her golf and education. “College golf is a learning experience. Girls drop out or turn pro on the tour. Megan has been around girls in those positions and has learned from it. She has seen how it can turn out so she has kept with her education Grehan at Vanderbilt.” She has been going for four years now. This year has been different, and “I think it would be pretty cool to get that,” she has pushed herself to the limit. She spent the fall semester taking 18 credits before giv- Grehan said. “I haven’t been thinking about ing herself a break in her final semester. She it though because I’m focusing on finishing has also improved her golf and is currently school and being a leader. I want to be a good example to my teammates and make shooting 73.3 on the year. Megan is shooting for history though. If sure I keep those relationships a priority.” In past experience is any indication, Greshe is named to the NGCA All-American Scholar Team this year she will become the han will not have any trouble keeping herself first golfer to earn the honors all four years focused on finishing strong in her final colat Vanderbilt. legiate season. n

Senior Megan Grehan has a chance to become VU’s first four-time NGCA All-American Scholar.

T

he student-athlete often leads a double life. Take senior golfer Megan Grehan, for example. Her time is split between the classroom and the golf course. Inside, she studies hard to earn the highest possible grades. On the course, she practices tirelessly in order to achieve the lowest scores. At Vanderbilt, Grehan has been able to apply a shared focus to both of her goals in order to enjoy great academic and athletic achievements. Grehan grew up in the New York suburb of Mamaroneck and started to hone her skills on the fairways from an early age with the encouragement of her father, Kevin. Her family has been long-time members of the Westchester Country Club, and Grehan had the privilege of learning the game on one of their two courses. “My dad got me started when I was 5 and my parents got me a plastic set of clubs and we would go and hit balls. I had so much fun with it and kept wanting to get out there. I’ve been playing ever since.” Like many aspects of her life, Grehan did not just go out there and hit around, she focused on it and wanted to partake

10

APRIL 2011

to the best of her ability. It began when she started taking golf lessons from LPGA Tour player Debbie Austin at Westchester. Austin played on the tour for 19 years, winning seven events—including five in 1977. After her career on the tour was over, she began teaching golf lessons in New York. Grehan began competing in tournaments around New York at the age of 8, and her golf schedule became more rigorous as she continued to improve. Even with the increased demand on her time, Grehan continued to focus on academics and started attending Sacred Heart high school in Waterbury, Conn. The school gave her the opportunity to further her education at a high level, as well as play golf competitively around the country. Grehan’s first major event was qualifying for the 2004 USGA Women’s Open. She would follow it up by making three straight trips to that tournament. “She was competing at a high level early on having success with it,” said her father, Kevin. “She was traveling all over the country to compete at golf tournaments against some great talent, and I think it helped her improve.” Before she started competing at the high

school level, Grehan knew she wanted to play collegiate golf and dedicated herself to earning a scholarship. She never lost focus of her academic goals either. Grehan chose to attend Vanderbilt and focus on getting a degree in business and continue the tradition of the Vanderbilt women’s golf program. Once in Nashville, Grehan embraced both sides of her role as a student-athlete. “I expected to come here and do well, and I didn’t want my grades to slip,” said Grehan. “Even though golf is very important, I always put my grades as my priority. I feel that college is about academics first, and I really wanted to embrace that.” Even though academics were her focus, Grehan had no problem helping the golf team. During her first year on campus, she helped bolster the team by posting the second-lowest stroke average with a 76.47. Her best tournament of her freshman season was the Tar Heel Invitational where she finished 15th. She also finished with the team’s lowest round of the season by shooting a 68 in the second round of the UCF Challenge. While many athletes would come

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

11

JOHN RUSSELL

Greens and Grades

into college and perform well in their sport and put academics second, Grehan did no such thing. She set her goals high and put her energy toward the classroom in hopes of doing her best. The determination paid off and her year was topped off by being named to the National Golf Coaches Association’s (NGCA) All-American Scholar team. “I didn’t think much of it,” Grehan said of her Academic All-American honors. “I’m just a competitive person. This is a competitive school, and I think it’s natural to try and do well when you are being graded or ranked.” Grehan continued to push herself and started taking classes that revolved around her Human Organizational Development major. Her freshman year was not easy, and she had a good support system with her teammates. She credits Liebelei Lawrence and Julie Bartholomew with helping her balance academics and golf her first year because they had veteran leadership. She also said she bonded with Brooke Goodwin because they were the youngest on the team and had similar struggles. Her transition to sophomore year was not as challenging as it can be for young student-athletes, she says that school gets challenging semester by semester, not year by year. The HOD major is one of the more popular ones at Vanderbilt, but it is also one of the more challenging programs. Grehan has been able to take full advantage of it by challenging herself in the classroom, taking up to 18 credit hours in one semester. It has become a cycle though because she


By Donald Turnbaugh

JOHN RUSSELL

Senior golfer an academic ace

enjoys the classes so she kept doing more and going at a high rate. She has also taken part in an internship working for the Pasta Shop, helping the marketing department. Her golf has stayed very consistent and she has avoided any sort of slump. She has remained around the 76 range in a sport where many college athletes either drop off or decide to go pro early on. She also has done something very few people can claim: be named to two more NGCA AllAmerican Scholar Teams. “Megan is very competitive and would not settle for a drop in her performance,” Kevin said about her golf and education. “College golf is a learning experience. Girls drop out or turn pro on the tour. Megan has been around girls in those positions and has learned from it. She has seen how it can turn out so she has kept with her education Grehan at Vanderbilt.” She has been going for four years now. This year has been different, and “I think it would be pretty cool to get that,” she has pushed herself to the limit. She spent the fall semester taking 18 credits before giv- Grehan said. “I haven’t been thinking about ing herself a break in her final semester. She it though because I’m focusing on finishing has also improved her golf and is currently school and being a leader. I want to be a good example to my teammates and make shooting 73.3 on the year. Megan is shooting for history though. If sure I keep those relationships a priority.” In past experience is any indication, Greshe is named to the NGCA All-American Scholar Team this year she will become the han will not have any trouble keeping herself first golfer to earn the honors all four years focused on finishing strong in her final colat Vanderbilt. legiate season. n

Senior Megan Grehan has a chance to become VU’s first four-time NGCA All-American Scholar.

T

he student-athlete often leads a double life. Take senior golfer Megan Grehan, for example. Her time is split between the classroom and the golf course. Inside, she studies hard to earn the highest possible grades. On the course, she practices tirelessly in order to achieve the lowest scores. At Vanderbilt, Grehan has been able to apply a shared focus to both of her goals in order to enjoy great academic and athletic achievements. Grehan grew up in the New York suburb of Mamaroneck and started to hone her skills on the fairways from an early age with the encouragement of her father, Kevin. Her family has been long-time members of the Westchester Country Club, and Grehan had the privilege of learning the game on one of their two courses. “My dad got me started when I was 5 and my parents got me a plastic set of clubs and we would go and hit balls. I had so much fun with it and kept wanting to get out there. I’ve been playing ever since.” Like many aspects of her life, Grehan did not just go out there and hit around, she focused on it and wanted to partake

10

APRIL 2011

to the best of her ability. It began when she started taking golf lessons from LPGA Tour player Debbie Austin at Westchester. Austin played on the tour for 19 years, winning seven events—including five in 1977. After her career on the tour was over, she began teaching golf lessons in New York. Grehan began competing in tournaments around New York at the age of 8, and her golf schedule became more rigorous as she continued to improve. Even with the increased demand on her time, Grehan continued to focus on academics and started attending Sacred Heart high school in Waterbury, Conn. The school gave her the opportunity to further her education at a high level, as well as play golf competitively around the country. Grehan’s first major event was qualifying for the 2004 USGA Women’s Open. She would follow it up by making three straight trips to that tournament. “She was competing at a high level early on having success with it,” said her father, Kevin. “She was traveling all over the country to compete at golf tournaments against some great talent, and I think it helped her improve.” Before she started competing at the high

school level, Grehan knew she wanted to play collegiate golf and dedicated herself to earning a scholarship. She never lost focus of her academic goals either. Grehan chose to attend Vanderbilt and focus on getting a degree in business and continue the tradition of the Vanderbilt women’s golf program. Once in Nashville, Grehan embraced both sides of her role as a student-athlete. “I expected to come here and do well, and I didn’t want my grades to slip,” said Grehan. “Even though golf is very important, I always put my grades as my priority. I feel that college is about academics first, and I really wanted to embrace that.” Even though academics were her focus, Grehan had no problem helping the golf team. During her first year on campus, she helped bolster the team by posting the second-lowest stroke average with a 76.47. Her best tournament of her freshman season was the Tar Heel Invitational where she finished 15th. She also finished with the team’s lowest round of the season by shooting a 68 in the second round of the UCF Challenge. While many athletes would come

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

11

JOHN RUSSELL

Greens and Grades

into college and perform well in their sport and put academics second, Grehan did no such thing. She set her goals high and put her energy toward the classroom in hopes of doing her best. The determination paid off and her year was topped off by being named to the National Golf Coaches Association’s (NGCA) All-American Scholar team. “I didn’t think much of it,” Grehan said of her Academic All-American honors. “I’m just a competitive person. This is a competitive school, and I think it’s natural to try and do well when you are being graded or ranked.” Grehan continued to push herself and started taking classes that revolved around her Human Organizational Development major. Her freshman year was not easy, and she had a good support system with her teammates. She credits Liebelei Lawrence and Julie Bartholomew with helping her balance academics and golf her first year because they had veteran leadership. She also said she bonded with Brooke Goodwin because they were the youngest on the team and had similar struggles. Her transition to sophomore year was not as challenging as it can be for young student-athletes, she says that school gets challenging semester by semester, not year by year. The HOD major is one of the more popular ones at Vanderbilt, but it is also one of the more challenging programs. Grehan has been able to take full advantage of it by challenging herself in the classroom, taking up to 18 credit hours in one semester. It has become a cycle though because she


It’s My Turn By Rod Williamson

Winning on Two Fronts

A

l McGuire, the late college basketball coach and broadcaster, was fond of saying he wanted a C student to take the last shot in a tied game. Why? He reasoned the bright kid would over-think the situation that required decisive action while the athletically smart player would be less encumbered and more apt to make the winning play. The subjects of athletic leaders and winning on and off the field of play have been the topic of recent water cooler conversations around the McGugin Center. Why do some players step up in prime time while others shrink? How can you predict who will shine when the going gets tough? Can ballplayers keep a winning athletic edge in an academically charged culture? There are many questions, and while everyone has a theory, nobody claims to have the answer. Leadership on the field of play is a puzzling matrix of skill sets involving physical attributes, concentration, confidence, experience and determination. Everyone wants to win on game day. And while nobody steps onto a Southeastern Conference court of competition unprepared, there certainly are degrees of commitment among the participants of any given game. To some, the game at hand means everything. They might be playing for a pro contract to change the family destiny. Some have something to prove. The next player is physically gifted but has a goal of graduate school. While wanting to win, the game is less critical. There is no valid test to determine competitive toughness. It does not come as standard equipment in either academically gifted students or athletically talented players. It is an intangible found in nearly every championship team and conspicuously absent on nearly all unsuccessful units. Vanderbilt people take pride that their Commodores are winners on and off the field of play. Winning both ways is much harder to do than it is to say. Let’s put this into perspective. How many of you could be your workplace superstar while also being the world’s best mom or dad and perhaps a Sunday School teacher or civic club president? Most of us would agree that few can achieve—or sustain—that regimen. Welcome to the Commodores’ world. But there isn’t room for degrees of commitment in the SEC. Every team has its roster of talented players and for many—not all—playing ball is their one and only priority. Train now, study later—if there is time. Once when traveling with one of our teams, I overheard a discussion about the other team’s star player, who had the audacity to whine within earshot that when she got back to her campus she would have to turn in a four-page research paper. “Can you imagine a FOUR-PAGE research paper at Vanderbilt?” one of our ’Dores said in astonishment. “We couldn’t complete the required introduction in four pages!” The story in the next day’s newspaper would only report that Vanderbilt won or lost. There is never extra credit in sports for turning in quality term papers or taking demanding class loads. There are lots of athletic success stories about players taking 1,000 shots a day, working on the driving range a few extra hours or coming early and staying late in the batting cage. Time management becomes paramount. For the academically minded, there is no time for mindless television or frat house shenanigans. This is the challenge that our Commodores have chosen. They are the reason our coaches want to be at Vanderbilt and why we respect their efforts. It is the road less traveled, but it is also the pathway to ultimate success and true victory. n

12

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

13


It’s My Turn By Rod Williamson

Winning on Two Fronts

A

l McGuire, the late college basketball coach and broadcaster, was fond of saying he wanted a C student to take the last shot in a tied game. Why? He reasoned the bright kid would over-think the situation that required decisive action while the athletically smart player would be less encumbered and more apt to make the winning play. The subjects of athletic leaders and winning on and off the field of play have been the topic of recent water cooler conversations around the McGugin Center. Why do some players step up in prime time while others shrink? How can you predict who will shine when the going gets tough? Can ballplayers keep a winning athletic edge in an academically charged culture? There are many questions, and while everyone has a theory, nobody claims to have the answer. Leadership on the field of play is a puzzling matrix of skill sets involving physical attributes, concentration, confidence, experience and determination. Everyone wants to win on game day. And while nobody steps onto a Southeastern Conference court of competition unprepared, there certainly are degrees of commitment among the participants of any given game. To some, the game at hand means everything. They might be playing for a pro contract to change the family destiny. Some have something to prove. The next player is physically gifted but has a goal of graduate school. While wanting to win, the game is less critical. There is no valid test to determine competitive toughness. It does not come as standard equipment in either academically gifted students or athletically talented players. It is an intangible found in nearly every championship team and conspicuously absent on nearly all unsuccessful units. Vanderbilt people take pride that their Commodores are winners on and off the field of play. Winning both ways is much harder to do than it is to say. Let’s put this into perspective. How many of you could be your workplace superstar while also being the world’s best mom or dad and perhaps a Sunday School teacher or civic club president? Most of us would agree that few can achieve—or sustain—that regimen. Welcome to the Commodores’ world. But there isn’t room for degrees of commitment in the SEC. Every team has its roster of talented players and for many—not all—playing ball is their one and only priority. Train now, study later—if there is time. Once when traveling with one of our teams, I overheard a discussion about the other team’s star player, who had the audacity to whine within earshot that when she got back to her campus she would have to turn in a four-page research paper. “Can you imagine a FOUR-PAGE research paper at Vanderbilt?” one of our ’Dores said in astonishment. “We couldn’t complete the required introduction in four pages!” The story in the next day’s newspaper would only report that Vanderbilt won or lost. There is never extra credit in sports for turning in quality term papers or taking demanding class loads. There are lots of athletic success stories about players taking 1,000 shots a day, working on the driving range a few extra hours or coming early and staying late in the batting cage. Time management becomes paramount. For the academically minded, there is no time for mindless television or frat house shenanigans. This is the challenge that our Commodores have chosen. They are the reason our coaches want to be at Vanderbilt and why we respect their efforts. It is the road less traveled, but it is also the pathway to ultimate success and true victory. n

12

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

13


JOHN RUSSELL

Spring Game to feature fireworks on & off field

BLACK & GOLD SPRING GAME SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011 – 6 P.M. VANDERBILT STADIUM FREE ADMISSION w/donation of a children’s book to the Books from Birth program.

JOHN RUSSELL

VANDYVILLE OPENS AT 3 P.M.

14

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

F

ireworks will cap a full day of activities in conjunction with Vanderbilt’s Black and Gold Spring Game, scheduled Sunday, April 17 on campus. The fireworks show is scheduled immediately after first-year Commodore Head Coach James Franklin puts his squad through the program’s first intrasquad spring game in more than a decade. “That’s great news,” Franklin said. “That means our fans will get to enjoy some fireworks during and after the game!” Admission to the Black and Gold Spring Game—and all associated activities—is free with the donation of a children’s book to the Books from Birth program. The game will kick off at 6 p.m. CT. An array of other activities in the vicinity of Vanderbilt Stadium will accompany the intrasquad encounter that effectively concludes the team’s spring practices, including tailgating, Vandyville—with its assortment of kids and family activities—and player autograph sessions. “I want the Black and Gold Spring Game to become a special activity for Vanderbilt fans and alumni for years to come,” Franklin said. “I really can’t think of a better way to conclude the day than with a fireworks show. “I hope to see 10,000 or more at the (spring) game and hope to see it grow from there. We want this to be a fun day for our student body, our season ticket holders and college football fans across Middle Tennessee,” the coach added. Fans wanting to tailgate can use surface parking lots 1, 1A, 2 and 4, with all opening at 3 p.m. Vandyville, the popular gameday

tailgating location along Natchez Trace, also opens hours prior to the game. Live music, inflatable games for kids and fan contests will be among the attractions in Vandyville. A special autograph session with current Commodore players will start at 3 p.m.

Early-bird prices good through April 18 Vanderbilt football fans who purchase their 2011 season tickets by April 18 will lock in 2010 pricing for the Commodores’ upcoming seven-game home schedule. By taking advantage of this early-bird pricing, fans will save money and guarantee the best seats in the house for Head Coach James Franklin’s inaugural season. “We hope to provide our fans with an incentive to purchase their season tickets early and take advantage of locking in their pricing,” Director of Sales and Marketing Steve Walsh said. “We have put our earlybird deadline the day after the Black and Gold Spring Game so that fans can celebrate the start of the 2011 season by buying at 2010 prices.” Early-bird pricing for the Commodores’ seven-game home schedule starts at $125 for end zone sections of Vanderbilt Stadium and $99 for university employees. Season tickets are available online at Vanderbilt’s official website, vucommodores.com, by phone through the Athletic Ticket Office at 615/322-GOLD (322-4653), or in person at the McGugin Athletic Center on campus. n

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

15


JOHN RUSSELL

Spring Game to feature fireworks on & off field

BLACK & GOLD SPRING GAME SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 2011 – 6 P.M. VANDERBILT STADIUM FREE ADMISSION w/donation of a children’s book to the Books from Birth program.

JOHN RUSSELL

VANDYVILLE OPENS AT 3 P.M.

14

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

F

ireworks will cap a full day of activities in conjunction with Vanderbilt’s Black and Gold Spring Game, scheduled Sunday, April 17 on campus. The fireworks show is scheduled immediately after first-year Commodore Head Coach James Franklin puts his squad through the program’s first intrasquad spring game in more than a decade. “That’s great news,” Franklin said. “That means our fans will get to enjoy some fireworks during and after the game!” Admission to the Black and Gold Spring Game—and all associated activities—is free with the donation of a children’s book to the Books from Birth program. The game will kick off at 6 p.m. CT. An array of other activities in the vicinity of Vanderbilt Stadium will accompany the intrasquad encounter that effectively concludes the team’s spring practices, including tailgating, Vandyville—with its assortment of kids and family activities—and player autograph sessions. “I want the Black and Gold Spring Game to become a special activity for Vanderbilt fans and alumni for years to come,” Franklin said. “I really can’t think of a better way to conclude the day than with a fireworks show. “I hope to see 10,000 or more at the (spring) game and hope to see it grow from there. We want this to be a fun day for our student body, our season ticket holders and college football fans across Middle Tennessee,” the coach added. Fans wanting to tailgate can use surface parking lots 1, 1A, 2 and 4, with all opening at 3 p.m. Vandyville, the popular gameday

tailgating location along Natchez Trace, also opens hours prior to the game. Live music, inflatable games for kids and fan contests will be among the attractions in Vandyville. A special autograph session with current Commodore players will start at 3 p.m.

Early-bird prices good through April 18 Vanderbilt football fans who purchase their 2011 season tickets by April 18 will lock in 2010 pricing for the Commodores’ upcoming seven-game home schedule. By taking advantage of this early-bird pricing, fans will save money and guarantee the best seats in the house for Head Coach James Franklin’s inaugural season. “We hope to provide our fans with an incentive to purchase their season tickets early and take advantage of locking in their pricing,” Director of Sales and Marketing Steve Walsh said. “We have put our earlybird deadline the day after the Black and Gold Spring Game so that fans can celebrate the start of the 2011 season by buying at 2010 prices.” Early-bird pricing for the Commodores’ seven-game home schedule starts at $125 for end zone sections of Vanderbilt Stadium and $99 for university employees. Season tickets are available online at Vanderbilt’s official website, vucommodores.com, by phone through the Athletic Ticket Office at 615/322-GOLD (322-4653), or in person at the McGugin Athletic Center on campus. n

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

15


Women’s basketball honors its past

Losey returns to Commodore football

JOHN RUSSELL

Vanderbilt hosted a women’s basketball reunion on Sunday, Feb. 13. In total, 28 former Commodores returned to Nashville for the event and were recognized on the court during halftime of the Tennessee game. Vanderbilt Athletics sponsored a reception for alumni and guests in the Admirals’ Room of Memorial Gymnasium prior to that game, and a sampling of images from that event are included here. right: A pair of 2003 graduates, Chantelle Anderson and Ashley McElhiney (left to right). During the halftime ceremony, Anderson—the program’s all-time leading scorer—became the second Commodore to have her jersey retired. Below left: Misty Lamb Thompson (’93), Renee Carter (’93) and Rhonda Blades Brown (’95) Below MIDDLE: Former administrator June Stewart, inducted into the Vanderbilt’s Athletics Hall of Fame in its inaugural class, with Dana Turner Reece (’86) Below RIGHT: Nicole Jules (’06), Eva Lemeh (’83), Cherish Stringfield (’07) n

Since coming to campus in December, Coach James Franklin and his staff have set out to change the culture surrounding Vanderbilt football. But that doesn’t mean ignoring the team’s past or shunning those who have come before. Quite the opposite, actually. The group has put an emphasis on getting successful former Commodores back on campus. Check out the sidelines at a spring practice and you’re likely to see Chicago Bears D.J. Moore and Chris Williams, among others. So when the Commodores had a chance to bring a successful VU alumnus onto their staff, Strength and Conditioning Director Dwight Galt jumped at the chance.

16

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

A

s a senior at Peabody, Chuck Losey sought out a Human and Organizational Development internship. As a defensive end for the Commodore football team, Losey was known to be devoted to weight training. Losey found Steve Watterson, the strength and conditioning coach for the Tennessee Titans, and though he would be unable to work with the Titans that year due to his draft-eligible status, he developed a relationship with Watterson and began to sculpt a career path for himself in the weight room. Just three months after graduating from Vanderbilt, Losey was hired to be the head strength and conditioning coach and defensive line coach at NAIA Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tenn.—30 miles east of Nashville. He held that position for less than a year before Tennessee State University called upon his talents. For six years, Losey was in charge of the design and implementation of all strength and conditioning programs for more than 300 student-athletes at Tennessee State. He oversaw the training of two Tiger football players selected in the NFL Draft, including first-round pick Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie. So when the Commodore football staff heard about a successful alumnus in their own backyard, they moved into action. “I had three pro scouts and three other strength coaches call me and tell me about him and what a good job he was doing,” Galt said. “I approached him. But he was the head guy, really successful, and I really didn’t know if he wanted to leave.”

Losey came in to meet with Galt about the position, and the two quickly found that their philosophies matched. “We hit it off right away,” Galt said. “He shares the same vision that I do. He’s obviously a really class act with a great work ethic.” That’s when Coach Franklin got involved in the sales pitch. “That sealed the deal,” Galt said. “Coach Franklin believes very strongly in what we’re doing here, and he was just being honest with Chuck. After that meeting he was ready to go.” For Losey, the opportunity to return to his alma mater coaching Southeastern Conference football was heightened by the attitudes of the men he would be working with. “It’s such a high-energy group of guys, first and foremost,” Losey said. “One of the first things Coach Franklin really sold to me is that we want to change the culture of Vanderbilt. I know he’s said that through out his interviews, but it’s not just words. Everything we do throughout the day is devoted to changing things and turning it around here, from the time we get in the office at 7 a.m. until the time we leave at 9 p.m. Everything.... With this staff it’s nothing but up-beat, high-tempo. It’s work; and I love it.” Losey’s insight into the day-to-day world of the Vanderbilt student-athlete also is a big perk for the Commodores. “I might know what classes they’re taking—it’s kind of weird because they’ll talk about some professors that I had in the past. Outside of that, I’m here to do the job in the weight room.” n

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

17


Women’s basketball honors its past

Losey returns to Commodore football

JOHN RUSSELL

Vanderbilt hosted a women’s basketball reunion on Sunday, Feb. 13. In total, 28 former Commodores returned to Nashville for the event and were recognized on the court during halftime of the Tennessee game. Vanderbilt Athletics sponsored a reception for alumni and guests in the Admirals’ Room of Memorial Gymnasium prior to that game, and a sampling of images from that event are included here. right: A pair of 2003 graduates, Chantelle Anderson and Ashley McElhiney (left to right). During the halftime ceremony, Anderson—the program’s all-time leading scorer—became the second Commodore to have her jersey retired. Below left: Misty Lamb Thompson (’93), Renee Carter (’93) and Rhonda Blades Brown (’95) Below MIDDLE: Former administrator June Stewart, inducted into the Vanderbilt’s Athletics Hall of Fame in its inaugural class, with Dana Turner Reece (’86) Below RIGHT: Nicole Jules (’06), Eva Lemeh (’83), Cherish Stringfield (’07) n

Since coming to campus in December, Coach James Franklin and his staff have set out to change the culture surrounding Vanderbilt football. But that doesn’t mean ignoring the team’s past or shunning those who have come before. Quite the opposite, actually. The group has put an emphasis on getting successful former Commodores back on campus. Check out the sidelines at a spring practice and you’re likely to see Chicago Bears D.J. Moore and Chris Williams, among others. So when the Commodores had a chance to bring a successful VU alumnus onto their staff, Strength and Conditioning Director Dwight Galt jumped at the chance.

16

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

A

s a senior at Peabody, Chuck Losey sought out a Human and Organizational Development internship. As a defensive end for the Commodore football team, Losey was known to be devoted to weight training. Losey found Steve Watterson, the strength and conditioning coach for the Tennessee Titans, and though he would be unable to work with the Titans that year due to his draft-eligible status, he developed a relationship with Watterson and began to sculpt a career path for himself in the weight room. Just three months after graduating from Vanderbilt, Losey was hired to be the head strength and conditioning coach and defensive line coach at NAIA Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tenn.—30 miles east of Nashville. He held that position for less than a year before Tennessee State University called upon his talents. For six years, Losey was in charge of the design and implementation of all strength and conditioning programs for more than 300 student-athletes at Tennessee State. He oversaw the training of two Tiger football players selected in the NFL Draft, including first-round pick Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie. So when the Commodore football staff heard about a successful alumnus in their own backyard, they moved into action. “I had three pro scouts and three other strength coaches call me and tell me about him and what a good job he was doing,” Galt said. “I approached him. But he was the head guy, really successful, and I really didn’t know if he wanted to leave.”

Losey came in to meet with Galt about the position, and the two quickly found that their philosophies matched. “We hit it off right away,” Galt said. “He shares the same vision that I do. He’s obviously a really class act with a great work ethic.” That’s when Coach Franklin got involved in the sales pitch. “That sealed the deal,” Galt said. “Coach Franklin believes very strongly in what we’re doing here, and he was just being honest with Chuck. After that meeting he was ready to go.” For Losey, the opportunity to return to his alma mater coaching Southeastern Conference football was heightened by the attitudes of the men he would be working with. “It’s such a high-energy group of guys, first and foremost,” Losey said. “One of the first things Coach Franklin really sold to me is that we want to change the culture of Vanderbilt. I know he’s said that through out his interviews, but it’s not just words. Everything we do throughout the day is devoted to changing things and turning it around here, from the time we get in the office at 7 a.m. until the time we leave at 9 p.m. Everything.... With this staff it’s nothing but up-beat, high-tempo. It’s work; and I love it.” Losey’s insight into the day-to-day world of the Vanderbilt student-athlete also is a big perk for the Commodores. “I might know what classes they’re taking—it’s kind of weird because they’ll talk about some professors that I had in the past. Outside of that, I’m here to do the job in the weight room.” n

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Basketball wrap-up: 2010-11 review

Women Final Record . . . . . . . . . . 20-12 (10-6 SEC) SEC Finish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Third Leading Scorers. . . . Jasmine Lister (11.8) . . . . . . Jence Rhoads (11.7) . . . . . Hannah Tuomi (11.2) . . . Stephanie Holzer (11.1)

TIMOTHY SOFRANKO

The women’s basketball team is one of only eight programs that have advanced to the NCAA Tournament in each of the last 12 seasons. Coach Balcomb’s squad had a unique mix of experience and youth this year. A pair of four-year starters in Jence Rhoads and Hannah Tuomi were joined by a number of freshmen phenoms, including Jasmine Lister and Stephanie Holzer. The Commodores battled injuries throughout the 2010-11 campaign, using 11 different starting lineups throughout the year as VU’s top five scorers missed a combined total of 18 games. In the end, Vanderbilt would make its 24th trip to the big dance, earning the No. 10 seed in the Spokane Region and making a second straight trip to the Xavier’s Cintas Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. This time, the ’Dores would fail to win at least one NCAA Tournament game as in each of the past 11 seasons, falling to seventh-seeded Louisville. n

Men Final Record . . . . . . . . . . . 23-11 (9-7 SEC) SEC Finish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Third (East) Leading Scorers. . . . . John Jenkins (19.5) . . . . . . Jeffery Taylor (14.7) . . . . . . . Festus Ezeli (13.0) . . . . . . . Brad Tinsley (10.6)

SCOTT ARNOLD

The men’s basketball team also advanced to the NCAA Tournament, making its fourth March Madness appearance in the past five seasons and its 12th trip overall. Coach Stallings’ solid junior class was bolstered by the emergence of a local sophomore, Hendersonville’s John Jenkins. The Commodores notched a number of key victories over ranked opponents during the course of the season, including North Carolina, St. Mary’s and Kentucky. The St. Mary’s victory improved VU’s nonconference home record under Stallings to 104-8. For their efforts, the ’Dores earned a No. 5 seed in the Southwest Region and traveled to Denver for their opening game of the 2011 NCAA Tournament. Despite 21 points apiece from Jenkins and junior Festus Ezeli, Vanderbilt fell to eventual Sweet 16 participant Richmond. n

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APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

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Basketball wrap-up: 2010-11 review

Women Final Record . . . . . . . . . . 20-12 (10-6 SEC) SEC Finish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Third Leading Scorers. . . . Jasmine Lister (11.8) . . . . . . Jence Rhoads (11.7) . . . . . Hannah Tuomi (11.2) . . . Stephanie Holzer (11.1)

TIMOTHY SOFRANKO

The women’s basketball team is one of only eight programs that have advanced to the NCAA Tournament in each of the last 12 seasons. Coach Balcomb’s squad had a unique mix of experience and youth this year. A pair of four-year starters in Jence Rhoads and Hannah Tuomi were joined by a number of freshmen phenoms, including Jasmine Lister and Stephanie Holzer. The Commodores battled injuries throughout the 2010-11 campaign, using 11 different starting lineups throughout the year as VU’s top five scorers missed a combined total of 18 games. In the end, Vanderbilt would make its 24th trip to the big dance, earning the No. 10 seed in the Spokane Region and making a second straight trip to the Xavier’s Cintas Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. This time, the ’Dores would fail to win at least one NCAA Tournament game as in each of the past 11 seasons, falling to seventh-seeded Louisville. n

Men Final Record . . . . . . . . . . . 23-11 (9-7 SEC) SEC Finish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Third (East) Leading Scorers. . . . . John Jenkins (19.5) . . . . . . Jeffery Taylor (14.7) . . . . . . . Festus Ezeli (13.0) . . . . . . . Brad Tinsley (10.6)

SCOTT ARNOLD

The men’s basketball team also advanced to the NCAA Tournament, making its fourth March Madness appearance in the past five seasons and its 12th trip overall. Coach Stallings’ solid junior class was bolstered by the emergence of a local sophomore, Hendersonville’s John Jenkins. The Commodores notched a number of key victories over ranked opponents during the course of the season, including North Carolina, St. Mary’s and Kentucky. The St. Mary’s victory improved VU’s nonconference home record under Stallings to 104-8. For their efforts, the ’Dores earned a No. 5 seed in the Southwest Region and traveled to Denver for their opening game of the 2011 NCAA Tournament. Despite 21 points apiece from Jenkins and junior Festus Ezeli, Vanderbilt fell to eventual Sweet 16 participant Richmond. n

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Words of Williams Vice Chancellor David Williams introduced this question and answer feature in last month’s Commodore Nation. Williams also pens “The Williams Report” on vucommodores.com. Fans can submit their questions for either venue via the website or by emailing commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu. Williams has two children currently competing in athletics. Daughter Samantha swims for Brown University, and son Nick runs cross country and plays basketball for University School of Nashville.

Q: A:

David Williams is in his eighth year overseeing Vanderbilt athletics in his role as vice chancellor for university affairs and athletics, general counsel and secretary of the university.

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APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

How does having children competing in sports affect your thoughts as head of VU Athletics? “I don’t believe that my children’s involvement in athletics has a direct impact on my decision-making process but it does influence how I view certain things. For example, since my daughter was a recruited student-athlete and my youngest son is still early in the process, I can more easily see where problems exist. Many families do not understand the college process; there is a tremendous amount of misinformation about recruitment and how scholarships are offered. When I hear misinformation, I am anxious to make certain Vanderbilt gets this right. I’ve noticed how some universities are very good at providing facts, presenting the case for their university and conducting first-class recruiting visits while others are very, very loose. We made one trip in which there was no conversation about academics! I’ve passed along what we’ve experienced to our coaches to give them the parents’ perspective. I want us to be sure we are doing what is right for the student-athletes and their families, and part of that is to be certain they understand that Vanderbilt is first and foremost an academic institution.”

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

21


Words of Williams Vice Chancellor David Williams introduced this question and answer feature in last month’s Commodore Nation. Williams also pens “The Williams Report” on vucommodores.com. Fans can submit their questions for either venue via the website or by emailing commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu. Williams has two children currently competing in athletics. Daughter Samantha swims for Brown University, and son Nick runs cross country and plays basketball for University School of Nashville.

Q: A:

David Williams is in his eighth year overseeing Vanderbilt athletics in his role as vice chancellor for university affairs and athletics, general counsel and secretary of the university.

20

APRIL 2011

vucommodores.com

How does having children competing in sports affect your thoughts as head of VU Athletics? “I don’t believe that my children’s involvement in athletics has a direct impact on my decision-making process but it does influence how I view certain things. For example, since my daughter was a recruited student-athlete and my youngest son is still early in the process, I can more easily see where problems exist. Many families do not understand the college process; there is a tremendous amount of misinformation about recruitment and how scholarships are offered. When I hear misinformation, I am anxious to make certain Vanderbilt gets this right. I’ve noticed how some universities are very good at providing facts, presenting the case for their university and conducting first-class recruiting visits while others are very, very loose. We made one trip in which there was no conversation about academics! I’ve passed along what we’ve experienced to our coaches to give them the parents’ perspective. I want us to be sure we are doing what is right for the student-athletes and their families, and part of that is to be certain they understand that Vanderbilt is first and foremost an academic institution.”

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

21


APRIL Schedule Baseball

Men’s Tennis

1

Auburn (Auburn, Ala.)

6 p.m.

1

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

2 p.m.

2

Auburn (Auburn, Ala.)

6 p.m.

3

Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)

1 p.m.

3

Auburn (Auburn, Ala.)

1 p.m.

8

LSU (Currey Tennis Center)

2 p.m.

5

Middle Tennessee State (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

10

Arkansas (Currey Tennis Center)

Noon

8

Alabama (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

16

Kentucky (Currey Tennis Center)

1 p.m.

9

Alabama (Hawkins Field)

2 p.m.

21-24 SEC Championships (Gainesville, Fla.)

10

Alabama (Hawkins Field)

1 p.m.

12

Middle Tennessee State (Murfreesboro)

6 p.m.

15

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

6 p.m.

16

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

6 p.m.

17

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

Noon

22

LSU (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

23

LSU (Hawkins Field)

2:30 p.m.

24

LSU (Hawkins Field)

2 p.m.

26

Western Kentucky (Bowling Green, Ky.)

6 p.m.

Women’s Track

29

Tennessee (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

1-2

Colonial Relays (Williamsburg, Va.)

Noon

1-2

Tiger Track Classic (Auburn, Ala.)

8-9

Spec Towns Invitational (Athens, Ga.)

30

Tennessee (Hawkins Field)

Bowling

South Carolina (Currey Tennis Center)

3

Florida (Currey Tennis Center)

2:30 p.m. Noon

8

LSU (Baton Rouge, La.)

3 p.m.

10

Arkansas (Fayetteville, Ark.)

16

Kentucky (Lexington, Ky.)

Noon 3 p.m.

21-24 SEC Championships (Knoxville)

22-23 Vanderbilt Invitational (Vanderbilt Track)

Football Black & Gold Spring Game (Vanderbilt Stadium)

1

15-16 Mt. SAC Relays (Walnut, Calif.)

14-16 NCAA Championship (Detroit, Mich.) 17

Women’s Tennis

27-30 Penn Relays (Philadelphia, Penn.) 6 p.m. All times Central and subject to change. Those not shown are TBA

Men’s Golf

– check vucommodores.com for updates.

15-17 SEC Championship (Sea Island, Ga.) Women’s Golf 15-17 SEC Championship (Auburn, Ala.) Lacrosse 3

John Hopkins (Baltimore, Md.)

10

Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio)

Noon

17

Florida (VU Lacrosse Complex)

1 p.m.

20

Notre Dame (VU Lacrosse Complex)

1 p.m.

11 a.m.

APRIL BIRTHDAYS 6 7 9 10 12 16 17 19 21 24 28

22

APRIL 2011

Lance Goulbourne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Men’s Basketball Andrew Harris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baseball Rebecca Silinski. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Women’s Basketball Zac Stacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Renee Hanemann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Track/Cross Country Brady Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football CJ Rhoades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer Abby Wheeler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lacrosse Ryan Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Steven Clarke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Rose Cornelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swimming Robert Jewell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Andrew Bridges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Kristabel Doebel-Hickok. . . . . . . . . Track/Cross Country Chelsea Stewart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

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APRIL Schedule Baseball

Men’s Tennis

1

Auburn (Auburn, Ala.)

6 p.m.

1

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

2 p.m.

2

Auburn (Auburn, Ala.)

6 p.m.

3

Florida (Gainesville, Fla.)

1 p.m.

3

Auburn (Auburn, Ala.)

1 p.m.

8

LSU (Currey Tennis Center)

2 p.m.

5

Middle Tennessee State (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

10

Arkansas (Currey Tennis Center)

Noon

8

Alabama (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

16

Kentucky (Currey Tennis Center)

1 p.m.

9

Alabama (Hawkins Field)

2 p.m.

21-24 SEC Championships (Gainesville, Fla.)

10

Alabama (Hawkins Field)

1 p.m.

12

Middle Tennessee State (Murfreesboro)

6 p.m.

15

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

6 p.m.

16

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

6 p.m.

17

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

Noon

22

LSU (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

23

LSU (Hawkins Field)

2:30 p.m.

24

LSU (Hawkins Field)

2 p.m.

26

Western Kentucky (Bowling Green, Ky.)

6 p.m.

Women’s Track

29

Tennessee (Hawkins Field)

6 p.m.

1-2

Colonial Relays (Williamsburg, Va.)

Noon

1-2

Tiger Track Classic (Auburn, Ala.)

8-9

Spec Towns Invitational (Athens, Ga.)

30

Tennessee (Hawkins Field)

Bowling

South Carolina (Currey Tennis Center)

3

Florida (Currey Tennis Center)

2:30 p.m. Noon

8

LSU (Baton Rouge, La.)

3 p.m.

10

Arkansas (Fayetteville, Ark.)

16

Kentucky (Lexington, Ky.)

Noon 3 p.m.

21-24 SEC Championships (Knoxville)

22-23 Vanderbilt Invitational (Vanderbilt Track)

Football Black & Gold Spring Game (Vanderbilt Stadium)

1

15-16 Mt. SAC Relays (Walnut, Calif.)

14-16 NCAA Championship (Detroit, Mich.) 17

Women’s Tennis

27-30 Penn Relays (Philadelphia, Penn.) 6 p.m. All times Central and subject to change. Those not shown are TBA

Men’s Golf

– check vucommodores.com for updates.

15-17 SEC Championship (Sea Island, Ga.) Women’s Golf 15-17 SEC Championship (Auburn, Ala.) Lacrosse 3

John Hopkins (Baltimore, Md.)

10

Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio)

Noon

17

Florida (VU Lacrosse Complex)

1 p.m.

20

Notre Dame (VU Lacrosse Complex)

1 p.m.

11 a.m.

APRIL BIRTHDAYS 6 7 9 10 12 16 17 19 21 24 28

22

APRIL 2011

Lance Goulbourne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Men’s Basketball Andrew Harris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baseball Rebecca Silinski. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Women’s Basketball Zac Stacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Renee Hanemann. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Track/Cross Country Brady Brown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football CJ Rhoades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer Abby Wheeler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lacrosse Ryan Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Steven Clarke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Rose Cornelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swimming Robert Jewell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Andrew Bridges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Kristabel Doebel-Hickok. . . . . . . . . Track/Cross Country Chelsea Stewart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer

vucommodores.com

C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

23


last shots JOHN RUSSELL / VU PHOTOGRAPHY

T

he women’s and men’s basketball programs paid tribute to their graduating senior classes after their final regular-season home games inside Memorial Gymnasium. The women’s senior class of Jence Rhoads, Rebecca Silinski and Hannah Tuomi won more than 70 percent of its games, advanced to two Sweet 16s and won an SEC Tournament title. Rhoads is the only player in school history with 1,100 points, 500 assists and 400 rebounds. The Slippery Rock, Pa., native earned first team All-SEC accolades from the league’s head coaches this season. Tuomi topped 1,000 career points and averaged double figures in scoring in her last three seasons at Vanderbilt. The Thornton, Colo., native’s career fieldgoal percentage of .568 ranks sixth in school history. Silinski leaves after a career that can not be properly judged by statistics. The Birmingham, Ala., native was an inspirational leader on the team who had a passion for serving others in the community and on campus. The men’s senior class also had a successful run during their Vanderbilt careers. In the past four years, Joe Duffy and Chris Meriwether helped the Commodores win 92 games and advance to the NCAA Tournament three times. Their contributions never lit up the stat sheet on game day, but their tireless work in practice made sure the Commodores were always prepared. Their tireless work off the court has both Meriwether and Duffy prepared for life after basketball, as well. Meriwether earned his degree last May and is currently enrolled in graduate coursework at Vanderbilt’s Owen School of Management, while Duffy will graduate next month and already has accepted a job with Goldman Sachs in Chicago.

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APRIL 2011


last shots JOHN RUSSELL / VU PHOTOGRAPHY

T

he women’s and men’s basketball programs paid tribute to their graduating senior classes after their final regular-season home games inside Memorial Gymnasium. The women’s senior class of Jence Rhoads, Rebecca Silinski and Hannah Tuomi won more than 70 percent of its games, advanced to two Sweet 16s and won an SEC Tournament title. Rhoads is the only player in school history with 1,100 points, 500 assists and 400 rebounds. The Slippery Rock, Pa., native earned first team All-SEC accolades from the league’s head coaches this season. Tuomi topped 1,000 career points and averaged double figures in scoring in her last three seasons at Vanderbilt. The Thornton, Colo., native’s career fieldgoal percentage of .568 ranks sixth in school history. Silinski leaves after a career that can not be properly judged by statistics. The Birmingham, Ala., native was an inspirational leader on the team who had a passion for serving others in the community and on campus. The men’s senior class also had a successful run during their Vanderbilt careers. In the past four years, Joe Duffy and Chris Meriwether helped the Commodores win 92 games and advance to the NCAA Tournament three times. Their contributions never lit up the stat sheet on game day, but their tireless work in practice made sure the Commodores were always prepared. Their tireless work off the court has both Meriwether and Duffy prepared for life after basketball, as well. Meriwether earned his degree last May and is currently enrolled in graduate coursework at Vanderbilt’s Owen School of Management, while Duffy will graduate next month and already has accepted a job with Goldman Sachs in Chicago.

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APRIL 2011



Commodore Nation, April 2011