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January 2011

MEET

JAMES

FRANKLIN


table of contents

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2 Compliance Corner When can we talk about recruits? 4 National Commodore Club Reunion weekend pics 6 Point of View Tennis travels to South Africa 7 More from McGugin By the numbers 8 My Game Freshman point guard Kyle Fuller 0 Introducing James Franklin 1 Vanderbilt’s new head football coach 13 Five Love Goulbourne goes from racket to rim

17 Diamond Notes Armstrong, Lupo win Omaha Challenge

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19 Medical Minutes Bossung discusses athletic training 20 Women’s Basketball Reunion Join the Commodores on Feb. 13

21 Anderson Honored Chantelle’s jersey to be retired 23 Commodore Calendar The schedule for January To submit a letter to Commodore Nation, you can e-mail: commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu or write to Commodore Nation, 2601 Jess Neely Drive, Nashville, TN 37212. Letters should include the writer’s name and address and may be edited for clarity and space.

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24 Last Shots The SAAC Christmas Party

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COMPLIANCE

COR NER Q: A:

Line Backer is a 5-star prospective student-athlete who is going to sign a National Letter of Intent on Wednesday to play football at Vanderbilt. Is the coaching staff allowed to discuss things about him to the media before Wednesday? No. NCAA Bylaw 13.10.9.2 states before the signing of a prospective studentathlete to a National Letter of Intent, a member institution may only comment publicly to the extent of confirming its recruitment of the prospective student-athlete. The institution may not comment generally about the prospective student-athlete’s ability, the contribution that they might make to the team or the likelihood of signing with the team.

Editorial

Publisher: Vanderbilt University Editor-in-Chief: Chris Weinman

Director of Communications: Rod Williamson

Designers: Jeremy Teaford

Chris Weinman

Digital Image Specialist: Julie Luckett Turner VU Photography: Mary Donaldson

Daniel Dubois Steve Green Joe Howell

Compliance questions? Please contact: Candice Lee George Midgett Director of Compliance Compliance Coordinator 615/322-7992 615/322-2083 candice.lee@vanderbilt.edu george.d.midgett@vanderbilt.edu

Jenny Mandeville Anne Rayner John Russell Susan Urmy

Contributors: Laina Balafas

Andy Boggs Sterling Frierson

John Peach Andrew Turner Compliance Coordinator Recruiting/Compliance Coordinator 615/343-1060 615/322-4543 john.w.peach@vanderbilt.edu andrew.turner@vanderbilt.edu

Larry Leathers George Midgett Ryan Schulz Jennifer Stevens Donald Turnbaugh

Administrative

Chancellor: Nicholas S. Zeppos Vice Chancellor for University Affairs: David Williams II Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs: Beth Fortune

Vanderbilt University’s Mission, Goals and Values Vanderbilt University is a center for scholarly research, informed and creative teaching, and service to the community and society at large. Vanderbilt will uphold the highest standards and be a leader in the quest for new knowledge through scholarship, dissemination of knowledge through teaching and outreach, and creative experimentation of ideas and concepts. In pursuit of these goals, Vanderbilt values most highly intellectual freedom that supports open inquiry; and equality, compassion and excellence in all endeavors. Vanderbilt University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action university. ON THE COVER: Head Coach James Franklin; photo by Daniel Dubois, VU Photography. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to National Commodore Club, 2601 Jess Neely Drive, Nashville, TN 37212. SUBSCRIPTION: To subscribe to Commodore Nation, please contact Chris Weinman by phone at 615/343-0019 or by e-mail at commodorenation@vanderbilt.edu ADVERTISEMENT: To advertise with Commodore Nation, please contact Vanderbilt ISP Sports. Jeff Miller, general manager 615/322-4468 jmiller@ispsports.com

Commodore Nation is printed using recycled paper.

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C O M M O D O R E C LU B

COR N E R

PHONE: 615/322-4114 • ONLINE: vanderbilt.edu/ncc Can I give to the National Commodore Club on an incremental basis?

NCC 101

Yes, you can make your NCC gift through an electronic fund transfer or scheduled deductions from your credit card. The form is painless to complete and is an easy way for you to keep your NCC membership current. Print the form at vanderbilt.edu/ncc or request a form by calling the NCC office at 615/322-4114. May 31 is the annual deadline for contributions to count toward your NCC priority.

PAVE THE WAY BRICK CAMPAIGN Be a part of Vanderbilt history by purchasing a brick toward our Pave the Way brick campaign. Yourpersonalized brick will be placed in the plaza around Vanderbilt Stadium. Proceeds will go toward facility upgrades for our outstanding student-athletes. Log on to vanderbilt.edu/ncc for more information.

ATHENS, GEORGIA - OCT. 16, 2010

NCC members and 1979 graduates Sarah and Tim English with Ellen LaGrone (center).

WELCOME NEW NCC MEMBERS Below are the names of NCC members who joined in November. We welcome you and look forward to seeing you at Commodore games and events this year.

Jerry Boyte – Springfield John Burchfield – Sylvania, Ohio Thomas Catanese – San Diego, Calif. Thomas Cox – Old Hickory Larry Goldberg – Nashville Janet Hensley – Brentwood James Holeman – Old Hickory Andrew Holt – Old Hickory D. Wayne Holt – LaVergne Boone Lancaster – Nashville Beth Matter – Nashville Dan McEwen – Columbia John Nunn – Camden, S.C.

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NCC members and 2006 graduates (left to right) Evan Metrock, Brad Hughes, Steve Kamb and Ali and Joe (back) Rougeux.

GET ON BOARD WITH THE COMMODORES The Commodores On Board program is a new initiative by the National Commodore Club designed to engage our current members and help increase our membership. As a current NCC member, we encourage you to actively recruit new members to the NCC. In return, you be will be eligible for Commodore apparel and prizes along with increasing your priority credit standing. Be on the lookout for more information on the Commodores On Board program soon.


REUNION WEEKEND - OCT. 22-23, 2010

Football alums Alphonso Harvey (’99) and Lamont Turner (’99).

Football alums George Kalazanis (’41) and Henry Tomlin (’41).

Men’s golf alum Mark Albus (’95) and wife, Sarah McDonald Albus (’95), a women’s soccer alum.

Baseball alum Terry Knepper (’65) and wife, Sharon.

Women’s track and field alums Zan Walter (’78), Lorie Hougland (’77) and Linda Norfleet (’77).

Lucy and David (’70) Strong, Vice Chancellor David Williams and Bill Pace’s daughters, Kim Easterling and Sheri Eldridge.

Show us your Commodore spirit. If you are interested in having your photos appear in a future issue of Commodore Nation, please e-mail your images to ncc@vanderbilt.edu. To ensure you receive important updates, please make sure your most current e-mail address is on file.

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Point of View By Charlie Jones Editor’s Note: A native of Destrehan, La., Charlie Jones is a junior on the men’s tennis team. The Commodores spent their Thanksgiving break on a weeklong trip to South Africa, homeland of Head Coach Ian Duvenhage. Charlie shares his point of view from the largest city in South Africa, Johannesburg.

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JACKIE WU

e headed toward downtown Johannesburg at around 8 a.m., fighting the morning traffic and knowing only that we were scheduled to see a place called Soweto. Our charismatic tour guide, Mr. Eric, was about to show us the community he called home; a place that just over three decades earlier had been the turning point in the struggle to liberate South Africa. Mr. Eric was about to provide us with perspective. Soweto is a black urban township within metropolitan Johannesburg and is home to more than 1 million people. A product of segregation, the area has suffered historically from unemployment and overpopulation. As we drove through Soweto we saw the shantytowns and crumbled infrastructure. Uncomfortably, we observed a way of life so foreign to our own that it felt scarcely more real than a movie. But Mr. Eric provided context. Soweto, he told us, is home to the largest hospital in the world. It boasts five shopping malls and has recently undergone massive development projects to improve the quality of housing and add greenery to the landscape. Soweto, he said proudly, was taking a communal interest in bettering itself. As we exited the bus and entered Freedom Square, we gathered around the Freedom Charter Monument. The stone memorial is inscribed with the 1955 Freedom Charter, the vision of 3,000 representatives of anti-apartheid resistance groups. Its ten pillars of humanity were a striking reminder of the magnitude of what we, as Americans, take for granted. Such common-sense ideas as peace and friendship and education were here enshrined as a reminder of just how far South Africa has come and the direction in which it continues to move. We soberly continued on our tour of Soweto, stopping next at the Regina Mundi Catholic Church. As we entered, the stained glass windows and beautifully intricate altar did well to divert our attention from the bullet-hole-riddled walls. Our guide in the church, however, drew our attention to them and gave us our first taste of

the Soweto uprising. It was here that 5,000 students had found shelter on June 16, 1976, as police fired upon them. They had been protesting the apartheid government’s imposition of the teaching of the language of Afrikaans in all schools. No one was killed that day in the church, but 23 people lost their lives outside its sanctuary and hundreds more would later die in the uprisings, the first of whom was 12-year-old Hector Pieterson, the namesake of the museum we would later visit. Before finishing the morning at the museum, we stopped on the famous Vilakazi Street to see the homes of two Nobel Peace Prize Laureates and international political and cultural icons, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Nelson Mandela. The outside of Mandela’s home, now a museum, bears the scars of bullet holes and bomb attacks. The very modest confines are adorned with pictures and plaques providing a glimpse of the danger into which Mandela threw himself. One wall featured a picture of his first wife, Winnie, ornamented with Nelson Mandela’s own words: “The wife of a freedom fighter is often like a widow.” Knowing him only as a symbol of peace, experiencing Mandela in this way was breathtaking. Today he may stand for peace, but I know now that he had to fight every day for his right to stand at all. Our final destination of the morning was the Hector Pieterson Museum commemorating the Soweto uprising. We were given an hour to wander around and look at the video footage and blackand-white photographs. I was struck immediately by how easily the museum could have been built to commemorate the American Civil Rights Movement. The photos depicted throngs of people resisting police forces and military units. Their faces were twisted in anger or agony, or both, and as I saw their struggle to be free of oppression I realized just exactly why we were given this opportunity to visit this country. As Americans, perspective is often hard to come by. We bicker about irrelevancies and label each other, oftentimes losing sight of just how truly democratic the mere concept of argument is. South Africa has come a long way in the past half-century, but it still has far to go. We are not unlike South Africa in this regard, and in many ways it is a microcosm of the world itself. There is tension still, but when we look at South Africa with perspective we see that it is possible to be more than a member of a race or an ethnicity or a political party; it is possible to share in our common bonds as people. It is possible simply to be a member of humanity. n

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More from McGugin

’55 Gator Bowl team reunites for 55th anniversary

By The

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Left: NCC members Henry Simpson (’56) and Buddy Stack. Below: Tom Redmond (’59) and Ken Kercher (’57).

dollar tickets available for Vanderbilt’s “Jam the Gym” women’s basketball game versus Ole Miss at 2 p.m. CT on Sunday, Jan. 30, inside Memorial Gymnasium.

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teams chosen higher than the No. 5 Commodore baseball team in the Collegiate Baseball Newspaper’s 2011 preseason rankings—only TCU, Florida, UCLA and Clemson.

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turnovers lost by incoming football coach James Franklin’s Maryland offense during the 2010 season—tied for third fewest in the NCAA FBS.

As part of Homecoming Weekend festivites in October, the 1955 Gator Bowl team held a meeting in the Admiral’s Room in Memorial Gym. Jim Cunningham (’56—pictured at left with co-captain Larry Frank) led the organization of the meeting, and Vice Chancellor David Williams thanked the group for their support of Vanderbilt Athletics.

Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame taps Southwood Vanderbilt legend Jerry Southwood (’67) will be inducted into the Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame on March 23 in Indianapolis. As a high school junior, Southwood led Evansville Bosse to an Indiana state championship in 1962. Southwood’s Commodore career included an NCAA quarterfinals appearance in 1965. He was the captain of Roy Skinner’s 1966-67 squad that won 21 games and finished second in the Southeastern Conference. Southwood, 65, serves as the chief financial officer for Dye, Van Mol and Lawrence in Nashville. He has been president of the Nashville Vanderbilt Club and the Vanderbilt Rebounders.

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home games scheduled for Head Coach Tim Corbin’s baseball team. The complete schedule is available on page 17.

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children from Ross Elementary School who took part in the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee’s annual holiday party at Memorial Gym.

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total 1,000-point scorers in Vanderbilt basketball history, including 40 men’s players and 31 women’s players.

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victories and counting at Vanderbilt for women’s basketball Head Coach Melanie Balcomb following an 81-68 win over Southern Illinois.

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My Game Freshman point guard Kyle “Zoom” Fuller hails from Moreno Valley, Calif., the same town that produced 2009 VU graduate and WNBA Draft pick Jennifer Risper. Fuller discusses his game—cracking up, locking down and avoiding splitting poles.... On why he chose to come to Vanderbilt from California: “You start growing up and see what’s the perfect fit for you. You play AAU, see who is recruiting you. At Vanderbilt, everyone on the team felt like my brothers, so I was really comfortable coming here.” On his personality: “Wild and crazy. I’m a dude that likes to have fun. I’m different. I don’t want to look the same. I want to stand out in my own type of way. That’s what the mohawk was about—that’s just who I am. I love making people laugh. But I can be serious, when it comes down to that time. Sometimes when I’m serious and people laugh, I get mad: ‘Hold on, why are you laughing, I didn’t make a joke.’” On how he gets focused before a game: “The way I get focused is by having fun, laughing before a game. I’m never that type of dude to have a serious game face.” On if he has any superstitions: “Never split poles. I don’t even care who you are. Say, if I just met you, if you split a pole, I will let you know to come back around that pole. That’s about it, because I feel like that’s bad luck. I don’t even know why I’m on that.” On his ritual at the free-throw line: “I dribble three times and say, ‘Got’em,’ because I know the ball’s going in. ‘Got’em,’ and it just drops.”

On the support of his family: “My family has always been there for me, even my little brother. I remember a football game where I made an interception, and I was running 80 yards for a touchdown. I look over to the sideline and see a little boy running the 80 yards with me. That was cool.” On playing against junior Brad Tinsley in practice: “I came here with the attitude that I wanted to go at Brad and I want Brad to go at me, because I know if we don’t go at each other then no one will get better.” On what he’s learned from Tinsley’s game: “I’m the type of point guard that’s fast and likes to go really fast, but I’m learning that there are times to go fast and time not to. I see Brad, and he knows when to go fast and when to slow it down and calm the team down. He knows when to pass and when not to pass. I like to jump in the lane, which I need to stop doing—he stays down. I may be more of a flashy-type point guard, but all that flash doesn’t always get it done as much as the fundamental stuff. I’m definitely learning from him.”

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Kyle

Fuller

JOHN RUSSELL

On why he chose basketball over football: “My mom was always afraid of contact. Me, I like hitting, that was fun for me. What really helped me out [in basketball] is that I was always able to handle the ball really well. The feeling of hearing the ‘ooh’s’ and ‘aah’s’ when I crossed somebody, I really liked that. And you know how people say it’s harder to get a basketball scholarship—there are 11 people on the football field, but only five on the basketball court. I felt like if I was one of the ones that got a basketball scholarship, I was more of an elite-type player.”


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James Franklin

Introducing Vanderbilt’s new head football coach

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Program. He is the first minority head coach to lead the Vanderbilt football program. “I have a plan that I’m very confident about,” Franklin said. “I’ve been able to coach for some really good coaches across the country and been able to tap in and take some of their great ideas that we’re going to be able to use here.” Franklin said the obvious commitment across the board at Vanderbilt convinced him to make a move. “Everything that I asked them for, everything we discussed that I thought was going to be important to change the culture and make a difference here, really before I could finish asking for it, they said, ‘You got it.’” The announcement capped 21 days of around-the-clock work under intense media scrutiny for Williams, who said Zeppos and a Board of Trust advisory committee were heavily involved. Zeppos characterized the effort as “all-in,” which he said reflected commitment across Vanderbilt to have a successful football program. “It’s been a tough 21 days,” Williams said. Williams said the future of the football program hinged on a three-pronged plan to change the culture, upgrade facilities and hire a dynamic head coach. “Today, we have accomplished one of those things,” Williams said. Franklin was accompanied to the news conference by wife, Fumi, and daughters Ava and Addison. “This is not a stepping stone for us,” Franklin said. “This is a destination.”

James Franklin was announced as Vanderbilt’s head football coach at a Dec. 17 news conference.

JOHN RUSSELL

pace travel is not off the table if it would help bolster the Vanderbilt football program under new Head Coach James Franklin, said Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos. “I told James if he needs a rocket to go to the moon to get a player—get the rocket,” Zeppos said Dec. 17 at a news conference in Sarratt Student Center. He, along with David Williams II, vice chancellor for university affairs and athletics, introduced Franklin as the 27th head coach of Vanderbilt football. Franklin, formerly assistant head coach and offensive coordinator at the University of Maryland, promised a culture change for a squad coming off twin 2-10 seasons after playing in the Music City Bowl in 2008. “I’m not a 6-5 guy,” Franklin said. “I’m not a 7-5 guy. There’s going to be very high expectations from day one. I’m not going to tell you it’s going to happen next year ... but no part of this program will settle.” Franklin, 38, has a reputation as a topnotch recruiter and offensive coordinator. The Maryland Terrapins have become bowlgame regulars over the past decade while he served on the staff of Head Coach Ralph Friedgen. This season, Franklin molded redshirt quarterback Danny O’Brien into the Atlantic Coast Conference Rookie of the Year and saw receiver Torrey Smith win firstteam all-ACC honors. A native of Langhorne, Pa., Franklin played quarterback for East Stroudsburg and has worked with the Minnesota Vikings, Philadelphia Eagles and Miami Dolphins as part of the NFL’s Minority Coaching Fellowship

DANIEL DUBOIS

By Jim Patterson, Vanderbilt News Service

Team captain Chris Marve (right) was on hand to greet new Vanderbilt Head Coach James Franklin at the Nashville airport on Dec. 17.

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JOHN RUSSELL

Head Coach James Franklin and wife, Fumi, with daughters Ava (right) and Addison.

Biography Alma Mater: . . . . . East Stroudsburg Univ.

(B.S., Psychology, 1995)

Graduate Degree: .Washington State Univ.

(M.A., Educational Leadership, 1999)

2008-10 University of Maryland Asst. Head Coach/Off. Coord./QB Coach 2006-07 Kansas State Offensive Coordinator/QB Coach 2005

Green Bay Packers Asst. Coach, Wide Receivers

2000-04 Unviersity of Maryland Asst. Coach, WRs/Recruiting Coord. 1999

Idaho State University Asst. Coach, WRs

1998

Washington State University Graduate Asst. Coach, Tight Ends

1997

James Madison Asst. Coach, WRs

1996

East Stroudsburg Graduate Asst. Coach, Secondary

1995

Kutztown University Asst. Coach, WRs

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What they’re saying.... “Coach Franklin and I worked together at Kansas State back in 2006. He is a first-class coach and a perfect fit for a university like Vanderbilt. He’s a tremendous motivator of men and inspires character in each of his players. He works really hard to be the best that he can be as a coach and has the toughness to build up a program in the SEC. He will no doubt be a great representative of Vanderbilt University.” — Raheem Morris Head Coach, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

“I’ve had the chance to work closely with Coach Franklin, and I can’t say enough good things about his approach, his work ethic, his passion for the game and his ability to teach the game. He’s a tireless recruiter and one of those coaches who can get the most out of his players and is excellent at making and maintaining relationships. He would be a great fit with Vanderbilt and an asset to the campus and football program both.” — Darrell Bevell Offensive Coordinator, Minnesota Vikings

“Coach Franklin is a terrific fit for Vanderbilt... an overachiever who maximizes every opportunity. He will bring with him a relentless work ethic and a staff that does the same. Working hard and working smart are his trademarks, along with expectations of academic excellence.” — Debbie Yow Director of Athletics, North Carolina State formerly AD at the University of Maryland

“I noticed early on that he always saw the big picture. He didn’t just coach his players on the field but saw the need for them to be accountable off the field, as well. He took an interest in every aspect of their lives and coached not just the player, but the person.” — Mike Sherman Head Coach, Texas A&M formerly HC of the Green Bay Packers

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Lance Goulbourne: Two-Court Athlete

By Donald Turnbaugh

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STEVE GREEN

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atching Vanderbilt junior forward Lance Goulbourne take the court at Memorial Gym, one can sense a calm and collected aura about him. In a sports world where tempers flare and athletes can lose their cool, it is sometimes hard to find a seasoned player who knows how to keep his emotions in check. Goulbourne’s discipline and focus have been shaped by a past that centered around the hardcourts at Flushing Meadows just as much as the one inside Madison Square Garden. His journey began at the age of 3 when Goulbourne was given a tennis racket by his father, Verne, while growing up in New York. Even though Lance was raised in the area that produced Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Julius Erving and Lenny Wilkens, he took to tennis at an early age instead of following in his older brother’s footsteps and playing basketball. His father would take him to the park to practice the motions and help teach him the game. “It didn’t matter if he even hit the ball,” Verne Goulbourne said. “I just wanted him to go out there and get his hand-eye coordination down. I would bounce him balls, and he would swat at them. If he missed, he missed, and he would just keep at it.” By the age of 5, Goulbourne was playing in different camps around New York, and when he turned 8 he entered his first competition, taking second place. The competitive juices were flowing, and Goulbourne continued to train at camps with different tennis pros. The training paid off, and after dominating junior competitions in New York, Goulbourne received the Mayor David Dinkins Scholarship in 2002. The scholarship is given to two young New York City tennis players who excel in the classroom and on the court. The candidates also have to show a strong work ethic and high standards of sportsmanship. After Goulbourne won the award, he earned a trip to train in Bradenton, Fla., with young tennis players from around the world. “After winning the Dinkins Award, Lance headed down to Florida to attend the Prince Edwards Tennis Camp,” Verne said. “It was his first time really leaving home, and he came back a totally different person. He played with some talented players from overseas, and it helped his game.” That “different” Lance continued to succeed for the next few years. When he began high school at the Dwight School, he showed his dominance by beating the top player on the team, who happened to be a senior. Goulbourne had only a brief stint at the New York-based school before he started being recruited by several academies in the area. Goulbourne eventually chose the Hun School in New Jersey, and that is when things started to change athletically. Basketball became a focus, and Goulbourne picked it up quickly. He worked hard and

started competing in AAU tournaments, while showcasing his talents on travel teams and at camps. Throughout all of this, Goulbourne was able to stick with tennis by being a ball boy at the U.S. Open in Flushing Meadows during the summer. When Goulbourne was 14, he was practicing at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, and some of the people there suggested he try out. After making the cuts he worked there for five years and was able to experience athletic competition at the highest level. He was there to witness Andre Agassi’s final match, a four-set loss to Benjamin Becker of Germany. Goulbourne remembers Agassi going through back pains that

required cortisone shots between sets and receiving an eight-minute standing ovation when it was all done. Working at the Open and taking away big moments is something that not all athletes get the chance to do. Even though tennis was still a part of his life, it was not as prevalent as it once had been. When he began at the Hun School, Goulbourne stopped participating in individual tennis competitions and played exclusively for his school, where he was able to bring the academy its first tennis championship. Despite not playing tennis as regularly as he once had, Goulbourne used the lessons he learned on the tennis court to help him grow in other areas

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DANIEL DUBOIS

of his life. While basketball and tennis may seem very different, Goulbourne is quick to find a correlation. “Tennis definitely helped my footwork,” Goulbourne said. “I was able to take aspects of tennis to help improve in basketball. In tennis, you’re all by yourself and if you make a mistake it’s all on you, and there is no one to blame. I had to build mental toughness which has helped me on the basketball court.” His sense of calm in the spotlight mixed with the mental toughness he was building for over a decade has helped shape his basketball prowess. He was able to play for different AAU teams and play in big-time tournaments and camps. During his senior year, Goulbourne stayed home in New York to compete in the Jordan Classic at Madison Square Garden. Michael Jordan, Carmelo Anthony and other star players were in attendance to watch. When attending the LeBron James Camp in Ohio, he was placed on a team that went up against James and fellow Vanderbilt teammate Brad Tinsley. Goulbourne’s team lost, but the experience of that level of competition was invaluable. Back at Hun, Goulbourne started to dominate on the basketball court just as he had done at tennis. He played against 2010 NBA Rookie of the Year Tyreke Evans his junior and senior season and matched up well. His ability to do well in the big games had college coaches interested in him. Goulbourne chose Vanderbilt over Notre Dame, Rutgers and Marquette to focus on academics and pursue a degree in economics while continuing his basketball career. Upon arriving at Vanderbilt, Goulbourne came down with mononucleosis and suffered a hip injury that slowed the beginning of his career as a Commodore. He took things in stride and still saw action in 23 games. His breakout game came on a big stage—a national ESPN broadcast against SEC Eastern Division rival Kentucky. The freshman scored a team-high 17 points in 22 minutes, including three threepointers, as the Commodores knocked off the Wildcats, 77-64, in front of a sellout crowd at Memorial Gym. Goulbourne credits the big moments of his past for helping him perform well in the bright spotlight of a packed Memorial Gym. He is looking forward to putting two injuryplagued years behind him. Those injuries may have hindered his play on the hardwood and halted his career on the hard court—he hasn’t picked up a tennis racket since he’s been at Vanderbilt—but the Brooklyn native is poised for a strong finish over the next two seasons with Coach Kevin Stallings’ Commodores. As for his future beyond Vanderbilt, Goulbourne is well on his way to an economics degree with thoughts of going into business following his basketball career. He also plans to get back to playing tennis, a sport he still embraces. One thing is for sure, though: Goulbourne’s experiences at a Top 20 school and on a major college basketball team will undoubtedly help him to continue to excel in the face of pressure. n On the tennis court, Goulbourne could serve the ball 130 mph. In the gym, he’s averaging eight points per game this year.

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Diamond Notes

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he Vanderbilt baseball team will begin the 2011 season on Feb. 18 in San Diego, where the Commodores will take on the University of San Diego and Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn’s San Diego State Aztecs. The Dores open the home schedule with cross-town rival Belmont on Feb. 23 before hosting Pac-10 power Stanford Feb. 25-27. Hawkins Field will get plenty of action, with 18 of the Commodores’ first 22 games in Nashville. “I like our schedule a lot,” Head Coach Tim Corbin said. “We are playing very good teams throughout the country before we get into the Southeastern Conference portion of our season. This will be a nice challenge for the kids.” The SEC schedule begins at Hawkins Field with Mississippi State visiting March 18-20. The following weekend the Dores hit the road in the SEC for the first time at Arkansas March 25-27. Rival Tennessee visits Nashville April 29-May 1, and the Florida Gators’ three-game visit May 13-15 concludes the home schedule. Vanderbilt will be featured on national

2011 Baseball Schedule television the final week of the regular season at Georgia as part of ESPN’s SEC Game of the Week. The Commodores and Bulldogs will play on ESPNU May 19. The Commodores are coming off one of the more successful seasons in school history, winning 46 games in 2010 and advancing to the school’s second-ever Super Regional. Vanderbilt returns 21 lettermen from last year’s club, including Sonny Gray, Jason Esposito and freshman All-American Anthony Gomez. Season tickets for the 2011 baseball season will include a new Family Plan. The Family Plan includes two adult and two youth tickets in the outfield for only $199. Other season ticket options include premium reserved seating behind home plate for $170, regular reserved seating down the lines for $135 and outfield season tickets for $75. Also new for 2011 is an Outfield Youth season ticket for only $50. Baseball season tickets went on sale beginning Dec. 15. For more information or to place your season ticket order visit vucommodores.com or call 615/322.GOLD.

Andrew Harris competes in baseball’s annual strength and conditioning competition, the Omaha Challenge.

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he Commodores team wrapped up their annual Omaha Challenge last month with The Omaholics taking home the team championship. The team’s roster boasted the pitchers’ winner, Jack Armstrong, and position players’ winner, Jack Lupo. Joining Armstrong and Lupo on the championship squad were pitchers Sonny Gray, Sam Selman and Steven Rice and position players D.J. Luna, Josh Lee, Joel McKeithan and Spencer Navin. The players competed in several events over the last week including a one-mile run, tire flip, obstacle course and broad jump, just to name a few.

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In the pitchers competition Armstrong beat out fellow junior Navery Moore. Senior Mark Lamm, who had won the event three times, and redshirt freshman Keenan Kolinsky rounded out the top four. In the position players challenge Lupo won going away topping second-place finisher and Omaholics teammate D.J. Luna by nearly 15 points. Freshman Conrad Gregor placed third ahead of sophomore Connor Harrell.

2/18 at San Diego 4 p.m. 2/19 at San Diego 5 p.m. at San Diego State 9 p.m. 2/20 at San Diego 3 p.m. 2/23 Belmont 4 p.m. 2/25 Stanford 4 p.m. 2/26 Stanford 2 p.m. 2/27 Stanford 1 p.m. 3/1 Western Kentucky 4 p.m. 3/4 Brown 4 p.m. 3/5 Brown 2 p.m. 3/6 Brown 1 p.m. 3/8 Wofford 4 p.m. 3/9 Kennesaw State 4 p.m. 3/11 Illinois-Chicago 4 p.m. 3/12 Illinois-Chicago 2 p.m. 3/13 Illinois-Chicago 1 p.m. 3/15 Purdue 4 p.m. 3/18 Mississippi State 4 p.m. 3/19 Mississippi State 2 p.m. 3/20 Mississippi State 1 p.m. 3/22 Tennessee Tech 6 p.m. 3/25 at Arkansas 6:35 p.m. 3/26 at Arkansas 2:05 p.m. 3/27 at Arkansas 1:05 p.m. 3/29 Tennessee-Martin 6 p.m. 4/1 at Auburn 6 p.m. 4/2 at Auburn 3 p.m. 4/3 at Auburn 1 p.m. 4/5 MTSU 6 p.m. 4/8 Alabama 6 p.m. 4/9 Alabama 2 p.m. 4/10 Alabama 1 p.m. 4/12 at MTSU 6 p.m. 4/15 at South Carolina 6 p.m. 4/16 at South Carolina 3 p.m. 4/17 at South Carolina 12:30 p.m. 4/22 LSU 6 p.m. 4/23 LSU 2 p.m. 4/24 LSU 1 p.m. 4/26 at Western Kentucky 6 p.m. 4/29 TeNNESSEE 6 p.m. 4/30 TeNNESSEE 2 p.m. 5/1 TeNNESSEE 1 p.m. 5/6 at Kentucky 5:30 p.m. 5/7 at Kentucky 5:30 p.m. 5/8 at Kentucky 12 p.m. 5/10 at Louisville 5 p.m. 5/13 FLORIDA 6 p.m. 5/14 FLORIDA 2 p.m. 5/15 FLORIDA 1 p.m. 5/19 at Georgia 6:30 p.m. 5/20 at Georgia 5:30 p.m. 5/21 at Georgia 1 p.m. 5/25-29 SEC Tournament (Hoover) 6/18-29 College World Series (Omaha) All times Central and subject to change. HOME GAMES played at Charles Hawkins Field in Nashville.

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JOE HOWELL

Athletic trainers keep Commodores safe

Head Athletic Trainer Tom Bossung (right) is in his 16th season with the Commodores.

T

he Vanderbilt Athletic Training Room exists to serve the medical needs of Vanderbilt’s student-athlete population. These services are aimed at the health of the entire student-athlete, from sportrelated injuries to overall health and welfare. With head injuries increasingly at the forefront of athlete well-being, VU Head Athletic Trainer Tom Bossung talked with Joe Fisher about his team’s role in support of the Commodores. On the response to a head injury like the concussion suffered by Zac Stacy: “There is a lot of prep work that goes into that before it ever happens. Every year, a couple times a year, we practice what we are going to do. When I get out there to the athlete, and I know he isn’t responsive, I can immediately get our team into action. As soon as I realized that Zac was unconscious, I got on the two-way radio and told Dr. Fitch that we had an unconscious athlete. The staff hears that call, and they automatically know what to do and what materials to bring. One of our students is assigned to get the [John Deere] Gator and the spine board and bring it out on the field. Once the doctors get out there, one of them takes control of the head and neck and stabilizes that. Me and my assistant Justin [Wenzel] start removing the facemask and get that

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off. Dr. Fitch, who we are lucky to have, is E.R. trained and is an emergency physician, as well as being one of our team physicians. He is there and assesses the situation. While we are doing our things everyone else is getting ready to go. Sam gets the Gator out there, and we get the board in place. Once it’s ready to go and everybody is in agreement of what we have, Dr. Spindler makes the call and we lift him up, put him on the board, strap him on, lift him off and take him away. In that process, we are also fortunate to have on our sidelines the emergency team from LifeFlight, Vanderbilt’s level-one trauma center. They cover our games as the EMS unit. While we are out there and I get to the point where I can communicate, I switch my radio over to them and I talk to them on the radio and tell them what we have and this is what we are bringing to you so meet us in the tunnel and once we get over there we transfer him into the ambulance and they’re gone.” How big of a deal is it to be able to tell a recruit or a parent about our world-class medical facilities? “I think it is a huge deal. I think it is one of the biggest things we have to offer here since we have this great medical center. I tell recruits all the time that the doctors we have here, the physicians, the specialists we

have here at Vanderbilt are here because they want to be here and we want them here. It’s not like we had to settle for someone or anything like that. We recruit the best physicians in the country—and sometimes Bossung the world—at what they do. I compare my list of consultants to athletes to a coach’s playlist. I have everything from an allergist to a urologist and everything in between. Cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology and all those things. They know that when we call them, which may not be often, they know to get them in and get them seen, and I feel very blessed to have those people at our access. The intermediate step is that we also have access to some of the best sports medicine physicians in the country every day. Every day at football practice I have at least one orthopedic doctor and a primary care physician, and a lot of times I have two or three. When something big happens, I’ve got plenty of physicians there, and some of the best at what they do. I feel very blessed to be at Vanderbilt and have the access that we have to the medical care that we do.” n

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2011

Reunion

M

TODD VAN EMST/SEC

Women’s Basketball ake plans to be on campus on Sunday, Feb. 13, as Vanderbilt Athletics and the Commodore women’s basketball program play host to an exciting reunion weekend. The history and tradition of Commodore women’s basketball will be on display as all former women’s basketball players and managers have been invited back to Memorial Gym and will be honored during a halftime presentation. The backdrop for this wonderful afternoon is Vanderbilt’s nationally televised game against Southeastern Conference rival Tennessee, which is set for a 5 p.m. CT tip. An extremely limited number of single-game tickets have been made available to the general public at a cost of $21. Season tickets are still on sale, starting at $35.

JOHN RUSSELL

Women’s basketball alumnae: Contact Allison Bradley in the Vanderbilt Athletic Marketing office for information on complimentary tickets, as well as a pre-game reception for you and your family. Ms. Bradley can be reached at 615/343-0245 or via e-mail at allison.bradley@vanderbilt.edu.

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J A N U A RY 2 0 1 1


Retiring

P

21

art of the festivities surrounding the Commodore women’s basketball reunion include the retiring of Chantelle Anderson’s jersey. Anderson, the school’s all-time leading scorer with 2,604 points, will become only the second women’s basketball player to have her number retired during a special presentation at the halftime intermission of the Vanderbilt-Tennessee game on Feb. 13. Wendy Scholtens (Wood), the Commodore women’s first All-American, had her No. 40 retired in 1991. Scholtens scored 2,602 points in her VU career. Anderson was the youngest member of Vanderbilt’s inaugural Athletic Hall of Fame class in 2008. The Commodores’ only two-time Kodak All-American, Anderson was voted Vanderbilt’s Female Athlete of the Year three times. Anderson was chosen with the second overall selection in the 2003 WNBA Draft and went on to play professionally for six years in the WNBA and overseas. Following her playing career, she has been seen as an analyst on FSN South. Anderson is currently an assistant coach at Division II Palm Beach Atlantic University, where she is pursuing a master’s degree in organizational leadership.

Chantelle Anderson (left) will join Wendy Scholtens (above) as the second Vanderbilt women’s basketball player who has had her number retired.

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C O M M O D O R E N AT I O N

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January Schedule

WHAT TO WATCH FOR

Men’s Basketball

College Gameday

2 Davidson (Memorial Gym)

4 p.m.

8

4 p.m.

South Carolina (Columbia, S.C.)

12

Georgia (Memorial Gym)

15

Tennessee (Knoxville)

7 p.m. 11 a.m.

19

Ole Miss (Memorial Gym)

8 p.m.

22

Saint Mary’s (Memorial Gym)

1 p.m.

27

Mississippi State (Starkville, Miss.)

6 p.m.

29

Arkansas (Memorial Gym)

5 p.m.

Women’s Basketball 2

Ole Miss (Oxford, Miss.)

1 p.m.

6

Mississippi State (Memorial Gym)

7 p.m.

9

Auburn (Memorial Gym)

2 p.m.

13

Alabama (Tuscaloosa, Ala.)

6 p.m.

15

Tennessee (Knoxville)

7 p.m.

20

Arkansas (Memorial Gym)

7 p.m.

23

Kentucky (Lexington, Ky.)

3 p.m.

30

Ole Miss (Memorial Gym)

2 p.m.

Bowling 20

Big Red Invitational (Lincoln, Neb.)

21

Big Red Invitational (Lincoln, Neb.)

22

Big Red Invitational (Lincoln, Neb.)

28

Kutztown Invitational (Reading, Pa.)

29

Kutztown Invitational (Reading, Pa.)

30

Kutztown Invitational (Reading, Pa.)

Kansas (Centennial Sportsplex)

29

Marshall (Huntington, W.Va.)

2 p.m.

Tennessee Tech (Currey Tennis Center)

9 a.m. 2 p.m.

22

Lipscomb (Currey Tennis Center)

28

National Indoor Kickoff (Palo Alto, Calif.)

29

National Indoor Kickoff (Palo Alto, Calif.)

30

National Indoor Kickoff (Palo Alto, Calif.)

Women’s Tennis 21

Northwestern (Currey Tennis Center)

28

ITA Kickoff Weekend (Clemson, S.C.)

29

ITA Kickoff Weekend (Clemson, S.C.)

30

ITA Kickoff Weekend (Clemson, S.C.)

2:30 p.m.

Women’s Track 14

Kentucky Invitational (Lexington, Ky.)

15

Kentucky Invitational (Lexington, Ky.)

28

Rod McCravy Memorial Meet (Lexington, Ky.)

29

Rod McCravy Memorial Meet (Lexington, Ky.)

All times Central and subject to change. Those not shown are TBA - check vucommodores.com for updates.

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Following the men’s game, the women will play the Lady Vols in primetime at 7 p.m. CT. GameDay will air again at 6 p.m. CT leading up to the women’s game. ESPN College GameDay debuted on Jan. 22, 2005, but the meeting between the Commodores and Vols will mark the first time the show has aired a men’s and women’s double-header between the same two schools.

JANUARY BIRTHDAYS

Men’s Tennis 22

A spin-off of its successful college football version, ESPN’s College GameDay will begin its eight-week schedule by broadcasting live from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. CT Saturday morning as a lead up to Vanderbilt’s men’s team facing Tennessee at 11 a.m. CT.

The matchup between the women’s teams will be just the second time a women’s game has been a part of ESPN’s College GameDay. Last year, UConn hosted Notre Dame in the firstever women’s game to be showcased on College GameDay.

Swimming 8

Just over two years after Vanderbilt’s football team was put in front of a national audience by hosting College GameDay in 2008, both of Vanderbilt’s basketball teams will share a similar stage on Jan. 15 when the Commodores play a doubleheader in Knoxville.

1/1 1/1 1/2 1/3 1/5 1/7 1/8 1/9 1/10 1/13 1/14 1/17 1/17 1/17 1/18 1/20 1/21 1/21 1/26 1/26 1/27 1/27 1/27 1/28 1/28 1/29 1/31

Nathan Gonzalez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baseball Carly Linthicum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lacrosse Javon Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Emily Grant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer Carey Spear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Chelsea Lanzoni. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lacrosse Taylor Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer Wesley Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Erin McManus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Track/Cross Country Gabrielle Ortega . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swimming Jared Morse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Paige Cahill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lacrosse Mary Rachel Reynolds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer Logan Stewart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Jonathan Krause. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Meghan Rose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lacrosse Theron Kadri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Sean Richardson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Matt Casas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Darshawn McClellan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Men’s Basketball Zoe Cooper-Surma. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Swimming Kyle Fuller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Men’s Basketball Claire Romaine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soccer Josh Henderson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Men’s Basketball Duane Vaughn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Football Ellie Kraus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lacrosse Lauren Rhein. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bowling

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last shots STEVE GREEN / VU PHOTOGRAPHY

Vanderbilt’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee hosted its annual holiday party for the children of Ross Elementary last month. Football player Caleb Welchans (above, as Santa) read The Night Before Christmas. Each team bought gifts for two or three children (below, women’s basketball).

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Commodore Nation, January 2011  

http://vucommodores.com/nation Commodore Nation magazine, January 2011 issue.

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