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VIRGINIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Journal Fall 2010

Leadership in Mission

Fall 2010

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On the Cover: One of four lancet windows in the north transept of the Seminary Chapel depicting areas of the world where Seminary graduates have traveled. This particular window commemorates the work of VTS graduates in Japan, other parts of Asia, and early medical missionaries in China. The windows were given to the Seminary in 1999 in memory of the Rt. Rev. Robert F. Gibson, tenth bishop of Virginia. Cover photo by Susan L. Shillinglaw.

Left: The Rt. Rev. James J. Shand, VTS chairman of the board of trustees and bishop of the Diocese of Easton, Maryland, blesses the crosses and Class of 2010.

Virginia Theological Seminary Journal Editor: Susan L. Shillinglaw Contributing Photographers: Lenore Funkhouser, Robin Gulick, Adam Jackson, James Livingston, Griska Niewiadomski, Curtis Prather, B. Cayce Ramey, Susan Shillinglaw, Lara Shine, Leslie Steffensen, and Gary Taylor. Layout: Susan L. Shillinglaw The Virginia Seminary Journal is published once a year by The Protestant Episcopal Seminary in Virginia at 3737 Seminary Road, Alexandria, VA 22304. Third class postage at Alexandria, Virginia. Phone: 703-370-6600; Fax: 703-370-6234. E-mail: editor@vts.edu. Web site: www.vts.edu.

Address Changes: Alumni Records, 3737 Seminary Road, Alexandria, VA 22304 or e-mail manderson@vts.edu. Š 2010 The Protestant Episcopal Seminary in Virginia. Published annually by the Office of Institutional Advancement.

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VIRGINIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Journal Fall 2010

In this issue: Letter from the Dean and President Forum Hour Photos 2010 Kreitler Environmental Lecture “Momentum Builds for Saving the Bay: The Biggest Fight for Clean Water This Nation Has Ever Seen” by Mr. William C. Baker 2010 Commencement Address “Four Friendships” by the Rev. Brian McLaren Missionary Society at VTS Mission Articles: “Blessed Are the Peacemakers” by the Rev. Robin Gulick “Sticks and Stones, Boiled Wool, Borrowed Chairs, and a Straw Hat” by the Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D. “Reflections on Tanzania” by James Livingston (VTS ‘11) “Journey to Jerusalem” by Kathryn Glover “Jerusalem’s Thick Places” by Amelia J. Dyer, Ph.D. “VTS in Hong Kong: Learning About the Church in China” by the Rev. John Yieh “God’s Restorative Justice in the Diocese of Florida” by the Rev. Thomas E. Beasley, Jr. “Serving Skid Row: Urban Mission as Theological Education” by the Rev. Jason Cox Article: “The Formidable Work of the Small Parish” by Dr. Marilyn Johns, D.Min. Interview: “The World According to Jacques Hadler” by Susan L. Shillinglaw Faculty Inaugural Lecture “Receiving Christ: Reading the Bible Across Time and Culture” by the Rev. John Yieh, Ph.D. Faculty News Article: “Asset-Based Community Development: Finding and Mobilizing Your Community’s Hidden Strengths and Power” by the Rev. David Gortner, Ph.D. Virginia Theological Seminary 2009-2010 Annual Giving Report Article: “Faith@Five: Can a Rite 3 Service Really Matter?” by Susan L. Shillinglaw Article: “How Does Your Garden Grow?” by the Rev. David Gortner, Ph.D.

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DEAN’S REPORT

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he sense of mission at Virginia Theological Seminary is strong. Students cannot help but have a mission focus given that they are expected (which is VTS language for required) to sit in chapel every day staring at the Ascension window with the words “Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel.” The Eucharist on the eve of commencement is a service dedicated to the “Mission of the Church.” Mission matters here. But what exactly does a commitment to mission mean? It is interesting to look at the different ways in which the word “mission” is used in the Episcopal Church. Those on the left tend to mean social programs that make a difference to the poor, the marginalized, and the excluded. Our youth go on mission trips, often serving deprived regions, witnessing to Gospel values. Congregations have a mission budget, which often funds outreach ministries to the homeless and hungry. This sense of mission is grounded in the prophetic (just look at Amos) and Gospel (just look at Luke) witness that the Church is called to identify with the poor. Those on the right tend to stress evangelism. Mission means finding opportunities to talk about your faith, inviting others to join your church, and bringing the healing power of Jesus to a hurting world. This view of mission is grounded in the Great Commission that surrounds our Ascension window. This is grounded in the great Biblical themes of human sinfulness and redemption through Christ on the cross.

“We are called to serve this hurting world and to bring, in very practical ways, hope and possibilities to those who are struggling.”

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Sometimes both sides tend to view the other with suspicion. Those on the right complain that the left is turning the Church into a United Way with spirituality; those on the left complain that the right turns people into “souls on legs,” has a preoccupation with the afterlife, and forgets that there are bodies which need to be fed and housed in this world. As on so many issues, Virginia Theological Seminary is a both/and place. Both of these views of mission are Biblical. Both of these are important. We ground ourselves in the Christian narrative of a loving God calling humanity out of their egotism and selfishness to a redeemed life made possible through Christ; we also recognize that precisely because of that narrative we are called to serve this hurting world and bring in very practical ways hope and possibilities to those who are struggling; and finally, we want to introduce to our friends and neighbors the life transforming possibilities of faith, especially as found in the Episcopal tradition. It isn’t simply good enough to have a larger congregation; we must also have more people available to help with outreach ministries. This issue of the Journal focuses on mission. Both types of mission are found in its pages. We are firmly committed to the Christian drama as our motive and witness; we are also firmly committed to the obligation emerging from that drama to ensure a world which is different - to anticipate the reign of God, where the hungry are fed and the homeless housed.

Yours in Christ,

The Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D. Dean and President


FORUMHOUR The popular lunch forum hour once again welcomed a variety of voices that included (pictured top left, clockwise) Stella Koch, Virginia Conservation associate at the Audubon Naturalist Society, who spoke to students about water conservation during Earth Week; students, Phil DeVaul, Bill Campbell, Tim Baer, and Charles Browning listening to the lively and provocative Peter Rollins (holding water glass) who discussed his theology of Biblical interpretation and culture; the Rev. Milton Williams, priest in charge at St. Monica’s and St. James’ Capitol Hill, who spoke about parish closures and mergers; Joelle Norvey, director of Greater Washington Interfaith Power and Light, who spoke about ways in which ordained and lay leaders can engage in interfaith approaches to environmentalism; and the Rev. Philip E. Wheaton (VTS ‘52), Latin American historian and theologian, who spoke to the students about the Dominican Republic.

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The 2010 Kreitler Environmental Lecture “Momentum Builds for Saving the Bay: The Biggest Fight for Clean Water This Nation Has Ever Seen” presented by William C. Baker President, The Chesapeake Bay Foundation really decided to make a career of saving the Bay. I’ll never forget the day I was down on the dock, near my house, with my 5-year old son. I was trying to teach him to net crabs off of the pilons. We made three or four foiled attempts when a few dead fish—Menhaden—came floating by. Of course, my son grabbed the net and immediately scooped up one of the Menhaden and puts it on the dock to examine. All of a sudden, it occurred to me, “That’s his baseline growing up.” Dead fish in the creek at the bottom of the hill. I thought at that point, if I can really make a career of this, if I can really be a part of a team, it could make a difference in a system that’s big enough to feel important but small enough so that you think you’ve really got a chance to make a difference in your lifetime.

Let me tell you a story. Delegate Harvey Morgan, of Virginia, tells the story of being down in a little waterman’s church on Mobjack Bay in Virginia. And outside in the cemetery after the service, he was noticing how grand the tombstones were. Way over in the corner, there was a stone that was overgrown with weeds, sort of tilting to the side. He brushed the weeds away and read the ephitat, which stated in its entirety, “I told you I was sick.” As delegate Morgan said, and I say today, the Bay has been telling us she’s sick for a long time, and in spite of promise after promise, even a formal signed agreement by top elected officials, we still have a Chesapeake Bay that is dangerously out of balance. It’s time for a change. It’s been said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. It’s time for our elected officials to be held to a higher standard. It is time for government to enforce the law. And it is time for those who have refused to obey the rule of law to suffer the consequences. And it is time for action. It’s time for all of us who value clean water to stand up and be counted. This is our time. This is our children’s time, our grandchildren’s time. It’s time for the biggest fight for clean water this nation has ever seen, right here on Chesapeake Bay. And if we don’t wage this fight, I am afraid that history will record that a well meaning but ultimately timid society lost the Chesapeake Bay in the early part of the 21st Century. If we fight, I guarantee that we will succeed. Our time has come.

Let me tell you how I got into this war and how I’ve made it my life’s career. After college, I was doing my normal summer job which was as a tree surgeon. I was 5070 feet up in an oak tree at a man’s house. It was about a 110 degree July day and he came out of the house with a tall glass of ice tea and he asked, “Will, would you like to save the Bay?” I responded “Yes, Mr. Siemans, that would be fine.” He invited me to come into the house to have a conversation. Truman Siemans was on the board of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. He invited me to come down to Annapolis and Baltimore where I started work as an intern, putting my plans to go to architecture school on hold. I got paid $200 a month; my rent in downtown Annapolis in 1976 was $105 a month. That left $95 a month for food and mostly beer. Then I got married and had children. This gets to the point of the story as to why I

I want to cover three topics: First, why the Bay is worth saving? Second, “how it will be saved?”. And third, “what each of you can do... no, must do to save it. Why it’s worth saving. Three reasons. 1. There is nothing like it in the world – absolutely nothing. H.L. Mencken called it an immense protein factory. Couldn’t be more true. 2. It is fragile – extremely vulnerable to damage. And 3. Most importantly, the Chesapeake Bay is our backyard. The Potomac River is the second largest tributary with a network of rivers and streams all flowing into the main stem of the bay. First, the legendary productivity. Have you Fall 2010

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Kreitler Environmental Lecture

heard the story about the group of visiting Japanese scientists in the 1950s? After touring the Bay and meeting with local scientists and seafood harvesters, they stated that if the Chesapeake Bay were in their country, they could feed their entire population. This story has been cited in numerous books, articles, and National Geographic; President Reagan even mentioned it when he came to Tilghman Island back in 1983. Second, the vulnerability. Not just of Chesapeake Bay but all of nature. Our planet. It has been reported that when the Apollo Thirteen astronauts came around from behind the dark side of the moon, Neil Armstrong looked out at that iconic image of the earth – a small globe suspended in the black of space – and he held up his thumb and blocked out the entire image. He says that it struck him right then what a small planet earth really is. He dedicated a great deal of his life, after that, to conservation issues. We think of the earth as enormous, as the Water Planet with its great oceans. But there’s not really as much water as we might think. Some scientists at National Geographic tried to figure out a way to describe to lay people how little water there is in relation to the mass of the earth. They calculated that if you take a 12” globe and dunked it into a basin of water, took it out and shook it, the amount of water remaining, clinging to the surface of the globe, would be representative of the amount of water on planet earth. Not a great deal to play with. It’s the same with the Chesapeake Bay. The watermen say that the bottom lies right near the top. And third, our backyard. It’s not some far off esoteric conservation issue – we are talking about our backyard! And it is more than just a body of water. It is, to quote an old beer commercial, “the land of pleasant living!” Saving Chesapeake Bay is really just a metaphor for addressing our quality of life in this region. There is nothing more important than clean water. And think about it, if we cannot save a national treasure like the Chesapeake Bay, then where on earth can we generate the 8  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

Did You Know? Formed about 12,000 years ago as glaciers melted and flooded the Susquehanna River valley, the Chesapeake Bay is North America's largest estuary and the world's third largest. The Chesapeake Bay watershed (the area of land that drains into the Bay) is 64,000 square miles and has 11,600 miles of tidal shoreline, including tidal wetlands and islands. The watershed encompasses parts of six states. Approximately 17 million people live in the watershed; about 10 million people live along its shores or near them. "Chesapeake" derives from the Native American "Tschiswapeki," which loosely translates into "great shellfish bay."

What is the CBF? The Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) is the largest conservation organization dedicated solely to saving the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Its motto, Save the Bay, defines the organization’s mission and commitment to reducing pollution, improving fisheries, and protecting and restoring natural resources such as wetlands, forests, and underwater grasses. CBF headquarters is in Annapolis, MD, and has state offices in Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania.

political will to really get the job done – to bring together environmental prosperity and economic good health– the essence of sustainability? So let me tell you how it will be saved. It’s really very straightforward. Put sound science to work. We have the very best in the world. Scientists can tell us precisely what has damaged the Chesapeake Bay and precisely how to bring it back to good health.

First, stop taking more oysters, crabs, and fin fish out of the Bay than nature can put back in any given year. Just stop. Set the limits based on science, and then enforce them. We made real progress here with rock fish in the 80s and now 25 years later with blue crabs. But only after 4,000 jobs had been lost due to the fishery’s decline. Did you hear the good news? Thanks to basic, science based conservation, the blue crab is enjoying a 60 % increase in the total population! The threshold catch is now below what it used to be but the total catch


Kreitler Environmental Lecture

is larger because the base of population has grown. So, the commercial fishermen benefit, the crabs benefit, and the recreational fishermen benefit. We have more crabs in the Bay, more to take, and we’re doing it more sustainably. Second, stop destroying nature’s own elegant system of natural filters which at no cost to the tax payer (zero!) – filter pollutants before they get into the water. These are the under water grasses, the emergent wetlands, the streamside buffers, and of course the great forests. If filters must be sacrificed for “progress,” require those “progressive” interests to sacrifice a little bit of their profit to offset the damage – and require it to be done before the permits are issued. And require a 2 to 1 offset, because restored wetlands, for instance, are never as good as the Creator’s own. Don’t let developers get away with an empty promise to carry out

mitigation after the original damage has been done. Require it up front! And now, pollution. Thanks to public pressure which grew out of the very first earth day forty years ago, we have a clear, concise basic law in America – the Federal Clean Water Act of 1972. It promised that waters Nationwide would be fishable and swimmable by June 1, 1983. June 1! Not June 2. The law goes on to say if a body of water is impaired by pollution – and impaired is a specific legal term - additional pollutants must not be added to that body of water until, and only until, the impairment is reversed. Think about it. It just makes intuitive good sense. And in Virginia we have 10,000 miles of impaired waters. But the law is not being enforced. CBF has had to take the extraordinary step of suing EPA to enforce the Clean Water Act here on the Bay. We also sue polluters.

One case against the giant Philip Morris Corporation was decided by the Virginia Supreme Court – no bastion of environmental extremism – when it ruled 8 to 0 in favor of CBF. In favor of an environmental not-for-profit group doing government’s job of enforcing the Clean Water Act… what is going on here? To repeat, we only take more fish and shellfish in a given year than nature can put back; we protect existing natural filters and begin to restore those that have already been lost; and third, we don’t add additional sources of pollution to already impaired waters. That’s the formula. Now before I tell you what you can do, let me try to answer a critical question. Why haven’t these three simple steps been taken in the past? Why hasn’t America been able to save this national treasure? My guess is that most of you are doing Fall 2010

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Photos by B. Cayce Ramey

Kreitler Environmental Lecture

Above: The Rev. Peter Gwillim Kreitler (VTS ’69), one of the founders of the Kreitler Environmental Fund, opened the lecture with a reminder that the environment is in our hands; Will Baker answers questions from the audience about the future of the Bay.

your part to a large extent. But you, me, all of us are part of a much larger system. From the buildings we live and work in to the products we buy and even the food we eat, we are part of a society that’s wasteful and polluting. And there are more and more of us every year – 6.8 billion and counting. It wasn’t always this way. In fact it took 3 million years to get the first billion people on the planet. Only a hundred years for the next billion. Today we’re adding a billion people every 11 years. Seventeen million of us live in the Bay watershed alone. Sure we can all do more individually. I didn’t ride my horse here. I don’t even own a horse. But the real mega impact is coming from fundamental decisions being made at a level most of us feel impotent to affect. While you are doing your part, big money lobbyists – with the emphasis on big money - are fighting to protect any number of special interests - like developers, manufacturers, and even industrial scale agriculture. And whenever a watchdog organization like CBF directs its advocacy towards one of the special interests, the shrill response repeated over and over is, “not me, not me, it’s somebody else, a different sector.” There is an endless stream of finger pointing. It’s always someone else’s fault that the environment is degraded. It reminds me of my children. When there’s a room

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full of kids playing and a lamp or a vase has been knocked over, each of them will look up and say to the adult, “not me, it wasn’t my fault, Dad!” Make no mistake, there are a lot of lobbyists out there, and there they have a ton of money to spend. According to the Center for Public Integrity, there are 35,000 lobbyists in this country and they spend six billion dollars a year. Sometimes it feels like they are all here working for special interests on the Bay. Did I say its time for a change? But don’t despair! We have a secret weapon. We have something that every special interest lobbyist wants. It’s you. You are the secret weapon. Do you want clean water? Do you think clean water should be a right, something that we should expect, like the right of freedom of speech? Will you demand it? Will you get angry? Can we count on you to flex your muscles and to invest a modest amount of time on a regular basis for clean water? If you do, collectively, we can be a force that will blow the big money right off the table. There is absolutely no way that paid lobbyists can compete with concerned and committed voters. If you don’t believe me, let me tell you a story. Recently I was at one of these big gala dinners and at our table sat a cap-

tain of industry. As the butter man came around putting butter on the butter plates, one pat of butter per plate, the captain said in a rather gruff tone, “I want two pats of butter.” The butter man said everyone gets one pat of butter. The CEO said he wanted two. They went back and forth like this for a few moments. Finally, the exasperated industrialist said, “Young man, do you have any idea who I am?” To which the young many replied, “Yes sir, you are a captain of industry.” And then he said “And sir, do you know who I am?” “No.” And the young man said, “I am the butter man.” You are all butter men and butter women. You have powers that you don’t even realize. Exercise those powers! There is no better time to get involved than right now. There are so many opportunities. And not all are insurmountable. Let me mention just one. There is a piece of legislation working its way through the United States Congress that is the most important for the Bay than any bill in our lifetimes. It is the Chesapeake Clean Water Act, introduced by Maryland Senator Ben Cardin and Congressman Elijah Cummings. In Virginia, Congressmen Gerry Connolly, James Moran, and Robert Scott are original cosponsors, but extraordinarily, Senators Warner and Webb are still not


on the bill. Both of them are concerned with what they feel might be the impact on farmers. The American Farm Bureau Federation – one of the strongest lobbying arms in the Country, has been spreading misinformation about the bill. They are going to the rank and file farmer and making them think that if this bill were to pass, they’d lose their jobs and their farms, and driven off their land by jack booted EPA agents followed by citizens with lawsuits in their hands. Sure farmers are part of the problem. We all are. But if each of us plays just a small role in reducing pollution, not one of us will be overburdened. After all, the opposite of gluttony is not starvation or even going hungry. It’s just eating wisely. We have to eat wisely, both literally and figuratively. The idea that to save the environment we would turn farms into strip malls is patently absurd. But that is what the lobbyists would have farmers believe is the environmental motive. Scare tactics of the most cynical kind. Just like the successful strategy for blue crabs, we need a bill that will do the following: put science to work, establish firm standards, and require strict enforcement. And that’s what this bill –the Chesapeake Clean Water Act - SB 1816 and H 3852– will do. It gives the states total flexibility and only requires that the Federal Government see that the states are meeting the standards. We need an army of citizen lobbyists – citizens who will continue to push for this legislation for the next several months throughout the period of congressional debate. Go to our website at www.cbf.org, and find out specifically what you can do to help. There is a lot at stake. Consider a grandfather I know, CBF member Bernie Voith. On July 4, a few years ago, he was playing in the Severn River with his grandson. A day later, he developed an infection, his temperature spiked above 105 degrees, and he was diagnosed with a life threatening bacterial blood infection. Doctors determined that a small cut on his right

calf had allowed dangerous water born bacteria to enter his body. If you’d like to see gruesome pictures of his leg as he was suffering, you can go to our website. The pollution levels found in the river that day were 30 times what EPA considers safe for swimming. There are so many more examples. I could talk about Joe Stover, a real estate broker from Virginia Beach who suffered a similar ailment in the Warwick River. He spent 10 days in the hospital in 2008 after a terrifying bout with a waterborne infection. These cases and others are documented in our Bad Waters 2009 report which can be found on the website. I came across a quote awhile ago that went something like this: “Our land, compared with the way it once was, is like the skeleton of a body wasted by disease. The soft, plump parts have vanished, and all that remains is the bare carcass.” It was written about Greece, in the fifth century, B.C., by Plato. My point is that history has a lot to teach us if only we will listen. We cannot take nature for granted. Mother Nature is a working Mother, and she needs some help. We need you to fight for the Bay, to fight for your backyard, to fight to protect your own health. It will be the biggest fight for clean water this nation has ever seen, because what we need to do here on the Chesapeake Country has never been done anywhere else in the country. Let’s not just learn from history, let’s go out and make some history! Let’s save the Bay. The momentum is building. We must seize the moment. Thank you! After graduation from Trinity College in 1976, Will Baker came to work for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) as an intern at the request of one of CBF’s trustees. Mr. Baker continues to dedicate his career to saving the Bay, as President and CEO of CBF since 1982, leading the largest not-for-profit conservation organization dedicated solely to preserving, protecting, and restoring the Bay. For more information, visit www.cbf.org.

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he Kreitler Environmental Fund was established at Virginia Theological Seminary in 2006 by the Rev. Peter Gwillim Kreitler and his family members in order to empower clergy and the church with a strong environmental ethic and to help conserve and preserve the environment. “Our family initiated this Environmental Fund because Virginia Seminary has a long and distinguished heritage of sending men and women in service to God throughout all of God’s creation,” said Kreitler, minister for the Environment in the Diocese of Los Angeles and creator of the Southern California television Series, Earth Talk Today. “This legacy has inspired the Kreitler family and friends to help foster and embolden new leadership informed by a strong environmental ethic that will help form a sustainable model for the future.” The Kreitler Environmental Lectures are held every other year and explore the ways one’s appreciation and stewardship of the environment is enhanced by informed theological beliefs. Past lectures have included Dr. Ellen F. Davis, professor of Bible and Theology at Duke Divinity School, and the Rt. Rev. James Jones, bishop of Liverpool, The Church of England. Visit www.vts.edu for more information about the lectures.

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Commencement Address 2010

Four Friendships

by the Rev. Brian McLaren

Jesus stepped into a boat, crossed over and came to his own town. Some men brought to him a paralytic, lying on a mat. When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Take heart, son; your sins are forgiven.” At this, some of the teachers of the law said to themselves, “This fellow is blaspheming!” Knowing their thoughts, Jesus said, “Why do you entertain evil thoughts in your hearts? Which is easier: to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Get up and walk’? But so that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins....” Then he said to the paralytic, “Get up, take your mat and go home.” And the man got up and went home. When the crowd saw this, they were filled with awe; and they praised God, who had given such authority to men.

Thank you so much, Dean Markham, Bishop Shand, and the whole VTS, faculty and staff, for this great honor, the honor of receiving an honorary degree, and of being invited to address the Class of 2010, and their guests. I am deeply humbled and grateful. And in fact, I would like to honor some people who are with me to share in this day. And students … that I would be associated with a group of people like you is a great honor in itself. Thanks for letting me

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tag a long and become part of the class of 2010 for a day. When I considered what direction my words for you should take, several possibilities came to mind. First, I considered talking about what I often call the Episcopal Moment. I believe you are graduating from seminary at a pregnant moment in the history of the Episcopal Church, and of the Church in America and the Church worldwide. And our time would be well spent considering your opportunity to help the church seize the opportunities that this moment provides.

But then I considered focusing on the mission of the church – to remind you that the church does not exist to satisfy the religious tastes of its tithe-paying members... much less its non-tithe paying members. Nor does it exist for institutional self-preservation. Nor does it exist to provide clergy with fulfilling employment and generous remuneration and an unparalleled retirement package. But rather the church exists to join God in God’s self-giving for the sake of the world that is loved by God. As the church moves


beyond a season of internal tension and conflict, this is a prime time to focus on our dual mission of disciple-formation and disciple-deployment into the needs and unseized potentials around us. And then, I considered sharing some of my own story – because I have a special love for the Episcopal Church. The best pastor I ever had was an Episcopal priest in this diocese, and through his encouragement I prayerfully considered coming to this seminary about 30 years ago. Although I felt I was led onto another path, serving in nondenominational settings over the years, I must admit that I have an Anglican heart, shaped by the Prayer Book and deepened by the Anglican liturgy, and I would love to tell more about that story, but the more I prayed and thought about it, the more I felt that I should focus less on something else entirely - God’s work in your lives. I would like to talk to you about how the words of Proverbs 4:23 apply to each of you graduates today and through the years ahead: Above all else, guard well your own heart, for from it flow the wellsprings of life. The Apostle Paul echoes these words in the New Testament (1Timothy 4:16): Pay close attention to yourself and to your teaching; continue in these things, for in doing this you will save both yourself and your hearers. Class of 2010, your greatest asset in the years ahead, it turns out, won’t be the certification and honor you receive today. It won’t be the title conferred upon you. It won’t even be the knowledge you’ve gained through your studies, as valuable as those things might be. Your greatest asset in the years ahead will be your morale, your internal climate, the purity and constancy and buoyancy of the wellsprings of life that spring up from your innermost being. Through a strong and healthy heart, you will make good use of all these other assets, including what you celebrate today and what you’ve learned over these last few years. But without a strong and

healthy heart, so much will be wasted that I felt today I should encourage you and also warn you – as all of the veteran ministers in this room could do if they were in my place – that your morale will be under constant assault. That’s especially evident in light of today’s gospel reading. When Jesus comes to his home town, he faces tremendous human need – physical need epitomized in a paralyzed man; social need evident in the friends who carry his stretcher; and spiritual need centered in sins needing forgiveness. But the physical paralysis of the man on the stretcher seems easy to heal compared to the spiritual paralysis of the teachers of the law who are stuck in a cramped, critical mode and mindset. All they can do as Jesus heals and forgives is criticize – either for what he does, when he does it, what he says, or how he says it. And that, brothers and sisters, I can promise you is going to be your experience too. You are leaving this place to go into the world and proclaim the gospel, to address multi-faceted human need in the Spirit of the Lord Jesus Christ, and I can guarantee that if you follow in his footsteps, if you do your job right, there will always be for you, as there was for the Lord, a crowd of religious critics standing by to tell you how you did it, when you did it, what you said, and how you said it were not up to their standards. You will learn that there are two paths of martyrdom – one leading into the den of ravenous lions and the other through the valley of nibbling ducks. And as all the veterans of ministry will tell you, unless you guard your heart well, unless you pay careful attention to your own soul, you will be nibbled and hobbled and worn down by the ducks at your ankles just as effectively as by the lions at your neck. The ducks can put you on a stretcher, like the man in the story, and leave you paralyzed. When they wear you down, you’ll stop playing to win, and you’ll settle for fishing for compliments instead of fishing for men, and eventually you’ll be reduced from playing to win to playing not to lose.

That’s why I want to share with you, as a kind of last lesson in your seminary education, four friendships that will guard your heart, preserve your morale, and be sure that the great assets you’ve gained at VTS will be supported by a cheerful, constant, and pure flow from the wellsprings of the Spirit deep within you. First Friendship

First, you must be a friend to yourself. I had a kind of spiritual epiphany that brought this lesson home to me about ten years into pastoral ministry. I was jogging – something I did not for the love of exercise but for the hatred of fat. Whenever I jog, my muscles and lungs talk to me. They send me constant, chattering messages: “OK,” they say, “that’s enough of this. Get off of this exercise kick. You’ve run quite far enough, you’re already in good shape. In fact, let’s reward you and go over to Dunkin Donuts for a nice crème-filled donut.” I learned that the only way to distract myself from the chattering voices of my muscles and lungs was to listen to podcasts on my iPod, except in those days they were called cassette tapes and you listened to them with a device called a Walkman, which you can probably see in Smithsonian Institution if you’re ever interested. Anyway, I was running and listening to a cassette tape and the speaker quoted Abraham Lincoln who said these words: “I desire to so conduct the affairs of this administration that if, at the end ... I have lost every friend on earth, I shall have one friend left, and that friend shall be down inside me.” As I heard those words, it was as if the Spirit of God took them and pierced me to the marrow of my soul, and out of the deepest part of me, completely unexpectedly, I suddenly felt a sob erupt. I realized, as I stopped running and bent over in the middle of the path, that I had no friend down inside of me. I had an enemy. If my friend made a mistake, I would tell

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him it was OK, and that nobody’s perfect. But if I made a mistake, I constantly beat myself up and mercilessly took myself to task. If a friend was working too hard, I would tell him, “take a day off, go fishing, do something good for yourself.” But down inside me was a cruel taskmaster who was never satisfied. In fact, he promised me he would be satisfied as soon as the last parishioner was satisfied. If a friend had some weaknesses, I would be gracious and compassionate to that friend, but not so with myself. And so that day I felt the Holy Spirit using a quote from Abraham Lincoln to tell me that if I was going to last in the ministry, I actually needed to follow Jesus’ words about loving others as myself, which required me to be a friend to myself. Some time later, I came across a quote from St. Bernard of Clairvaux, who talked about the three stages of love. In the first stage, we love God for our own sake, for what God can do for us – this is the great stage of televangelism. In the second stage, we love God for God’s own sake, for who God is in God’s own character and glory and beauty. It’s hard to imagine anything being greater than that, but Bernard said in the third stage, we love ourselves for God’s sake. It’s as if we join with God in seeing ourselves with love and compassion. Brothers and sisters, another way of saying above all else, guard well your heart, for from it flow the wellsprings of life is to say please be a friend to yourself. Realize that you are responsible for your own morale, and that if you aren’t a friend to

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yourself, you’ll sabotage the efforts of anyone else to befriend you, and you will fall pray to nibbling ducks. One of the best ways you can be a friend to yourself, of course, is to understand that when you are paid by anybody, the first thing that they’re paying you for is to be your own manager and to be a friendly manager. Second Friendship

Right along with that, I would encourage you, Class of 2010, to give yourself the gift of a few soul-friends. This is the second soul-guarding friendship I want to share with you. By soul-friends I mean people with whom you experience what one of my soul-friends calls a “nonutilitarian relationships.” You care about each other not for money, not for success, not for self-interest, not for “ministry,” but you care about each other because you like each other and you want what’s best for one another’s souls. These are people you stay in touch with through the years. You might not see each other for a year or two or three but whenever you meet, you pick up where you left off. You find yourself following, consciously or not, the old Quaker spiritual discipline of query, and you ask one another, not just “How is ministry?” or “How is the church?” but rather “How goes it with your soul?” My guess is that along with reams of notes and the beginnings of a great library and a fantastic GPA, you’ll take away with you from VTS some soul-friends. My guess is that, right now, you have them within

reach of your arms, soul-friends who will be one of the greatest legacies of your time here. They may even include a couple of faculty members. I’ve accumulated a half-dozen or so of these kinds of friends through the years, and I’ll tell you the truth: it’s worth buying a plane ticket and traveling anywhere in the world to have one day in the presence of a friend who cares about your soul, who knows you, and who will be your friend no matter what. So maybe before the day ends it wouldn’t be a bad thing to pull aside one of your fellow graduates and say, “Hey listen, let’s make a pact.” Not just to be old friends but to be soul-friends. If you want to guard your heart well, please be a friend to yourself, and please make and keep a few lifelong soul friends, and third – and this might surprise you – please have some friends outside the church. Third Friendship

A few years into pastoral ministry, I realized that all my friends were inside the church. I didn’t have any margin for friends on the outside. The truth is, I don’t think you can be a very good Christian if all your friends are Christians. And I don’t think you can be a very good pastor if you don’t have a life outside the church. Now I’d say that any friend you make outside the church would be really well-off having a having a seminary-trained friend – they come in handy in all kinds of times and places.


Photos by B. Cayce Ramey

But I’m less thinking of how they’ll need you and more of how you’ll need them. Of course, you’ll need them for perspective, because intra-church life can too easily become an obsession. You need to get out of the goldfish bowl sometimes and swim in the big river of the real world. Friends on the outside will help you do that. They’ll help you keep a life outside the church, and that’s important for your life inside the church. My friend Rob Bell says it in a memorable way that some of you won’t get (which is probably a good thing.) He says,“You have to smoke what you’re selling.” In other words, you can become so busy as a purveyor of the abundant life in Christ that you run out of time to actually enjoy the abundant life in Christ. You can get so busy talking about life in the Kingdom of God that you don’t participate in life in the Kingdom of God. You can be so busy organizing other people’s experience of the realm or dream of God that you actually forget to be a part of it yourself. Here’s how one of my mentors explained it to me: Think of three circles. A big one, a smaller one, and a smaller one still. The smallest circle is your job. That’s what you get paid to do. It’s important. It’s probably worth it when you end up at your first assignment to make sure that you know how many hours a week you’re being paid to work because if it’s 40, it’s important that you don’t work 39; if it’s 40 then it’s also important that you don’t work 60. You’re paid to do something and that part of your life is important. But the danger is that, if you love your work as I did in my 24 years

as a pastor, it’s too easy to let that work expand and soon take up the whole circle. It is important for you to keep the work that you are paid to do within boundaries.

“Your greatest asset in the years ahead will be your morale, your internal climate, the purity and constancy and buoyancy of the wellsprings of life that spring up from your innermost being.” The larger circle is your ministry. Hopefully, your work is part of your ministry, but that you also have ministry that you’re not getting paid for. It’s one of the occupational dangers of getting paid to be good. You forget how to be good for nothing. And it’s not good for the soul of a Christian—especially a Christian leader—if you only do good when you’re being paid to do it. That’s why a friend of mine, who was a mega-church pastor for many years, would sneak out on Saturday night, after the sermon was done, and would go to a little club that was the host for an Alcoholic’s Anonymous meeting. While the addicts

and alcoholics were having their meeting, it was his spiritual discipline to go into the bathrooms and scrub the toilets. And it was his way, on a Saturday night, of being a servant, off the clock. That helped him get up on Sunday morning, knowing that he had been good that week, that he had done an active service that he wasn’t getting paid for. So it’s important to have your work that you’re paid for but to also have a ministry that goes beyond. Now, let’s turn to the biggest circle, the circle of your life. That’s the circle that includes your parenthood, your marriage, your hobbies and interests. It’s the circle where you are just a human being. Just because you’re a Christian doesn’t mean that you are not a human being. Just because you are a priest does not mean that you are not a human being. This largest circle is an expression of your humanity as one of God’s creatures in God’s beautiful and fascinating world. In the little circle, you prepare sermons. In the larger circle, you do good that you don’t get paid to do – but in the largest circle you enjoy life. You pursue a human interest in antique cars or fishing or watercolor painting or birdwatching or playing tennis or hiking the Appalachian Trail or wine-making or Chinese calligraphy or historical biographies or following Lost. And in the largest circle you find friends outside the church who are drawn together simply for the love of that human interest. It’s not good for a banker’s life to be reduced to work. It’s not good for a real estate agent’s life to be reduced to work. It’s not good for a cabinet maker or doc-

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Commencement Address 2010

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rian McLaren graduated from the University of Maryland with degrees in English (BA, summa cum laude, 1978, and MA, magna cum laude, 1981). In addition to the Doctor of Divinity Degree, honoris causa, that he was awarded this year from VTS, Brian was also awarded a Doctor of Divinity Degree, honoris causa, from Carey Theological Seminary in Vancouver, BC, Canada in 2004. He began his career teaching college English. He left teaching in 1986 to become founding pastor of Cedar Ridge Community Church, an innovative, transdenominational church in the Baltimore-Washington region (crcc.org). The church grew to involve several hundred people, many of whom were previously unchurched. In 2006, he left the pastorate to devote full time to writing and speaking. He has written several books including The Secret Message of Jesus (Thomas Nelson, 2006), followed in 2007 by Everything Must Change: Jesus, Global Crises, and A Revolution of Hope. In 2008, he released Finding Our Way Again (Nelson, April 2008). These three books lay out a contemporary approach to the Christian life, message, and mission. In 2009, he co-edited The Justice Project (Baker), which brings together over 30 voices on the biblical vision of social justice. His 2010 book, A New Kind of Christianity: Ten Questions That Are Transforming the Faith, has been identified as one of his major works. In 2011, he will be releasing an important book on the spiritual life. He has served on the international steering team and board of directors for emergent, a growing generative friendship among missional Christian leaders (www.emergentvillage.com), and has served on several other nonprofit boards. . Brian is married to Grace, and they have four young adult children. His website is www.brianmclaren.net.

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tor’s life to be reduced to work. And it is not good for a clergy-person’s life to be reduced to work, and some non-church friends will help you be sure that doesn’t happen, and that will be good for your soul. Fourth Friendship

One last friendship needs to be mentioned. Yes, you need to be a friend to yourself, yes, you need a few soul-friends, and you need some friends outside the church too. But I was surprised to find out, when I went from being an English teacher bi-vocationally and being part of a little church planting team to becoming a full-time Christian pastor, how easy is it let your friendship with the living God languish. And that’s the fourth friendship that I want to mention. I want to tell you something, by way of testimony, by way of proclamation. This isn’t a proposition of scholarship that I can prove to you. It’s a tenet of faith I can only proclaim to you. Are you ready? Here it is: God is friendly. The living God is friendly. That’s what Jesus reveals to us in the gospel story that we heard a few minutes ago. Jesus, the Word of God, Jesus, the image of God, Jesus, the radiance of God’s glory, Jesus, the incarnation of God, Jesus, word made flesh … is friendly. And that means God is friendly. When those friends bring that paralyzed man on his stretcher to Jesus, Jesus allies himself with them to help the paralyzed man. Jesus joins their friendship. He was known as a friend of sinners, you’ll recall, and that’s good news for all of us sinners. People will sometimes bless you, sometimes betray you, sometimes forget about you, and sometimes disappoint you. But God is friendly and faithfully friendly. Abraham knew this, and was called the friend of God. Moses knew this, and spoke to God as a person speaks with a friend. That paralyzed man knew this, when Jesus wasn’t bothered by the roof being opened up, but healed him and forgave him that

day. And I know this, because I have experienced forgiveness and friendship from God through Jesus Christ. And so I ask you to imagine yourself as that paralyzed man in the gospel story. You’ve been lowered down from the roof and are on the ground in your stretcher. You look up to one corner, and there you see your own face, because you have to be a friend to yourself; you look to another corner, and there you see a soul-friend, maybe someone here in this room today, someone who is going to stick with you through the years ahead; you look to the

“But I was surprised to find out... how easy is it let your friendship with the living God languish.” third corner, and there you see someone who doesn’t go to church, just a normal, regular human being with whom you share an interest, and who is going to be important in your spiritual life in the years ahead; and then, you look in the fourth corner. There, in the face of Jesus, you see the friendliness of God radiating to you. And so it is to God’s friendship that I commend you now. Surrounded by those four friends, your heart will be well guarded in whatever you ministry will be, and the wellsprings of life will flow, and all will not be easy, but all will be well. Amen. The Rev. Brian D. McLaren is the, founder of the Cedar Ridge Community Church in Maryland and one of the founders of the Emerging Church movement. He is also an author, speaker, pastor, and networker among Christian leaders, thinkers, and activists. This year, Virginia Theological Seminary conferred a Doctors in Divinity, honoris causa upon Mr. McLaren.

Photo by B. Cayce Ramey


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MISSIONARY SOCIETY@VTS

Established in 1835, the Missionary Society at Virginia Theological Seminary provides a link between those in the mission field and members of the seminary community through grants, theological book drives, forums, presentations, interaction with missionary organizations, prayer and an annual Eucharist.

E

ach year, grant requests from around the world are submitted to Virginia Theological Seminary’s Missionary Society. The grant applications must demonstrate that the project includes spreading the Good News of Jesus Christ by word or deed as an important part of the overall effort; that the project has well-defined goals and states clearly how funds will be used; and that the project will either be completed with the funds given or stimulate further giving on the part of other organizations. Another consideration is if the grant is for meeting capital costs or can show that the project will become self-supporting (rather

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than remain dependent on outside maintenance.) A subcommittee of the Missionary Society Council, chaired this year by George Hinchliffe, met to review the grants and make recommendations to the council. The council then met for conversation about the grants and voted to: "recommend full funding of the following grant proposals: Vision Conference on Sustainable Housing-Lakota Reservation, SD; São Paulo Mission Bakery, Brazil; San Marcos School, Dominican Republic; La Resurrection, Gros Morne, Haiti." For the week proceeding the annual Community


Eucharist and community vote, information about the grants and council members were made available during lunches in Scott Lounge. A community vote approving the grants was cast on Friday, March 12th. Grants Awarded this year: São Paulo Mission Bakery – Brazil

The goals of this Conference are to consider ways "to design a form of housing that is economically sustainable; ecologically responsible; and culturally resonant for the Lakota people." In the grant application it is written that "conversation about the project began as a result of a series of events related to VTS: continuing conversation over time between Borderlands Director Linda Kramer and VTS faculty member Bob Prichard, a crosscultural internship of a VTS student at the Borderlands, increased discussion in the role of ecology and religion sparked by the Kreitler Lecture series, and the visit on the VTS campus of Robert Two Bulls (who will serve as chaplain to this project.) The Conference has been funded by another source, and this grant will provide scholarships to Native Americans to attend the conference. Grant: $1,000

San Marcos School – Dominican Republic San Marcos Episcopal Church and School in Haina, Dominican Republic is home to 325 members and 750 school children. The goal of this project to remove hazardous electrical wiring and modernize electricity for this church school. Members of the congregation will provide the labor. In addition to creating a safer environment for those who use the space, this project will enable San Marcos to increase its school rankings and to receive short-term mission groups. Grant: $3,000 La Resurrection School – Gros Morne, Haiti La Resurrection School in Gros Morne, Haiti serves 650 children and is supported in part by a 25-year relationship with St. Martin's-in-the-Fields Church (MD). The original grant request was for funds to finish the second story of several school buildings; the grant is now for renovations to restore the classrooms to full use. Grant: $3,000

Photo by Leslie Steffensen

Started by a small group of women, the cooperative community bakery at São Pedro Apostolo Mission Church in Curitbia, Brazil bakes bread in the church kitchen selling it to the residents of one the cities poorest neighborhoods for "the price people can afford to pay, sometimes pennies and far less than the cost to produce it." The bakery currently receives no outside support and this grant is primarily for more modern baking equipment so that this church kitchen which feeds the poor and provides local employment can be self-sustaining. Grant: $1,820

Vision Conference on Sustainable Housing – Lakota Reservation, SD

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VIRGINIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Missionary Society Grant Information

Established in 1835, The Missionary Society of Virginia Theological Seminary provides a link between those in the mission field and members of the seminary community. The funds for the Missionary Society grants are received from weekly offerings during the worship life of the Seminary community. In the recent past, grants have averaged between $2,000 and $3,000. Grant requests, including both the application form and the project description should be received by January 31st. The VTS Missionary Society will select the projects to be funded by April of the following year. All applicants will be notified as to whether or not they will receive a grant. The Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia grants funding for certain missionary projects. The following constitute the criteria for receiving funding of missionary projects: To be eligible for consideration, grant applications MUST be able to demonstrate that: the project includes spreading the Good News of Jesus Christ by word or deed as an important part of the overall effort and that the project has well-defined goals and state clearly how funds will be used. In addition, applications must be complete, including being approved and signed by the bishop or other appropriate authority, as determined by the Mission Council; grants will not be made to the same program or site for more than two consecutive years; and grants will not be awarded directly to any individual for personal use. In order to select recipients among the applicants, preference will be given to projects which meet the greatest number of the following criteria: • Will either be completed with the funds given or stimulate further giving on the part of other organizations; • If the grant is for meeting capital costs, through meeting capital costs, the project will become self-supporting (rather than remain dependent on outside maintenance); • Indicate pioneer efforts in facing new circumstances or strong opposition; • Will be implemented outside the United States. Those who would like to apply for a modest grant should complete the one page application form and requested background information. Inquiries may be made by email (missionarysociety@vts.edu), but applications must be mailed or faxed to: The Missionary Society, Attn: Grants Committee Virginia Theological Seminary Seminary Post Office Alexandria, Virginia 22304, U.S.A. Fax: 703-370-6234 20  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL


VIRGINIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Missionary Society Grant Application (PLEASE PRINT OR TYPE)

Name and address of the organization (or individual) for which the grant is requested: ____________ _________________________________________________________________________________ Amount requested (in U.S. Dollars): ___________________________________________________ Are you requesting assistance from any other grant organization for this project ? If yes, please describe:

Yes

No

Have you previously applied for or received a grant from VTS Missionary Society? If yes, please describe:

Yes No

What connection, if any, does the organization named above have to VTS?

The name, title, address and e-mail address of the person completing the form, along with your relationship to the project. Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Title: ___________________________________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________________ Email: __________________________________________________________________________ Relationship to Project: ____________________________________________________________ Please attach a one-to-two page, detailed description of the project. Include the project goals, a time line of implementation, the number and type of people who would benefit and how the project relates to the mission of the church. Photographs are welcome and may be submitted digitally. Signature of Supervising Officer or Bishop: _____________________________________________ Name and Title of Supervising Officer or Bishop: ________________________________________ In the event of approval, information regarding where funds should be sent: Bank name and address: ____________________________________________________________ Account name and number: _________________________________________________________ Bank SWIFT Code: _______________________________________________________________ Applicant signature:__________________________________ Date:_________________________

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An Interreligious Peacebuilding Conference sponsored by

Msalato Theological Seminary & Virginia Theological Seminary

blessed are the

Peacemakers by the Rev. Robin Gulick

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VTS in Tanzania

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his summer, over 55 Christian and Muslim leaders from Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania gathered together for three days of community building, networking and professional development in Dodoma, Tanzania. The conference, largely focused on conflict analysis and peacebuilding, was organized by the Msalato Theological College in Dodoma and the Virginia Theological Seminary and hosted by Bishop Mdimi Mhogolo and the Anglican Diocese of Central Tanganyika. “The foundations of our faiths - one God, one world, one humanity and one heaven – are strong and everlasting realities that can enhance peace on earth,” said Bishop Mhogolo in his opening remarks. “We have to learn to come together regularly and renew ourselves for cooperation in keeping and preserving peace in our world.” Providing time for renewal was a primary goal of conference organizers. There are so few opportunities to get together for rest and renewal given the busy demands of religious work in Africa and around the globe. The setting for the conference provided beautiful grounds for Christian and Muslim colleagues to get to know one another more deeply, learn together and share fellowship during meals, tea breaks and World Cup Soccer. It was also a time for VTS alumni to get meet again! Four alumni from Kenya, two from Malawi and two from Tanzania gathered together for this important conference. They expressed sincere gratitude for this rare opportunity to see old friends and colleagues once more. During one evening meal, the VTS alumni gathered with the Rev. Dr. Barney Hawkins to talk about current and new directions for VTS. Each alum was also given a copy of either Christ and Culture, Communion after Lambeth or Staying One, Remaining Open: Educating Leaders for a 21st Century Church – two books which capture the work

and ministry of VTS and the Center for Anglican Communion Studies. Along with participants from Msalato, other theological schools throughout Tanzania and the Program on Christian and Muslim Relations in Africa (PROCMURA), each of the VTS alumni participating in the conference were invited to identify at least one Muslim counterpart from their community to join them at the conference. Because of these efforts, over 20 Muslim clergy and scholars from the three East African countries came to Dodoma to participate in the conference.

It is important not to be misled by this; although the peace-building process is significantly assisted if the leaders on both sides are signed up to it, and what happened was the best possible start, there is nevertheless a mountain of ignorance, superstition and potential ill-will out there which it is frighteningly easy for an extremist on either side to manipulate.”

The professional development component of the conference included discussions of conflict analysis, conflict transformation and reconciliation. At the end of the conference, participants were able to formulate and develop action steps that will allow relationships to deepen through continued mutual engagement. “The conference left me, and most others I am sure, with a real sense of optimism for future progress in Christian-Muslim understanding, friendship and reconciliation,” said David Boorman, an English missionary currently working with Msalato. “Not only is this crucial for Africa’s future peace and prosperity, there are also common enemies in HIV/AIDS, drug and alcohol addiction, family breakdown, and poverty, which we can most effectively fight together.” “However, a note of warning should also be sounded,” cautioned Boorman. “The mood of the conference was very upbeat and positive, quite possibly more so than anyone expected. However, it is easy to become lulled into a false sense of security by a successful event, which was very well led by a skilled team, held in beautiful and comfortable surroundings, and attended by what was effectively the intelligentsia from both sides. This may well have created an impression for at least some of those present that the task ahead of us will be easy, or at least easier than anticipated.

These sentiments expressed by Boorman echoed an earlier comment from Bishop Mhogolo, “When the notions of domination, control and favoritism become the driving forces for political gain, a meeting like this is very helpful in trying to balance those destructive powers of greed, pride, and domination that threaten our countries.” Each of the participants left the conference having completed three days of conflict analysis and peacebuilding training. The conference was facilitated by a wellknown theologian and peacebuilder, The Rev. Chris Ahrends. Rev. Ahrends was previously the Executive Director of the

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Photos by Leslie Steffensen and James Livingston

Mission: Tanzania

Desmond Tutu Peace Centre in Cape Town, SA; and Sub Dean at St. George’s Cathedral, Cape Town and Chaplain to Archbishop Desmond Tutu. At the beginning of the conference, Rev. Ahrends introduced himself as a bus driver; he did not see himself as teacher imparting his knowledge on the participants. Rather he saw himself as someone guiding the participants on a journey. Though he had a good idea of the terrain, he only drove where his passengers told him to go! Whether it was providing helpful metaphors for describing conflict situations or highlighting principles of successful peacebuilding initiatives, the facilitation was directed towards tapping into the

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profound knowledge and experience of the leaders gathered together in the conference hall. This way of organizing and leading a conference was new to many of the participants, but it was very well received. In their evaluations of the conference, participants expressed the fact that they felt like they were able to contribute a lot of their own ideas and experiences, while also learning new ways of thinking about religion, conflict and peace. In a reflection presented during an evening ceremony a small group of participants crafted a statement which read in part “We need to work towards creating an atmosphere of positive tolerance, acceptance, respect for diversity, responsibility for our actions or inactions, justice, equity, harmony, tranquility, peace and peace-

ful coexistence. We as a group, commit ourselves to these values, and call on our fellow participants to buy into it and ensure that we propagate it far and wide, in the recognition that peace is not something for which we wish. It is something for which we work and something for which we live.” In a room filled with candlelight, this reflection was presented alongside poems, songs and readings from the Quran and the Bible. The next day the rest of the participants agreed it captured well the will and feelings of all those gathered. The conference was organized as part of a three-year grant to VTS from the Henry Luce Foundation. The overall goal of this grant is to encourage greater interreligious sensitivities at VTS and assist in fostering interreligious understanding between Anglican and Muslim communities around


VTS in Tanzania

Back together again: Several VTS graduates and friends attended the conference including (from left to right) Bishop Mhogolo, the Rev. Yohana Mtokambali (‘09, Tanzania), the Rev. Daniel Munene (‘08, Kenya), Bishop Johannes Angela (‘88, Kenya), the Rev. Evans Kachiwanda (‘04, Malawi, crouched), the Rev. Barney Hawkins from Virginia Seminary, the Rev. Samuel Sudhe (‘07, Kenya), the Rev. Mary Tororeiy (‘09, Kenya), and the Rev. Martin Kalimbe (‘06, Malawi). Left: the Rev. Robin Gulick (‘08) discusses the lecture plan with facilitator, the Rev. Chris Ahrends of South Africa. The conference took place at St. Gaspars conference center in Dodoma, Tanzania.

the world through research, education and dialogue. Two relevant objectives of the grant that were met by this conference include: 1. Introduce the challenge of interreligious dialogue to VTS and prepare our students and other members of the Anglican Church to engage in informed dialogue with the Muslim community in the United States and around the world, considering the inherent tensions between evangelism in the Anglican tradition and respect for the other. 2. Provide opportunities for Anglican and Muslim leaders to come together to discuss difficult issues facing religious communities worldwide, identify shared values and religious convictions, and pave a way forward built on mutual trust and understanding. X

Impromptu Tour by David Boorman

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n inspiration by the host Bishop Mhogolo (above, left) of Dodoma on the first afternoon was a spurof-the-moment tour of Dodoma. Two buses were conjured up at short notice and we set off on a drive around the currently under construction University of Dodoma (spectacularly materializing in the barren bush on a 50 square mile site), followed by a tour of the biggest Dodoma mosque, known as the Gad-

dafi mosque in honor of its benefactor, Colonel Gaddafi of Libya, and finally one of the Anglican cathedral. In true African fashion the whole thing was arranged on a whim and implemented with no consideration of time – in the West the idea would have been vetoed when first mooted (early afternoon) as the timetable had been carefully arranged months previously. Off we all set at 15:45, and in view of the ambitious itinerary being loudly formulated off-the-cuff by the bishop and other local delegates keen to show off the place, clearly with no hope whatsoever of getting back to the conference centre for dinner at 19:00! Ah well, this is Africa, you go with the flow! The incorrigible bishop did an absolutely excellent job as tour guide, embarking on a loud and hilarious commentary which effectively broke any remaining ice, cracking jokes in true Tanzanian

fashion which would have had a Western audience at such a “sensitive” event wincing (e.g. – pointing at the grounds of a passing mosque – “I think I will build an even bigger cathedral here!” – to loud guffaws from the assembled Christian and Muslim delegates alike). We were greatly honored by the way the Imam of the Gaddafi mosque opened up his magnificent building to us – it was stunningly beautiful and quite possibly unheard of for Christians – including women – to be invited in and allowed to take photos. I will cherish the memory of the Imam posing for photos arm-in-arm with Anglican clergy. The Anglican cathedral is less prepossessing but the Muslims had largely never been inside a Christian church before and were clearly fascinated – I overheard one saying with surprise after looking through a prayer-book “They really do confess their sins like us!” The lengths to which both the bishop and the Imam had gone to welcome those of the other religion well demonstrated the extent to which reconciliation is desired by both sides. Fall 2010

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Mission: Tanzania

STICKS AND STONES, BOILED WOOL, BORROWED CHAIRS, AND A STRAW HAT by the Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D.

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his summer I had the good fortune of representing the Seminary at a partnership signing at St. George’s College in Jerusalem. I also participated in a Christian-Muslim Conference which VTS sponsored in Dodoma, Tanzania. I always learn so much when I travel. I like connecting with old friends and meeting new people. New cities give me energy and I like to encounter the cuisines of countries so very different from our own. I was reminded this summer that the ministry of the Church and God’s mission in the world are more about faith in God and the hearts of people than doctrine and resources. We talk often about having adequate resources for ministry. Sometime we mean people, paid staff and volunteers who deliver the Church’s ministry and who participate in God’s mission in the world. Often, however, we mean resources which help people in their ministry and mission. For example, a parish decides to do “Godly Play” and goes on a buying spree to get all the supplies; a community decides that it wants to build a labyrinth and realizes the cost can be quite high; when prayer books get tattered in the pew, we replace them. And so it goes. People cannot “do” ministry without resources—human and otherwise. That’s a given. Yes, dioceses, churches, schools and all the institutions of the Church need resources. But I learned this summer that faith and heart can make resources from very little. Let me give you four examples of using what we have to do the work that God gives us to do. While in Jerusalem, I took a solo walk one afternoon in the lively Old City, trekking

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‘03) across the country’s rugged terrain to Handali, a rural village that I do not think is even on the world’s map. We had a healthy lunch of grilled goat, spicy vegetables, rice and very fresh bananas in the home of Deacon Ayubu and his family. They borrowed spoons and chairs to give us the best hospitality possible. I learned that Christian hospitality does not depend upon elaborate resources, sterling silver services, catered food and fresh flowers. (I always preach to myself!) Deacon Ayubu took what he had and borrowed from neighbors to set a bountiful table. My body and soul were graciously fed.

down the ancient Via Dolorosa, talking to the vendors, and enjoying their wares in little shops. As some of you know, I am always looking for a crèche or nativity set to add to my collection. In one shop, on the floor, I found a rustic crèche that was a cave with Mary, Joseph, Baby Jesus, and two lambs. I was told that it had been made out of left-over boiled wool by handicapped and mentally-challenged children in war-torn Gaza, a place of limited resources. It takes a lot of faith and heart to make a crèche that inspires and recalls the holy family—but it takes not much more. Left-over wool will do. Of course I bought the crèche.

After lunch we went to church. The building had a dirt floor and no chairs or pews. The chairs from lunch were brought from Ayubu’s house to the sanctuary/chancel area for the service. The sermon was given by Ms. Susan Lukens, one of our gifted D.Min. students, with the help of Anna, a very bright student from Msalato Theological College. Susan and Anna used Godly Play to tell the story of the good shepherd which was the theme of the day’s lessons. No fancy supplies—only ordinary rope, ribbons, clay, sticks and stones. It was a truly moving proclamation of the Good News of Jesus Christ. With faith, heart and imagination, Susan and Anna found resources enough to communicate with a congregation eager to know more about Jesus and his parables.

In Dodoma, Tanzania, I participated in a Christian-Muslim Conference which VTS hosted with the Diocesan Bishop (The Rt. Rev. Gmidimi Mhogolo of the Diocese of Central Tanganyka) and our valued Anglican Communion partner, Msalato Theological College and its principal (The Rev. Moses Matonya). One day I traveled with the incredible Rev. Sandra McCann (VTS

After the service, as we greeted the congregation, I stood to the side, observing, seeking some shade, and wearing my straw hat. Suddenly, I was surrounded by small children—lots of them! For some reason, I took off my fancy hat and placed it on the head of a small child, then another child and another—and a game of the Straw Hat happened before my eyes.


VTS in Tanzania

Some children were reluctant to have a hat on their head for the first time in their lives. But there was lots of laughing and lots of dancing. The game had energy, noise, movement and not an end in sight! At one point I said to Deacon Ayubu, “I think I will give the children my hat.” He quickly said, “Oh, they will tear it to shreds for all of them want the hat!” I decided to give the hat to Deacon Ayubu and presented it to him as though it were a great trophy of a new game in the village of Handali. The children cheered, Deacon Ayubu was grateful and my heart was glad. Games do not have to come from stores or from boxes. Games can come from what we already have. A fancy Straw Hat can become a prop for a wonderful game— creating moments of laughter and joy. I

shall never forget the game of the Straw Hat in the village of Handali. Utilizing what we have or can find— boiled wool, borrowed chairs and spoons, sticks and stones, and a straw hat—for ministry and mission: that’s what I learned this summer. The common is holy. Leftovers can become works of art. The ordinary can be quite beautiful. Even a Straw Hat can become something for a game, or a story, or perhaps a memory. Finally, we can find Christ is such unlikely places: in the handiwork of a simple crèche, in the joy of a lunch lovingly served, in a sermon of sticks and stones and in a game of the Straw Hat. It was Frank Weston, bishop of Zanzibar from 1908 until his death in 1924 who once challenged his fellow Anglicans to find Christ in the sacraments but also in the deprived and destitute. He

pleaded with his Church: “You have your Mass, you have your altars, you have begun to get your tabernacles. Now go out into the highways and hedges, and look for Jesus in the ragged and the naked, in the oppressed and the sweated, in those who have lost hope, and in those who are struggling to make good. Look for Jesus in them….” Weston’s invitation is worth hearing again. While we look for Jesus in cities and villages like Handali, I invite us to utilize what we have already in hand for the ministry and mission we are called to do. We have enough already to do what God wants us to do—or at least to get started. X To view photos from the VTS Tanzania trip, visit the Media Gallery at www.vts.edu.

Fall 2010

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Mission: Tanzania

REFLECTIONS ON TANZANIA

by James Livingston (VTS ‘11)

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ou live in an Ivory Tower," the driver said as we made our way through Dodoma, Tanzania. The words were not meant to offend, but they made me defensive. I'm proud of the dear seminary you're bashing, sir! I preferred to think of my seminary doing great things, forming God's people, preparing ourselves to make a difference in the world in the name of Christ. And indeed it has been, since 1823. Yet its history is not as pristine as I would have hoped. Records of the purchase of slaves for work are tangible, a slave trade that wound its way through Stonetown, Zanzibar, an island off the east coast of Tanzania. There, slaves had been marched for hundreds of miles from the mainland, to wait in cramped, underground pits that lie beneath the water level so that the tide would wash out the waste that accumulated in a barely ventilated room. Where was their Ivory Tower, I wondered? How can we reconcile past atrocities with modern development?

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The story of slavery ended in Stonetown in 1887 when the altar of the Anglican Cathedral was erected atop the very spot that slaves were shown, tested, beaten for sale. In the narthex stands a baptismal font replacing the well in which infant children were sacrificed in hopes of better profit. Half way between the font and altar, reaching high to heaven, stands a stainedglass window and beneath it, a well-polished plaque. Both are dedicated to a man who is considered by the people of Zanzibar to be instrumental in the abolishment of the slave trade, by raising awareness in the English people and amassing support from afar. This man was Dr. David Livingstone, and I am his descendant. On the opposite wall from this window stands a cross made from the wood of a tree from Zambia, the tree that is rumored to have been planted and nourished by the heart of David Livingstone after his death. As his heart remains in Africa, so too does mine. In the midst of abject poverty and an

endless struggle to provide for the basic necessities of life, a village called Handali stands 100 kilometers from the political capital of Tanzania called Dodoma. There the grounds are dusty and red, and the wind that sweeps through in early July serves only to stir up the dry ground within the windowless and doorless church that is the village center. And yet, when amenities are furthest from your reach, you are struck by the Spirit in a place like this! The people greet you with the radical hospitality that we are striving for at coffee hour. Genuine, unabashed, unreservedly eager faces smile at you from hundreds of children and adults. And in that place, sharing in the Eucharist with the entire town, all pretenses are stripped away. In Christ we are brothers and sisters alike. The same meal of everlasting life is shared, whether it be within an open church with dirt floors or an Ivory Tower. No matter what history I may carry in my bloodline, the work of Christ remains vibrant and alive, from Hindali to Holy Hill. X


a world of welcome Virginia Theological Seminary celebrates 101 years of welcoming international students from around the globe.

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he Center for Anglican Communion Studies is very pleased to welcome this academic year’s incoming International Students. This year is a “bumper crop” year as we have five students entering the Master’s in Theological Studies (MTS) program. Pictured in order: The Rev. Joel Ochieng Atong is a parish priest and vicar of St. Paul's Church Kiembeni in the Anglican Diocese of Mombasa. He has a wife Tabitha and three children Grace, Rosemary, and Phanuel. He is a graduate of St. Paul’s University, Limuru, Kenya. While at VTS, Atong intends to concentrate on Biblical Studies with special emphasis in New Testament. He discovered VTS through our website. Atong says he was impressed by VTS’ rich history. Mr. Edgardo Cedeno is a lifelong Episcopalian from Cuba. Cedona studied at the Seminario Evangelico de Teologia in Matanzas, Cuba. He soon became aware of the limited resources in his homeland to further his studies in Anglicanism. “The Church’s context and a global understanding of the Anglican Communion surfaced in my vocation as a central theme from which I am call to minister,” says Cedeno. “The Post Graduate Diploma in Theology at Virginia Theological Seminary attracted me as a program that will allow me a deeper understanding of this great Anglican/Episcopal tradition and equip me further to fulfill God’s call in my faith journey.” He studied in an intensive English program at the University of Toronto, Canada and completed the program this summer. Ms. Florence Jee is Malaysian Chinese who has been living and working in Hong Kong. She has been most recently serving at the Holy Trinity Cathedral of the Anglican (Episcopal) Diocese of Eastern Kowloon, Province of Hong Kong. Jee first heard about the MTS program at VTS through meeting Dr. John Yieh, professor of New Testament. She intends to concentrate on Christian Education. Jee believes “VTS will not

only provide practical and relevant training for ministry, it will enrich my understanding of the Anglican Communion through the community life and other learning experiences throughout my campus life these two years.” The Rev. Adolfo Moronta is originally from New York City. His parents moved their large family back to the Dominican Republic when he was thirteen years old. Moronta has three bachelors’ degrees in Hotel Administration, Philosophy and Theology. He is a deacon who has been working in two congregations, San Pedro y San Pablo and San Felipe Apóstol, parish communities “situated on the outskirts of the city of Santo Domingo and in impoverished areas where many people live on the banks of the Ozama River.” He also works on the Communications Committee of the Dominican Episcopal Church, on the Church newspaper “Episcopax”, and on the Micro Credit Committee that has provided loans to 134 families in the past years. He first heard of VTS through the January Term crosscultural immersion students at El Centro de Esudios Teologicos. The Rev. Sonley Joseph is from Lascahobas, a town in central Haiti has a bachelor’s degree in law which allowed him to work as a defender of many poor people who could not pay for the services of a regular lawyer in his hometown. Joseph worked as a literature teacher from 2001 to 2005. He followed his call to the priesthood in 2005 and studied at the Seminaire de Theologie de l’Eglise Episcopale d’Haiti. Through a grant to VTS from the Carpenter Foundation, Joseph has been living on campus since January 2010 while studying in an intensive ESL course at Northern Virginia Community College. Joseph wishes “to give a hearty thank you to my generous sponsors for helping me accomplish my academic goals.” Now entering the MTS program, Joseph will concentrate on systematic theology.

Fall 2010

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journey to jerusalem By Kathryn Glover & Amelia J. Dyer, Ph.D.

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his past June, Amy Dyer and I traveled to Israel to represent the Dean at the signing of an agreement with St. George’s College in Jerusalem which commits the two organizations to providing educational opportunities for members of the Seminary community at St. George’s College. Bishop Suheil Dawani, Anglican bishop in Jerusalem, signed the agreement as we looked on. The Rev. Barney Hawkins, representing the North American Regional Committee of St. George’s College which was holding a meeting at the College, was also present at the signing. The agreement was prepared in consultation with Bishop Dawani and Dr. Stephen Need, dean of St. George’s College, during their visit to the VTS campus in late February. Our conversations with Bishop Dawani and Dean Need in February encompassed the Seminary’s deep desire to support St. George’s College invaluable role and mission. Our partnership with St. George’s formalizes a relationship that has been in existence for many, many years. Students and faculty from VTS have traveled to Jerusalem to participate in a two-week course focusing on the Gospel story of the life of Jesus within the geographical context of that story. The text of this important agreement states: In response to our kinship in Christ and out of a shared commitment to the Gospel, St. George’s College and Virginia Theological Seminary agree to work together to provide educational opportunities for members of the Seminary family. In partnership, VTS and St. George’s will provide an important piece in the formation of both current and future ordained and lay Photo by Kathryn Glover

leaders of the Episcopal Church: the appreciation of the significance of the Holy Land both as part of our past and as part of our future. This partnership will also seek to deepen the future connection and support of St. George’s College and the Anglican Church in the Holy Land through the extensive network of VTS alumni. In support of the agreement, VTS guarantees tuition for 10 participants each year for three years for enrollment in a course entitled Studies in the Land of the Holy One. The course is open to all members of the VTS community—students, faculty, staff and alumni. Should 10 tuition paying participants not emerge, VTS has agreed to pay the tuition for the remaining places guaranteeing income to the College in support of its programs. As part of its mission, VTS is committed to serving the Anglican Communion and the wider Church by providing an ecumenical, international, and cross-cultural context for theological education. Establishing partnerships with institutions around the Anglican Communion is one way in which VTS is creating, developing and maintaining relationships with our brothers and sisters whose cultural and religious contexts are different from that of the Episcopal Church in the United States. These partnerships offer a unique opportunity for VTS students to participate in cross-cultural immersions as a means of experiencing the Anglican Church in other parts of the world and understanding better the influence that indigenous cultures have on religious expression. On the following pages, Katie Lasseron and Amy Dyer share their experiences during their first trip to the Holy Land. Fall 2010

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Mission: Jerusalem

other travelers.

Walking In Faith Reflections on a first-time visit to the Holy Land. by Kathryn Glover

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ots of people I know have dreamt about going to the Holy Land and walking where Jesus walked. My own trip to Israel and Jordan was not a dream fulfilled but an opportunity I had not expected to ever have. To stand in the Dead Sea and to walk and wonder in Petra were two things I never thought I would do; I could not be more grateful for both experiences. My time in the Holy Land was more complicated than merely marveling at God’s creation and the gift of innovation and skill that God has bestowed upon each and every one of us. Walking in the Old City of Jerusalem I had a sense of people of different beliefs and lifestyles living together with ease and comfort, yet outside those same walls I felt a sense of segregation and discomfort. It left me feeling uneasy and this unease only increased the day I traveled to Bethlehem. The source of my discomfort was two-fold. First, there was the wall. Why? Do we need a wall anywhere to separate one people from another? Is anything accomplished by building a wall? Does it 32  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

really deter anyone from doing whatever the wall has been erected to prevent? Seeing the “Yes We Can” and “I have a dream” statements on the wall brought my thoughts to my own country where we too are contemplating the construction of a wall to keep out unwanted immigrants. The juxtaposition left me with such mixed emotions. How could we use God’s gifts of innovation and skill to build walls to separate God’s people one from another? The second source of discomfort was my own inability to feel anything at those places which are believed to be the location of the birth and crucifixion of our Lord. To watch people venerate a place or an actual spot left me wondering about myself and my faith. I carried those doubts and questions with me for the remainder of my stay in Jerusalem and my general discomfort only increased as I went through the steps to leave Israel. The general suspicion that I felt at moments walking through parts of East Jerusalem was mirrored in the faces of the security guards inspecting my luggage and questioning

Almost three weeks after my departure from Israel (by way of Ghana and France) I found myself sitting in a pew in my parish church listening to the parable of the Good Samaritan. All of a sudden it clicked…I made the connection. The way from Jerusalem to Jericho was no longer an idea but a reality. I traveled the road from Jerusalem to Jericho and could now picture it all as if I were there. Now I get what some of my fellow travelers in Israel meant when they said “you’ll get the bug to come back.” I have already said that I would like to go back, but the next time I will go prepared…prepared for the political and human reality that is Israel in its entirety and prepared to have the story of our Lord brought to life by merely being where he was and walking where he and so many others have walked in faith. X


VTS in Jerusalem

Jerusalem’s Thick Places

by Amy J. Dyer, Ph.D. I found the tomb to be a “thick place” where layers and layers of tradition and marble have defined this place for centuries. To meet God in this sacred place one has to peel back the layers of tradition laid down by the many different Christian churches that worship and care for the Tomb. I had the same feeling a few days later when I entered the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem.

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his was my first trip to the Holy Land. I had seen pictures and heard stories from many who had visited years ago and from those who had just returned last January - how their time in that place had transformed their lives. I had also heard stories of the difficulties in getting in and out of Israel and the tensions that are ever present. I was traveling alone, something I am used to doing, but my anxiety increased as I set off from London to Tel Aviv. Arriving in the early afternoon, I learned that through some miscommunication, I would not be met at the airport but would have to make my own way to Jerusalem and St. George’s College. I did find my way thanks to an American student traveling to the same vicinity. The land was hot and dry, the hills barren and brown. We traveled on highways that could have been in the American southwest. I arrived at St. Georges’ in the cool of the evening and was surprised by the beautiful gardens that occupied the grounds.

Early the next day I ventured on my own into the Old City of Jerusalem, a short walk from the college. There are no street signs in the Old City, so I wandered about, stopping at the British-owned Garden of the Tomb and at a cafe where I had the best falafel I’d ever tasted. In the early afternoon I found my way to the Church of the Resurrection and entered with what seemed like thousands of people into the coolness of the Church. People were everywhere. I found myself in a stream of humanity, speaking many different languages, and wearing various forms of dress. I had plenty of time to observe as the line moved slowly for more than an hour. I have spent a great deal of time in “thin places”— Iona in Scotland and Glendalough, in Ireland, where people say that the veil between heaven and earth is so thin that you can almost move back and forth.

In addition to the layers of Christian tradition that cover these Holy Places, the political layers and tensions of a place sacred to three major religious faiths also helps to create even further distance from what I believe God wants for his people. The metal detector and security checkpoint to enter the portion of the city where the Western Wall is located, and then the prohibition of women from getting near the wall, prevented me from adding my prayers to those of others? The security guard who stopped me from walking down what seemed to be an ordinary street, saying “only Muslims”; the modern Wall that now separates Jerusalem from Bethlehem; and the tensions that are present almost everywhere only seem to separate people from God. The agreement VTS has signed with St. George’s can help leaders in the Church to understand the situation and the issues that are ever present in the Holy Land. The streets where Jesus walked and the places where he prayed can connect us with the scriptures in a deeper way, but the interactions with people of faith are the main way that we in our time will come to understand God’s call to us to seek peace and justice in the world. X

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VTS in Hong Kong: Learning About the Church in China by the Rev. John Yueh-Han Yieh, Ph.D.

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n the spring of 2008, I spent a semester as visiting professor doing research for my sabbatical project on Chinese biblical interpretation at the Chung Chi College Divinity School of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. While there, I began to see the important ministry in education of the Hong Kong Sheng Kong Hui (The Anglican/Episcopal Church of Hong Kong) that owns more than a hundred schools. Since VTS had just started a D.Min. program in Educational Leadership, with the encouragement of Dr. Sedgwick and Dean Markham, Dr. David Gortner and I began to plan for a visit to Hong Kong. Last year, on October 20-25, we visited the Most Revd. Paul Kwong, and the principal of Minghwa Theological College, the Very Rev. Ian Lam, to introduce our D.Min. programs to their clergy and school chaplains. As a result, one priest has committed to attend our D.Min. program this year, and a student has entered our M.Div. program. As we move forward, more ways of cooperation and exchange will be discussed to strengthen our relationship to that province. In Hong Kong,

we also visited Lutheran Theological Seminary and Chung Chi College Divinity School, both of which expressed strong desire to make connections with us, too. On October 26-31, 2009, we traveled on to China to visit the Rev. Kan Baoping, Secretary General of the China Christian Council in Shanghai and were invited to give talks on biblical studies and evangelism at Nanjing Union Theological Seminary, receiving very warm hospitality from their faculty and students. VTS graduates were the first missionary bishops in China in mid 19th century who established churches, schools, and universities with good success. After a long interval, it is high time for our seminary to reconnect with the church in Hong Kong and China. A cross-cultural and immersion trip for our faculty, students, and alums is being planned to visit Hong Kong and China in May/June of 2011. It will be a great opportunity to broaden our cultural horizon as well as deepen our understanding of God’s work in a radically changing society and an emerging power in the global south. X

MEETING CHINA “It was the period between 1827 and 1841 that graduates went out to Greece, to China, and to Africa. In later years they would go to Japan, Brazil, and indeed to all the world. The distinction of being the first to embark from Virginia Seminary for China belonged to Francis R. Hanson of the class of 1833. He, along with one Lockwood, was refused entrance into China and withdrew to Java, where in time he was join in October 1837 by William J. Boone, class of 1835, and his wife. Hanson and Lockwood returned to the United States, leaving the Boones, who studied language and arrived at Macao in 1840. With this the China mission of The Episcopal Church began, and in 1844 Boone became its first bishop. From then on there was remarkable growth. From the start, Boone sought for an indigenous ordained ministry, ordaining Wang Chi a deacon in 1851, just six years after his arrival in Shanghai. As Stephen Neill says, ‘This concentration on the indigenous ministry was of vital importance, and proved its worth a century later in the general collapse of missions in China.’” - Excerpt from Mission and Ministry: A History of Virginia Theological Seminary by John E. Booty.

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Photo by Herman Chan

Mission: China


Mission: Dominican Republic and Guatemala

Student Mission Trips

Photos by Tracey Kelly and Colin Maltbie

The Dominican Republic and Guatemala

From top left, clockwise: Rising senior, Tracey Kelly (2nd from left, back row) with members of St. John’s, McLean to the city of Consuelo in the Dominican Republic where they are partnered with the Iglesia San Gabriel congregation; a little boy cools off by catching rainwater falling from the roof; the Bocas Isla slums in Guatemala; rising senior, Colin Maltbie, preaching at a parish in Changuinola, Guatemala; two little girls assuring guests that the Episcopal Church in the Dominican Republic welcomes you!

Fall 2010

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Mission: Prison Ministry

God’s Restorative Justice in the Diocese of Florida by the Rev. Thomas E. Beasley, Jr. (VTS ‘74)

Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love. - Francis of Assisi

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ne of the more challenging questions that I have been asked since becoming a prison missioner has been this one: “What ever possessed you to go into prison in the first place?” Immediately, my response to the question was, ”God.” Now that I have had some time to mull over the question, I must add to my initial reply this extension “. . . and His great Cloud of Witnesses.” I add this addition because, one Sunday back in the

early 1980s, I was sitting in my pew at St. Catherine's, Jacksonville, minding my own business, not bothering anyone when I heard a sermon on prison ministry. The preacher that Sunday was the Reverend Deacon Joe Ryan, a vocational deacon in the diocese ministering to inmates at Union Correctional Institution. By the time Joe had finished his sermon, I was hooked on prison ministry.


ing prison ministry in the state, it did blaze a trail through the gauntlet of government requirements that would eventually lead to a successful establishment of Kairos Prison Ministry in West Virginia much latter. In 1990, I returned home to the Diocese of Florida and reestablished connections with my friends here in the diocese, many of whom were already involved in prison ministry. One particular friend, the Reverend Paul David Kidd, invited me to go to Union Correctional for the Department of Corrections' orientation with him and his wife Margaret and to stay after for the reunion - prison version of a Cursillo Ultreya. And as they say, the rest is history. By November of that year I had worked my first Kairos weekend at Baker Correctional which has turned into twenty years of continual blessings, great joy and eventually priesthood in the Episcopal Diocese of Florida. My story is not so unusual. Many others working in prison ministry will tell you that they too are having the time of their lives serving God and their brothers and sisters in prisons throughout the Diocese of Florida and all over the world. All who have responded to Matthew's call to go into prisons do so with the expectation of being a blessing to those who live there but return home humbled by the enormous blessings they have received. Shortly after my prison ministry epiphany at St. Catherine’s, I moved to the Diocese of West Virginia where I met the Rev. Thomas Sites. Fr. Sites had had a similar conversion experience listening to Chuck Colson and enlisted my support in helping to get Kairos Prison Ministry established in the Diocese of West Virginia. Although that first attempt to jump-start Kairos in West Virginia did not succeed in establish-

In Luke's gospel, we read, “When someone has been given much, much will be required in return; and when someone has been entrusted with much, even more will be required.” (New International Version 12:48). The Diocese of Florida has been given much, very much indeed. There are currently 32 prisons, 28 jails and 11 youth facilities located within the boundaries of the Diocese of Florida. We have been challenged by our Lord to tend to the

spiritual and pastoral needs of over 30,000 incarcerated individuals, their families and loved ones and those who work with the incarcerated within our borders. The Diocese of Florida has indeed been entrusted with much need but we have also been given much to meet that need; much in leadership and vision by our bishops: †John Howard,†Frank Cerveny,†Charles Keyser and †Steve Jecko (deceased); we have been given much in our compassionate and dedicated clergy: Paul Canepa† (deceased), Joe Ryan† (deceased), Richard Turk†(retired), Grafton McFadden† (retired), Dave Kidd†, Sandy Tull†, John Owens†, Roy Minerva†, Allison Defoor†, Jay Lauer†, Carrie English† (our deacon currently studying hard for her M.Div. at VTS), Ben Clance†, and myself; and we have been given much in the many dedicated and gifted lay men and women who serve in our prisons from whom William (Bill) Ross (retired) and Charles Lewis (deceased) stand out for their help in guiding and directing the Commission on Prisons and Related Ministries from its very beginning until recent times. All these dedicated and gifted people allow the Diocese of Florida to minister in the name of Jesus Christ in the following areas: All Saints Chapel, Union Correctional; The Community of St. Dismas, Baker Correctional; The Episcopal Community of St. Teresa, Wakulla Correctional; The Episcopal Community of St. Teresa, Wakulla Work Camp; Brotherhood of St Philip at Suwannee Correctional; Brotherhood of St Philip at Suwannee Work Camp; Franklin Correctional; The Ministry at Florida State Prison; The Ministry on death row, Union Correctional; Chapel of Transformation at St. John's County Detention Center; All Soul's Community at Hastings Youth Academy; The Ministry at Columbia Correctional; The Ministry at Columbia Work Camp; The Episcopal Community at Liberty

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Mission: Prison Ministry

Lights Out!

by Walter Pilgrim The door slams shut on my prison cell, A human invention, a man made hell. Lights out! The darkness is complete Alone with my thoughts and distant memories. Word of Life ignites a flame Expels the darkness, reveals my shame. Sower of sorrows, reaper of time The chiefest of sinners, guilty of crimes. Who can pay the price, the sacrifice supreme? I have no excuse, how can I be redeemed? Lights out! The darkest of dark Then the light of the world came into my heart. Washed in the blood, born again The Lord Jesus Christ forgave my sin. Bought with a price, no longer my own Loved of my Father who rules from the throne. The cell door slams shut, lights out! I’m no longer in darkness but a light to be seen, Praise the Lord Jesus for rescuing me.

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Correctional; The Ministry at Gadston Correctional (women's); Jefferson Correctional (ALPHA); New River Correctional (KAIROS); Florida State West Correctional (KAIROS); Camp Saint Elizabeth's, a camping experience for the children of incarcerated parents at Camp Weed. The Diocese of Florida is also collaborating with Prisoners of Christ, an ex-offender transitional ministry, to turn around the terrible recidivism rate that occurs with ex-felons. What all of us bring into these settings is the love of Christ and what do we find there? More love … more love than you can imagine. And what has been the result of all this effort? Lives are being changed, forgiveness and reconciliation take place and a little bit of restorative justice seeps into our criminal justice system because Mother Theresa was right: “Small things done with great love will change the world.”

Below: the Kairos teams that work in the Diocese of Florida’s prison system, serving the spiritual and pastoral needs of over 30,000 incarcerated individuals, their families, and loved ones. The teams are comprised of Episcopalians, Roman Catholics, Presbyterians, Methodists, a Baptist and some Anglicans. “We all work together in spite of our differences,” says Fr. Tom, “because we concentrate on what we have in common and not what divides us. Many inmates come to Kairos to see if all these diverse church people can function with out fighting. What they witness is the power of the Holy Spirit at work in their midst and it has resulted in many a conversion. Bottom: Fr. Thomas Beasley blesses a colleague.

If you want to learn more about prison ministry in the Diocese of Florida, do what Jesus said to do, “come and see.” Come to the Diocese of Florida and see what God can do with his love. X

The Rev. Tom Beasley (VTS ‘74) serves as a prison missioner in the Diocese of Florida in the following prisons: Baker Correctional Institution's Main Camp and Work Camp; Columbia Correctional Institution; and Suwannee Correctional Institution's Main Camp and Work Camp. He can be reached via email: beesknees@earthlink.net ; Facebook; Twitter; and on the web: http://home. earthlink.net/~beesknees/index.htm

Photos provided by Fr. Thomas Beasley.


A Prayer for an Execution by Dale S. Recinella Lord Jesus Christ, In all of human history, You are the only God Who - Has sat in the death house, - Walked the “Perp” walk to the place of your killing, - And suffered execution. As I sit on the cold, concrete floor of this death cell, Barely twenty feet from where I will be killed, I have nothing - Not a cup, - No property, - Not even a sheet.

Prison Ministry at VTS

T

he Prison Ministry team at VTS is currently entering its third year of providing services to inmates at the Alexandria Jail. The

ministry, sponsored by the VTS Chapter of the Beatitude Society, is

The clothes on my back belong to the state. My very body belongs to the state. Lord Jesus, You also were stripped and left with nothing. There are crowds outside the prison chanting for my death. Lord Jesus, You also heard the crowds chanting for your death.

co-chaired this year by Patricia Sexton (‘11) and Kyle Oliver (‘12).

And, there are my mother and a few friends—very few friends— standing by me to the end. My Lord Jesus, your Blessed Mother and the holy women and John—only John—stood by you to the end.

keep the volunteer safe and effect in their mission. Both men and

And, there are the guards. Some have been kind. Some have not been kind. So it was with You, Jesus, and the guards on your death squad. Some mocked and struck You. Yet others testified to your divinity. Oh Lord, they are coming for me. They are coming to take me and kill me. I am terrified. My Lord, You have traveled this ground before. Stay with me, Jesus. They are here, Lord. Oh please, lead me through this, Jesus. Oh my God, they are really killing me. Lord, remember me in your kingdom. And forgive them, Lord. They do not know what they are doing. Amen. © 2006 Dale S. Recinella Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

The Beatitudes Society purchases Bibles and other material for distribution to inmates, as well as leading Bible study and discussion groups for both men and women. Each jail volunteer is trained by jail personal in security policy and procedures, as well as other topics to women being held at the jail have embraced the programs provided by VTS students and eagarly look forward to each week's visit. Our volunteers have been active in sharing the love of God with the Jail inmates and proclaming the the untiring message that God loves them! The participation in this ministry has been a blessing for inmates and students alike and has provided an opportunity for hands on application of what the students have learned and what they believe. The students currently involved in this ministry are Patricia Sexton (‘11), Kati Nakamura (‘11), Shivaun Wilkinson (‘12), Kyle Oliver (‘12), Josiah Rengers (‘10), and George Hinchliffe (‘11). The Rev. A. Katherine Grieb, Ph.D., professor of New Testament, serves as the group’s faculty advisor. “Prison ministry has meant a lot to me,” says Rengers, “It gives me an opportunity to practice ministry outside the seminary world while using the tools and skills I learn at seminary. It is a beautiful experience to share our lives and ministry in the prison system.” (Photo by Griska Niewiadomski) Fall 2010

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Mission: Urban Ministry

Serving Skid Row:

Urban Mission as Theological Education by the Rev. Jason Cox (VTS ‘07)

I

n August 2002, I boarded the Sunset Limited in Houston, Texas, bound for Union Station in Los Angeles, California. The train wasn’t actually cheaper than flying, but I thought it would be nice to have the extra time for reflection along the journey. And Amtrak didn’t weigh my luggage or charge me extra for the handful of boxes I brought with me. I was moving to L.A. for a year to participate in something called the Episcopal Urban Intern Program (EUIP), which brings young adults together for a year of simple, community living and service to those in need. EUIP was founded in 1991 at Holy Faith Church in Inglewood, a multicultural urban parish in a community that borders South Central Los Angeles. That same year, another program was started at the National Cathedral, which would eventually develop into the Trinity Volunteer Corps, based at Trinity Church in Washington, DC. For many years, these two programs were the only options for young adult service in The Episcopal Church.

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“I had seen shantytowns on the outskirts of Mexico City--but this was the United States, the land of plenty! What in God’s name was going on here?” On that long train ride, through miles and miles of desert, I thought about the life I was leaving behind, family and friends in Texas. A job as a music director in a medium-sized parish in Houston. And I thought about what I was moving towards:

a year of service, a time of giving back. I didn’t think of my family as rich, but I knew that I had certain advantages that others lacked. A college education, for one. And coming from a small town in Texas, I knew I was from the right side of the tracks... literally. The side where the white people lived. My heart had been pierced in college by the preaching I heard at Christ Church Cathedral, in Houston. Love God, the first commandment. The second, love your neighbor. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets. It was this commandment to love that compelled me to get on that train, to go to Los Angeles and spend a year learning how to love my neighbor—not from a distance, not with my money, but with my hands, with my presence, face to face.


I thought I knew what I was getting myself into when I disembarked at Union Station under an impossibly blue sky, palm trees swaying in the temperate L.A. breeze. I had no idea. Union Station is located across from Olvera Street, where Spanish settlers founded El Pueblo de Nuesta Señora Reina de los Ángeles in 1781. Although Olvera Street itself remains a Disneyland-style monument to L.A.’s Spanish heritage, Latinos haven’t really lived there for more than a century. El Pueblo is surrounded on all sides by L.A.’s Chinatown. Other ethnic enclaves radiate from the historic core: Historic Fillipinotown. Thai-town. Little Tokyo. Little Armenia. Koreatown. And these are just the groups that have neighborhoods named after them. If you come from the South, or the mid-Atlantic, or the mid-West, you think you know what it means to be American, where the cultural fault-lines are, the ways we have hurt and healed over two centuries. Then you come to L.A., and find a foreign country. Things are different here. There’s another way L.A. is different from most other parts of the country. Just a few blocks south of Union Station, centering around San Pedro and 5th, is L.A.’s infamous Skid Row. That’s not a slang term, either: its how we referred to the place on country documents. Skid Row has well defined borders. In those 50 or so city blocks, 7,000-8,000 people sleep on the streets every night. And that’s just a small fraction of the total homeless population in L.A., estimated to be about 48,000 total. L.A. is the homelessness capital of the US. Skid Row is where I was assigned to work as an intern, in a transitional housing facility called the Weingart Center. The Weingart is at the corner of 6th and San Pedro, in what was once the El Ray Hotel, back in the days when many hotels lined the streets south of Union Station, when many more trains arrived every day bringing all sorts of people chasing the American dream into the golden west. As I learned from my clients during my year of service, these days, if you’re coming to L.A. and your destination is Skid Row, you’re more

likely to arrive on a Greyhound Bus. Of course, everyone knows that you can still head to L.A. to chase your dreams; what I didn’t realize is that there are busloads of desperate people arriving every day, from Mobile or Atlanta or Little Rock, for whom Skid Row is the dirty promised land, the last hope for salvation. Skid Row is one of the last remaining patches of what passes for a safety net in this country: if you can get to L.A. and survive for fifteen days, the county will put you on General Relief and give you $221 a month. On Labor Day, I drove over to Skid Row from Inglewood, to get the lay of the land and see where I was supposed to report to work the next morning. Nothing could have prepared me for what I saw there. It was a hot day in L.A., and the car the program provided for me wasn’t air conditioned, so the windows were down. Skid Row stank of human waste. I had not thought of what you would have to do if you didn’t have access to a bathroom, any bathroom at all. The sidewalks were mostly blocked by makeshift shelters, tents and tarps held up with sticks. People slept in doorways or up against walls. There was a fire in a trashcan, and trash was everywhere, on the sidewalk, in the gutter, on the street. The number of desperate people was overwhelming. I had no idea there was poverty like this in our country. There were homeless people here and there on the streets of Houston, but nothing like this. I had seen shantytowns on the outskirts of Mexico City—but this was the United States, the land of plenty! What in God’s name was going on here? I was devastated, angry, and terrified. What on earth could I give these lost people? At the beginning of my service year, I wasn’t able to offer very much. I was a “case manager,” responsible for coordinating care and services for people admitted to a bed in the facility. I was also supposed to check in with my clients weekly to make sure they were following program rules and working toward targeted program goals. But at the begin-

The Episcopal Urban Intern Program (EUIP), Los Angeles, is a year-long service learning project of the Jubilee Consortium, a group of inner city Episcopal parishes in LA working together to effect meaningful social change within their communities. Each fall, EUIP gathers a new class of young adults from across the United States to live in Christian community and to work for change by serving in some of LA County’s most innovative and effective social service agencies. EUIP's mission is to raise up a new generation of change leaders for the church and the world who will spend their whole lives working to expand God’s reign of peace and justice for all people. EUIP prepares young adults to become such leaders. For more information, contact: Episcopal Urban Intern Program 6128 Yucca Street Los Angeles, CA 90028 Contact: Jason Cox Phone: 323.469.3993 Email: jcox@euip.org Website: www.euip.org The Episcopal Service Corps (ESC) is a federation of young adult service programs across the United States. We invite you to learn more about us. Perhaps you or someone you know is searching for just what we offer. ESC helps young adults discern the inner “voice” that is calling them to their life’s work, and to develop the skills to listen and respond through a life of service.” Contact: Kim Lamberty Email: kim@episcopalservicecorps.org Website: www.episcopalservicecorps.org;

Fall 2010

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Mission: Urban Ministry

Right: Los Angeles’ Skid Row.

ning of the year, I didn’t know where the 12-step groups met if my clients were in recovery and needed to go to a meeting. If they needed mental health services, I could tell them to go to Downtown Mental Health or a county agency. I could even show them where it was on a map but I’d never walked the four or five blocks over there myself. I didn’t know who greeted you when you went in the door, or what the procedure was to get an appointment. I didn’t know that, at a minimum, I needed to call DTMH ahead to let them know to expect someone and that, in some cases, I really needed to walk over there with my client myself to make sure they made it okay. As the year went on, I got better. Some clients were easy to work with, and grateful for whatever help I could give them. I held on to these positive encounters; they reminded me why I wanted to be doing this work to begin with. Other clients, the majority, were harder. They had been on the streets a long time. They were suspicious of my motives, and not always honest. The program I worked in had penalties for not meeting program goals, like completing a certain job prep class, or saving a certain amount of income every month. And there was zero tolerance for drug or alcohol use. Sifting through forged signatures and studying urinalysis reports were a regular part of my routine. When I first stepped foot on Skid Row, I promised myself I would treat my clients the way God treats us: welcoming, nonjudgmental. Generously. Always forgiving. But I soon realized a hard fact about the difference between God’s economy and ours: God’s resources are infinite. Ours are not. 42  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

“I soon realized a hard fact about the difference between God’s economy and ours: God’s resources are infinite. Ours are not.” This realization really bothered me. How was I supposed to imitate God, when the game was so different between heaven and earth? I’ve never fully resolved this question. It still burns inside me. But I’ve come to see this burning, this agitation and dissatisfaction with the world the way it is, as one of the greatest blessings of my year of service. Like Jacob after wrestling with the angel, I haven’t quite been the same since I spent a year on Skid Row. I move through the world differently, a little wounded, but I believe my eyesight is better; I see things in a way I could never have seen them before. Listening to the cries of the poor, face to face, one on one, is a transformational experience. Seeking out those whom the

world accounts the least, and abiding with them, trying to hear what they are really saying: this is the surest way I know to discern God’s voice in the world. I believe this experience was a key component of my theological education, giving me a framework for understanding who Jesus is for us, why he was killed, and how we can join him in resurrection. Everything I learned at Virginia Seminary was colored by the lessons I brought with me from Skid Row. Jesus teaches us to pray for God’s Kingdom to come on earth. I believe our country has sufficient resources to meet the needs of all the people suffering on Skid Row, and all the other places where praying for daily bread is a physical reality, rather than a spiritual metaphor. The burning, unresolved question my year with EUIP left me was this: why isn’t the Kingdom here yet? And what can I do to participate with God in making God’s Kingdom a reality? After my year of service, I came to VTS to complete the other part of my theological education, to hone my skills in interpreting God’s word and leading worship, so I could teach others about discerning the


way of Jesus in their lives, and inspire them to follow it. I’m grateful that I can read New Testament Greek (a little) and can speak with some confidence about the 4th century controversies that produced the Nicene Creed. But it is my experience on Skid Row that causes me to think, whenever I’m writing a sermon: how is this Good News I’m trying to share going to push these people, God’s people, out of this church and into the streets, where the real Gospel preaching happens? Is it pushing me? When I returned to the Diocese of Los Angeles after graduation, the Bishop appointed me Executive Director of EUIP. Over the past few years, we have worked hard, both locally and nationally, to expand opportunities for young adult service in the Episcopal Church. Together with Trinity Volunteer Corps in DC, and a handful of other service programs that sprung up over the years based on our model, the Episcopal Service Corps (ESC) was formed in 2008. With funding from Trinity Wall Street and the Fund for Theological Education, five new programs are opening this fall, expanding our reach to eleven locations around the country. Further expansion is planned for the future. In Los Angeles, EUIP will expand to serve 15 interns next year, up from 6.

CPE

A SUMMER OF GROWTH & LEARNING

Hospital Chaplains: VTS students at the Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, Virginia: Andrew Terry (far left), Caleb Lee (2nd from left), Chris Cole (2nd from right), and Peter Doddema (far right).

ESC’s mission is to raise up leaders who will transform the church and the world. I came to LA thinking that I would spend a year on Skid Row giving back, then move on with my life. But my experience on Skid Row ended up changing me far more than the change I was able to make in my short time there. Which I now realize is the real point of service, to allow the world’s need to change and transform us. We don’t want one year from the volunteers who come to ESC. We want a lifetime. X

The Rev. Jason Cox graduated from Virginia Theological Seminary in 2007 and now serves as the Executive Director of the Episcopal Urban Intern Program.

Finishing CPE - VTS students at CPE graduation at Goodwin House, Bailey’s Crossroads: Shawn Strout (3rd from left), Jo Belser (4th from left), Josiah Rengers (3rd from right), and Anne Dale (2nd from right.) Photo by Lenore Funkhouser.

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The Formidable Work of the Small Parish:

Farewell to the Summer Collegium

by Dr. Marilyn Johns, D.Min.

Photo by G. Scholiers

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or the past five years, Virginia Seminary has been the grateful recipient of a Lilly Endowment grant to support small congregations. This grant has enabled the seminary to offer the Summer Collegium, a nine-day conference for the pastors of small congregations in all Christian denominations across the U.S. and Canada, and their spouses or partners. Each year, 25 applicants are selected to come to VTS, with all expenses paid by the grant, to be part of the program. Included in the project are follow-up visits to each of the churches to meet and encourage congregation members in their ministry. We have also hosted a Small Church Religious Arts Festival each summer as part of the Collegium, lifting up the connection between faith and the arts to the surrounding community.

The project was designed to:

There were specific goals for the project, and specific parameters outlined in the grant, written with great foresight and care by the Rev. Dr. Roger Ferlo and others.

• Serve healthy small churches. The vision of the Summer Collegium was not to serve congregations in trouble, but to serve those congregations who could

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• Be ecumenical. Each year we worked to send application invitations to as many denominations as we could find. Over the last five years we received applications from 27 different denominations; welcomed participants from 18 denominations; and utilized a faculty from 16. • Include spouses and partners. We believed that the greatest support in ministry comes from one’s spouse or partner, and although we encountered some resistance at times (“my spouse isn’t part of this church; my spouse won’t come, etc.), we have stuck to that vision. The partners and spouses who attend overwhelmingly agreed that they should be there. We also welcomed single people.

model healthy small churches to others as a result of their participation in the Collegium. This has happened to a large extent. Through our rather extensive application process, we were able to determine which congregations were healthiest. I recently met with a United Methodist pastor who was part of the Summer Collegium in 2006, and she said that, since her time here, she has led eight workshops on small church ministry in her conference and in ecumenical settings. Many others in the program have done the same. • Include Sabbath and refreshment. The grant acknowledged the relentless demands on small church clergy and their families in their congregations, as well as the pressure they feel from judicatories and society to grow numbers in order to be successful. So, in addition to keynotes by experts in the field of small church ministry, we treated participants to a theatre outing as well as a dinner on the town. They were housed in a five-star hotel for part of


Institute for Christian Formation & Leadership

saving for years to someday get a full-time priest, but after discernment decided to use the money to start a women’s shelter instead. This is a very different picture than much of the literature on the small church portrays. their stay, and were treated with matchless VTS hospitality. • Celebrate ministry in the small church. So often events for small congregations focus on how to grow the church to become a medium or large-size church. Our goal was to celebrate healthy small churches and their unique and valuable gifts. More than one clergy participant has remarked: “When I came to Virginia I was kind of ashamed of being a small church pastor. Now I’m proud to be living my call in the small church.” Now, the five year project is coming to a close. The final residents have left, and the final follow-up visits are beginning. Final reports are being written, and final plans are being made. Much has been learned about life in the small church since our first residency in 2006. For one thing, we have learned how necessary it is to offer support to small congregations. These parishes are doing interesting and innovative ministry, and thrive on the intimate relationships that are the backbone of the small church. The stereotypical inwardfocused, older, dying small church is out there, but the participants in the Collegium have shown that there is another side to the small church – the church that, in addition to traditional Sunday worship, offers a “street church” every Sunday afternoon, setting up in the middle of town, and preaching and serving Communion and lunch to the street people who choose to participate; the church that was formed when two small churches merged, one African-American and one Caucasian, and maintains a 50-50 racial balance (and it works!); the church that had been

Another important lesson is that small church issues are for the most part not denominationally determined. Everyone has the same joys and concerns, whether in an Anglican church or a Missionary Baptist church. Seeing each of the five Summer Collegium groups bond together was a true joy of this project. It helped increase awareness of the global nature of the Christian church, and helped these pastors envision ecumenical ministry in their communities. One of the ways the Institute for Christian Formation and Leadership is planning to continue to support small churches after the project has officially ended is that we have converted our website into a resource for small congregations. The new website contains monthly commentary from former participants or faculty, with a link to a Facebook fan page so that readers can discuss the article further. In addition, there are bibliographic resources and websites that have good information on small congregations, and we are developing a way to post the videos we have taken of keynotes and workshops over the years, to make them available to pastors, their leaders, and anyone interested in small church ministry at no cost. We may also include a book review section. One of the main issues for many small church clergy is that they do not have the resources to attend continuing education events; this website will offer ways they might get a taste of the Summer Collegium without the cost of attending a conference.

work on this important project in support of these churches which are home to millions of faithful Christians. In mainline denominations, the number of churches with fewer than 100 in worship on an average Sunday is from 50-75%. The vast majority of clergy graduating from seminaries will be called to a small church at some time in their ministry. Some will be called there for their entire ministry. The Summer Collegium has allowed Virginia Seminary to support small church clergy and show them that this call is important and needed. As for my work with the Summer Collegium, well, how many clichés can you think of to denote the ending of something? Folks have tried to make me feel better about the last residency of the Collegium by saying, “Well, all good things must come to an end,” or “breaking up is hard to do.” I’d prefer the more positive cliché: “it ain’t over ‘til it’s over.” There’s much still to be done! There are the 25 site visits to small churches all over the U.S. and Canada - times to preach and teach and bring a word of hope to these congregations who are concerned about shrinking numbers and budgets. We have a new website devoted to providing free, online resources to small congregations – it’s still a work in progress, but check it out at www.vts.edu/smallchurches. And this project, as successful and life-changing as it has been, has potential for new life. VTS has birthed something unique, and although it may not look exactly the same, I am hopeful that God is not done with this support for small churches yet. Perhaps the more appropriate cliché is “where there is life, there is hope. There is indeed life, and hope abounds!” X

Small churches are here to stay – their numbers increase every year, even if their size doesn’t! It has been a privilege to

Fall 2010

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Interview: Jacques Hadler

“We must be global Christians with a global vision because our God is a global God.” — John Stott

The World according to Jacques Hadler by Susan L. Shillinglaw

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n July 31, 2010, the Rev. Jacques Hadler Jr. retired from Virginia Theological Seminary where he had worked for the past 17 years as Director of Field Education. His service to VTS was multi-faceted: he taught in the Departments of Practical Theology and Global Christianity, taught family systems theory in the Doctor of Ministry program, offered a seminar for clergy on Congregational Leadership, and led Cross-cultural Internships to Tanzania. “I have often heard from our alums the impact that Jacques had on their ministry,” said the Very Rev. Ian Markham, dean and president of Virginia Seminary, “As 46  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

Photo by Curtis Prather

Field Education Director he treated each student as a distinct individual needing the perfect match for his or her gifts. He had real insight and wisdom as he worked with each student.” Hadler completed his M.Div. at the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts and earned his B.A in History at the University of WisconsinMadison. He is a long time participant in the Post Graduate Seminar in Family Emotional Process founded by Dr. Edwin Friedman. Before joining the faculty at VTS, Fr. Hadler served on the faculty of St. Philip’s

Theological College, Kongwa, Tanzania, as a lecturer in Church History. He has also served the Episcopal Church as rector, priest-in-charge or assistant at parishes in Waldorf, Hyattsville, and Laurel—all in Maryland—as well as Trinity in Manassas, Virginia, and All Souls in DC. He has written two articles, Genogram of a Congregation and Two-way Bridge: The Cross-cultural Colloquy at Virginia Seminary. I sat down with Fr. Hadler to find out more about his past, how his experiences shaped his ministry, and what he planned to do in the future.


SS: Tell me about your past, how you got to Tanzania and to VTS. JH: Raised an Episcopalian, I was involved in two parishes in the Diocese of Washington where I served as an acolyte and in the choirs. In college, I became an atheist and sought to find the meaning of life through science. I majored in math and nuclear physics, mainly because I was good with numbers, but also because the University of Wisconsin allowed science majors to take history and humanities courses as well – subjects which also piqued my interest. In my sophomore year, I felt the desire to reexamine Christianity but wanted to do it outside of the United States. After spotting an ad on the wall for a work camp in the Diocese of Central Tanganyika, I applied for grants and was soon off to Tanzania where I worked to build classrooms and a chapel in a theological college. I was even given an African name—Chedego—by one of the African students. With the acceptance of the Australian missionary Bishop, Alfred Stanway, I decided to stay for another year and teach English at the theological college. During that year I met Nathaniel Kamunye, a Kikuyu student who’d migrated to Tanzania after fighting in the Mau Mau independence movement of the 1950s in Kenya and who had taken the oath to kill white people. However he had been impressed by the faith of a Presbyterian pastor who would not take the oath even on threat of death. After release from an imprisonment, Nathaniel opened the door to Jesus. When Nathanial told me about his own conversion and the aliveness of Jesus to him, and I saw the way he treated people, generously sharing his food with the locals during a time of famine, I saw that Jesus was real and could really affect someone’s life. A number of months after that meeting, I had an awakening of my own and soon felt a call to the priesthood. When I returned to the states, I switched my major to history and then went to seminary at the Episcopal

Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, now Episcopal Divinity School. In my first year at seminary, I was sort of an oddball because I had done mission work, something that was, at the time, seen as imperialism and not valued at all by my fellow students. It was an eerie environment. I dropped out after a year and a half, and, for the next two and a half years, worked in a state mental hospital with alcoholics and then took an intern year of CPE in a general hospital. After that, I returned to seminary and earned an M.Div. in 1972. After seminary, I became a deacon-intraining at St. Matthews, Hyattsville with Larry Harris (a current VTS Field Ed supervisor). In 1975, I was invited back to Kongwa to teach Church History in the theological college there. This time, however, I brought my wife, Susan, and two children, 6 and 4 (Jacques and Sarah). We had three very good family years, there. Even though we were often without water and certain provisions, even with these hardships, it was a good time for us. Ten months after returning to the States in 1979, I was called to St. Paul’s in Waldorf, Maryland where I worked for 12 years. It was there that I began to supervise seminarians under the VTS system. Then, it was my turn to follow Susan with her career. We moved to Washington where she had a counseling practice. In 1991, I was called to All Souls in DC to be the interim. A year later, I was called to St. Phillips in Laurel, Maryland, as interim after Jane Dixon was elected a bishop. It was there that I received a call from the then Dean of VTS, Dick Reid, who asked me to serve as an interim Field Ed Director, which I did. When the Rev. Martha Horne was elected Dean of VTS a year later, she asked me if I would continue in

Above: the Rev. Jacques Hadler is given a chicken in honor of his visit. the Field Ed position as a full-time faculty member. I began my first official term in January 1995. SS: How has the practice of Field Ed changed over the years? JH: The foundation of VTS’ field Ed program was laid down in 1967 by Gordon Charleton. The same structure continues– and it’s a gifted structure. What changes is the content with which we fill the structure - the flesh is different but the structure is the same. For example, when I went through the training to be a FE supervisor in the early 80s, our first year of training focused around doing verbatims and on the one-to-one relationship – this is still the same today. The second year, however, was very focused around parish programs. Since then, I’ve completely changed this formula from being program-based to focusing on the dynamics of the parish— family systems—the way a parish has functioned in its history from founding to the present. Now, rather than study a current parish program, we study the history of a congregation’s relationship to its clergy, to its environment, and how it does its mission. SS: What one thing would you change in terms of what students are learning in their Field Ed parishes? Continued on page 97... Fall 2010

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Faculty Inaugural Lecture

Receiving Christ: reading the bible across time and culture

An abridged version of the Inaugural Lecture of the Rev. Dr. John Yieh, professor of New Testament. March 3, 2010

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or all of us at VTS, there is no need to argue how important the Bible is for Christian life and ministry. The church regards the study of the Bible as absolutely essential for the spiritual growth of the newly baptized (BCP 304). Diligent study of the Bible affords the priests with necessary knowledge to serve as faithful and competent ministers of Christ (BCP 532) and will lead the bishops to find the mind of Christ so that they may instruct the minds and conscience of God’s people (BCP 518). 1. Jesus Christ and the Bible The Bible is believed to be the inspired “word of God,” and to say so is to accept it as a divine revelation with divine authority (2 Tim 3:16-17). In church language, the “word of God” has been used in reference to three different things: Jesus Christ, the Bible, and the sermons. In Karl Barth’s scheme, Jesus Christ is the living Word of God who alone has seen God, is close to the Father, and through incarnation has become the exegesis of the

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invisible God (John 1.18). The Bible is the written word of God, which acquires a derived authority by virtue of its unique testimony to Jesus Christ. A sermon can be called the word of God, because it proclaims Jesus Christ on the basis of biblical witnesses. There is a hierarchy of authority among the three. Jesus Christ has the supreme authority, then the Bible, and finally preaching. Hence, the Bible has a unique role to play in the church. It testifies to Jesus Christ on the one hand, and informs the church’s proclamation on the other. How we read the Bible that we may know Christ and make Christ known, however, involves a complicated process and requires humble and careful efforts. How can we read the Bible faithfully and critically in order to receive Christ in our hearts and minds so that our lives may be transformed? This is the main question I want to address in this lecture. 2. Critical Studies of the Bible Very early in its history, church leaders have vigorously searched for proper


John Yieh, Ph.D.

ways to interpret the Bible. Origen, for instance, compiled the Hexapla, with six OT versions in parallel columns: Hebrew, Hebrew transliterated in Greek, and four Greek versions edited by Aquila, Symmachus, LXX, and Theodotion. This was one of the earliest tools for textual-critical studies. Augustine also produced many commentaries and homilies on biblical books, and wrote De Doctrina Christiana in four books (AD 397, 426) to teach the rules of interpretation including how to discover the meaning and signs in the scripture and how to express them in effective rhetorical styles. Luther’s exegetical study of Romans and Galatians and his re-discovery of Paul’s theological teaching of justification by faith started the Reformation that changed the course of the history of the church. Since Schleiermacher, general theory of hermeneutics was applied to the interpretation of the Bible, so rules and methods used in analyzing linguistics, history, and philosophy are also used to study biblical text. Critical studies of the Bible as a scientific discipline became possible.

Since the 19th century, critical studies of the NT have focused on the formation history of the text and its source traditions, believing that knowledge of the “Vorleben” (previous life or prehistory) of the biblical books may shed light on the composition of the writing and thus the purposes of the writers/editors and the meaning of the text. Taking the Gospels as an example, a robust interest in finding historical facts leads to the development of critical methods, such as source criticism, form criticism and redaction criticism, and discover the Sitz im Leben, church activities, and theological debates of the earliest Christian communities that produced and preserved the oral and written traditions of Jesus (Luke 1.1-4). Many methods devised with such a “traditioning” history in mind become useful tools for exegesis. In comparison to the pre-history of biblical text, much less attention has been paid to the “Nachleben” (after life), i.e. the reception history of the Bible. Textual critics, for instance, have combed through ancient manuscripts and versions produced in later centuries to create a “restored text” for translation and interpretation. Quite often, however, NT scholars forget that those manuscripts and versions, though produced after the NT books, were the very Bibles that were read, interpreted, and used by church fathers to preach the gospel, teach Christian life, debate the heretics, and create the creeds. They reflect the ideas of those centuries. Most important of all, we are all inheritors of one or a

few theological thoughts and interpretive traditions which have conditioned our reading lenses. As biblical scholars and preachers, we are at great peril, therefore, if we ignore the reception history of the Bible. In this light, we may have been wrong to assume that, once a preacher has done basic exegetical study of a biblical text, he or she is ready to connect the ancient biblical ideas with our contemporary world, flying over the two thousand years in between as if nothing has ever happened in that span of time and as if we have never been touched by the traditions of the church developed in that period of time. This is where I find a huge gap that needs to be closed in a hermeneutical process. In recent biblical scholarship, there are two shifts of interest worth noticing: from text to context, and from author to reader. Insofar as “context” is concerned, some studies investigate biblical texts for the purpose of uncovering the social-cultural world behind the text (e.g. sociological studies of early Christian communities, anthropological studies of the ancient Mediterranean culture), the literary world in the text (e.g. narrative criticism, rhetorical criticism), and the social world in front of the text (e.g. social location and theological position of today’s reader). These recent efforts enhance our exegetical task. Insofar as “reader” is concerned, biblical texts are critically examined in order to address the theological concerns of the church (e.g. theological interpretation or particular themes) and contemporary issues of particular groups (e.g. liberation-

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theological, feminist, and postcolonial). The passionate interest in the reader, especially today’s reader, reflects an earnest attempt to connect the meaning of biblical text to the theological challenges and social concerns facing us today, so it advances interpretive task. Giving high priority to the reader in the interpretive process, however, scholars need to consider two potential problems. First, there is a tendency among ideological crit-

ics to privilege their self-interest as reader over the meaning of the Bible. Their reading posture as advocates for worthy causes sometimes turn too quickly into hostility against the Bible. Consequently, their reading of the Bible becomes an interrogation rather than interpretation. The result is an ideological battle about the Bible rather than honest wrestling with the Bible. The second challenge is the danger of “privatizing” reading. Like some stubborn fundamentalists, some passionate ideological critics run the risk of privatizing their interpretation, to read the Bible with a tunnel vision and address only the issues of their personal interest without considering the proper framework and major concerns of the Bible itself. As such, there is still room for biblical scholars to improve their interpretive efforts. Two additional approaches are important. 3. History of Effects Approach The first approach is the Wirkungsgeschichte (history of effects or consequences) , which Ulrich Luz began to advocate in Matthew in History: Interpretation, Influence and Effects (1994). What motivates him? Luz finds several texts in Matthew whose controversial interpretations have caused theological disputes and religious wars between Catholics and Protestants in Europe. Mt 16.18 is a case in point. After confessing Jesus as the Christ and the Son of the living God, Jesus renamed Simon as Peter and said to him, “on this rock I will build my church.” The Roman Catholic Church thus interprets Peter to be the rock of the church and cites it to support Peter’s apostolic primacy and by association the papacy for the Bishop of Rome. The Lutheran church, on the other hand, interprets this verse to insist that Peter’s confession of Jesus as “the Christ and the Son of God” is the foundation of the church. The Lutherans are quick to point out that almost immediately Peter was called Satan because he refused to accept Jesus’ prediction of crucifixion. As a consequence, the two interpretations divide the church into two rival camps and result in many wars. In Europe, Luz also witnesses anti-Semitism culminating in the Holocaust. What the Jewish crowd

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said to Pilate against Jesus: “His blood be on us and on our children!” (Mt 27.25) has played a role in creating the anti-Semitic prejudice and discrimination. Facing the two problems, Luz begins to realize that historical and literary studies may be able to answer some exegetical questions of the Bible, but they are inadequate in dealing with interpretive issues. What is “history of effects”? The Bible is ancient, authoritative, and has been influential in many ways for a long time, so its meanings and interpretations have infiltrated into every aspect and level of the life of the church, the society, and the culture in West civilization. All readers in the West, even an atheist, have been shaped by the language, ideas, and values of the Bible, before they open it to read. Like a fish in the water, the readers cannot think or act without the influence of the Bible that is part of their culture. The “history of effects” includes both the history of interpretation (found in commentaries and theological writings) and the history of influence (attested in the sermons, hymns, arts, and practice of the church). Studying the history of effects, Luz seeks to achieve two aims: to clarify the readers’ preunderstanding of the text and to correct the wrong interpretations in history. This approach has two noteworthy assumptions about biblical text: “A Biblical text is not a reservoir or a cistern, with a fixed amount of water in it that can be clearly measured. Rather it resembles a source, where new water emerges from the same place.” (Luz, Matthew in History, 19). Because the meaning of biblical text is not limited or fixed to the historical locus where it was first written, Luz further writes: “I would propose to understand the meaning of a biblical text as an interaction of a ‘kernel of meaning,’ which corresponds to the given structures of a text, and a ‘directional meaning,’ which gives a present direction to the readers on their way to new lands.” (Luz, Matthew in History, 20). The division of “kernel of meaning” and “directional meaning” may be simplistic from a hermeneutical point of view, but they provide useful categories for the implementation of interpretive


John Yieh, Ph.D.

practice. Luz also proposes that the ultimate standard by which to assess the truth of a “kernel of meaning” in any biblical text is the criterion of “Christological consistency,” whether it consists with Jesus Christ and the truth he represents. The final judgment on the validity of a “directional meaning” is the criterion of “love,” whether it leads to the consequence of love, loving God and loving neighbors as the Bible has attested to be Jesus’ new commandments. What is to be gained, if we take this approach? (1) Broaden hermeneutical horizons. Recognizing the hermeneutical presuppositions in the readers, this approach urges us not to over-privilege our own perspectives or to preclude other interpretations. (2) Sensitize ethical concerns. Learning from historical cases the social impact of biblical interpretation, this approach has the potential to sensitize our ethical concerns in using biblical texts. (3) Enhance ecumenical relationship. Reflecting on the reason and impact of biblical interpretation in different ecclesial bodies in the contexts of their doctrines, disciplines, and missions, this approach may deepen our ecumenical understanding and enhance ecumenical relationship. This approach requires knowledge of several disciplines of study. Besides the usual training in biblical hermeneutics, linguistics, literature, philosophy, history, and sociology, we will need familiarity with church history, doctrine, theology, ethics, and arts. Because this is an integrated approach to the interpretation of the Bible, it will also require team work among scholars. This approach seeks to learn how the Bible has exercised its influence in the history of its reception. So, it is particularly important and necessary for a preacher who reads and interprets the Bible for the church. 4. Cross-Cultural Approach If the history of effects approach closes the gap between the ancient biblical world and the modern day readers, another approach that seeks to bridge different worlds also deserves to be considered, namely, the

cross-cultural study of the Bible. More than before, we are living in a small global village, with easier mobility of population, faster international communication, and frequent cultural exchanges that make cross-cultural interpretation not only desirable but necessary.

Culture is an amalgamation of racialethnic identity, linguistic-literary expression, social-ethical experience, and historical-political heritage that a group of people share and value over time. Some cultural practices and expressions can be easily observed like the tip of an iceberg, but many more cultural assumptions and values are hidden from outsiders and very hard to articulate. In order to bridge the cultural gap, one needs to be generous with each other, especially when dealing with uncertainties and controversies. It is living in tension with both similarities and particularities that is the hallmark of a cross-cultural experience.

good reasons why a cross-cultural approach to the Bible is necessary and good. (1) To deepen our experience of God. We believe in God as Creator of heaven and earth and Father of all peoples. God loves the world and God’s love can be understood in all cultures. Learning how the scripture speaks to each culture (i.e. how it is interpreted in different cultures) can, therefore, enhance our understanding of God’s work among all peoples. (2) To enrich our understanding of the Bible. One should not forget that people in different cultures share much in common, such as fear, hope, aspiration, and need, so biblical interpretation in each culture can make contributions to people living in other cultures. It can be very affirming indeed if one interpretation proves to be helpful to others. It is also true that, by virtue of their distinctive cultural experience, some people have closer affinities with the Bible in certain ways. For instance, African Christians living in a tribal system may understand the conquest narrative in the OT in a more personal way than Western scholars. The house-church Christians in China may appreciate the persecution of the Johannine community in the Book of Revelation in a way more intimate than most of the readers in other parts of the world. Some Chinese readings of the scripture can therefore be inspiring for us, just as our penetrating analysis of theology, developed in the scholarly tradition of the West can be informative to the churches in Asia. (3) To prevent misunderstanding among believers. Equally important is the function to prevent brothers and sisters in the church universal to misunderstand one another. A cross-cultural sensitivity may bring people to an empathetic understanding of other biblical interpretations and avoid unnecessary dispute. Even as they continue to debate, both sides may be better informed.

The Apostle Paul have had to deal with cross-cultural debates between Jewish and Gentile members of his church, the subjects ranging from the doctrine of salvation, the rite of circumcision, dietary law and table fellowship. In modern days, many divisions remain in the life of the church universal, so there are at least three

Several things should be borne in mind, when we try to learn from “others” with a cross-cultural reading of the Bible. (1) Border-crossing. By definition, a crosscultural approach is a border-crossing experience, a journey out of one’s familiar territory and comfort zone in order to explore and discover new things and

I would venture to say that no one else knows and appreciates the importance of cross-cultural interpretation of the Bible more than Anglicans or Episcopalians. Recent controversy on sexuality and ordination has driven everybody to see the significant difference in varied cultural interpretations of the Bible. Clearly, biblical interpretation lies right under the surface of controversy. It is not simply the authority of the scripture or the methods of reading, but also cultural assumptions and social impact that shape one’s particular interpretation of the Bible. Every interpretation is culture-specific and culturally conditioned, be it Northern-American or African. We may be able to overcome some misunderstanding and learn from one another, if we approach biblical interpretation with a cross-cultural sensitivity and proficiency.

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maybe dangerous ideas from others. On this journey, one will risk changes by what he or she sees and hears in other cultures. So, the willingness to take risks and be changed is a prerequisite. (2) Comparison and contrast. When one tries to understand interpretations made in different cultures, one will have to compare and contrast. It is in the dialectic exchange of two or more interpretations that we may learn new things about the Bible and about ourselves. So, honesty and fairness are necessary. (3) No relativism. In order to benefit from a cross-cultural interpretation, one needs to be confident in his or her own views while respecting other opinions, but that does not mean a conscientious wrestling with the text and the contexts can be lightly spared. Cross-cultural approach does not seek compromise or relativism at the expense of truth, but rather the chance for all cultural interpretations to be confirmed or corrected to serve as faithful messengers of God’s word. 5. The Sermon on the Mount as an example When we use the traditional historical and literary methods to read the Sermon on the Mount (Matt 5-7) that follows the narrative sequence of slaughtered babies, flight from Egypt, and crossing the water of Jordan into the desert (Matt 1-4), we can find in Matthew’s Jesus a “New Moses” giving new laws on a mountain to God’s people with authority. When we take on a history of effects approach, we ask a different set of questions. Why did Augustine consider the Sermon “perfect measure of the Christian life” and the Beatitudes as “ascending steps to perfection for the human soul”? (Augustine, On the Sermon on the Mount, 1) Why did Luther claim that it “only brings us to the knowledge of ourselves, the knowledge that by our own ability we cannot properly fulfill an iota of it . . . We can never take our stand before God on this basis, but we must always creep to Christ”? (Luther, Luther’s Works, Vol 21: 72) And how can Hauerwas argue that it “is not addressed to individuals but to the community that Jesus begins and portends through the

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calling of the disciples. The sermon is not a heroic ethic. It is the constitution of a people. . . . a description of the life of a people gathered by and around Jesus” (Hauerwas, Matthew, 61)? These three interpretations represent three influential traditions: Catholic, Protestant, and Anabaptist. With which interpretation do I agree or disagree, and why? What do I learn from each of them? What images of Jesus do they present? Together, these influential interpreters remind us of important themes (Beatitudes) and issues (law or gospel) in Matthew’s text that we may otherwise overlook. They also provide a range of fresh questions which demand further consideration (spiritual sphere vs. secular sphere; individual ethics or community witness). When we think about the Sermon on the Mount cross-culturally, Ghandi’s use of the non-violence principle to defeat the occupying army of the British Empire in India comes first to mind. It was not Jesus the “Jewish lawgiver” but his moral wisdom that empowers the people of India to peaceably obtain independence from a ruthless colonial power. In China, we can also find a few remarkable interpretations of Jesus who gives the Sermon on the Mount. Hong Xiuquan, a rebel king, established a quasi-Christian kingdom in Nanjing in 1850 called Taiping Tianguo (the Great Peace Kingdom of Heaven) and used the principle of brotherhood and equality to make new laws. Both Ghandi and Hong were attracted to Jesus when they sought freedom for their suffering people oppressed by ruthless empires, perhaps because they found in him the same compassion for the Jewish peasants suffering under the iron rule of the Roman Empire. Wu Leichuan, a Chinese scholar, considered Jesus a “messianic revolutionary turned wise sage” who inspired his followers by example and by words to cultivate their moral character in order to build an ideal society of selfsacrifice. Watchman Nee, an influential leader of an indigenous church, believed that Jesus was the savior of the world who came to save his people from sins; but he also taught them how to live a Christian life. Nee regarded the high demands in

the Sermon on the Mount as challenging “tests” meant to reveal the strength of our inner life. Like Luther, he believed that no one can be saved by obeying the Sermon on the Mount; nonetheless, it is a grace to train and enable us to live a Christian life worthy of the name. Conclusion Reading the Bible across time and across culture takes time and energy, but it will surely reward us with generous prizes and good surprises. This reading process leads us to some important hermeneutical insights. (1) On the Bible. There are a wide range of views of Jesus and his words in the scriptures. Jesus is many things to many people. (2) On the reader. With critical appreciation, our understanding of Jesus can be broadened and deepened. Some interpretations affirm us; others challenge us, but all show how the scripture as the word of God may speak to people in their needs and crisis. (3) On interpretive differences. Not every interpretation is right, appropriate or good, but by trying to understand others in their particular contexts we may at least prevent some misunderstanding, disputes or mistakes. (4) On cultural differences. There are indeed significant differences between cultures just as there are many similarities between the West and the East in cultural milieu, social experiences, and theological convictions. They however enrich each other in understanding the messages and influence of the Bible as the word of God. This lecture represents one of my recent reflections on biblical scholarship. What I am calling for is an “interdisciplinary and integrated” approach to Biblical studies that utilizes as many disciplines as necessary, attends to interpretive goal as well as exegetical task, consults influential interpretations and evaluate their effects with critical appreciation, and focuses on the localized concern with a broad crosscultural horizons, so that the voice of God can be better heard, the image of Christ be more clearly seen, and the touch of the Holy Spirit be more intimately felt as we open the Bible to preach its good news to the world. X


FACULTY NEWS Left to right: Mitzi Budde, Stephen Cook, and David Gortner.

Mitzi Budde, D.Min. • Authored “The Marks as Signposts of the Journey to Unity in Mission,” Journal of Ecumenical Studies 42:2 (Spring 2010): 218-226; and “Unity in Mission: Introduction,” co-authored with Don Thorsen, same issue: 178-182. • Authored “The Vocation for Unity in Theological Education,” in Staying One, Remaining Open, edited by J. Barney Hawkins, IV & Richard J. Jones. New York: Church Publishing, 2010, pp. 89-108. • While on sabbatical during the month of February, 2010, was part of a delegation accompanying the President of the Lutheran World Federation, ELCA Presiding Bishop Mark Hanson, on an ecumenical pilgrimage to visit international church leaders in London, Istanbul, Rome, and Geneva. Stephen Cook, Ph.D. • Authored “Haggai,” “Zechariah,” and “Malachi” in The New Interpreter’s Bible One-Volume Commentary (ed. Beverly Roberts Gaventa and David Petersen; Nashville, TN: Abingdon, 2010). See http://biblische.blogspot.com/2010/08/now-in-printnib-one-volume-commentary.html • Authored the introduction and annotations to “Ezekiel,” in The New Oxford Annotated Bible: New Revised Standard Version with the Apocrypha (Fully Revised Fourth Edition; eds. M. Coogan, et al; New York: Oxford University Press, 2010) 1159–1232. See http://biblische.blogspot.com/2010/03/now-in-printnoab-fully-revised-fourth.html. • Authored “Theological Exegesis of Genesis 22: Wrestling with a Disturbing Scripture,” in Staying One, Remaining Open: Educating Leaders for a 21st-Century Church (ed. Richard J. Jones and J. Barney Hawkins IV; New York: Morehouse, 2010) 125–138. See http://biblische.blogspot. com/2010/05/now-in-print-staying-one-remainingopen.html

• Developed “The Yale Bible Study: Second Isaiah,” eight 15-30 minute online video conversations with Robert R. Wilson of Yale University supplemented with a series notebook containing an introduction, interpretation essays, and supplemental materials (February 2010). Yale Bible Study Homepage: http://www.yale.edu/yalebiblestudy/. The Rev. David Gortner, Ph.D. • Led diocesan and clergy conferences on evangelism for the Episcopal Church in Greenville, South Carolina, Vancouver, British Columbia, Estes Park, Colorado, and Jackson, Michigan. • With Alban Institute president Jim Wind, led a consultation on congregational vitality for the diocesan council of the Diocese of Washington. • At last November's "Fridays at the Seminary," led a discussion of his documentary, Feast in the Desert: Five Approaches to Young Adult Ministry (to be posted soon on the “VTS Without Walls” portion of the VTS website). • Wrote Retraining Ourselves in Thought and Action, his second of two articles on leadership in the Anglican Theological Review (Winter 2010). • Primary author of Around One Table, the first report from the Episcopal Identity Project funded by CREDO and the College for Bishops. • Initiated the first VTS online / hybrid course, Reading and Exegesis of Congregations and Contexts of Ministry, which now guides D.Min. Ministry Development students through a multi-view process for their congregational studies. • Helped launched a two-year reading course, Visions of Societal and Soulful Transformation, to help ground all D.Min. students’ studies and projects in deep biblical, theological, and philosophical consideration of the ultimate aims in Christian ministry. • Organized and led the first Second Three Years gathering last November at the Maritime Center in Baltimore.

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Faculty Update

Left to right: Jonathan Gray, Barney Hawkins, Ruthanna Hooke, and Ian Markham.

• With John Yieh, co-taught "Asian Christian and Anglican Experience." • Continue to serve as the principal investigator for the nationwide research project, funded by the Lilly Endowment, to study the impact of post-seminary training and continuing education on clergy leadership. • Completing a book Varieties of Personal Theologies: The Beliefs and Values of American Young Adults, to be published by Ashgate Publishing. Jonathan Gray, Ph.D. • Published “The Sixteenth-Century Background to the Current ‘Oath’ of Conformity of the Episcopal Church,” Journal of Episcopal Church Canon Law 1 (2010): 33-59. • Awarded a Mayers Fellowship at the Huntington Library. Spent a month there as a research fellow. • Taught an adult education class this spring at St. Columba’s Church in DC on the English Reformation. The Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D. • Attended the AAR in Montreal where VTS and Ripon College Cuddesdon, one of our Anglican Communion Partners, offered a panel discussion under the banner, “The Society for the Study of Anglicanism.” • Went on a number of development trips to cultivate friends for the Dean’s Roundtables: Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Richmond, and Atlanta. • Preached at the December 2009 service at which the Rev. David Umphlett was installed as the Rector of St. Mary’s, High Point, North Carolina, and

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at the ordinations of George Roberts in Columbia, South Carolina; Christopher Street in Rochester, New York; and Patrick Perkins in West Hartford, Connecticut. • This summer, attended the signing ceremony, representing the Dean, with Dr. Amy Dyer and Ms. Kathryn Glover for our partnership with St. George’s College, Jerusalem, VTS’ newest Anglican Communion Partner. • Participated in VTS’ Christian-Muslim Conference in Dodoma, Tanzania. • Co-edited, with Richard Jones, Staying One, Remaining Open: Educating Leaders for a 21st Century Church. • Helped edit Christ and Culture: Communion After Lambeth. The Rev. Ruthanna Hooke, Ph.D. • Published Transforming Preaching (Church Publishing) in the spring of 2010. The Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D. • Interviewed on BBC Radio Ulster. • A profile of Dean Markham appeared in the Washington Examiner. • “A Discussion: Richard Burridge’s Jesus: Imitating Jesus: reading the Eternal Word” in the Scottish Journal of Theology, volume 63, issue 03, Summer 2010 pp 340-345. • Published Against Atheism: Why Dawkins, Hitchens, and Harris Are Fundamentally Wrong (Blackwell, 2010.)


Faculty Update

Left to right: Bob Prichard, Bill Roberts, Tim Sedgwick, and John Yieh.

The Rev. Robert W. Prichard, Ph.D. • Created and launched the Journal of Episcopal Church Canon which can be found on the VTS website.

Anglican – USA bilateral ecumenical dialogue on matters of the church, Christian life and ethics. • Continues to serve on the Board of Directors for the College for Bishops. The Rev. John Yieh, Ph.D.

The Rev. William B. Roberts, D.M.A. • Attended the annual conference of the Association of Anglican Musicians in Hartford and New Haven. •Presented two sessions at the national convention of the American Guild of Organists in Washington. • Presented at the Mississippi Conference on Church Music and Liturgy. • Conducted a children’s choir camp for the Diocese of East Carolina. • Completed a commissioned choral composition for Oxford-University United Methodist Church, Oxford, Mississippi. • Studied Spanish for two weeks in Oaxaca, Mexico. Timothy Sedgwick, Ph.D. • Published Theological Commentary, Feasting on the Word: Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary, Year A, Volume 1 (Westminster John Knox Press,2010), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Sundays in Epiphany, (ICor.1:1-9, 1Cor.10-18, and Acts 10:34-43) • Published “Exploring the Great Divide: Sex, Ethics, and Ecumenism,” Journal of Ecumenical Studies 45:3 (Summer 2010). • Continues to work with the Roman-Catholic

• As newly appointed full Professor of New Testament, delivered his Inaugural Lecture entitled “Receiving Christ: Reading the Bible across Time and Culture” on March 3. • Was the keynote speaker at the Mackay Memorial Lectureship with five lectures on “Encounter and Transformation: Jesus and Women Disciples in the Gospel of John,” at Taiwan Theological Seminary in Taipei, Taiwan from May 10-12. • Traveled to China to give a lecture “Bible as Literature: Current Approaches to Jesus’ Parables in the West” at the Institute of Biblical Literature, Henan University, on May 26, and at the Institute of Jewish Studies, Peking University, on June 2. • Presented a paper Conflict and Concord: Meandering on Biblical Visions of Social Relations in the Fourth International Colloquium on Chinese Biblical Studies held at Peking University, Beijing, May 31 - June 3. • Presented a paper on “Wirkungsgeschichte (History of Effects)” at the bi-annual meeting of the Ethnic Chinese Biblical Colloquium held at Princeton Theological Seminary June 9-12. • Visited Taiwan to review a Chinese Study Bible project co-sponsored by the Bible Society in Taiwan and the American Bible Society. Also preached and lectured at the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Taipei on August 8.

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Institute for Christian Formation & Leadership

Asset-Based Community Development Finding and Mobilizing Your Community’s Hidden Strengths and Power by the Rev. David Gortner, Ph.D.

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n mid-June, 2010, the Institute for Christian Formation and Leadership at VTS hosted a conference led by the Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) Institute. The conference, “Finding and Mobilizing Your Community’s Hidden Strengths and Power,” brought together 22 clergy, lay leaders, and seminarians from across the United States. For three days, participants learned how to discover and gather people’s gifts and capacities within communities, for the sake of building their own stronger communities. Leaders of the conference, Dr. John (Jody) Kretzmann and the Rev. Damon Lynch III, are nationally renowned leaders in this approach to community development. Jody (a dedicated Lutheran) and his colleague, Dr. John McKnight, formed the ABCD Institute at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Damon, senior

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in individuals, families, groups, informal networks, and agencies or institutions. Most other community organizing efforts attempt to uncover, clarify, and amplify neighborhood concerns and passions – usually related to what residents perceive as problems. While most service and government organizations focus primarily on needs and deficits, a sort of “glass half-empty” perspective on communities, the asset-based approach practices a “glass half-full” philosophy. This does not mean that the asset-based approach is simply Pollyanna: asset-organizers recognize the brokenness and dysfunction in the community, but primarily through the perspective that the many gifts and capacities available in individuals and a community have not been tapped, mustered, or collectively recognized.

pastor of New Prospect Baptist Church in Cincinnati, has been one of their core instructors for many years. The asset-based approach grew out of the community organizing movements born in Chicago – but differs in philosophy and practice from traditional community organizing networks that have followed the agitation and confrontation methods of Saul Alinsky. It also differs significantly from the relief-oriented approach most social service and government agencies – and for that matter, most churches – take. In short, an asset-based approach to community development works to bring the assets, strengths, and gifts that exist within a community to the surface and mobilizes them for the sake of the common good. These assets may be hidden or obvious,

An example that Kretzmann uses is the case of Maria, a young pregnant woman not yet graduated from high school. A needs-based approach might ask, “What problems is Maria facing, and where does she need assistance?” Maria would then be understood as high-risk, a potential recipient of medical and financial assistance, and possibly needing counseling. An interest-based approach might ask, “What does Maria care most about?” Maria would then be understood in terms of her concerns for the future of her child and herself, and the social forces and policies that fail to support her as much as they might. Through both of these approaches, we know nothing of Maria’s capacities. But an asset-based approach might ask, “What are Maria’s gifts, and what can she contribute?” Here, we learn that Maria is a singer recognized by her peers and neighbors for her beautiful voice. Maria becomes understood as an artist, a valued new member of a neighborhood church choir, and a mother-to-be in a network of experienced mothers who already have an established informal associations of mutual support.


ABCD grew out of Kretzmann and McKnight’s gentle critique of the traditional community organizing movements, as well as a severe critique of the top-down “specialist” approach to community development taken by governments, universities, and many non-profit organizations. ABCD’s basic approach is that every person, physical space, group, and organization in a community has capacities that have yet to be tapped and brought together for the common good (note: ABCD has a lot of similarities to Appreciative Inquiry, but moves beyond this to focusing on building relationships between different individuals, informal groups, agencies, and institutions.) When social service agencies, community organizers, and churches focus principally on deficits or problems, people are cast in helpless or needy roles which deny their own capacities, and force agencies to import solutions from outside the community. Such a deficit-based approach serves institutions by helping them fulfill their missions, and thus keeps them alive. But in the process, the focus on deficits denigrates people to a position of neediness and habitual readiness to be helped. In contrast, the asset-based approach rec-

Photo by Curtis Prather

Kretzmann began his career in sociology as a community organizer, and was an early protégé of his long-term colleague, John McKnight. Kretzmann and McKnight together learned community organizing alongside Saul Alinsky in the heady and high-impact days of Alinsky’s Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), the largest community organizing network in America. But they both came to recognize that there were limits to the long-term effectiveness of Alinsky’s model, particularly in terms of helping communities develop their own power for self-direction and self-governance.

ognizes that people in America and around the world are particularly artful at forming associations and groups to address their own needs and interests, and that the untapped power is in these groups could do great work for their communities. Damon Lynch III is the senior pastor of New Prospect Baptist Church in the Overthe-Rhine neighborhood of Cincinnati, an area that has continued to face challenges of poverty, crime, and under-employment for many years – similar to neighborhoods and communities found across the country. Over the past 20 years, Lynch has become a recognized leader in this community and a formidable voice in the world of Cincinnati politics. He has become one of the core community pastors. “It took me 10 years to get to the point of becoming a pastor of the broader community,” he said. Like Kretzmann, Lynch had been trained in traditional community organizing. But he became dissatisfied with the limited focus of traditional methods. “You know, it’s fun to put those ‘action items’ together, and to get the officials you are confronting to sit in a chair in front of a crowd and ask them questions that they are supposed to go on record answering ‘Yes’ or ‘No.’ It feels good, like you’re getting something done. And sometimes, you are. But there is a lot of work that isn’t getting done in your community while you’re busy focus-

Above: ABCD conference participants listen to a case study on the asset-based method of working in within communities. ing on those ‘action items.’” Lynch helped participants in the conference focus on the theology of asset-based community development. He began with a powerful interpretation of the parable of the talents. “These three servants of the master did not exist in isolation. They existed in a social system, a surrounding community. And we have to ask ourselves, ‘How did the servant with one talent survive? What in the system allowed him to assume that he could bury his talent? Was he relying on handouts from well-meaning sympathizers? Who else is responsible for the plight of the servant with one talent, by allowing that servant to get away with burying his talent?’” Lynch related a story that resonated deeply with the priests, pastors, lay leaders, and seminarians in the room. He said, “This asset-based approach seems easy. But it is not. It is so easy to drift back into deficitbased thinking and to focus on what someone needs rather than what someone has to contribute. I still slip back into that thinking, even after years as an ABCD

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Institute for Christian Formation & Leadership

Photo by Curtis Prather

Left: Damon Lynch III, senior pastor of New Prospect Baptist Church in Cincinnati, tells the story of “Hank” and his integration into the church.

organizer and teacher. I met a man—let’s call him Hank—who was known in the community as an alcoholic. He came by one day, asking for money. I decided to get all pastoral with him. I said, ‘Hank, why don’t you come on into church this Sunday? There are some people I’d love for you to meet, and you might find this a really good place for you.’ I was telling him what he really needed, right? But I was really thinking about the problems Hank had and how the church could help him. Hank responded by mumbling that he’d been meaning to get around to coming to church but hadn’t done it in a while, and that he’d try to make it. Then, I gave him some money and told him I expected to see him in church. He didn’t come, of course. This went on periodically over several months – Hank would appear, I’d get all pastoral, and he’d respond with embarrassment and make a vague promise to come. “I was getting frustrated and dreaded seeing Hank. But then, remembering my training, I started asking questions in the neighborhood. To people who knew Hank, I would ask what they knew about him. I heard again and again that he was a tuck-pointer. So, the next time I saw Hank and he asked for money, I told him,

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‘No, Hank, I’m through doing things for you. Now, what are you going to do for me?’ Hank was surprised by my response, and started telling me all about his needs and problems. I kept saying, “No, Hank, I’m not giving you anything more. What can you give me?” And, when he was about to turn away, I said, ‘You know, Hank, I heard you were a tuck-pointer.’ Hank looked at me, and asked, ‘How did you know that?’ I said, ‘People in this community told me. I started asking about you, and they told me.’ Hank straightened up and said, ‘Let me tell you – I’m not just a tuck-pointer. I’m the Brick Doctor.’ And he began to tell me all the ways in which he was able to work with bricks and fix walls. “Well, we had just gotten some office spaces for the church in a building nearby. I decided then and there that I would hire Hank to put the brick façade on the front of the building. I broke all the rules – I didn’t go to my church board, because they would have gotten all hung up about insurance (even though they didn’t worry about insurance when people from the church volunteered to do stuff like this). So, I hired him then and there. And he got to work. And he did a fantastic job. “And, the Sunday after the job was finished, there was Hank in one of the front rows in church, in a pressed white shirt. And I could tell he was listening intently to every word. “When I started by trying to get Hank the alcoholic to come to church, I got nobody. But when I called on Hank the tuck-pointer to help me, Hank the tuckpointer came to church. And when Hank the tuck-pointer came, Hank the alcoholic came with him.” These and other stories throughout the conference helped demonstrate the power of calling forth and releasing people’s capacities. And, as conference partici-

pants wrestled with applying the assetbased principles in their own settings, they realized how challenging it was to shift their thinking. One team from a parish in DC realized that they had only begun to scratch the surface in forming relationships with people in their surrounding neighborhoods; a vestry leader from Richmond said that he saw direct applications to the work he did with the board of education; two Doctor of Ministry students brought their learning from this conference directly to their work with their congregations and dioceses; and a seminarian said that he had experienced a breakthrough, a kind of conversion, in his thinking about people whom he wished to serve. Lay leaders Ford Rowan and Patty Johnson, from a network of lay social activists known as The Committee of Seventy (based in part at the National Cathedral but with members in cities across the United States), said that this conference helped them realize the power of the asset-based approach in expanding the service and advocacy work they were doing. They – and we – are eager to take the next step. As Lynch said, learning to work with communities in this way takes years of unlearning, and a steady practice of seeing people, groups, and institutions through the lenses of potential and giftedness rather than through they lenses of deficit and disorder. It is my hope that this approach will become an integral part of VTS’s education, formation, and training with our students. X

This conference was supported in part by The Committee of Seventy, a network of laypeople engaged in significant social relief, advocacy and action, based at the National Cathedral.


VTS Faculty Member Receives Lilly Research Grant Professor to Study Impact of Transition into Ministry Programs

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ow important are the years immediately following seminary in the development of strong, committed, wise pastoral leaders? What key things should new priests and pastors learn during their first years, and what impact do the experiences of those years have on new clergy? Virginia Theological Seminary has received a grant of $597,000 from Lilly Endowment Inc. to help find out. The Rev. David T. Gortner, Ph.D., professor of evangelism and Christian leadership and director of the Doctor of Ministry Programs, will lead the research to explore these questions in depth.

with them the insights gained and practices learned. But more questions remain: Why are these programs working? Which ones have the greatest impact on new clergy? What skills and habits for Christian leadership do these programs foster? How do new pastors and priests bring their new insights and practices for Christian leadership into their congregations? And where is the impact in the congregations served by these new clergy?

The project has a focus that is particularly important: a thorough exploration and study of the impact that the “Transition into Ministry” (TiM) programs have had on clergy leadership. For over 10 years, Lilly Endowment has funded 30 programs dedicated to supporting new clergy in their transition from student to pastor and fostering further development of their skills and habits for strong pastoral leadership. These programs range from residencystyled programs based in training congregations (such as the residency program at Christ Church in Alexandria) to peer- and mentor-support programs located in seminaries (such as VTS’ Second Three Years), judicatories, and geographic regions.

Gortner is no stranger to Lilly Endowment. For five years, he worked with Prof. John Dreibelbis at Seabury-Western Theological Seminary on an early major Endowment-funded study of clergy leadership effectiveness and congregational vitality. In this study, they developed interviews and surveys that focused on identifying how clergy thought and acted most effectively in a variety of leadership situations. Their research has been published in several journals and is being used for leadership development in several Episcopal dioceses across the United States. Gortner also worked on other Endowment-funded projects including the PLSE initiative (Pastoral Leadership Search Effort) to help congregations foster and encourage young leaders, and his own study of how young adults form unique faith communities.

It is already clear that these programs, which have touched the lives and vocations of nearly 1000 clergy, across many different Christian denominations, have had an impact. Participants in TiM programs are far less likely to drop out of ministry than are seminary graduates who have no network of support, learning, or accountability. New clergy who benefitted from these programs seem to be carrying

Trained as a developmental and organizational psychologist, he has little patience for blind faith when it comes to processes and results of training. “We in the church (and in any institution) are tempted to hold onto untested assumptions about what constitutes strong leadership and what experiences are important in the development of leaders,” he said. “But these assumptions may simply be ways

that institutions of the church avoid a real examination of their own habits. We would do well to make a closer study of our own work of mission, ministry, and leadership.” The Transition Impact Study will become a primary focus for Gortner and a team of project staff for the next three years. They will conduct surveys, interviews, and observations with clergy who have participated in TiM programs, as well as with clergy who did not benefit from such programs. They will also conduct surveys, 360 evaluations, and interviews with members of the congregations that TiM participants now serve. What they learn will be distributed for church leaders through web-based and print publications. “We hope to identify the practices and habits of leadership that the TiM programs foster,” Gortner explains. “We think that what we learn will have a significant impact on seminary and post-seminary training across denominations, for years to come.” X

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The Virginia Theological Seminary ANNUAL GIVING REPORT July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010

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he 2010 Virginia Theological Seminary Annual Report set within this Journal reflects on the Seminary’s role in God’s mission in the world. Mission is a word that has many meanings. When I was a child, I remember missionaries coming home on furlough and telling fascinating tales of faraway places. They brought more photographs than you wanted to see and they could talk forever. The traditional missionary, however, who journeyed out from western Christendom to heathen Africa has gone by the wayside. There is a new sort of missionary going forth from VTS these days. We recognize increasingly that mission includes parish ministry, school chaplaincy and the church plant. Mission is adapting the liturgy to reach our teenagers. Mission is supporting Christians in other countries who are making a difference and doing the work of social justice in our own cities.

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The missionaries or missioners who go forth from VTS are taught that God’s mission in the world of the 21st century involves conversation as well as conversion. Effective leaders trained at VTS will listen carefully to those with whom they disagree. Conversation that practices Anglican tolerance is much needed in our diverse, multi-cultural world. Today’s students are exposed on campus to leaders from other faith traditions because we believe that effective leaders must respect a person who lives out of another faith tradition, even as they learn to state clearly and to believe the core doctrines and values of the Christian tradition. But it is a fact: Conversion is not out-of-date. We are called as Christians to share the faith that is within us. We are not custodians of a tradition that needs no converts. It is meet and right to be a missioner who leads others to Jesus Christ. Ministerial and missional formation at VTS has never been about denominational

survival or housebound clergy who serve only the needs of the people who already “belong.” VTS graduates must be gifted preachers and teachers. They should be liturgists who attend carefully to worship details. Our graduates lead best when they understand the importance of pastoral care and appreciate fully that administering a parish or school or institution is also ministry in Christ’s holy name. But a leader, lay or ordained, shaped at VTS must also discover what it means to go into the Church and the world to preach the good news of Jesus Christ as a modern-day missioner. Training a new generation of missionaries requires funds we do not have. So, your gifts to Virginia Theological Seminary help us shape leaders who are effective in the household of the Church and in the world that God loves so much. I am pleased to report that the overall giving of alumni, friends and parishes, exclusive of foundation grants and


bequests, reached $1,332,670, exceeding $1 million for the fifth year in a row. Undesignated giving to the Annual Fund reached a new high of $780,250, a 6% increase in a year when many non-profits saw a decline in their Annual Fund. We are grateful for 260 new donors. There have been many workers in the vineyard: class stewards; phonathon callers; Monina Pangan in the office of Institutional Advancement; Ray Sabalis, director of Development and the Rev. Charles L Fischer III, director of Alumni, Annual Fund and Church Relations. These good people join me in being grateful for your generous hearts. Overall Annual Giving for the year, including foundation grants and bequests, was $1,657.852. The Annual Fund is a critical income stream for VTS and it must grow to insure effective leaders for the Episcopal Church in the years before us. Let me highlight our society for planned giving; two new scholarships which will help us form effective leaders; the Dean’s Roundtable and VTS Chapters initiative; and the 21st Century Fund for a 21st Century Seminary. FRANCIS SCOTT KEY SOCIETY Please remember the Francis Scott Key Society. We are grateful for those individuals who during their lifetime have made provisions in their estate plans for the future of the Seminary. Mrs. Jesse Trotter and the Rt. Rev. A. Theodore Eastman, distinguished leaders in our Seminary Community, continue to serve as co-chairs of the Society. They are currently 282 members of the FSK Society with 17 new members this past year. THE BRAGG AND FULLER SCHOLARSHIPS The family of the Rev. Dr. Reginald Fuller established a scholarship for a student who has promise in New Testament Studies. Dr. Fuller was Professor Emeritus of New Testament at VTS and world-renowned scholar and teacher. In May 2010 the family of Wayne Gladstone Bragg established a scholarship for an M.Div. student who feels called to minister with the poor and

disenfranchised. Dr. Wayne Bragg spent his life in servant ministry working with the poor and understood the transformational power of engaging in this work. DEAN’S ROUNDTABLE AND VTS CHAPTERS Virginia Theological Seminary is a Seminary for the nation and the world. We have never really been a regional seminary; North Carolina comes in second to Virginia with a large number of alumni. We want our numbers to continue to increase as we connect with every state and every diocese of the Episcopal Church. The initiative of the Dean’s Roundtables seeks to bring together old and new friends across the country who love the Episcopal Church; who care about theological education and the formation of leaders; and who recognize that VTS needs a very large friend base and a much larger Annual Fund to carry out its ministry and mission. Dean’s Roundtables have been established in Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, and, of course, Alexandria. We are on the cusp of having two west coast roundtables in Southern California and San Francisco. There will be Dean’s Roundtables in Richmond, Washington and a few other urban centers. The Dean will visit each Roundtable once each year for five years—and hopefully beyond. Others from the Holy Hill will connect with the Roundtable on a second annual visit. We are already welcoming members of the Dean’s Roundtables to the campus—and it is a great privilege to introduce newcomers to VTS. While we welcome friends to join the Dean’s Roundtables, we are encouraging our alumni/ae to form VTS Chapters across the country. We are providing a “small purse” to assist each chapter in its meetings. The Chapters will always meet at the same time as the Roundtables. Clearly, we can have more Chapters than Roundtables—and Charles Fischer will be working on this great challenge. We can be the Seminary God wants us to

be—if we listen to people of the Episcopal Church. Dean’s Roundtables and Chapters are “outposts” for listening as the Seminary finds its way of service. THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY FUND We continue to look for donors who will give us $1,000 annually. We’d like to have 2,100 such donors for our 21st Century Fund. We are glad that our donor base is growing. We still need to move beyond the 175 or so who give us at least $1,000 annually. God has a mission in the world, and we humbly believe that Virginia Theological Seminary is part of it. At one of our recent cultivation events for a new Dean’s Roundtable, a trustee remarked: “…at a time when people can get depressed about the state of the church, the guests last night left feeling encouraged and enthusiastic that VTS is alive and well and has a hopeful story to tell.” It cannot be said better. Thank you for helping us tell the story! The Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D.

Vice President of Institutional Advancement

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The following recognizes gifts received by Virginia Seminary between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010. Much care has been given to the preparation of this report. The names and titles listed are as requested by our friends and graduates. Errors or updates should be referred to the Office of Institutional Advancement at 703-461-1730 or by email at manderson@vts.edu. Thank you for your continued support.

VTS GIVING SOCIETIES LETTIE PATE WHITEHEAD EVANS SOCIETY: $25,000 + BISHOP MEADE SOCIETY: $10,000 - $24,999 DEAN’S SOCIETY: $ 5,000 - $ 9,999 HENRY ST. GEORGE TUCKER SOCIETY: $ 2,500 - $ 4,999 WILLIAM SPARROW SOCIETY: $ 1,000 - $ 2,499 ASPINWALL TOWER SOCIETY: $

500 - $ 999

SEMINARY HILL SOCIETY: $

150 - $ 499

LETTIE PATE WHITEHEAD EVANS SOCIETY Hamilton Baskerville Trust Mrs. Ann K. Bragg Arthur Vining Davis Foundations The Constance Dundas Foundation Lettie Pate Evans Foundation Mrs. Ilse B. Fuller The Rt. Rev. Carolyn Tanner Irish, ‘83 The Rev. Irene Clifford Jones, ‘03 The Henry Luce Foundation Clarence J. Robinson Foundation Trust George C. Thomas Trust

BISHOP MEADE SOCIETY The Rev. John Paul Carter, ‘47 The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads, ‘47 Robert G. C. Eads Jean Lykes Grace Foundation The Rev. and Mrs. James M. L. Grace, ‘05 Mr. Thomas M. Moore, ‘71 Jane Litle Peters Trust

St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Richmond, VA The Rev. and Mrs. James W. H. Sell, ‘69 The Rev. Robert Morgan Shaw, ‘43 Robert L. Young Trust

DEAN’S SOCIETY Suzanne S. Brock The Cartinhour Woods Foundation Christ Church Cathedral, Indianapolis, IN Dr. and Mrs. Dale Cloyd The Rev. Michele V. Hagans The Rev. Dr. J. Barney Hawkins IV The Rev. Linda Wofford Hawkins Mrs. Martha W. High Holmes I. Goode Trust The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Peter G. Kreitler, ‘69 Louise P. Overby Trust Ms. Sissy Poland Mrs. Ellen W. Polansky

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St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Burke, VA St. Christopher's Church, Gladwyne, PA St. John's Episcopal Church, McLean, VA St. John's Episcopal Church, Montgomery, AL St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Mobile, AL St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA Mr. and Mrs. Alexander H. Slaughter The Rev. and Ms. Wesley S. Williams, Jr. Ms. Caroline T. Woods Mrs. Kathleen C. Woods Ms. Margaret C. Woods Mrs. G. Cecil Woods

TUCKER SOCIETY All Saints' Episcopal Church, Hershey, PA Mr. and Mrs. David Booth Beers Ms. Ana-Mita Betancourt Ms. Elizabeth D. Camp Ruth Camp Campbell Foundation Calvary Episcopal Church, Memphis, TN Mary and J. P. Causey, Jr. Chapel of the Cross, Chapel Hill, NC Christ Church, Raleigh, NC Christ Church Christiana Hundred, Wilmington, DE Ellason and Molly Laird Downs Perpetual Charitable Trust The Rt. Rev. James M. Dyer Dr. Amelia J. Gearey Dyer, Ph.D. Ely Fund

Photo by Curtis Prather

2010 Annual Giving Report

Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Southern Pines, NC Mr. and Mrs. A. Hugh Ewing III Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund The Rev. and Mrs. George A. Hull, ‘81 Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, Alexandria, VA Mr. James R. Lowe, Jr., (H) ‘05 The Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D. and Mrs. Lesley Markham Mrs. Lockhart B. McGuire Mr. and Mrs. S. Ford Rowan St. John's Episcopal Church, Ocean Springs, MS St. Mark's Episcopal Church, San Antonio, TX St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Lynchburg, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Kansas City, MO St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, Wilson, NC The Rev. and Mrs. Patrick H. Sanders, Jr., ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. Roland S. Szadokierski The Rev. Janet E. Tarbox, ‘92 and Mr. Talmadge M. LeGrand Mr. and Mrs. William G. Thomas Trinity Episcopal Church, New York, NY Trinity Episcopal Church, Natchez, MS Mr. David F. Wright, ‘77

SPARROW SOCIETY Mr. and Mrs. A. Marshall Acuff, Jr. The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Gladstone B. Adams III, ‘80 Mrs. Sherodd Albritton


All Saints' Episcopal ChurchSharon Chapel, Alexandria, VA All Saints' Episcopal Church, Atlanta, GA All Saints' Episcopal Church, Greensboro, NC The Rev. Gina Arents, ‘09 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Robert P. Atkinson, ‘53 Baltimore Community Foundation Auguste and David Bannard Robinson F. and Mary Haskins Barker Charitable Foundation The Rev. Christopher H. Barker, Ph.D., ‘70 and Mrs. Mary P. Barker The Rev. Dr. Richard L. M. Barry, ‘68 The Rev. Cynthia O. Baskin, ‘95 The Rt. Rev. Nathan D. Baxter The Rt. Rev. Scott A. Benhase, ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. R. Dyke Benjamin The Rev. James G. Birney, ‘53 Mr. and Mrs. Julian M. Bivins, Jr. Charles Blair Testament Trust The Rev. Anne B. Bonnyman, ‘82 Mrs. Caroline Y. Brandt Mr. and Mrs. Harry Braswell Mr. David N. Brown, ‘09 The Rev. Lila B. Brown, ‘96 Col. and Mrs. Richard H. Brownley Mr. and Mrs. J. Stewart Bryan III Buck Mountain Episcopal Church, Earlysville, VA Mrs. Robert A. Burch The Rev. Augustus M. Burt, ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. Marvin P. Bush Cathedral of All Souls, Asheville, NC The Rev. Michael D. Chalk, ‘73 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. John B.

Chane, (H) ‘03 Dr. and Mrs. David H. Charlton Mr. Tak-Kei Cheong, ‘91 Christ & Grace Episcopal Church, Petersburg, VA Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, TX Christ Church Cathedral, Springfield, MA Christ Church Glendale, Glendale, OH Christ Episcopal Church, Roanoke, VA Church of St. John the Evangelist Episcopal, Flossmoor, IL Church of the Good Shepherd, Knoxville, TN Church of the Good Shepherd, Rangeley, ME Church of the Holy Apostles, Collierville, TN Church of the Holy Family, Chapel Hill, NC Emmanuel Church at Brook Hill, Richmond, VA Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Greenwood, VA Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Keyser, WV Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Bethesda, MD The Rev. Canon Thomas G. Clarke, ‘70 The Rev. and Mrs. Thomas D. Clay The Rev. Dr. Timothy B. Cogan, ‘59 Mr. Garrett V. Coleman The Rev. Kim L. Coleman, ‘01 The Community Foundation The Rev. Jan Naylor Cope

Dr. John R. Cope The Rev. and Mrs. James R. Crowder, ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tradewell Davis, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. H. Talmage Day Dr. Lynwood D.I. Day Diocesan Missionary and Church Extension Society Mrs. Julie M. Dokell Mr. W. Carter Doswell The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. A. Theodore Eastman, ‘53 The Rev. Beth H. Echols, ‘89 The Rev. Don Raby Edwards, D.D., ‘58 Ms. Elizabeth H. Farquhar The Rev. Charles W.B. Fels, ‘05 The Rev. and Mrs. Michael B. Ferguson, Sr., ‘93 The Rev. Paul W. Gennett, Jr., ‘92 Ms. Dolores R. Goble Grace Episcopal Church, Kilmarnock, VA Grace Memorial Episcopal Church, Lynchburg, VA The Rev. L. Roberts Graves, Jr., ‘63 The Rev. Dr. Rowan A. Greer, (H) ‘02 The Rev. A. Katherine Grieb, Ph.D., ‘83 Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, Jr. Mrs. William B. Hastings The Rev. Louis B. Hays, ‘99 The Rev. Judith A. Hefner, ‘96 The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church Col. and Mrs. William Michael Hix Dr. and Mrs. William A. Hobbs, Jr. The Rev. Nelson B. Hodgkins, ‘60

The Rt. Rev. Herman Hollerith IV The Very Rev. Martha J. Horne, ‘83 Dr. McDonald K. Horne III Ms. Elizabeth Cabell Jennings The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Shannon S. Johnston, ‘08 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Richard J. Jones, ‘72 Mrs. Alexander D. Juhan Ms. Anne M. Karoly, ‘97 The Rev. John I. Kilby, ‘59 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. W. Michie Klusmeyer, (H) ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Kozlowski, ‘11 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Edward H. Kryder, ‘53 The Rev. Lauren E. Kuratko. ‘05 The Rev. Ryan P. Kuratko, ‘06 Mr. Brian E. Ledgerwood The Rev. Mary Jayne Ledgerwood, ‘01 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Peter James Lee, ‘67 The Rev. Canon W. Grainger Lesesne, Jr., ‘01 The Rev. T. Stewart Lucas, ‘01 and Mr. Douglas Campbell The Rev. and Mrs. James Hugh Magers, ‘68 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. James R. Mathes, ‘91 Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Matz The Rev. George M. Maxwell, ‘61 The Rev. Roma W. Maycock, ‘83 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Gerald N. McAllister, ‘51 Dr. and Mrs. J. Kenneth McDonald The Rev. Jennifer G. McKenzie, ‘04 Mr. Kenneth McKenzie The Rev. Margaret McNaughton, ‘82 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. C. Thomas Midyette III, ‘66 The Rev. Ann C. Miller, ‘89 Mrs. Sally C. Miller, ‘54 The Rev. Catharine W. Montgomery, ‘98 Joan and Frank Mount The Hon. and Mrs. Robert J. Murray Olivet Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA The Rt. Rev. George E. Packard, ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. William H. Pardoe Dr. and Mrs. Allan M. Parrent, (H) ‘84 The Honorable and Mrs. Thomas R. Pickering, (H) ‘93 The Rev. John R. Pitts, ‘87

Left: Participants in the 2010 Summer Collegium for small church leaders give each other an enthusiastic greeting at the start of the program.

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2010 Annual Giving Report

Left: Senior, Julia Messer, leads the process out of Chapel at the end of the Service of Lessons and Carols last December.

Mr. Charles H. Prioleau The Very Rev. and Mrs. Harry H. Pritchett, Jr., ‘64 The Rt. Rev. Lawrence C. Provenzano Mr. and Mrs. Laurance M. Redway Mr. Benjamin Reid The Rev. Jennie L. Reid, ‘99 Mr. Robert B. Rice The Rev. Edward G. Robinson, ‘53 Ray and Robert Sabalis St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Virginia Beach, VA St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Annandale, VA St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Newport News, VA St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Boca Grande, FL St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC St. Barnabas' Episcopal Church, Upper Marlboro, MD St. Barnabas' Episcopal Church, Annandale, VA St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, Greenwich, CT St. David's Episcopal Church, Glenview, IL St. Georges Episcopal Church, Bossier City, LA St. James' Episcopal Church, Potomac, MD

St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church, York, PA St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, Houston, TX St. John's Church-Lafayette Square, Washington, DC St. John's Episcopal Church, West Point, VA St. Johns Episcopal Church, Tulsa, OK St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Durham, NC St. Mark's Cathedral, Shreveport, LA St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Louisville, KY St. Mary's-on-the-Highlands, Birmingham, AL St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, Dallas, TX St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Delray Beach, FL St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Smithfield, NC St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish, Washington, DC St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC

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St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Oxford, NC The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, (H) ‘08 The Rev. A. Wayne Schwab, ‘53 Mrs. Frederic W. Scott Dr. Timothy F. and Mrs. Martha W. Sedgwick The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. James J. Shand, ‘99 The Rev. Alfred R. Shands III, ‘54 Mr. and Mrs. John S. Shannon Judith H. Shaw The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. William R. Shiflet, Jr., ‘72 Ms. Susan L. Shillinglaw Mrs. Gregoria D. Smith The Rt. Rev. Philip A. Smith, ‘49 Mr. and Mrs. Ron Smith The Rev. Dr. Allison St. Louis, ‘00 State Farm Companies Foundation Mrs. Sarah D. Steptoe Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Stettinius The Memorial Church of the Prince of Peace, Gettysburg, PA Dr. and Mrs. William G. Thomas III Mrs. Stephen A. Trentman Trinity Church in the City of Boston, Boston, MA Trinity Episcopal Church, Upperville, VA

Mrs. Jesse M. Trotter The Rev. Peggy E., ‘95 and Mr. Jon F. Tuttle The Most Rev. Desmond M. Tutu, (H) ‘98 The Rev. David A. Umphlett, ‘04 Mr. and Mrs. E. Massie Valentine Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program The Rev. V. Alastair and Rhoda Votaw, ‘64 Dr. Mary Frances Wagley Ms. Betty J. Ward The Very Rev. and Mrs. Alan Kim Webster, ‘98 The Revs. Michaeland Helen White, ‘08, ‘95 The Rev. Christine R. Whittaker, ‘90 The Rev. Dr. J. Douglas Wigner, Jr., ‘72 and Ms. Nancy J. Hein The Rev. Barbara C. Willis, ‘05 The Rev. Herbert A. Willke, ‘54 Dr. and Mrs. Robert K. Wineland The Rev. and Mrs. Frank W. Young, ‘74 Ms. Heather Zdancewicz Mr. Donald Zdancewicz The Rev. Janet L. W. Zimmerman, ‘09 Zion Episcopal Church, Charles Town, WV

ASPINWALL TOWER SOCIETY The Rev. and Mrs. S. F. James Abbott, ‘66 The Rev. Ronald G. Abrams, ‘82 The Rev. Peter K. Ackerman, ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Adams The Rev. and Mrs. Charles D. Aiken, Jr., ‘63 The Rev. Stephen G. Alexander, ‘65 All Saints' Episcopal Church, Roanoke Rapids, NC All Souls' Church, Ansonville, Wadesboro, NC The Rev. and Mrs. George E. Andrews II, ‘71 Ascension Episcopal Church, Amherst, VA Roxana and Jim Atwood, ‘77 The Rev. Mariann C. Babnis, ‘04 The Rev. Katharine E. Babson, ‘92 Mr. and Mrs. John L. Bartlett, ‘04 The Rev. James P. Bartz, ‘99


The Rt. Rev. Larry R. Benfield, ‘90 The Rev. and Mrs. Errol K. Booth, ‘84 Victor A. Brown (USA Ret.) The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. George M. Calvert, ‘86 Charles Stewart Mott Foundation The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Winston B. Charles, ‘74 Christ Church Episcopal and Trinity Lutheran Church, Sheffield, MA Christ Episcopal Church, Bowling Green, KY Christ Episcopal Church, Denmark, SC Church of the Epiphany, Richmond, VA Church of the Good Shepherd, Burke, VA Church of the Holy Comforter, Burlington, NC Church of the Holy Innocents, Henderson, NC Church of the Messiah, Mayodan, NC Class of 2010 The Rev. Carlotta Cochran, ‘93 Mr. Thomas Cochran Cole & Denny Incorporated The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region The Rev. David Copley, ‘03 The Rev. Susan Copley, ‘03 Mr. John H. Cox Cunningham Chapel Parish, Millwood, VA

Below: The Rev. Anne-Marie Jeffery (VTS ‘04) greets MTS student, Wisnel Dejardin, at the Organization for Black Episcopalians conference held at VTS this past spring.

Mrs. Helen Weems Daley, ‘89 Mr. Thomas M. Daley The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Dannals, ‘81 Dr. Barbara Day, ‘04 The Rev. Charles C. Demeré, ‘54 The Rev. Thomas T. Diggs, ‘59 The Rt. Rev. Jane Holmes Dixon, ‘81 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. C. Andrew Doyle, ‘95 Mrs. Edward R. Dyer, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John Elwood The Rev. Dr. Margaret A. Faeth, ‘96 Mr. Paul Faeth The Rev. Dr. Roger A. Ferlo and Ms. Anne C. Harlan The Rev. and Mrs. Louis C. Fischer III, ‘59 The Very Rev. Zachary W.M. Fleetwood, ‘87 The Very Rev. H. Douglas Fontaine, ‘59 Mrs. Jeanne Fontaine Ms. Susan Ford The Rev. Richard P. Fowler, ‘59 Frederick E. and Jane A. Gilbert The Rev. J. Carlyle Gill, ‘76 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. M. Douglas Girardeau, ‘62 Ms. Kathryn A. Glover Mr. and Mrs. R. Edward Godsey The Rev. Dr. David T. Gortner and The Rev. Heather A. Vandeventer Grace & Holy Trinity Church, Richmond, VA Grace Episcopal Church, Weldon, NC The Rev. and Mrs. Lee Graham, Jr., ‘48 Ruth Tomlin Gronneberg, ‘59 The Rt. Rev. Edwin F. Gulick, Jr., ‘73 The Rt. Rev. E. Ambrose Gumbs, ‘87 Mrs. Elizabeth B. Hahn and Mr. Thomas S. Hahn Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hamilton IV

The Rev. Canon Victoria T. Hatch, ‘75 Charles and Barbara Heath The Rev. C. Read Heydt, ‘79 The Rev. John C. Humphries, Jr., ‘60 Mrs. Gretel T. James Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. James The Rev. Canon Anthony H. Jewiss, ‘92 Ms. Elizabeth A. Johnson Dr. Karl Johnson The Rev. Connie Jones, ‘01 The Rt. Rev. David B. Joslin The Rev. Patterson Keller, ‘56 The Rev. and Mrs. Pierce W. Klemmt Mrs. Alfred T. Knies, Jr. The Rev. Thomas Alonzo "Lonnie" Lacy, II, ‘06 The Rev. Dr. Richard B. Lampert, ‘00 The Very Rev. William B. Lane, ‘63 Ms. Donna R. Lefeve Mrs. David H. Lewis Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lewis The Rev. Dr. Lloyd A. Lewis, Jr., ‘72 Mrs. Angelica D. Light Mr. and Mrs. S. William Livingston, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Long, Jr. The Rev. Louise J. Lusignan, ‘88 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Andrew J. MacBeth, ‘00 Dr. and Mrs. Preston C. Manning, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. David A. Marshall, ‘03 The Rev. Nancy Horton McCarthy, ‘88 Mr. John A. McColley, ‘74 The Rev. Dr. Judith M. McDaniel Mr. Jackson McDaniel The Rev. Beth C. McNamara, ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Bowman Miller The Rev. Dr. Genevieve M. Murphy, ‘98 The Rev. Julie F. Nelson, ‘94 The Rev. Dr. Murray L. Newman, (H) ‘72 and Mrs. Janice Newman Mr. and Mrs. Blake T. Newton III Ms. Monica L. Parry The Rev. Michael R. J. Pipkin, ‘02 The Rev. Dr. Sam A. Portaro, ‘73 and Christopher Dionesotes The Rev. Dr. Peter R. Powell, Jr., ‘76 The Rev. Paul A. Price, ‘04 The Rev. Grant H. Robinson, ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Bret E. Russell Mr. and Mrs. William R. Russell, Jr. St. Chad's Episcopal Church, Albuquerque, NM St. Clement's Church, Berkeley, CA St. Dunstan's Episcopal Church, McLean, VA

St. James Episcopal Church, Danbury, CT St. James' Parish, Wilmington, NC St. John's Episcopal Church, Waynesboro, VA St. John's Episcopal Church, Wytheville, VA St. John's Episcopal Church, Wake Forest, NC St. Luke's Church, Simeon, Charlottesville, VA St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Lebanon, PA St. Mark's Episcopal Chapel, Storrs, CT St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Mount Kisco, NY St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Jonesboro, AR St. Mary Magdalene, Seven Lakes, NC St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, Salisbury, NC St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, Kernersville, NC St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, Sunbury, PA St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Tarboro, NC St. Paul's Memorial Chapel, Lawrenceville, VA St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Oxford, MS St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Birmingham, AL St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Durham, NC St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Heathsville, VA St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Rochester, NY St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, Washington, DC St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, Herndon, VA St. Timothy's in the Valley Episcopal Church, Hurricane, WV The Rev. Canon Louis C. Schueddig, ‘73 The Rev. Susan L. Scranton, ‘94 The Rev. and Mrs. Jeffrey S. Shankles, ‘05 The Rev. Melody W. Shobe, ‘06 The Rev. Robert C. Shobe, ‘06 Mr. and Mrs. E. Lee Showalter Mr. John W. Sinwell The Rev. Gail S. Smith, ‘93 Mr. David Smith Dr. W. Eugene Stern Mr. and Mrs. Edward Symes III The Rev. John G. Tampa, ‘98

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2010 Annual Giving Report

Elvira Tate Mrs. Janise C. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. Volney M. Taylor The Rev. William B. Taylor, Jr., ‘86 The Rev. Adam P. Thomas, ‘08 Trinity Episcopal Church, Scotland Neck, NC Trinity Episcopal Church, Indianapolis, IN Trinity Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Iowa City, IA Trinity Episcopal Church, Charlottesville, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Natchitoches, LA Trinity Memorial Episcopal Church, Binghamton, NY Ms. Marian Trotter The Rev. and Mrs. James L. Tucker, ‘52 The Rev. Diane E. Vie, ‘07 The Rev. Todd M. Vie, ‘07 The Rev. Dr. Franklin E. Vilas, Jr., ‘59 Mr. Michael Vreeland Ware Episcopal Church, Gloucester, VA The Rev. and Mrs. Mark D. Wilkinson, ’04, ‘04 Mrs. Daphne R. Williams The Rev. Ann B. Willms, ‘09 Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas G. Wilson III The Rev. William A. Yon, ‘55 The Rev. Luther Zeigler, ‘07

SEMINARY HILL SOCIETY Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Abbott, ‘92 The Honorable and Mrs. Charles D. Ablard Mr. and Mrs. Gary L. Abrecht Mr. and Mrs. J. Marshall Acee, Jr. Mr. Anthony B. Adams The Very Rev. and Mrs. Jerry D. Adinolfi, Jr., ‘96 The Rev. and Mrs. Martin L. Agnew, Jr., ‘67 Dr. and Mrs. Perry B. Alers The Rev. and Mrs. John D. Alfriend, ‘59 Mr. Matthew Anderson The Rev. William C. Anderson, ‘02 The Rev. Robert Hancock Armstrong, ‘63 The Rev. Dr. Robert D. Askren, ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Ayres, ‘83 The Rev. Canon Nathaniel Luke Back, ‘02 The Rev. Brett P. Backus, ‘08 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Douglass M. Bailey III, ‘64

The Rev. and Mrs. Edwin P. Bailey, ‘55 The Rev. John Patrick Baker, ‘84 The Rev. Dr. Edna J. Banes, ‘88 The Rev. and Mrs. Donald S. Barrus, ‘52 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Allen L. Bartlett, Jr., ‘58 The Rev. Robert L. Bast, ‘47 The Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Bayfield, ‘59 The Rev. Rosemary E. Beales, ‘05 Dr. Graham Beard Mrs. Marcia H. Bennett The Rev. Gloria K. Berberich, ‘76 Steve and Ginny Bergen The Rev. and Mrs. Alden Besse, ‘51 The Rev. and Mrs. James C. Blackburn, ‘59 Mr. Duncan W. Blair The Rev. Barbara K. Blakemore, ‘90 Mr. William A. Blakemore Mrs. William W. Blood, ‘62 The Rev. Dr. William E. Blottner, ‘56 The Rev. Robert S. Blumenstock, ‘88 The Very Rev. Kathleen M. Bobbitt, ‘93 The Rev. Mitchell and Beth Bojarski, ‘08, ‘08 The Rev. Vaughan P. L. Booker, ‘92 The Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Bowers, ‘56 The Rt. Rev. David C. Bowman, ‘60 The Rev. Dr. Locke E. Bowman, Jr. Mrs. Cynthia R. Boyer Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Barrows The Rev. Kenneth H. Brannon, ‘03 The Rev. Anne Elizabeth Bridgers, ‘98 Mr. J. D. Bridgers III Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Bridges, Jr. Ms. Annie W. Brock The Rev. Charles F. Brock, ‘07 The Rev. and Mrs. John T. Broome, ‘58 The Rev. and Mrs. Dewey E. Brown, Jr., ‘01 The Rev. and Mrs. Percival G. Brown, ‘72 Mrs. Joseph L. Brown, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Wm. Hill Brown III, (H) ‘79 The Rev. Robert F. Browning, Jr., ‘06 The Rev. J. Todd Bruce, ‘07 The Rev. John Budde Dr. Mitzi J. Budde Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Buford Mr. Charles H. Bullock Ms. Pamela J. Jewett-Bullock Mrs. Jere Bunting, Jr. Mrs. Beryl O. Burke The Rev. Mary R. Busse, ‘00 The Rev. and Mrs. Ralph M. Byrd, Jr., ‘63 Randolph and Mary Kay Cabell

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Ms. Yvonne D. Callahan The Rev. Catherine M. Campbell, ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Hugh L. Campbell Ms. Stacy Carlson The Rev. Alison C. Carmody, ‘00 The Rev. Diane P. Carroll, ‘03 Ms. Betty F. Carter The Rev. Rodney L. Caulkins, ‘66 Mr. Don A. Chamblee, ‘79 The Rt. Rev. Gordon T. Charlton, Jr., ‘49 The Rev. Dr. Barbara T. Cheney, ‘80 The Rev. K. Dexter Cheney Mrs. Leslie B. Chisholm Christ Church Cathedral, Lexington, KY Christ Church, I. U. Parish, Worton, MD Christ Episcopal Church, Poughkeepsie, NY Christ Episcopal Church, Denmark, SC Church of the Advent, Williamston, NC Church of the Epiphany, Summerville, SC Church of the Incarnation, Mineral, VA Church of the Redeemer, Baltimore, MD Church of the Transfiguration, Braddock Heights, MD The Rev. Albert L. Clark, ‘58 The Rev. Dr. Cheryl L. Clark, ‘02 Mr. Warren Clark, Jr., ‘05 The Rev. Frederick C. Clarkson, ‘08 The Hon. and Mrs. George M. Cochran Mrs. Sarah Hill Langhorne Colhoun The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis The Community Foundation of Louisville The Rev. Alan B. Conley, ‘59 The Rev. Doyt L. Conn, Jr., ‘03 The Rev. Robert D. Cook, ‘61 Mr. and Mrs. Clarke T. Cooper, Jr. Ms. Mary Grace Corey The Rev. and Mrs. John D. Crandall, ‘69 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. Crewdson, ‘60 Mr. and Mrs. Ian Croft Mr. and Mrs. David Crosby, ‘12 The Rev. Richard S. Crowell The Rev. and Mrs. Carleton S. Cunningham, Jr., ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. George A. Currie The Rev. Irving T. Cutter IV, ‘98 Mrs. Rae W. Dahlinger The Rev. Randolph K. Dales, ‘66

The Rev. Dr. Alexander S. Daley The Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel, 3rd, ‘72 Ms. Elaine F. Davies Dr. Ellen F. Davis and Dr. Dwayne Huebner Col. and Mrs. James W. Davis, Jr. Ms. Gail Dawson, ‘03 The Rev. George H. Dawson, ‘61 The Rev. J. William DeForest, ‘96 The Rev. Nancy DeForest, ‘96 The Rev. Robert B. Dendtler, ‘83 The Rev. John Denham, ‘56 Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Denious Mrs. W. Gilbert Dent The Rev. Whitney J. DeVine, ‘88 Mr. Craig DeVine The Rev. Lark S. Diaz The Rev. Robert W. Dickey, ‘60 Mrs. John H. Diehl III Ms. Sara A. Dillich The Rev. Philip M. Dinwiddie, ‘02 Diocese of Rhode Island Diocese of Southwestern Virginia Mrs. Charles J. Dobbins The Rev. Robin D. Dodge, ‘99 and Mrs. Therese M. Saint-Andre Mrs. Dorothy L. Dodson Ms. Louise Day Dodson, ‘99 The Rev. and Mrs. H. Arthur Doersam, ‘53 The Very Rev. Todd M. Donatelli, ‘87 The Rt. Rev. Herbert A. Donovan, ‘57 Dr. Mary S. Donovan The Rev. Sara H. Dover, ‘87 Mr. Julian R. Dugas, Esq. The Rev. Dr. Rosemarie L. Duncan, ‘05 The Rev. William M. DuncanO'Neal, ‘62 The Rev. Dr. Frank G. Dunn, ‘09 and Joseph A. Casazza The Rev. and Mrs. Lester E. Durst, ‘90 Mrs. Claude F. DuTeil, ‘49 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Charles F. Duvall, ‘60 The Rev. Daniel W. Eckman, Jr., ‘72 The Rev. Stephen B. Edmondson and Ms. Cynthia Hess The Rev. and Mrs. William F. Egelhoff, ‘57 The Rev. Robert G. Eidson, ‘61 The Rev. Amanda B. Eiman, ‘07 Mr. Earl E. Eisenhart, Jr. The Rev. William T. Elliott, ‘51 The Rev. Eleanor L. Ellsworth, ‘90 The Rev. Dr. Keith R. Emerson, ‘87 The Rev. Sandra L. Etemad, ‘06 The Rev. and Mrs. Donald L. Farrow, ‘53 The Rev. James C. Fenhagen II, ‘54 The Rev. Richard E. Fichter, Jr., ‘01


The Rev. and Mrs. Charles L Fischer III, ‘09 The Rev. Jeff W. Fisher, ‘04 The Rev. J. William Flanders, Jr., ‘62 The Rev. Jonathan H. Folts, ‘96 The Rev. Kimberly S. Folts, ‘94 Catherine and Alan Ford Foundation For The Carolinas The Rev. Dr. Allie Washington Frazier, Jr., ‘61 The Rev. Leonard W. Freeman, ‘69 Dr. John L. Fuller The Rev. J. Gary Fulton, ‘72 The Rev. Fran Gardner, ‘06 The Rev. John B. Gardner, ‘02 The Rev. Rachel E. Gardner The Rev. Denise D. Giardina, ‘79 The Rt. Rev. Wendell N. Gibbs, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Elizabeth M. Gibson, ‘08 Mrs. Charles Waters Gilchrist Mr. and Mrs. John B. Gillett Mrs. Kay G. Glenday Dr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Glover, (H) ‘86 The Rev. C. Neal Goldsborough, ‘81 The Rev. Sarabeth Goodwin, ‘05 The Rev. Linda K. Gosnell, ‘05 The Rev. Samuel F. Gouldthorpe, Jr., ‘57 The Rev. and Mrs. N. Brooks Graebner, ‘85 Grace Episcopal Church, Hopkinsville, KY Grace Episcopal Church, Middleway, WV The Rev. Earnest N. Graham, ‘01 and The Rev. Shirley E. SmithGraham, 02 The Rt. Rev. Duncan M. Gray III, ‘75 The Rev. Giulianna M. Gray, ‘08 The Rev. Peter W. Gray, ‘08 The Rev. Timothy H. Grayson, ‘07 The Rev. Paula C. Green, ‘04 Mrs. Anna S. Greenwood The Rev. and Mrs. David J. Greer, ‘55 Mrs. Reginald C. Groff Mr. and Mrs. Bradley H. Gunter Mrs. Grace D. Guthrie Capt. and Mrs. William S. Guthrie, USN (Ret) The Rev. Robert L. Haden, Jr., ‘64 The Rev. Jacques B. Hadler Dr. Susan L. Hadler Mrs. Jane M. Hague, ‘84 The Rev. Dr. William Hague, ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Edwin King Hall The Rev. Samuel L. Hall, ‘56 The Rev. Jay D. Hanson, ‘62 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Donald G. Hanway, Jr., ‘71 Capt. and Mrs. William D. Harkins, USN (Ret)

The Wayne Gladstone Bragg Scholarship Fund In May 2010 the family of Wayne Gladstone Bragg established a scholarship fund at Virginia Theological Seminary in his honor. The purpose of this fund is to enable a seminarian studying for a Masters of Divinity, who feels called to minister with the poor and disenfranchised, to continue his or her course of study; or to support a seminarian for a Masters of Divinity who wishes to spend a summer internship in a project or ministry in a developing country. Such project or ministry shall be affiliated with an Episcopal or Anglican diocese, parish, or church-related institution. Dr. Wayne Bragg was a man who spent his life in servant ministry and had a special interest in working with people from Latin American countries. As a professor of Sociology, he taught Third World Issues and spent much of his academic life setting up internships for students in developing countries. He mentored and encouraged his student interns to share the lives and cultures of the people they were serving and to work on sustainable development projects in the host countries. He developed and directed an innovative HNGR program (Human Needs and Global Resources) at Wheaton College in 1976 that sent college students around the world to help those in need. He had a passion for working with the poor and understood the transformational power of engaging in such work. At Wheaton College this past May for those having completed their HNGR program internships and were graduating, his granddaughter included in those being honored, they gave a brief history of the program and Wayne’s contribution, summing it this way: “Dr. Wayne Bragg was HNGR’S first director. He lived and breathed Matthew 25 -- ‘I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink. I was a stranger and you invited me in. I needed clothes and you clothed me. I was sick and you looked after me. I was in prison and you came to visit me.’“ His children wrote that he “..... selflessly dedicated his life work, heart and soul, to help educate and enhance the lives of others. He will be sorely missed not only by his family, friends, and associates; but, also by a world community that has been touched by his life.” That was Wayne.

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Above: Middlers (from left to right,) Meghan Holland, Rebecca Edwards, Matthew Kozlowski, and Andrew D’Angio White at the fall Variety Show.

The Rev. Anne M. Harris, ‘08 The Rev. and Mrs. John C. Harris, ‘55 The Rev. Ladd K. Harris, ‘66 Ms. Kathleen Hartnett and Ms. Ellen Marcus The Rev. W. Scott Harvin, ‘57 The Rev. Nanese A. Hawthorne, ‘03 The Rev. Valerie J. Hayes, ‘09 The Rev. Bret B. Hays, ‘08 The Rev. Stephen D. Hein, ‘80 The Rev. Daniel R. Heischman, D. Min. The Rev. Dr. James R. Henry, ‘65 The Rev. and Mrs. Joseph H. Hensley, Jr., ‘07 Mrs. Robert D. Herzog The Very Rev. and Mrs. Archibald M. Hewitt, ‘54 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Hewson, Jr. The Rev. Mellie Hussey Hickey, ‘77 The Rev. Nancy S. Hildebrand, ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Gene Hitchcock Mary Buford and Frederick Hitz Ms. Margret Hjalmarson Mr. James E. Hoben Miss Ethel P. Hoffman The Rev. and Mrs. Harry L. Hoffman III, ‘57

Mr. and Mrs. John Holden The Rev. Sarah D. Hollar, ‘03 The Rev. Richard H. Holley, ‘64 Dr. William F. Honaman, (H) ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Keith Hook Mr. and Mrs. Roland Hoover The Rev. Charles K. Horn, ‘55 The Rev. Peter M. Horn, ‘61 The Rev. and Mrs. Lance C. Horne, ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. Morris Hoven Mrs. Boyd R. Howarth The Rt. Rev. Sam B. Hulsey, ‘58 The Rev. Richard M. Humm, ‘08 The Rev. and Mrs. Frederic D. Huntington, ‘79 The Rev. Preston B. Huntley, Jr., ‘68 The Rev. Jeffrey C. Huston, ‘05 IBM International Corporation The Rev. and Mrs. Russell W. Ingersoll, ‘65 The Rev. and Mrs. Clyde L. Ireland, ‘54 Ms. Kimberly S. Jackson, ‘10 Ms. Jean Jackson-Mason Mr. James P. Jarrard The Rev. Kedron D. Jarvis, ‘02 The Rev. George W. Jenkins, ‘65 Jenzabar, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas F. John Dr. Marilyn T. Johns, D. Min., ‘05 The Rev. Doris B. Johnson, ‘99 Mr. and Mrs. Gordon O. F. Johnson The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Robert H. Johnson, ‘63

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The Rev. Andrew B. Jones, ‘02 The Rev. Constance M. Jones, ‘03 The Rt. Rev. David C. Jones, ‘68 Vernon and Lillian Jones, ’48, ‘47 The Rev. Katherine H. Jordan, ‘92 The Rev. Linda M. Kapurch, ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Kelly The Rev. Marguerite S. Kenney, ‘77 The Rev. and Mrs. Walter W. Kesler, ‘79 Joel T. and Mary Elizabeth T. Keys, ‘73 The Rev. and Mrs. Charles E. Kiblinger, ‘66 Dr. Elisabeth M. Kimball, Ph.D. King of Peace Episcopal Church, Kingsland, GA The Rev. Ruth L. Kirk, ‘89 The Rev. Jessica T. Knowles, ‘10 Ms. Ann Korky Dr. Elizabeth Kryder-Reid The Rev. Thomas M. Kryder-Reid, ‘86 La Iglesia El Buen Pastor, Durham, NC The Rev. Christy E. Laborda, ‘07 Elizabeth Fleming Lacy The Rev. Peter M. Larsen, ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. James A. Lawrence The Rev. and Mrs. Robert Lawthers, ‘59 The Hon. James A. Leach, (H) ‘00 Mrs. Chrishelle Leonard The Rev. Sean T. Leonard, ‘06 Mr. Charles W. Leslie, Jr. The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Russell J. Levenson, Jr., ‘92

The Rev. Dr. Sandra M. Levy, ‘94 and Dr. Leon H. Levy John G. Lewis, ‘97 and Patricia G. Bridwell The Rev. Richard H. Lewis, ‘63 The Rev. Sarah V. Lewis Mr. Theodore M. Lewis The Rev. Allison S. Liles, ‘06 The Rev. Eric J. Liles, ‘07 The Rt. Rev. Gary R. Lillibridge, ‘82 Mrs. Sara Ann Lindsey Thomas and Dorothy Linthicum Kevin and Julia Lloyd, ’00, ‘01 The Rev. Dr. Harold J. Lockett, ‘04 Mrs. Nancy I. Long The Rev. Thomas M. Long, ‘75 The Rev. Richard A. Lord, ‘81 The Rt. Rev. Henry I. Louttit, Jr., ‘63 The Rev. David W. Lovelace, ‘76 The Rev. Ronald J. Lynch, ‘67 Mrs. Arthur L. Lyon-Vaiden Mr. Arthur W. Machen, Jr. The Rev. Morgan M. MacIntire, ‘08 The Rev. Anne S. MacNabb, ‘04 Robert L. and Jean A. Major Janet Malcolm The Rev. Gary B. Manning, ‘02 Mrs. C. Gresham Marmion, ‘33 The Rev. Ann F. Martens, ‘05 The Rev. and Mrs. Samuel A. Mason, ‘73 The Rev. and Mrs. Claud W. McCauley, ‘55 The Rev. John S. McDuffie, ‘87 The Rev. Dr. Michael T. McEwen, ‘88 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. H. Coleman McGehee, Jr., ‘57 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Y. McGehee, ‘12 The Rev. Clifton J. McInnis, Jr., ‘56 The Rev. Sheila N. McJilton, ‘99 Mrs. Dorris W. McNeal The Rev. Charles C. McNeer, ‘63 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Charlie F. McNutt, Jr., D.D., ‘56 The Rev. Canon Glenda R. McQueen Dawkins, ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. Robert McQuie The Rev. Dr. Joyce A. Mercer and The Rev. Dr. Lawrence Golemon The Rev. Patricia Merchant, ‘74 Merchants Hope Episcopal Church, Hopewell, VA Mr. and Mrs. Hugh S. Meredith The Rev. Susan L. Merrin, ‘05 The Rev. Andrew T. P. Merrow, ‘81 The Rev. James P. Metzger, ‘63 The Rev. Dr. Charles W. Midkiff, ‘87 The Rev. Luther D. Miller, Jr., ‘50 The Rev. Bollin M. Millner, Jr., ‘79 Minor Foundation, Inc. Rabbi and Mrs. Jack L. Moline


Mrs. Ronald C. Molrine The Rev. Anne Duval Monahan, ‘82 Mr. Robert L. Montague III The Rt. Rev. James W. Montgomery The Rev. Jennifer G. Montgomery, ‘98 and The Rev. Joseph Glaze The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Robert M. Moody, ‘66 The Rev. Michael O. Moore, ‘65 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Edward Morgan III, ‘55 Mr. Gerald Morgan, Jr. The Rev. James C. Morgan, ‘69 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Morris, ‘57 Mr. and Mrs. Sedgwick L. Moss The Rev. Gwynneth J. Mudd, ‘92 The Rev. George D. Muir, ‘82 Mrs. Kay C. Murray Mrs. Beatrice W. Myers Mrs. Susan M. Nelsen Dr. and Mrs. C. M. Kinloch Nelson The Rev. John W. Newton IV, ‘08 Mr. Christopher Northrup The Rev. Rachel A. Nyback, ‘04 The Rev. Dr. Carol Pinkham Oak The Rev. Dr. Jeffrey Oak The Rev. Cesar S. Olivero, ‘03 Mrs. Robert Matthew Olton, ‘33 The Rt. Rev. Benjamin O. Omosebi, ‘82 The Rev. John J. Ormond, ‘53 Mrs. H. Paul Osborne The Rev. Janne Alro Osborne, ‘94 The Rev. Jennifer OvenstoneSmith, ‘03 The Rev. Ronald M. Owen, ‘08 Mr. Merlin W. Packard The Rev. Beth A. Palmer, ‘03 Mrs. Monina B. Pangan Mrs. Everett Parke Mrs. Jean Parkins-Edens The Rev. William C. Parnell, ‘89 The Very Rev. Charles F. Parthum III, ‘87 Ms. Barbara A. Passut The Rev. J. Frederick Patten, ‘67 Mr. Arthur E. Peabody, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. William N. Peabody, ‘63 Jack and Penny Pearson Mrs. Sharon Ely Pearson, ‘03 The Rev. and Mrs. Charles F. Penniman, Jr., ‘57 The Rev. J. Joseph Pennington, Jr., ‘71 The Rev. Cynthia M. PetersonWlosinski, ‘82 The Rev. Stephen S. Wlosinski The Rev. Joy Ogburn Phipps, ‘88 Mr. Mark Pilling Mrs. Olivine J. Pilling

Dr. Harry W. Pollock, ‘69 The Rev. Philip G. Porcher, Jr., ‘57 The Rev. Blanche L. Powell, ‘75 The Rev. Robert D. Price, ‘60 The Very Rev. Dr. Randall L. Prior, ‘70 Marjorie M. and Jerome F. Prochaska The Rev. Judith Harris Proctor, ‘96 The Rev. Robert A. Pruitt, ‘07 and The Rev. Jessica K. Hitchcock Dr. Frederick Rahal The Rev. William L. Rawson, ‘67 Mrs. Judith L. Reddig The Rev. Michael D. Reddig, ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. Gant Redmon The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. David B. Reed, ‘51 The Rev. and Mrs. Manney C. Reid, ‘51 The Very Rev. and Mrs. Richard Reid, (H) ‘72 The Rev. and Mrs. F. Lee Richards, ‘51 Mrs. Robert H. Richardson The Rev. Dr. Hill C. Riddle, ‘64 The Rev. W. Blake Rider, ‘04 The Rev. Dr. Anne Gavin Ritchie, ‘78 The Rev. Michael E. Robinson, ‘92 Dr. and Mrs. Dudley F. Rochester Ms. Ann F. Roebuck Mr. and Mrs. Donald V. Romanik The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Sean W. Rowe, ‘00 The Rev. Stephen L. Rudacille, ‘66 The Rev. Jan C. Rudinoff, ‘72 The Rev. Gary B. Rundle, ‘62 Mrs. Marianne Van Vorst Ryan The Rev. David W. Sailer, ‘67 St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Waco, TX St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Tifton, GA St. Edward's Episcopal Church, San Jose, CA St. James' Episcopal Church, Montross, VA St. James Episcopal Church, Mooresville, NC St. James the Less Episcopal Church, Ashland, VA St. John's - St. Mark's Church, Grifton, NC St. John's Episcopal Church, Battleboro, NC St. John's Episcopal Church, Holbrook, MA St. John's Episcopal Church, Murray, KY St. Katherine's Episcopal Church, Williamston, MI St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Grants Pass, OR

St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Plainview, TX St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Hampton, VA St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Speed, NC St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Madisonville, KY St. Matthias' Episcopal Church, Grafton, WV St. Michael and All Angel's Episcopal Church, Columbia, SC St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Milton, MA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Thomasville, NC St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Altus, OK St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Montvale, NJ St. Paul's-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, Winchester, VA St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Del Mar, CA St. Philip's Episcopal Church, Circleville, OH St. Stephen's Cathedral, Harrisburg, PA St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Huntsville, TX St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Reidsville, NC St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, McLean, VA St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Hamilton, NY St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Garden City, KS St. Thomas' Parish, Hancock, Hancock, MD The Rev. Lisa A. Saunders, ‘07 The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick E. Scharf, Jr., ‘88 Mr. Peter Schultheis Schwab Charitable Fund The Rev. Jack S. Scott, ‘58 The Rev. Carol Westerberg Sedlacek, ‘94 The Rev. Marcia A. Sessions, ‘91 Mrs. John W. Shackleton Major Stuart G. Shafer, ‘78 The Rev. John Edward Shields, ‘84 The Rev. Harrison T. Simons, D.D., ‘07 Mr. David L. Simpson, Jr., ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Simpson, Sr. The Rev. Dr. Carey E. Sloan III, ‘65 The Rev. Frank F. Smart, Jr., ‘41 The Rev. Dr. Benjamin B. Smith, LHD, ‘54 Jane Barber Smith

The Rev. Father J. Larrie Smith, ‘73 The Rev. Dr. Leslie C. Smith, ‘69 The Rev. and Mrs. Ralph W. Smith, ‘50 The Rev. Thomas R. Smith, ‘57 The Rev. Shirley E. Smith-Graham, ‘02 and The Rev. Earnest N. Graham III, ‘01 The Rev. Thelma A. Smullen, ‘84 and Mr. John Smullen The Rev. Robin Thomas Soller, ‘89 and Mr. Jon Soller Mr. Peter Frederick Spalding, ‘98 The Rev. Fr. Benjamin E. SpeareHardy II, ‘90 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Leon P. Spencer, Jr., ‘89 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. John S. Spong, ‘55 The Rev. Dr. Virginia F. Stanford, ‘93 The Rev. John R. Stanton, ‘53 The Rev. Isabel F. Steilberg, ‘92 The Rev. Canon Edward L. Stein, ‘72 The Rev. Kyle D. Stillings, ‘07 Ms. Margaret P. Stillman The Rev. and Mrs. Steven R. Strane, ‘78 The Rev. Canon Mary C. Sulerud, ‘88 and Mr. Peder A. Sulerud The Rev. Catherine W. Swann, ‘99 and Mr. Robert Swann The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. William E. Swing, ‘61 The Rev. Charles R. Sydnor, Jr., ‘70 The Venerable Charles B. Tachau, ‘63 The Rev. John D. Talbird, Jr., ‘65 The Rev. Elizabeth P. Tappe, ‘77 The Rev. James M. Taylor, ‘94 The Rev. William N. Tedesco, ‘74 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. C. Cabell Tennis, ‘64 The Rev. Dr. Patricia M. Thomas, ‘79 and Dr. Hoben Thomas The Rev. Dr. Peter G. Thomas, ‘63 The Rev. Sherry Hardwick Thomas, ‘89 The Rev. Catherine M. Thompson, ‘00 The Rev. Michael K. Thompson, ‘67 The Rev. Mary Brennan Thorpe, ‘09 and The Rev. Dr. Douglas Thorpe Mrs. R. Carmichael Tilghman The Rev. Edward J. Tracy, ‘95 and Mrs. Lee A. Tracy The Rev. James A. Trimble, Jr., ‘56 The Rev. Sarah M. Trimble, ‘89 Trinity Ecumenical Parish, Moneta, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Staunton, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Meredith, NH

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Trinity Episcopal Church, Fuquay-Varina, NC Trinity Episcopal Church, Glen Arm, MD Trinity Episcopal Church, Wauwatosa, WI Mr. William P. Trotter The Rev. and Mrs. Malcolm E. Turnbull, ‘70 The Rev. Clair F. Ullmann, ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. E. Massie Valentine, Jr. The Rev. Canon Samuel Van Culin, Jr., ‘55 The Rev. Sven L. vanBaars, ‘08 and The Rev. Jennifer S. Kimball, ‘04 Kathleen vanEsselstyn Mr. and Mrs. Grant B. Varner, Jr. Vauters Church, Loretto, Champlain, VA The Rev. and Mrs. Robert Vickery, Jr., ‘76 The Rt. Rev. Charles G. vonRosenberg, ‘74 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Francis H. Wade, ‘66 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. James E. Waggoner Jr., ‘79 Joyce Bogardus Walker, ‘85 The Rt. Rev. Orris G. Walker, Jr. The Rt. Rev. Leigh A. Wallace, Jr., ‘62 The Rev. Cynthia B. Walter, ‘03 The Rev. Dr. Charles L. Walthall, ‘01 Captain and Mrs. Raymond E. Ward The Rev. Oran E. Warder, ‘88 Mr. Guilford D. Ware Mrs. Marshall T. Ware (Tricia) Mr. Gerald L. Warren, ‘04 The Rev. Dr. Emery Washington, Sr., ‘61 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. William J. Watson III, ‘03 The Rev. and Mrs. David F. Wayland, ‘62 The Rev. Joseph T. Webb III, ‘64 The Rev. Eileen E. Weglarz, ‘02 Mrs. Sarah White The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Marlin L. Whitmer, ‘55 The Rev. Antoinette R. Wike, ‘82 Miss Jane F. Williams The Rev. and Mrs. Stephen G. Williamson III, ‘65 The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick W. Willis, Jr., ‘65 The Rev. Thomas L. Wilson, ‘08 Ms. Maureen Wilson-Jarrard The Rev. Canon Flora Winfield, (H) ‘10 Mrs. Donnan Wintermute The Rev. and Mrs. Rhett Y. Winters, Jr., ‘49

The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. John W. Wires, ‘72 The Rev. Canon Nancy H. Wittig, D. Min., ‘72 The Rev. and Mrs. Robert F. Wollard, ‘63 The Rev. and Mrs. Daniel O. Worthington, Jr., ‘76 Ms. Ann McJimsey Yarborough, ‘96 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. John Y. Yieh The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Alexander C. Zabriskie, Jr., ‘56 Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ziegler

FRIENDS OF THE SEMINARY Ms. Aurie Acciavatti Ms. Jennifer C. Addington The Rev. Orlando J. Addison, ‘00 The Rev. Edward T. Adkins, ‘45 The Rev. Richard L. Aiken, ‘56 Dr. and Mrs. Lee S. Ainslie, Jr., (H) ‘98 The Rev. and Mrs. John H. Albrecht, ‘59 The Rev. Conor M. Alexander, ‘07 The Rev. and Mrs. James T. Alves The Rev. Robert M. Alves, ‘89 The Rev. John Alvey, ‘09 The Rev. Paul J. Andersen, ‘77 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. David T. Anderson, ‘00 Mrs. Mary Anderson Ms. Priscilla Andre-Colton The Rev. Anthony F. Andres, ‘64 The Rev. Jennifer N. AndrewsWeckerly, ‘09 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Mark S. Anschutz The Rev. Deborah D. Apoldo, ‘03 Mr. Jacob P. Asma Mr. Kenneth F. Athey, Jr., ‘07 The Rev. Canon Henry L. Atkins, Jr., D.Min., ‘64 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Patrick P. Augustine, ‘08 The Rev. Stephen P. Austill, ‘54 The Rev. Henry W. Austin The Rev. Benjamin Axleroad, Jr., ‘44 The Rev. Timothy W. Backus, ‘09 Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Baer, ‘11 Mr. Frederick F. Baker, ‘95 The Rev. R. Louise Baker, ‘98 Mr. and Mrs. Harry Baldwin The Rev. and Mrs. Harry W. Baldwin, Jr., ‘48 Mrs. Lynn H. Banks The Rev. Dr. Graham F. Bardsley, ‘81 The Rev. Webster G. Barnett, ‘51 Mr. Thomas M. Barr The Rev. Dr. Lisa S. Barrowclough, ‘09 The Rev. Harwood Bartlett, ‘62 Mr. and Mrs. John H. Bartol

70  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

Mrs. Lois Barton Mrs. William A. Beal The Rev. Carl H. Beasley III, ‘76 The Rev. Dr. George C. Bedell II, ‘53 Ms. Jo J. Belser, ‘12 Mrs. William R. Belury Mrs. W. Tapley Bennett The Rev. Kathleen S. Benson, ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. John Berger The Rev. and Mrs. Earl D. Beshears, ‘01 The Rev. Dr. Charles A. Bevan, Jr. The Rev. Michael Billingsley, ‘92 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. John E. Bird, Jr., ‘93 The Rev. James G. Birney III, ‘79 The Rev. Robert W. Black, Jr., ‘09 The Rev. and Mrs. Judd H. Blain, ‘60 Dr. Barbara Blakistone The Rev. J. Paul Board, ‘95 Ms. Paula Bokros The Rev. Michele B. Bond, ‘89 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. John E. Booty, ‘53 Mr. and Mrs. Jon B. Boss Dr. Herman Bostick The Rev. Dr. James T. Boston, ‘02 The Rev. Dr. Lynn E. Bowdish, ‘91 The Rev. Paul Roger Bowen, ‘68 The Rev. and Mrs. Robert J. Boyd, Jr. Ms. Beverly A. Bradley, ‘91 The Rev. and Mrs. William M. Branscomb, Jr., ‘63 Mr. C. Madison Brewer The Rev. Diane Britt, ‘02 The Rev. and Mrs. William M. Brock, ‘86 Mr. Philip R. Brooks, ‘00 The Rev. David C. Brown, ‘92 The Rev. Donna H. Brown, ‘93 The Rev. Canon Dwight L. Brown, ‘81 The Rev. Ervin A. Brown III, ‘65 Ms. Kaye Brown The Rev. Paige R. Buchholz, ‘88

Above: The Rt. Rev. Carolyn Tanner Irish (VTS ‘83, left) and Mr. David Pitts, recipients of the 2009 Dean’s Cross Award, are congratulated by he Rev. Canon Rosemari Sullivan (VTS ‘85.)

The Rev. Judith F. Burgess, ‘84 The Rev. and Mrs. Douglas G. Burgoyne Mr. Arnold D. Burke The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Cyril C. Burke, Sr. Dr. Barbara Burkhardt Mr. Craig S. Burkhardt The Rev. Ann Lyn Burns, ‘06 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Glenn E. Busch, ‘71 The Rev. and Mrs. Richard A. Busch, (H) ‘84 The Rev. Katherine M. Bush, ‘03 Mr. Larry D. Bussey, ‘82 The Rev. Andrew G. Butler III, ‘08 The Rev. Ronald C. Byrd, ‘07 The Rev. and Mrs. J. Michael Cadaret, ‘03 Amelie and Charles Cagle Calvary Episcopal Church, Cairo, NY The Rev. David W. Cammack, ‘55 Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Caress The Rev. and Mrs. Peter M. Carey, ‘07 Ms. Diane Carl The Rev. Katherine A. Carlson, ‘00 and Mr. Wendell Lynch The Rev. Douglas M. Carpenter, ‘60 Mrs. John Paul Carter The Rev. and Mrs. John F. Carter II, ‘84 The Rev. R. Douglas Carter, ‘76 Cathedral Church of St. John, Wilmington, DE The Rev. David M. Chamberlain, ‘71


The Rev. Nan E. Chandler, ‘85 Dr. Ernest E. Chapman, ‘89 The Rev. and Mrs. Willie A. Chappell, Jr., ‘74 Peg Garner Cheadle, ‘80 The Rev. Bruce D. Cheney, Sr., ‘06 The Rev. Peter G. Cheney, ‘75 Ms. Hope S. Childs The Rev. Canon and Mrs. William P. Chilton, ‘66 The Rev. Kathleen D. Chipps, ‘84 Christ Episcopal Church, Walnut Cove, NC Church of Our Saviour, Milton, MA Church of the Good Shepherd, Cooleemee, NC Church of the Nativity, Cedarcroft, Baltimore, MD Colonel Robert H. Clagett, Jr. Ms. Florence Clark The Rev. Holland B. Clark, ‘54 The Rev. Walter D. Clark, Jr., ‘67 Ms. Maggie Alston Claud The Rev. Charlotte D. Cleghorn, ‘86 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Patrick R. Close, ‘84 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Harold J. Cobb, Jr., ‘90 Mr. Nicholas H. Cobbs Mrs. Malinda W. Collier, ‘09 Mr. Haley D. Collums The Rev. and Mrs. William L. Combs, ‘03 The Rev. and Mrs. Joshua T. Condon, ‘03 The Rev. Robert F. Coniglio, ‘10 The Rev. Edward W. Conklin, ‘49 The Rev. Alexandra K. Conrads, ‘01 Kenneth and Jane Cook Dr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Cook, Ph.D. Mrs. J. Finley Cooper Mrs. Rebecca P. Cooper, ‘01 Cople Episcopal Parish, Hague, VA The Rev. Dr. Robert T. Copenhaver, ‘62 The Rev. Dr. James A. Corl, ‘92 Mrs. Isabel Souder Correll The Rev. Hilary "Pete" Costello, Jr. The Rev. Frances F. Cox, ‘81 and The Rev. Edwin M. Cox The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Peyton G. Craighill, ‘54 The Rev. Rebecca T. Crites, ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Crooks, Jr. The Rev. John W. Crossin O.S.F.S. Mr. Robert C. Crowl Mrs. Jeffrey T. Cuffee The Rev. David P. Culbertson, ‘04 The Rev. Christopher T. Cunningham The Rev. Jeunee L. Cunningham, ‘00 The Rev. Raymond D. Custer, ‘00

The Rev. and Mrs. Robert E. Daly, Jr. Mrs. Lori Daniels Ms. Cynthia Darling The Rev. Dr. Ronald David, ‘03 Mrs. Nancy M. D. Davidson, ‘09 Mr. Thomas E. Davis The Rev. Mary H. T. Davisson, ‘04 The Rev. Carl P. Daw, Jr., ‘09 Mrs. May B. Daw Ms. Susan D. Dawson The Rev. and Mrs. Walter W. Dawson, ‘73 The Rev. David C. Dearman, ‘87 Mrs. Margaret Demchuk Col. Sergi L. Demchuk Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Denkinger The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick D. Devall IV, ‘96 The Rev. Michael F. DeVine, ‘77 and Ms. Mariana M. Bauman Mrs. Margaret S. Diederich, ‘83 The Rev. Rebecca W. Dinan, ‘80 Ms. Wilhelmina S. Dixon The Rev. Dr. William L. Dols, Jr., ‘58 Mr. Brian D'Onofrio Ms. Danica D'Onofrio, ‘01 Ms. Vivian T. Dooley-Burney The Rev. Mary Anne Dorner, ‘89 Alexandra Dorr

The Rev. Ballard Dorsee, ‘67 The Rev. and Mrs. William S. Douglas, ‘53 The Rev. J. Thomas Downs, Jr., ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. W. Harding Drane, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Draycott The Rev. and Mrs. Christopher R. Duncan, ‘09 The Rev. G. Edward Dunlap, ‘72 Mrs. Jennifer Durant, ‘11 Ms. Lynn B. Dutton Mrs. Mary E. Duvall Mr. Severn P. C. Duvall The Rev. Dr. Patty T. Earle, ‘89 The Rev. John G. Earls, ‘04 Mr. James A. Eastwood Ms. Jane Edwards Ms. Nancy K. Ehlke Chaplain Robert M. Elder The Rev. Gates Elliott, ‘09 Ms. Lynn D. Ellison Mrs. Elizabeth B. Elmore Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Woodstock, VA The Rev. Gail A. Epes, ‘87 Episcopal Church Women Diocese of Virginia Mrs. Carl N. Ettinger, Jr. Allene and H. Bradley Evans

The Rev. H. Barry Evans, ‘62 Mr. H. Bradley Evans, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Theodore H. Evans, Jr., ‘61 The Rev. William D. Evans III, ‘75 Mr. Steven L. Everett The Rev. and Mrs. William M. Fay, ‘51 Dr. Judy Fentress-Williams and Dr. Kevin Williams The Rev. Floyd W. Finch, Jr., ‘54 The Rev. Susan M. Flanders, ‘85 The Rev. and Mrs. Peter W. Fleming, Jr., ‘54 Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Flemming The Rev. Roger L. Foote, ‘81 Ms. Barbara A. Forbes The Rev. Canon David R. Forbes, ‘53 The Rev. Richard B. Ford

Below: President of the Episcopal Church Foundation, David V. Romanik, leads a session at VTS’ Saturday School for Leadership, a program run by the Seminary’s Institute for Christian Formation and Leadership.

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Mr. William Forester Mr. George E. Fox, ‘79 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Andrew M. France, Jr., ‘66 The Rev. and Mrs. David J. C. Frazelle, ‘04 The Rev. John T. Frazier, ‘05 The Rev. Sollace M. Freeman, Jr., ‘65 Ms. Pamela G. Frick, ‘00 Mr. and Mrs. C. Craighead Fritsche, Sr. Mr. David R. Fronk Mr. Carter B. S. Furr The Rev. John C. Gale, ‘66 The Rev. Stephen C. Galleher, ‘70 The Rev. Fr. Liston A. Garfield, ‘85 Mr. George C. Garikes The Rev. Sarah K. Gaventa, ‘05 Ms. Diane H. Gay

Left: The Rev. Canon Angela Ifill (VTS ‘95), pictured here will the Rev. Willis Foster (VTS ‘10), will serve as the new AAEC President for the 2010 term.

Mrs. Margaret H. Gibson Dr. and Mrs. Timothy B. Gilbert The Rev. Ann H. Gillespie, ‘07 The Rev. Dr. Cynthia A. Gilliatt, ‘88 The Rev. and Mrs. Charles M. Girardeau, ‘82 The Rev. Dr. William S. Glazier II, ‘52 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Edward Stone Gleason, ‘60 Ms. Sarah Glenn The Rev. Holly M. Gloff, ‘06 Dr. Susan H. Godson The Rev. Lisa Goforth, ‘03 Dr. and Mrs. Albert S. Gooch, Jr., (H) ‘02 Ms. Laine Covington Goren Mr. Oscar A. Gottscho Grace Episcopal Church, Ridgway, PA Grace Episcopal Church, Lewiston Woodville, NC The Rev. Canon Blount H. Grant, Jr., ‘62 The Rev. Dr. J. Segar Gravatt, ‘85 Dr. Jonathan M. Gray, Ph.D. Mr. Bentley C. Gregg The Rev. Norman E. Griffith, Jr., ‘68 Mr. David A. Griswold Mr. and Mrs. Max Guggenheimer, Jr.

72  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

The Rev. and Mrs. Matthew Gunter, ‘96 The Rev. Jane T. Gurry, ‘80 Mr. David Q. Hall The Rev. and Mrs. Sidney J. Hall, ‘89 Maj. Gen. and Mrs. Hal E. Hallgren Mrs. Jane E. Halpern Dr. Paul J. Halpern, ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. James C. Hamilton, Jr. The Rev. Canon Michael P. Hamilton, ‘55 The Rev. and Mrs. Robert L. Hammett, ‘54 Dr. Hobart G. Hansen The Rev. Dr. Norma D. Hanson, ‘94 The Rev. John Hardaway IV, ‘95 The Rev. Susan Louttit Hardaway, ‘93 The Rev. Robert A. Hargreaves, ‘62 Mr. and Mrs. John Harkins Mr. Daniel L. Harmon Ms. Jennifer Harper The Rev. and Mrs. Lawrence R. Harris, Jr., ‘65 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Harris, ‘69 Mrs. Georgia H. Hart The Rev. Dorothy C. Hartzog, ‘94 The Rev. Elizabeth S. Hasen, ‘91 The Rev. and Mrs. Edward M. Hasse III, ‘89 The Rev. Rebekah Bokros Hatch, ‘04 and Dr. Anthony Hatch The Rev. Adele M. Hatfield, ‘05 The Rev. Charles J. Hatfield, ‘05 Mrs. Stanley F. Hauser Mr. Franklin Hawkins The Rev. Victoria R. T. Heard, ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Hedges Dr. and Mrs. John H. Hedley The Rev. Meredith T. Heffner, ‘08 Ms. Dorothy F. Heil, ‘98 Mr. Bruce G. Helmer The Rt. Rev. Dorsey F. Henderson, Jr., ‘77 Cdr. and Mrs. Douglas D. Henry Mr. and Mrs. James P. Henry The Rev. Erin S. Hensley, ‘07 Mr. Sam Hensley The Rev. and Mrs. Gary S. Herbst, ‘76 The Rev. Lynda S. Hergenrather Ms. Mary Hickert Herring, ‘03 Mrs. Charles Henry Hewitt The Rev. John D. Hiers, Jr., ‘78 The Rev. John S. Hill, ‘98 Harvey Hillin, Ph.D., ‘69 The Rev. John M. Hines, ‘70 Mr. Michael B. Hinson, ‘05 Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. G. Hobson The Rev. Wayne C. Hodge, Sr., ‘89 The Rev. Lucy L. Hogan, Ph.D., ‘81

Mrs. Charles B. Hoglan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Yerby R. Holman Mr. and Mrs. Yuille Holt III Holy Trinity Parish, Decatur, GA The Rev. Dr. Ruthanna B. Hooke and Dr. Judy Adkins The Very Rev. Alan B. Hooker, ‘76 The Rev. John K. Hooper, ‘58 The Rev. James R. Horton, ‘67 The Rev. Theodore B. Howard, ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Stuart M. Hoyt, Jr. Mr. Charles H. Huettner The Rev. Richard H. Humke, ‘56 Mr. and Mrs. John O. Hummel Mr. and Mrs. Rollin L. Huntington Col. and Mrs. C. Powell Hutton The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Robert W. Ihloff, (H) ‘96 Intelliscan, Inc. The Rev. John E. Isbell III, ‘71 Mr. Kenneth P. Isler The Rev. and Mrs. Fielder Israel, Jr., ‘75 Mrs. Marlowe K. Iverson The Rev. Dr. Carol J. Jablonski, ‘06 Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Jackle Mrs. Solomon N. Jacobs Ms. Doris E. James Mr. and Mrs. Sidney J. Jarvis Ms. Susan Jaskot The Rev. Kathryn E. Jenkins, ‘02 Ms. Carolyn A. Johnson The Rev. Marta Dove-Vila Johnson, ‘08 Mr. Robert E. Johnson, Jr. Ms. Caroline F. Johnston The Rev. David K. Johnston, ‘61 The Rev. Robert O. Johnston, ‘70 Mrs. Elizabeth Root Jones Mr. John T. Jones, ‘06 and The Rev. Dr. Carol J. Jablonski The Rev. Barbara Jordan The Rev. Noel Julnes-Dehner, ‘77 and Mr. Joseph Julnes-Dehner Mr. Joseph W. Karlson Mrs. Lenore F. Karnis The Rev. and Mrs. Joseph Keblesh, Jr., ‘85 The Rev. Kate E. Kelderman, ‘04 The Rev. John S. Keller, ‘75 The Rev. Meaghan M. Kelly, ‘07 Ms. Tracey E. Kelly, ‘11 The Rev. Dr. Howard F. Kempsell, Jr., ‘80 The Rev. Dexter W. Kessler, ‘86 Ms. Mary S. Kimball Mr. Billy W. Kingery The Rev. William M. Kirkland, Ph.D., ‘54 Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Knight Mr. and Mrs. John L. Knight


Left: Dean Markham’s lunchtime forums for the VTS Community are well attended and address issues within the life of the Seminary.

Dr. and Mrs. H. Donald Knox, M.D. Mr. Fritz-Alan Korth The Rev. Linda J. Kramer, ‘87 The Rev. and Mrs. Robert A. Krogman The Rev. Kenneth C. Kroohs, ‘95 The Rev. Dr. Charles D. Krutz, ‘95 The Rev. and Mrs. Barry P. Kubler, ‘97 The Rev. Howard A. La Rue, ‘67 The Rt. Rev. Robert L. Ladehoff, ‘80 The Rev. Joseph H. Laird, ‘53 Mr. Lester Lamb Ms. Linda L. Lanam, ‘09 The Rev. James J. Lanter, ‘08 The Rev. Dr. William M. Lawbaugh, ‘07 Dr. and Mrs. C. Rodney Layton, Jr. Father Lazarus, O.I.C., ‘80 Ms. Cheri J. Leberknight The Rev. Dr. Luis Leon, ‘77 Mr. Andrew G. Levchuk Mrs. Beryl Levy Mr. Merle Levy The Rev. Canon Richard C. Lief, D. Min., ‘65 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. A. Heath Light, ‘54 The Rev. Thomas C. Lincoln, ‘66 The Rev. Mark A. Linder, ‘73 The Rev. C. Lloyd Lipscomb III, ‘62 The Rev. I. Mayo Little, Jr., ‘60 The Rev. Arthur and Mrs. Susan S. Lloyd, ‘56 The Rev. Lucia K. Lloyd, ‘05

Mrs. Barton M. Lloyd The Rev. Laura K. Lockey, ‘92 Mr. Russell G. Lockey The Rev. Candyce J. Loescher, ‘07 Mr. Warren Loescher The Rev. Bruce A. Lomas, ‘92 The Rev. Canon A. Adams Lovekin, Ph.D., ‘54 The Rev. Donald A. Lowery, ‘87 Mr. Roye L. Lowry Mrs. Elizabeth C. Lubelfeld, ‘78 The Rev. Nicholas P. N. Lubelfeld, ‘78 The Rev. and Mrs. Robert H. Lyles, ‘57 The Rev. Alexander H. MacDonell, ‘68 Mr. and Mrs. Mark MacGougan The Rev. Albert H. MacKenzie, Jr., ‘62 Mr. Eddie Mackey III The Rev. Robert A. Mackie, ‘66 Dr. and Mrs. Cooper R. Mackin, ‘12 The Rev. and Mrs. Jeffrey B. MacKnight, ‘84 Mrs. John D. Macomber The Rev. Alexander D. MacPhail, ‘02 The Rev. Karin MacPhail, ‘04 Alice and Ralph MacPhail, Jr. Capt. Janet Lewis Maguire, ‘80 The Rev. Timothy Malone, ‘09 Mr. Joseph L. Manson, ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Markham Mr. and Mrs. S. Keith Markham The Rev. Wm. Parker Marks, ‘60 The Rev. Gayle M. Marsh, ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. M. Lee Marston

The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Edward Martin, Jr., ‘71 Mrs. Roy B. Martin, Jr. The Very Rev. Richard J. Martindale, ‘95 Mrs. Charles O'Fallon Mastin Mrs. Judith Wright Mathews The Rev. Lex S. Mathews, ‘60 The Rev. Ernest G. Matijasic, ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Richard V. Mattingly, Jr. The Rev. James H. Maxwell, ‘64 The Rev. and Mrs. David P. McBride, ‘50 The Rev. Dr. Richard L. McCandless, ‘70 The Rev. Dr. John F. McCard, ‘07 The Rev. Carla B. McCook, ‘04 The Rev. Robert M. McCoy Ms. Sharon McCray Ms. Patricia M. McDermott The Rev. Canon and Mrs. John S. McDowell, Jr., ‘71 The Rev. Charles R. McGinley, ‘57 The Rev. Tara L. McGraw, ‘05 Dr. and Mrs. Hunter H. McGuire, Jr. The Rev. Helen K. McKee, ‘06 The Rt. Rev. Jack M. McKelvey, ‘66 Ms. Dorothy H. McLachlan Ms. Lucinda A. McLaughlin The Rev. William P. McLemore, ‘65 Mr. William McMillen, ‘12 Ms. Dorothy S. Mcrae Ms. Laura Y. Meagher, ‘80 Mr. Roy Mendez

The Rev. Troy Mendez, ‘09 Dr. Dorothy Merrill The Rev. Richard H. Merrill, ‘71 The Rev. Dewayne J. Messenger, ‘07 and Mr. Raymond Knapp The Rev. Catherine A. Metivier, D.D.S., ‘05 The Rev. Garrett M. Mettler, ‘02 The Rev. Martha Z. Miller, ‘87 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Irvin S. Mitchell, ‘69 Professor Emmet V. Mittlebeeler, ‘92 The Rev. Ann L. Moczydlowski, ‘00 The Rev. Karen B. Montagno, ‘95 The Rev. Alex G. Montes, ‘05 Mrs. Lillian H. Moore Ms. Margaret D. Moore, ‘02 The Rev. Dennis L. Morgan, ‘08 Dr. Lyman W. Morgan The Rev. Randall C. Morgan, ‘85 Dr. Florence M. Morrill The Rev. Dr. James E. Morris, ‘00 The Rev. and Mrs. Robert D. Morrison, Jr., ‘71 Ms. Patricia P. Moser Mr. and Mrs. Frank F. Mountcastle, Jr. The Rev. Laureen H. Moyer, ‘04 Ms. Elizabeth Mueller The Rev. and Mrs. Charles F. Mullaly, Jr., ‘94 Mr. John D. Muller The Rev. Peter A. Munson, ‘91 The Rev. Milton H. Murray, ‘58 The Rev. and Mrs. G. Thomas Mustard, ‘77 Mrs. Shirley S. Mustard The Rev. Annwn H. Myers, ‘84 The Rev. Elizabeth W. Myers, ‘71 Ms. Nancy Myrick The Rev. Anne M. Natoli, ‘98 Mrs. Caroline H. Neal The Rev. Walter E. Neds, ‘62 Mr. David S. Nelson, ‘05 The Rev. Rita B. Nelson, ‘99 The Rev. Melana Nelson-Amaker Mrs. Marie-Lynn Neville, ‘96 and Mr. Thomas A. Neville Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Neville, ‘83 Sarah and Don Noble Ms. Betty M. Noer The Rev. Steve and Sandy Norcross The Rev. Worth E. Norman, Jr.

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2010 Annual Giving Report

North Farnham Episcopal Church, Farnham, VA The Rev. J. Ellen Nunnally, ‘76 Mr. Lynwood T. Oakes The Rev. Elizabeth P. O'Callaghan, ‘09 The Rev. Andrew T. O'Connor, ‘05 Mrs. Samuel S. Odom The Rev. and Mrs. Donnel O'Flynn, ‘85 Ms. Anita D. Ogden, ‘89 The Rev. and Mrs. Lloyd F. O'Keefe, ‘67 Mr. Kyle M. Oliver, ‘12 Mr. Ralph E. Olson Mrs. Phyllis O'Quinn Mrs. Walter R. O'Quinn Ms. Margaret D. Orem The Rev. Richard N. Ottaway, ‘57 The Rev. Harrison H. Owen, ‘60 The Rev. Shelby O. Owen, ‘05 The Rev. Jeffrey A. Packard, ‘95 The Rev. James L. Pahl, Jr., ‘05 Mr. James A. Palmer The Rev. and Mrs. Steven J. Pankey, ‘07 The Rev. Barbara D. Parini, ‘88 The Rev. Cynthia Park, ‘08 The Rev. and Mrs. Howard F. Park III, ‘62 The Rev. Allan C. Parker, Jr. Mrs. Margaret A. Parker The Rev. William P. Parrish, ‘59 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Timothy H. Parsons, ‘68 Mr. Oliver B. Patton and Ms. Barbara Van Gelder Mr. and Mrs. William S. Peebles IV, ‘04 The Rev. Donald H. Peet, ‘58 The Rev. Scott B. Petersen, ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Peterson Mr. Gordon P. Peyton Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Pierce Dr. and Mrs. Richard N. Pierson III The Rev. and Mrs. Clifford A. Pike, ‘71 Ms. Meredith Pilling Mrs. J. Edwin Pippin, ‘72 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Albert C. Pittman, ‘81 The Rev. Jane D. Piver, ‘00 Ms. Mae Barbee Pleasant The Rev. J. Richard Pobjecky, ‘75 The Rev. Rollin S. Polk, Jr., ‘45 The Rev. Robert Pollard III, ‘54 The Rev. John M. Porter-Acee III, ‘05 Mr. Christopher Pote The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. F. Neff Powell, (H) ‘97 The Rev. Mark M. Powell, ‘07 The Rev. Murray R. Powell, ‘77 The Rev. R. Bingham Powell, ‘07 The Rev. Woodson Lea Powell IV, ‘60

The Rev. John S. Prater, ‘58 Mr. Curtis Prather The Rev. and Mrs. William S. Pregnall, ‘58 The Rev. Dr. Gary K. Price, ‘47 The Rev. George N. Price, ‘60 The Rev. John W. Price, ‘64 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Prichard Dr. Betty Carr Pulkingham, ‘06 The Rev. C. Michael Pumphrey, ‘81 The Rev. and Mrs. Thomas C. Pumphrey, ‘04 The Rev. Sarah T. Putnam, ‘97 Mrs. Lynn Ellen Queen The Rev. William Queen, Jr., ‘94 The Rev. Alison J. Quin, ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo C. Rand, Jr. Ms. Frances Randall Mr. and Mrs. Russell V. Randle Ms. Carlin Rankin and Dr. Alfred P. Morgan Ms. Barbara Read Ms. Gretchen A. Redmond Mr. and Mrs. A. Crenshaw Reed, Jr. The Rev. Mary E. Reese, ‘08 The Rev. Dr. Robert E. Reese, ‘74 The Rev. and Mrs. Alwin Reiners, Jr., ‘54 Mr. Russell R. Reno, Jr. The Very Rev. Joe D. Reynolds, ‘74 The Rev. Grady W. Richardson, Jr., ‘68 Mrs. Robert E. Richardson The Rev. Dr. Charles M. Riddle III, ‘63 Mr. and Mrs. James F. Ridenour The Honorable and Mrs. Stephen W. Rideout Mr. and Mrs. J. Fred Rippy III The Rev. Phoebe A. Roaf, ‘08 Ms. Frances L. Robb George and Zara Roberts The Rev. William B. Roberts, D.M.A. Mr. Kenneth M. Robison Ms. Virginia V. Rocen Ms. Cynthia J. Rogers, ‘06 Mr. and Mrs. N. Pendleton Rogers The Rev. Canon Charles M. Roper, ‘56 Mr. James M. Rose, Jr. Mr. William Alfred Rose, Jr., ‘96 Mr. William Roth, ‘88 The Rev. John Henry Rule, ‘05 The Rev. Joseph M. Rushton, ‘07 Ms. Ann Ryan The Rev. and Mrs. Henry M. Sabetti III, ‘98 Penelope deBordenave Saffer St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Mount Jackson, VA St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Tuskegee Institute, AL

74  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

St. Barnabas' Church, Berlin, NH St. Clement's Church, Greenville, PA St. John the Evangelist Church, Dunbarton, NH St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Grand Rapids, MI St. Matthias Episcopal Church, Sault Sainte Marie, MI St. Paul's Cathedral, Oklahoma City, OK St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Louisville, KY St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Cheney, WA St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Washington, NC St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Richmond, VA Ms. Jamie Samilio, ‘05 The Rev. Dr. Richard E. Sanders, ‘85 The Rev. Holladay Sanderson, ‘01

Mrs. Michelle M. Sanderson, ‘03 Mrs. David E. Satterfield III The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Stanley W. Sawyer, ‘76 The Rev. Miriam S. Saxon, ‘07 The Rev. Dr. Lee P. Schaefer, ‘83 The Rev. Carleton Schaller, Jr., ‘57 The Very Rev. Robert D. Schenkel, Jr., ‘60 Ms. Cynthia R. Schlattmann The Rev. Carolyn J. Schmidt, ‘87 Dr. Barbara B. Schnorrenberg Dr. John Schnorrenberg The Rev. Beverly C. Schroeder, ‘09 The Rev. George H. Schroeter, ‘56 Mr. H. Richard Schumacher

Below: Nothing is more precious than giving out candy to the Butterfly House Trick or Treaters.


The Rev. Matthew R. Scott, ‘07 The Rev. C. Perry Scruggs, Jr., ‘74 Mr. Narcis J. Sebikwekwe, ‘10 Mrs. Marshall E. Seifert The Rev. and Mrs. Jeffrey H. Seiler, ‘86 Ms. Patricia Sexton, ‘11 The Rev. and Mrs. William M. Shand III, ‘81 The Rev. Andrew J. Sherman, ‘92 Mrs. Edward S. Shirley The Rev. John G. Shoemaker, ‘54 Mr. James F. Shook Mrs. Hilary Shostal Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Shostal The Rev. Canon and Mrs. David I. Shoulders, ‘75 The Rev. Nicholas N. Sichangi, ‘07 Mr. William H. Simons Mr. Alan B. Sinclair The Rev. and Mrs. Roderick D. Sinclair, ‘66 Mrs. Nancy Siridavong Mrs. Mary L. Sivertsen Mrs. Anthony E. Skopac The Rev. Timothy K. Small, ‘82 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Smith, Jr., ‘88 Ms. Claire E. Smith Mr. Ether D.G. Smith The Rev. Manning Lee Smith, ‘68 Dr. Newland F. Smith, 3rd, ‘07 The Rev. P. Kingsley Smith, ‘56 Ms. Sarah L. O. Smith The Rev. and Mrs. Taylor M. Smith, ‘96 The Rev. and Mrs. John R. Smucker, 3rd, ‘58 Mrs. Margaret J. Soleau, ‘52 The Rev. William M. Sowards, ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sowden Mr. and Mrs. William J. Spahr Ms. Bette Spencer Ms. Margaret E. Sperow, ‘91 The Rev. Phyllis A. Spiegel, ‘04 The Rev. Carol H. Spigner, ‘85 Mrs. Barbara M. Stafford The Very Rev. Dr. William S. Stafford, (H) ‘05 The Rev. and Mrs. Stephen R. Stanley, ‘82 The Rev. Donald G. Stauffer, ‘54 The Rev. Frederick Stecker IV, ‘72 Ms. Leslie Charlotte Nunez Steffensen, ‘06 Mr. Luke M. Stephens The Rev. Caroline R. Stewart, ‘06 The Rev. J. Bruce Stewart, ‘78 The Rev. Joseph Stewart-Sicking, Ed. D., ‘03 The Rev. Megan Stewart-Sicking, ‘03

Mrs. George C. Stierwald The Rev. David A. Storm, ‘65 Mrs. Joseph M. Stoudenmire Ms. Tina Strauss The Rev. Ann J. Stribling, ‘82 The Rev. Dr. Charles M. Stuart II, ‘83 Mrs. Geraldine M. Stuhr Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Sullivan Mr. Edmund J. Sullivan, Jr. The Rev. Canon Rosemari G. Sullivan, ‘85 Mrs. Susan G. Sullivan, ‘99 The Rev. and Mrs. H. Howard Surface, ‘51 Mr. Donald Sutherland, ‘57 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Suttle, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David Swann The Rev. and Mrs. Craig C. Sweeney, ‘01 The Rev. Canon Walter Szymanski Mr. and Mrs. George Taft Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Taggart The Rev. Erika L. Takacs, ‘07 Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Taliaferro, Jr., ‘03 The Rt. Rev. John T. Tarrant, ‘83 The Rev. Cynthia N. Taylor, ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Edgar R. Taylor, Jr. The Rev. Gregory B. Taylor, ‘63 Mrs. Roberta Taylor, ‘11 The Rev. and Mrs. Timus G. Taylor, Jr., ‘63 The Rev. A. Dawson Teague, Jr., ‘55 Mrs. Herman Templin The Rev. Shelley-Ann Tenia, ‘05 Mr. and Mrs. Philip Terzian The Rev. David H. Teschner, ‘86 The Teagle Foundation The Rev. Ellie and Bob Thober, ‘04 The Rev. Canon and Mrs. James M. Thomas, Jr., ‘01 The Rev. Robert L. Thomas, ‘50 The Rev. William T. Thomas, ‘57 Mrs. Florence E. Thompson Mrs. Mary B. Thornburgh The Honorable Patricia S. Ticer Mr. David Tomkinson Mr. George J. Tompkins The Rev. Lewis W. Towler, ‘55 Mr. Vincent D. Travaglini The Rev. Canon Warner R. Traynham, ‘61 Ms. Carol E. Tsou Mrs. Robert Tsu The Rev. Beverley D. Tucker, ‘48 Mrs. Beverley D. Tucker The Rev. Julia M. Tucker Mr. Charles F. Tucker The Rev. Julia M. Tucker Mr. Arthur M. Turner The Rev. Claude S. Turner, Jr.

The Rev. Linnea S. Turner, ‘89 The Rev. and Mrs. Melvin E. Turner, ‘77 Mr. Jack Upper and Mrs. Claudia R. Upper Ms. Ruby Van Croft The Rev. Gardner W. Van Scoyoc, ‘58 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Frank R. VanDevelder, ‘63 The Rev. and Mrs. Joshua Varner, ‘01 Varina Episcopal Church, Henrico, VA Mrs. Frank H. Vest, Jr. The Rev. Leigh C. Vicens, ‘09 The Rev. Samantha A. Vincent, ‘05 Mrs. William A. Vogely The Rev. Edwin H. Voorhees, Jr., ‘75 The Rev. Anne F. Vouga, ‘08 Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Wagenius The Rev. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Wagner-Pizza, ‘02 The Rev. Mark E. Waldo, Sr., ‘51 The Rev. Mark E. Waldo, Jr., ‘88 The Rev. Dr. Raymond J. Waldon, Jr., ‘95 Ms. Gwendolyn L. Walker The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Arthur E. Walmsley The Rev. Dr. James I. Walter, ‘59 The Rev. and Mrs. Edwin M. Ward, ‘55 The Rev. Edward S. Warfield, ‘62 Mrs. Mary R. Warfield The Rev. Frederick J. Warnecke, Jr., ‘58 The Rev. Janet C. Watrous Mr. Andrew B. Watt, ‘96 Mrs. Marion S. Wattenbarger Mr. Raymond A. Wedlake The Rev. Charles S. Weiss, ‘97 The Rev. and Mrs. George H. Welles, Jr., ‘64 The Rev. David D. Wendel, Jr., ‘59 Mrs. R. Mark Wenley The Rev. Carolyn K. West, ‘93 The Rev. Philip E. Wheaton, ‘52 The Rev. Elisa D. Wheeler, ‘81 The Rev. Burton K. White, Jr., ‘09

Above: Former seniors, Charles Garcia, Corry Weierbach, and Susan Sowers, enjoy a round of good-hearted teasing before getting formal portraits taken. The Rev. Cyril E. White, Sr., ‘95 Mrs. Dorothy D. Whitmire The Rev. John W. Wigle, ‘56 The Very Rev. and Mrs. C. Preston Wiles, ‘48 The Rev. Canon Larry G. Wilkes, ‘92 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Huntington Williams, Jr., ‘52 The Rev. Shearon S. Williams, ‘03 Mr. Robbie Williams Mrs. Rolf Williams Mrs. Sarah C. Williamson Mr. Rance R. Willis Mrs. Vera L. Willis Ms. Isabel Wilner Mrs. David W. C. Graham, ‘35 Ms. Sandra H. Wilson The Rev. Dr. Marian K. Windel, ‘79 The Rev. Arthur K. Wing III, ‘61 Mrs. William D. Winn The Rev. Cheryl A. Winter, ‘87 Mr. Robert W. Wiseman The Rev. Robert C. Wisnewski, Jr., ‘83 The Rev. and Mrs. David B. Wolf, ‘96 The Rev. Stuart C. Wood, ‘87 Mrs. Wendell W. Woodbury The Rev. James P. Woodson, Jr., ‘53 The Rev. Dr. John F. Woolverton, ‘53 The Rev. Middleton L. Wootten III, ‘69 The Rev. Anne M. Wrede The Rev. Richard C. Wrede, ‘90 Ms. Hallie E. Wright The Rev. John A. Wright, Jr., ‘65 The Rev. Wesley Wubbenhorst, ‘89 The Rev. George S. Yandell, ‘79 Mr. Dorsey Yearley Ms. Anne J. Yellott Ms. Patricia R. York The Rev. George Zabriskie II, ‘54

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2010 Annual Giving Report

ALUMNI AND ALUMNAE SUPPORT OF VIRGINIA SEMINARY 1941

The Rev. Frank F. Smart, Jr.

1943

The Rev. Robert Morgan Shaw

1944

The Rev. Benjamin Axleroad, Jr.

1952

The Rev. Donald S. Barrus The Rev. Dr. William S. Glazier II The Rev. James L. Tucker The Rev. Philip E. Wheaton The Rt. Rev. Huntington Williams, Jr.

1953

The Rev. Harry W. Baldwin, Jr. The Rev. Lee Graham, Jr. The Rev. Vernon A. Jones, Jr. The Rev. Beverley D. Tucker, Jr. The Very Rev. C. Preston Wiles, Ph.D.

The Rt. Rev. Robert P. Atkinson The Rev. Dr. George C. Bedell II The Rev. Dr. William R. Belury The Rev. James G. Birney The Rev. Dr. John E. Booty The Rev. H. Arthur Doersam The Rev. William S. Douglas The Rt. Rev. A. Theodore Eastman The Rev. Donald L. Farrow The Rev. Canon David R. Forbes The Rev. Dr. Edward H. Kryder The Rev. Joseph H. Laird The Rev. Samuel S. Odom The Rev. John J. Ormond The Rev. Edward G. Robinson The Rev. A. Wayne Schwab The Rev. John R. Stanton The Rev. James P. Woodson, Jr. The Rev. Dr. John F. Woolverton

1949

1954

1945

The Rev. Edward T. Adkins The Rev. Rollin S. Polk, Jr.

1947

The Rev. Robert L. Bast The Rev. John Paul Carter The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads Mrs. Lillian C. Jones The Rev. Dr. Gary K. Price

1948

The Rt. Rev. Gordon T. Charlton, Jr. The Rev. Edward W. Conklin The Rt. Rev. Philip A. Smith The Rev. Rhett Y. Winters, Jr.

1950

The Rev. David P. McBride The Rev. Luther D. Miller, Jr. The Rev. Ralph W. Smith The Rev. Robert L. Thomas

1951

The Rev. Webster G. Barnett The Rev. Alden Besse The Rev. William T. Elliott The Rev. William M. Fay The Rt. Rev. Gerald N. McAllister The Rt. Rev. David B. Reed The Rev. Manney C. Reid The Rev. F. Lee Richards The Rev. H. Howard Surface, Jr. The Rev. Mark E. Waldo, Sr.

The Rev. Stephen P. Austill The Rev. Holland B. Clark The Rev. Dr. Peyton G. Craighill The Rev. Charles C. Demeré The Rev. James C. Fenhagen II The Rev. Floyd W. Finch, Jr. The Rev. Peter W. Fleming, Jr. The Rev. Robert L. Hammett The Very Rev. Archibald M. Hewitt The Rev. Clyde L. Ireland The Rev. William M. Kirkland, Ph.D. The Rt. Rev. A. Heath Light The Rev. Canon Arthur A. Lovekin, Ph.D. The Rev. Claudius Miller III The Rev. Robert Pollard III The Rev. Alwin Reiners, Jr. The Rev. Alfred R. Shands III The Rev. John G. Shoemaker The Rev. Dr. Benjamin B. Smith, LHD The Rev. Donald G. Stauffer The Rev. Herbert A. Willke The Rev. George Zabriskie II

Bob Cook, class of 1961, at the Alumni Convocation. 76  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

1955

The Rev. Edwin P. Bailey The Rev. David W. Cammack The Rev. David J. Greer The Rev. Canon Michael P. Hamilton The Rev. John C. Harris The Rev. Charles K. Horn The Rev. Claud W. McCauley The Rev. Dr. Edward Morgan III The Rt. Rev. John S. Spong The Rev. A. Dawson Teague, Jr. The Rev. Lewis W. Towler The Rev. Canon Samuel Van Culin, Jr. The Rev. Edwin M. Ward The Rev. Canon Marlin L. Whitmer The Rev. William A. Yon

1956

The Rev. Richard L. Aiken The Rev. Dr. William E. Blottner The Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Bowers The Rev. Jere Bunting, Jr. The Rev. John Denham The Rev. Samuel L. Hall The Rev. Richard H. Humke The Rev. Patterson Keller The Rev. Arthur S. Lloyd The Rev. Clifton J. McInnis, Jr. The Rt. Rev. Charlie F. McNutt, Jr. The Rev. Canon Charles M. Roper The Rev. George H. Schroeter The Rev. P. Kingsley Smith The Rev. James A. Trimble, Jr. The Rev. John W. Wigle The Rev. Dr. Alexander C. Zabriskie, Jr.

1957

The Rt. Rev. Herbert A. Donovan, Jr. The Rev. William F. Egelhoff The Rev. Samuel F. Gouldthorpe, Jr. The Rev. W. Scott Harvin The Rev. Harry L. Hoffman III The Rev. Robert H. Lyles The Rt. Rev. H. Coleman McGehee, Jr. The Rev. Charles R. McGinley The Rev. Dr. Charles H. Morris The Rev. Richard N. Ottaway The Rev. Charles F. Penniman, Jr. The Rev. Philip G. Porcher, Jr. The Rev. Carleton Schaller, Jr. The Rev. Thomas R. Smith Mr. Donald Sutherland The Rev. William T. Thomas

1958

The Rt. Rev. Allen L. Bartlett, Jr. The Rev. John Tol Broome The Rev. Albert L. Clark The Rev. Dr. William L. Dols, Jr. The Rev. Don Raby Edwards, D.D. The Rev. John K. Hooper The Rt. Rev. Sam B. Hulsey The Rev. Milton H. Murray The Rev. Donald H. Peet The Rev. John S. Prater The Rev. William S. Pregnall The Rev. Jack S. Scott The Rev. John R. Smucker, 3rd The Rev. Gardner W. Van Scoyoc The Rev. Frederick J. Warnecke, Jr.


Above: Members of the class of 1969 (from left to right), Ed Covert, Bob Hardman, Mid Wootten, and Grant Robinson.

1959

The Rev. John H. Albrecht The Rev. John D. Alfriend The Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Bayfield The Rev. James C. Blackburn The Rev. A. Moody Burt The Rev. Dr. Timothy B. Cogan The Rev. Alan B. Conley The Rev. James R. Crowder The Rev. Thomas T. Diggs The Rev. Louis C. Fischer III The Very Rev. H. Douglas Fontaine The Rev. Richard P. Fowler The Rev. John I. Kilby The Rev. Robert Lawthers The Rev. William P. Parrish The Rev. Patrick H. Sanders, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Franklin E. Vilas, Jr. The Rev. Dr. James I. Walter The Rev. David D. Wendel, Jr.

1960

The Rev. Judd H. Blain The Rt. Rev. David C. Bowman The Rev. Douglas M. Carpenter The Rev. Dr. Robert H. Crewdson The Rev. Robert W. Dickey The Rt. Rev. Charles F. Duvall The Rev. Dr. Edward Stone Gleason The Rev. Nelson B. Hodgkins The Rev. John C. Humphries, Jr. The Rev. I. Mayo Little, Jr. The Rev. Wm. Parker Marks The Rev. Lex S. Mathews The Rev. Harrison H. Owen The Rev. Woodson L. Powell IV The Rev. George N. Price

The Rev. Robert D. Price The Very Rev. Robert D. Schenkel, Jr.

1961

The Rev. Robert D. Cook The Rev. George H. Dawson The Rev. Robert G. Eidson The Rev. Theodore H. Evans, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Allie Washington Frazier, Jr. The Rev. Peter M. Horn The Rev. David K. Johnston The Rev. George M. Maxwell The Rt. Rev. William E. Swing The Rev. Canon Warner R. Traynham The Rev. Dr. Emery Washington, Sr. The Rev. Arthur K. Wing III

1962

The Rev. Harwood Bartlett The Rev. Dr. Robert T. Copenhaver The Rev. William M. DuncanO'Neal The Rev. H. Barry Evans The Rev. J. William Flanders, Jr. The Rev. Dr. M. Douglas Girardeau The Rev. Canon Blount H. Grant, Jr. The Rev. Jay D. Hanson The Rev. Robert A. Hargreaves The Rev. C. Lloyd Lipscomb III The Rev. Albert H. MacKenzie, Jr. The Rev. Walter E. Neds The Rev. Howard F. Park III The Rev. Gary B. Rundle The Rt. Rev. Leigh A. Wallace, Jr. The Rev. Edward S. Warfield, Jr. The Rev. David F. Wayland

1963

The Rev. Charles D. Aiken, Jr. The Rev. Robert H. Armstrong The Rev. William M. Branscomb, Jr.

The Rev. Ralph M. Byrd, Jr. The Rev. L. Roberts Graves, Jr. The Rt. Rev. Robert H. Johnson The Very Rev. William B. Lane The Rev. Richard H. Lewis The Rt. Rev. Henry I. Louttit, Jr. The Rev. Charles C. McNeer The Rev. James P. Metzger The Rev. William N. Peabody The Rev. Dr. Charles M. Riddle III The Venerable Charles B. Tachau The Rev. Gregory B. Taylor The Rev. Timus G. Taylor, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Peter G. Thomas The Rev. Dr. Frank R. VanDevelder The Rev. Robert F. Wollard

1964

The Rev. Anthony F. Andres The Rev. Canon Henry L. Atkins, Jr., D.Min The Rev. Dr. Douglass M. Bailey III The Rev. Robert L. Haden, Jr. The Rev. Richard H. Holley The Rev. James H. Maxwell The Rev. John W. Price The Very Rev. Harry H. Pritchett, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Hill C. Riddle The Rt. Rev. C. Cabell Tennis The Rev. V. Alastair Votaw The Rev. Joseph T. Webb III The Rev. George H. Welles, Jr.

1965

The Rev. Stephen G. Alexander The Rev. Ervin A. Brown III The Rev. Ronald C. Davis The Rev. Sollace M. Freeman, Jr. The Rev. Lawrence R. Harris, Jr. The Rev. Dr. James R. Henry The Rev. Russell W. Ingersoll The Rev. George W. Jenkins The Rev. Canon Richard C. Lief, D. Min.

The Rev. William P. McLemore The Rev. Michael O. Moore The Rev. Armistead C. Powell The Rev. Dr. Carey E. Sloan III The Rev. David A. Storm The Rev. John D. Talbird, Jr. The Rev. Stephen G. Williamson III The Rev. Frederick W. Willis, Jr. The Rev. John A. Wright, Jr.

1966

The Rev. S. F. James Abbott The Rev. Dr. Robert D. Askren The Rev. Rodney L. Caulkins The Rev. Canon William P. Chilton The Rev. Randolph K. Dales The Rev. Dr. Andrew M. France, Jr. The Rev. John C. Gale The Rev. Ladd K. Harris The Rev. Charles E. Kiblinger The Rev. Thomas C. Lincoln The Rev. Robert A. Mackie The Rt. Rev. Jack M. McKelvey The Rev. Dr. C. Thomas Midyette III The Rt. Rev. Robert M. Moody The Rev. Stephen L. Rudacille The Rev. Roderick D. Sinclair The Rev. Dr. Francis H. Wade

1967

The Rev. Martin L. Agnew, Jr. The Rev. Walter D. Clark, Jr. The Rev. Ballard Dorsee The Rev. James R. Horton The Rev. Howard A. La Rue The Rt. Rev. Peter James Lee The Rev. Ronald J. Lynch The Rev. Lloyd F. O'Keefe The Rev. J. Frederick Patten The Rev. William L. Rawson The Rev. David W. Sailer The Rev. Michael K. Thompson

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1968

The Rev. Dr. Richard L. M. Barry The Rev. Paul Roger Bowen The Rev. Norman E. Griffith, Jr. The Rev. Preston B. Huntley, Jr. The Rt. Rev. David C. Jones The Rev. Alexander H. MacDonell The Rev. James Hugh Magers The Rev. Dr. Timothy H. Parsons The Rev. Grady W. Richardson, Jr. The Rev. Manning L. Smith

1969

The Rev. John D. Crandall The Rev. Leonard W. Freeman The Rev. Dr. Stephen D. Harris Harvey Hillin, Ph.D. The Rev. Canon Peter G. Kreitler The Rev. Dr. Irvin S. Mitchell The Rev. James C. Morgan Dr. Harry W. Pollock The Rev. Robert E. Richardson The Rev. Grant H. Robinson The Rev. James W. H. Sell The Rev. Dr. Leslie C. Smith The Rev. Middleton L. Wootten III

1970

The Rev. Christopher H. Barker, Ph.D. The Rev. Canon Thomas G. Clarke The Rev. Stephen C. Galleher The Rev. John M. Hines The Rev. Robert O. Johnston The Rev. Dr. Richard L. McCandless The Very Rev. Dr. Randall L. Prior The Rev. Charles R. Sydnor, Jr. The Rev. Malcolm E. Turnbull

1971

The Rev. George E. Andrews II The Rev. Dr. Glenn E. Busch The Rev. David M. Chamberlain The Rev. Carleton S. Cunningham, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Donald G. Hanway, Jr. The Rev. John E. Isbell III The Rev. Dr. Edward Martin, Jr. The Rev. Canon John S. McDowell, Jr. The Rev. Richard H. Merrill Mr. Thomas M. Moore The Rev. Robert D. Morrison, Jr. The Rev. Elizabeth W. Myers The Rev. J. Joseph Pennington, Jr. The Rev. Clifford A. Pike

1972

The Rev. Percival G. Brown The Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel, 3rd The Rev. G. Edward Dunlap The Rev. Daniel W. Eckman, Jr. The Rev. J. Gary Fulton

The Rev. Dr. Richard J. Jones The Rev. Lloyd A. Lewis, Jr., Ph.D. The Rev. Jan C. Rudinoff The Rev. Dr. William R. Shiflet, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Frederick Stecker IV The Rev. Canon Edward L. Stein The Rev. Dr. J. Douglas Wigner, Jr. The Rev. Dr. John W. Wires The Rev. Canon Nancy H. Wittig, D. Min.

1973

The Rev. Michael D. Chalk The Rev. Walter W. Dawson The Rt. Rev. Edwin F. Gulick, Jr. The Rev. Joel T. Keys The Rev. Mark A. Linder The Rev. Samuel A. Mason The Rev. Dr. Sam A. Portaro, Jr. The Rev. Canon Louis C. Schueddig The Rev. J. Larrie Smith

1974

The Rev. Willie A. Chappell, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Winston B. Charles The Rev. J. Thomas Downs, Jr. The Rev. Peter M. Larsen Mr. John A. McColley The Rev. Patricia Merchant The Rt. Rev. George E. Packard The Rev. Dr. Robert E. Reese The Very Rev. Joe D. Reynolds The Rev. C. Perry Scruggs, Jr. The Rev. William N. Tedesco The Rt. Rev. Charles G. vonRosenberg The Rev. Frank W. Young

1975

The Rev. Peter G. Cheney The Rev. William D. Evans III The Rt. Rev. Duncan M. Gray III The Rev. Canon Victoria T. Hatch The Rev. Fielder Israel, Jr. The Rev. John S. Keller The Rev. Thomas M. Long The Rev. J. Richard Pobjecky The Rev. Blanche L. Powell The Rev. Canon David I. Shoulders The Rev. Edwin H. Voorhees, Jr.

1976

The Rev. Carl H. Beasley III The Rev. Gloria K. Berberich The Rev. R. Douglas Carter The Rev. J. Carlyle Gill The Rev. Gary S. Herbst The Very Rev. Alan B. Hooker The Rev. David W. Lovelace The Rev. J. Ellen Nunnally The Rev. Dr. Peter R. Powell, Jr.

78  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

The Rev. Dr. Stanley W. Sawyer The Rev. Robert Vickery, Jr. The Rev. Daniel O. Worthington, Jr.

1977

The Rev. Paul J. Andersen The Rev. Dr. Roxana M. Atwood The Rev. Michael F. DeVine The Rt. Rev. Dorsey F. Henderson, Jr. The Rev. Mellie Hussey Hickey The Rev. Noel Julnes-Dehner The Rev. Marguerite Shirley Kenney The Rev. Dr. Luis Leon The Rev. G. Thomas Mustard The Rev. Murray R. Powell The Rev. Elizabeth P. Tappe The Rev. Melvin E. Turner Mr. David F. Wright

1978

The Rev. John D. Hiers, Jr. Mrs. Elizabeth C. Lubelfeld The Rev. Nicholas P. N. Lubelfeld The Rev. Ernest G. Matijasic The Rev. Dr. Anne Gavin Ritchie Major Stuart G. Shafer The Rev. J. Bruce Stewart The Rev. Steven R. Strane

1979

The Rev. James G. Birney III Mr. Don Allen Chamblee Mr. George E. Fox The Rev. Denise D. Giardina The Rev. C. Read Heydt The Rev. Frederic D. Huntington The Rev. Walter W. Kesler Mr. Joseph L. Manson The Rev. Bollin M. Millner, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Patricia M. Thomas The Rt. Rev. James E. Waggoner Jr.

Above: from left to right, Melody Shobe (‘05), Allison Liles (‘06), Jessica Hitchcock (‘05), Lauren Kuratko (‘05), and Sarah Gaventa (‘05), meet up for a girls weekend away. The Rev. Dr. Marian K. Windel The Rev. George Shaw Yandell

1980

The Rt. Rev. Gladstone B. Adams III Mrs. Peg Cheadle The Rev. Dr. Barbara T. Cheney The Rev. Rebecca W. Dinan The Rev. Jane T. Gurry The Rev. Dr. William Hague The Rev. Stephen D. Hein The Rev. Dr. Howard F. Kempsell, Jr. The Rt. Rev. Robert L. Ladehoff Father Lazarus, O.I.C. Capt. Janet Lewis Maguire, (Ret) Ms. Laura Y. Meagher

1981

The Rev. Dr. Graham F. Bardsley The Rev. Canon Dwight L. Brown The Rev. Frances Fosbroke Cox The Rev. Dr. Robert S. Dannals The Rt. Rev. Jane Holmes Dixon The Rev. Roger L. Foote The Rev. C. Neal Goldsborough The Rev. Lucy L. Hogan, Ph.D. The Rev. George A. Hull The Rev. Richard A. Lord The Rev. Andrew T. P. Merrow The Rev. Dr. Albert C. Pittman The Rev. C. Michael Pumphrey The Rev. William M. Shand III The Rev. Elisa D. Wheeler


1982

The Rev. Ronald G. Abrams The Rev. Anne B. Bonnyman Mr. Larry D. Bussey The Rev. Charles M. Girardeau The Rev. Victoria R. T. Heard The Rt. Rev. Gary R. Lillibridge The Rev. Dr. Margaret McNaughton The Rev. Anne D. Monahan The Rev. George D. Muir The Rt. Rev. Benjamin O. Omosebi The Rev. Cynthia M. PetersonWlosinski The Rev. Timothy K. Small Mrs. Jacqueline H. Stanley The Rev. Stephen R. Stanley The Rev. Ann J. Stribling The Rev. Antoinette R. Wike

Below: Ketlen Solak (‘05) and Charles Brock (‘07) attended the Youth Ministry Conference at VTS this summer.

1983

Mr. Robert A. Ayres The Rt. Rev. Scott A. Benhase The Rev. Robert B. Dendtler Mrs. Margaret S. Diederich The Rev. A. Katherine Grieb, Ph.D. The Very Rev. Martha J. Horne The Rt. Rev. Carolyn Tanner Irish The Rev. Roma W. Maycock Mr. Thomas A. Neville The Rev. Dr. Lee P. Schaefer The Rev. Dr. Charles Moore Stuart II The Rt. Rev. John T. Tarrant The Rev. Robert C. Wisnewski, Jr.

1984

The Rev. John Patrick Baker The Rev. Errol Kent Booth The Rev. Judith F. Burgess The Rev. John F. Carter II The Rev. Kathleen D. Chipps The Rev. Dr. Patrick R. Close Mrs. Jane M. Hague The Rev. Jeffrey B. MacKnight

The Rev. Annwn H. Myers The Rev. John E. Shields The Rev. Thelma A. Smullen

1985

The Rev. Kathleen S. Benson The Rev. Nan E. Chandler The Rev. Susan M. Flanders The Rev. Fr. Liston A. Garfield The Rev. N. Brooks Graebner The Rev. Dr. J. Segar Gravatt The Rev. Joseph Keblesh, Jr. The Rev. Randall C. Morgan The Rev. Donnel O'Flynn The Rev. Dr. Richard E. Sanders The Rev. Carol H. Spigner The Rev. Canon Rosemari G. Sullivan Joyce Bogardus Walker

1986

The Rev. William M. Brock The Rev. Dr. George M. Calvert The Rev. Charlotte D. Cleghorn The Rev. Dexter W. Kessler The Rev. Thomas M. Kryder-Reid The Rev. Beth C. McNamara The Rev. Jeffrey H. Seiler The Rev. Cynthia N. Taylor The Rev. William B. Taylor, Jr. The Rev. David H. Teschner

1987

The Rev. David C. Dearman The Very Rev. Todd M. Donatelli The Rev. Sara H. Dover The Rev. Dr. Keith R. Emerson The Rev. Gail A. Epes The Very Rev. Zachary W.M. Fleetwood The Rt. Rev. E. Ambrose Gumbs The Rev. Linda J. Kramer The Rev. Donald A. Lowery The Rev. John S. McDuffie The Rev. Dr. Charles W. Midkiff The Rev. Martha Z. Miller The Very Rev. Charles F. Parthum III The Rev. John R. Pitts The Rev. Carolyn J. Schmidt The Rev. Cheryl A. Winter The Rev. Stuart C. Wood

1988

The Rev. Dr. Edna J. Banes The Rev. Robert S. Blumenstock The Rev. Paige R. Buchholz The Rev. Catherine M. Campbell The Rev. Whitney J. DeVine The Rev. Dr. Cynthia A. Gilliatt The Rev. Louise J. Lusignan The Rev. Nancy Horton McCarthy

The Rev. Dr. Michael T. McEwen The Rev. Barbara D. Parini The Rev. Joy Ogburn Phipps Mr. William Roth The Rev. Frederick E. Scharf, Jr. Mr. David L. Simpson, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Alfred H. Smith, Jr. The Rev. Canon Mary C. Sulerud The Rev. Mark E. Waldo, Jr. The Rev. Oran E. Warder

1989

The Rev. Robert M. Alves The Rev. Michele B. Bond Dr. Ernest E. Chapman Mrs. Helen W. Daley The Rev. Mary Anne Dorner The Rev. Dr. Patty T. Earle The Rev. Beth H. Echols The Rev. Sidney J. Hall The Rev. Edward M. Hasse III The Rev. Wayne C. Hodge, Sr. The Rev. Ruth L. Kirk The Rev. Gayle M. Marsh The Rev. Ann C. Miller Ms. Anita D. Ogden The Rev. William C. Parnell The Rev. Robin Thomas Soller The Rev. Dr. Leon P. Spencer, Jr. The Rev. Sherry Hardwick Thomas The Rev. Sarah M. Trimble The Rev. Linnea S. Turner The Rev. Wesley Wubbenhorst

1990

The Rt. Rev. Larry R. Benfield The Rev. Barbara K. Blakemore The Rev. Lee H. Bristol III The Rev. Dr. Harold J. Cobb, Jr. The Rev. Lester E. Durst The Rev. Eleanor Lynch Ellsworth The Rev. Fr. Benjamin E. SpeareHardy II The Rev. Christine R. Whittaker The Rev. Richard C. Wrede

1991

The Rev. Dr. Lynn E. Bowdish Ms. Beverly A. Bradley Mr. Tak-Kei Cheong The Rev. Elizabeth S. Hasen The Rt. Rev. James R. Mathes The Rev. Peter A. Munson The Rev. Marcia A. Sessions Ms. Margaret E. Sperow

1992

Mr. Richard G. Abbott The Rev. Katharine E. Babson The Rev. Michael Billingsley

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2010 Annual Giving Report

The Rev. Vaughan P. L. Booker The Rev. David C. Brown The Rev. Dr. James A. Corl The Rev. Paul W. Gennett, Jr. The Rev. Canon Anthony H. Jewiss The Rev. Katherine H. Jordan The Rev. Dr. Russell J. Levenson, Jr. The Rev. Laura K. Lockey The Rev. Bruce A. Lomas Professor Emmet V. Mittlebeeler The Rev. Gwynneth J. Mudd The Rev. Michael E. Robinson The Rev. Andrew J. Sherman The Rev. Isabel F. Steilberg The Rev. Janet E. Tarbox The Rev. Canon Larry G. Wilkes

1993

The Rev. Dr. John E. Bird, Jr. The Very Rev. Kathleen M. Bobbitt The Rev. Donna H. Brown The Rev. Carlotta A. Cochran The Rev. Michael B. Ferguson, Sr. The Rev. Susan L. Hardaway The Rev. Gail S. Smith The Rev. Dr. Virginia F. Stanford The Rev. Carolyn K. West

The Rev. Clair F. Ullmann The Rev. Dr. Raymond J. Waldon, Jr. The Rev. Cyril E. White, Sr. The Rev. Michael S. White

1996

The Very Rev. Jerry D. Adinolfi, Jr. The Rev. Lila B. Brown The Rev. J. William DeForest The Rev. Nancy P. DeForest The Rev. Frederick D. Devall IV The Rev. Margaret A. Faeth The Rev. Jonathan H. Folts The Rev. Matthew Gunter The Rev. Judith A. Hefner Mrs. Marie-Lynn Neville The Rev. Judith Harris Proctor Mr. W. Alfred Rose, Jr. The Rev. Taylor M. Smith Mr. Andrew B. Watt The Rev. David B. Wolf Ms. Ann McJimsey Yarborough

1994

The Rev. Kimberly Spire Folts The Rev. Dr. Norma D. Hanson The Rev. Dorothy C. Hartzog The Rev. Dr. Sandra M. Levy The Rev. Charles F. Mullaly, Jr. The Rev. Julie F. Nelson The Rev. Janne Alro Osborne The Rev. William L. Queen, Jr. The Rev. Susan L. Scranton The Rev. Carol Westerberg Sedlacek The Rev. James M. Taylor

1995

Mr. Frederick F. Baker The Rev. Cynthia O. Baskin The Rev. J. Paul Board The Rt. Rev. C. Andrew Doyle The Rev. John B. Hardaway IV The Rev. Kenneth C. Kroohs The Rev. Dr. Charles D. Krutz The Very Rev. Richard J. Martindale The Rev. Karen B. Montagno The Rev. Jeffrey A. Packard The Rev. Edward J. Tracy The Rev. Peggy E. Tuttle

Right: Congratulations to the Rev. Jimmy Abbott (‘10) and his wife, Maggie, who were married on June 12, 2010.

80  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL

1997

Ms. Anne M. Karoly The Rev. Barry P. Kubler The Rev. Dr. John G. Lewis The Rev. Sarah T. Putnam The Rev. Charles S. Weiss

1998

The Rev. R. Louise Baker The Rev. Anne H. Bridgers The Rev. Irving T. Cutter IV Ms. Dorothy F. Heil The Rev. John S. Hill The Rev. Catharine W. Montgomery The Rev. Jennifer Glaze Montgomery The Rev. Dr. Genevieve M. Murphy The Rev. Anne M. Natoli The Rev. Henry M. Sabetti III Mr. Peter F. Spalding The Rev. John G. Tampa The Very Rev. Alan Kim Webster

1999

The Rev. James P. Bartz The Rev. Sandra DePriest The Rev. Robin D. Dodge Ms. Louise Day Dodson The Rev. Louis B. Hays The Rev. Doris B. Johnson The Rev. Adam P. Kradel The Rev. Sheila N. McJilton The Rev. Rita B. Nelson The Rev. Jennie Lou Reid The Rt. Rev. James J. Shand Mrs. Susan G. Sullivan The Rev. Catherine W. Swann

2000

The Rev. Orlando J. Addison The Rev. Dr. David T. Anderson Mr. Philip R. Brooks The Rev. Mary R. Busse The Rev. Katherine A. Carlson The Rev. Alison C. Carmody The Rev. Jeunee L. Cunningham The Rev. Raymond Dale Custer Ms. Pamela G. Frick The Rev. Dr. Richard B. Lampert Ms. Julia Ann Lloyd The Rev. Dr. Andrew J. MacBeth The Rev. Ann L. Moczydlowski The Rev. Dr. James E. Morris The Rev. Jane D. Piver The Rt. Rev. Sean W. Rowe The Rev. J. Allison St. Louis, Ph.D. The Rev. Catherine M. Thompson

2001

The Rev. Earl D. Beshears The Rev. Dewey E. Brown, Jr. The Rev. Kim L. Coleman The Rev. Alexandra K. Conrads Mrs. Rebecca P. Cooper Ms. Danica D'Onofrio The Rev. Richard E. Fichter, Jr. The Rev. Earnest N. Graham III The Rev. Lance C. Horne The Rev. Connie Jones The Rev. Mary Jayne Ledgerwood The Rev. Canon W. Grainger Lesesne, Jr. The Rev. Kevin M. Lloyd The Rev. T. Stewart Lucas The Rev. Arlene Lukas The Rev. Alison J. Quin The Rev. Holladay Sanderson The Rev. Craig C. Sweeney The Rev. Canon James M. Thomas, Jr. The Rev. Joshua Varner The Rev. Dr. Charles L. Walthall The Rev. Melissa Wilcox


CORPORATIONS & FOUNDATIONS Bank of America Matching Gifts Program Cole & Denny Incorporated IBM International Corporation Intelliscan, Inc. Jenzabar, Inc. McGriff, Seibels & Williams Inc. State Farm Companies Foundation

FACULTY/STAFF

2002

The Rev. William C. Anderson The Rev. Canon Nathaniel Luke Back The Rev. Dr. James T. Boston The Rev. Diane Britt The Rev. Dr. Cheryl L. Clark The Rev. Margaret Kay Dagg Mr. Adam L. Dagg The Rev. Philip M. Dinwiddie The Rev. John B. Gardner Dr. Paul J. Halpern The Rev. Kedron D. Jarvis The Rev. Kathryn E. Jenkins The Rev. Andrew B. Jones The Rev. Linda M. Kapurch The Rev. Alexander D. MacPhail The Rev. Gary B. Manning The Rev. Garrett M. Mettler Ms. Margaret D. Moore The Rev. Michael R. J. Pipkin The Rev. Michael D. Reddig The Rev. Shirley E. Smith-Graham The Rev. Kenneth E. Wagner-Pizza The Rev. Eileen E. Weglarz

2003

The Rev. Deborah D. Apoldo The Rev. Kenneth H. Brannon The Rev. Katherine M. Bush The Rev. J. Michael Cadaret The Rev. Diane P. Carroll The Rev. William L. Combs The Rev. Joshua T. Condon The Rev. Doyt L. Conn, Jr. The Rev. David Copley

The Rev. Susan Copley The Rev. Dr. Ronald David Ms. Gail Dawson The Rev. Lisa Goforth The Rev. Nanese A. Hawthorne Ms. Mary Hickert Herring The Rev. Sarah D. Hollar The Rev. Irene C. Jones The Rev. Constance M. Jones The Rev. David A. Marshall The Rev. Canon Glenda R. McQueen Dawkins The Rev. Cesar S. Olivero The Rev. Jennifer OvenstoneSmith The Rev. Beth A. Palmer Mrs. Sharon E. Pearson Mrs. Michelle M. Sanderson The Rev. Megan Stewart-Sicking The Rev. Dr. Joseph StewartSicking, Ed. D. Mr. Richard N. Taliaferro, Jr. The Rev. Cynthia B. Walter The Rev. Dr. William J. Watson III The Rev. Shearon S. Williams

2004

The Rev. Mariann C. Babnis Mr. John L. Bartlett The Rev. David P. Culbertson The Rev. Mary H. T. Davisson Dr. Barbara Day The Rev. John G. Earls The Rev. Jeff W. Fisher

The Rev. David J. C. Frazelle The Rev. Paula C. Green The Rev. Rebekah B. Hatch The Rev. Kate E. Kelderman The Rev. Jennifer S. Kimball The Rev. Dr. Harold J. Lockett The Rev. Anne S. MacNabb The Rev. Karin L. MacPhail The Rev. Carla B. McCook The Rev. Jennifer G. McKenzie The Rev. Laureen H. Moyer The Rev. Rachel A. Nyback Mr. William S. Peebles IV The Rev. Paul A. Price The Rev. Thomas C. Pumphrey The Rev. W. Blake Rider The Rev. Phyllis A. Spiegel The Rev. Ellie Thober The Rev. David A. Umphlett Mr. Gerald L. Warren The Rev. Mark D. Wilkinson Mrs. Wendy J. Wilkinson

2005

The Rev. Rosemary E. Beales Mr. Warren Clark, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Rosemarie L. Duncan The Rev. Charles W. Fels The Rev. John T. Frazier The Rev. Sarah K. Gaventa The Rev. Sarabeth Goodwin The Rev. Linda K. Gosnell The Rev. James M. L. Grace The Rev. Charles J. Hatfield

Above: The Revs. Amy Porterfield and Brian Palmer (both from the class of 2010), married on July 10, 2010 by the Rt. Rev. W. Michie Klusmeyer, bishop of West Virginia, were surrounded by a number of VTS classmates, faculty members, and alums. The Rev. Adele M. Hatfield Mr. Michael B. Hinson The Rev. Jessica K. Hitchcock The Rev. Jeffrey C. Huston Marilyn T. Johns, D. Min. The Rev. Lauren E. Kuratko The Rev. Lucia K. Lloyd The Rev. Ann F. Martens The Rev. Tara L. McGraw The Rev. Susan L. Merrin The Rev. Catherine A. Metivier, D.D.S. The Rev. Alex G. Montes Mr. David Nelson The Rev. Andrew T. O'Connor The Rev. Shelby O. Owen The Rev. James L. Pahl, Jr. The Rev. John M. Porter-Acee III The Rev. John Henry Rule Ms. Jamie Samilio The Rev. Jeffrey S. Shankles The Rev. Shelley-Ann Tenia The Rev. Samantha A. Vincent The Rev. Barbara C. Willis

Fall 2010

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2010 Annual Giving Report

2006

The Rev. Robert F. Browning, Jr. The Rev. Ann Lyn Burns The Rev. Bruce D. Cheney, Sr. The Rev. Sandra L. Etemad The Rev. Fran Gardner The Rev. Holly M. Gloff The Rev. Dr. Carol J. Jablonski Mr. John T. Jones The Rev. Ryan P. Kuratko The Rev. Thomas A. Lacy II The Rev. Sean T. Leonard The Rev. Allison S. Liles The Rev. Helen K. McKee Ms. Cynthia J. Rogers The Rev. Melody W. Shobe The Rev. Robert C. Shobe Ms. Leslie Charlotte Nunez Steffensen The Rev. Caroline R. Stewart

2007

The Rev. Peter K. Ackerman The Rev. Conor M. Alexander Mr. Kenneth F. Athey, Jr. The Rev. Charles F. Brock The Rev. J. Todd Bruce The Rev. Ronald C. Byrd The Rev. Peter M. Carey The Rev. Rebecca T. Crites Mr. John D. Daniels The Rev. Amanda B. Eiman The Rev. Ann H. Gillespie The Rev. Timothy H. Grayson The Rev. Joseph H. Hensley, Jr. The Rev. Erin S. Hensley The Rev. Nancy S. Hildebrand The Rev. Theodore B. Howard The Rev. Meaghan M. Kelly The Rev. Christy E. Laborda The Rev. Dr. William M. Lawbaugh The Rev. Eric J. Liles The Rev. Candyce J. Loescher The Rev. Dr. John F. McCard The Rev. Dewayne J. Messenger The Rev. Steven J. Pankey The Rev. Scott B. Petersen The Rev. R. Bingham Powell The Rev. Mark M. Powell The Rev. Robert A. Pruitt The Rev. Joseph M. Rushton The Rev. Lisa A. Saunders The Rev. Miriam S. Saxon The Rev. Matthew R. Scott The Rev. Nicholas N. Sichangi The Rev. William M. Sowards The Rev. Kyle D. Stillings The Rev. Erika L. Takacs The Rev. Diane E. Vie The Rev. Todd M. Vie The Rev. Luther Zeigler

2008

The Rev. Dr. Patrick P. Augustine The Rev. Brett P. Backus The Rev. Mitchell T. Bojarski Mrs. Beth Bojarski The Rev. Andrew G. Butler III The Rev. Frederick C. Clarkson The Rev. Dr. Elizabeth M. Gibson The Rev. Giulianna M. Gray The Rev. Peter W. Gray The Rev. Anne M. Harris The Rev. Bret B. Hays The Rev. Meredith T. Heffner The Rev. Richard M. Humm The Rev. Marta Dove-Vila Johnson The Rev. James J. Lanter The Rev. Morgan M. MacIntire The Rev. Dennis L. Morgan The Rev. John W. Newton IV The Rev. Ronald M. Owen The Rev. Cynthia Park The Rev. Mary E. Reese The Rev. Phoebe A. Roaf The Rev. Adam P. Thomas The Rev. Sven L. vanBaars The Rev. Anne F. Vouga The Rev. Helen M. White The Rev. Thomas L. Wilson

2009

The Rev. John Alvey The Rev. Jennifer N. AndrewsWeckerly Ms. Gina Arents The Rev. Timothy W. Backus The Rev. Dr. Lisa S. Barrowclough The Rev. Robert W. Black, Jr. Mrs. Malinda W. Collier Mrs. Nancy M. D. Davidson The Rev. Christopher R. Duncan Mrs. Casey C. R. Duncan The Rev. Dr. Frank G. Dunn The Rev. Gates Elliott The Rev. Charles L Fischer III The Rev. Valerie J. Hayes Ms. Linda L. Lanam The Rev. Timothy Malone The Rev. Troy Mendez The Rev. Elizabeth P. O'Callaghan The Rev. Beverly C. Schroeder The Rev. Mary B. Thorpe The Rev. Leigh C. Vicens The Rev. Burton K. White, Jr. The Rev. Ann B. Willms The Rev. Janet L. W. Zimmerman

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STUDENT GIFTS 2010

The Rev. Mary K. Babcock Ms. Gillian R. Barr Ms. Barbara A. Bassuener The Rev. Pierre-Henry Buisson Ms. Lynn M. Campbell The Rev. Robert F. Coniglio The Rev. Philip H. DeVaul The Rev. Geoffrey D. Doolittle The Rev. Geoffrey P. Evans The Rev. Christine M. Faulstich The Rev. Leslie C. Ferguson The Rev. Stephen D. Foisie The Rev. Kenneth N. Forti The Rev. Willis R. Foster, Sr. The Rev. Lauren M. Kilbourn Gaudette The Rev. Patrick J. Greene The Rev. Matthew R. Hanisian The Rev. Catherine D. Hicks The Rev. Meredith L. Holt Ms. Marian T. Humphrey The Rev. Kimberly S. Jackson The Rev. Jessica T. Knowles The Rev. Catherine C. L. Lemons Mr. Richard D. Meadows, Jr. The Rev. Julia W. Messer Ms. Sayama Naw Lwin Thida Myint The Rev. Sara E. Palmer The Rev. Dr. Susan M. Prinz Mr. Christopher M. Robinson The Rev. Narcis J. Sebikwekwe Mr. Benson E. Shelton The Rev. Janis H. T. Shook Ms. Julie A. Simonton Mrs. Sonya K. Sowards

Above: Members of the VTS Ultimate Frisbee Club included (front row, from left to right) Blake Woods, Jimmy Abbott, Phil DeVaul, Julia Messer; (2nd row) Lara Shine and Patrick Funston; and (back row) Matthew Kozlowski, Tim Dang, Andrew Terry, and Mike Angell. The Rev. Susan R. Sowers The Rev. Richard A. Tucker The Rev. Amy P. Turner The Rev. Brian W. Turner The Rev. Matthew Venuti The Rev. Alexander H. Webb II The Rev. Cornelia M. Weierbach The Rev. Canon Flora Winfield The Rev. Janis E. R. Yskamp

2011

Mrs. Kirsten Baer Mr. Timothy Baer Mrs. Jennifer Durant Ms. Tracey E. Kelly Mr. Matthew Kozlowski Ms. Patricia Sexton Mr. Edgar Taylor Mrs. Roberta Taylor Dr. Norman Whitmire, Jr.

2012

Ms. Jo J. Belser Mr. David Crosby Mrs. Mary R. Mackin Mr. Stephen Y. McGehee Mr. William McMillen Mr. Kyle M. Oliver


STAFF/FACULTY GIFTS Mr. Matthew Anderson Mitzi J. Budde, D. Min. Ms. Diane Carl Stephen L. Cook, Ph.D. Mrs. Lori Daniels Ms. Wilhelmina Dixon Judy Fentress-Williams, Ph.D. The Rev. Roger A. Ferlo, Ph.D. The Rev. Charles L Fischer III, ‘09 Amelia J. Gearey Dyer, Ph.D. Ms. Sarah Glenn Ms. Kathryn A. Glover The Rev. Dr. David T. Gortner, Ph.D. Jonathan M. Gray, Ph.D. The Rev. A. Katherine Grieb, Ph.D., ‘83 The Rev. Jacques B. Hadler, Jr. The Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D.

Mrs. Deborah Hewson The Rev. Ruthanna B. Hooke, Ph.D. Marilyn T. Johns, D. Min., ‘05 Ms. Anne M. Karoly, ‘97 Elisabeth M. Kimball, Ph.D. The Rev. Lloyd A. Lewis, Jr., Ph.D., ‘72 Mrs. Dorothy Linthicum The Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D. The Rev. Judith M. McDaniel, Ph.D. The Rev. Joyce A. Mercer, Ph.D. The Rev. Melana Nelson-Amaker Mrs. Monina B. Pangan Ms. Meredith Pilling Mrs. Olivine Jan Pilling Mr. Christopher Pote Mr. Curtis Prather The Rev. Robert W. Prichard, Ph.D. Mrs. Julia E. Randle The Rev. William B. Roberts, D.M.A. Ms. Ann F. Roebuck Ms. Ray W. Sabalis

Timothy F. Sedgwick, Ph.D. Ms. Susan L. Shillinglaw Mrs. Nancy Siridavong Ms. Bette Spencer The Rev. J. Allison St. Louis, Ph.D., ‘00 Ms. Leslie Charlotte Nunez Steffensen, ‘06 The Rev. Alexander H. Webb II, ‘10 Ms. Maureen Wilson-Jarrard The Rev. John Y. Yieh, Ph.D. Ms. Heather Zdancewicz

GIFTS IN KIND Ms. Evelyn Bence The Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Bowers, ‘56 The Rev. Mary W. Brake, ‘78 The Rev. and Mrs. Richard A. Busch (H), ‘84 Mr. Hershel F. Connally IV Mr. Murray Dewart The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert D. Friend, ‘76 Mrs. Nancy Gilbert The Rev. Susan E. Goff The Rev. Dr. David T. Gortner and The Rev. Heather A. Vandeventer The Rev. A. Katherine Grieb, Ph.D., ‘83 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Harris, ‘69 The Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D. The Rev. and Mrs. Frederic D. Huntington, ‘79 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Richard J. Jones, ‘72 The Rev. Robert J. Kerner Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Kozlowski, ‘11 The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Peter James Lee, ‘67 The Rev. Herbert K. Lodder, ‘58 and Mrs. Frances Pinter Lodder Mr. and Mrs. Francis March The Rev. Loren B. Mead, ‘55 The Very Rev. Charles Osberger Mrs. Barbara Porterfield The Rev. Dr. Susan M. Prinz, ‘10 Mr. and Mrs. Gene Pruet The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick E. Scharf, Jr., ‘88 The Rev. Kenneth E. Schnepp, Jr.

Left: Congratulations to rising seniors, Katie Nakamura and Josiah Rengers who were married on May 26, 2010 in Birmingham, Alabama.

Ms. Margaret Shannon Mr. and Mrs. Barry Stauffer The Rev. Mary Brennan Thorpe, ‘09 and The Rev. Dr. Douglas Thorpe The Rev. Adam T. Trambley, ‘04 The Rev. Brian W. Turner, ‘10 The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Frank R. VanDevelder, ‘63 Kathleen vanEsselstyn Homer and Charlotte Lloyd Walkup Dr. Norman Whitmire, Jr., ‘11

FOUNDATIONS Baltimore Community Foundation Robinson F. and Mary Haskins Barker Charitable Foundation Hamilton Baskerville Trust Charles Blair Testament Trust Ruth Camp Campbell Foundation The Cartinhour Woods Foundation Charles Stewart Mott Foundation The Community Foundation The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region The Community Foundation of Greater Memphis The Community Foundation of Louisville Arthur Vining Davis Foundations Elliason and Molly Laird Downs Perpetual Charitable Trust The Constance Dundas Foundation Ely Fund Lettie Pate Evans Foundation Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Foundation For The Carolinas Holmes I. Goode Trust Jean Lykes Grace Foundation The Henry Luce Foundation Minor Foundation, Inc. The Norfolk Foundation Louise P. Overby Trust Payne Foundation Jane Litle Peters Trust Clarence J. Robinson Foundation Trust Schwab Charitable Fund The Fuller Foundation The Teagle Foundation Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program Robert L. Young Trust

Fall 2010

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2010 Annual Giving Report

IN HONOR OF GIFTS The Rt. Rev. C. Fitzsimons Allison The Rev. Dr. Edna J. Banes Mr. Peter Schultheis The Rev. Robert C. Ayers, Ph.D. Mr. Joseph W. Karlson The Rev. Harry W. Baldwin, Jr. 60th anniversary as an Episcopal priest Mr. and Mrs. Harry Baldwin William Basom Dr. Karl Johnson Biblical Studies Faculty Ms. Gail Dawson The Rev. William P. Billow, Jr. The Rev. Luther Zeigler Bishop Payne Library Staff Mr. James Kotora The Rev. Dr. John E. Booty The Rev. James P. Metzger The Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Bowers Mr. and Mrs. R. Dyke Benjamin The Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Bowers Mrs. Josephine H. Carter Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Crooks, Jr. Mrs. Jennifer Durant Ms. Jane U. Henry Ms. Carlin Rankin and Dr. Alfred P. Morgan Mr. and Mrs. A. Crenshaw Reed, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Bret E. Russell Mr. and Mrs. David Swann Mr. and Mrs. W. Wardlaw Thompson, Jr.

The Rev. Dr. Richard A. Busch The Rev. Dr. Richard B. Lampert

Class of 1981 The Rev. Lucy L. Hogan, Ph.D.

Class of 1950 The Rev. Luther D. Miller, Jr.

Class of 1989 Dr. Ernest E. Chapman

Class of 1953 The Rev. Canon David R. Forbes

Class of 2001 The Rev. Alison J. Quin

Class of 1959 – 50th Reunion The Rev. and Mrs. John H. Albrecht The Rev. and Mrs. John D. Alfriend Mrs. Lynn H. Banks The Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Bayfield The Rev. and Mrs. James C. Blackburn The Rev. Augustus M. Burt The Rev. Dr. Timothy B. Cogan The Rev. Alan B. Conley The Rev. and Mrs. James R. Crowder Mrs. Jeffrey T. Cuffee Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Denkinger The Rev. Thomas T. Diggs The Rev. William B. Easter The Rev. and Mrs. Louis C. Fischer III The Very Rev. H. Douglas Fontaine and Mrs. Jeanne Fontaine The Rev. Richard P. Fowler Ruth Tomlin Gronneberg The Rev. John I. Kilby The Rev. and Mrs. Robert Lawthers The Rev. William P. Parrish The Rev. and Mrs. Patrick H. Sanders, Jr. Mrs. Mary B. Thornburgh The Rev. Dr. Franklin E. Vilas, Jr. The Rev. Dr. James I. Walter The Rev. David D. Wendel, Jr. Mrs. Sarah C. Williamson The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. R. Stewart Wood

The Rev. Joseph M. Constant The Rt. Rev. Nathan D. Baxter Mrs. Robert A. Burch

The Rev. Matthew B. Bradley St. John's Episcopal Church, Murray, KY The Rev. Mary Kay Brown Ms. Monica L. Parry The Rt. Rev. Edmond L. Browning The Rev. Robert O. Johnston Dr. Mitzi J. Budde Mr. and Mrs. Russell V. Randle

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The Rev. Joseph M. Constant and Family Mr. Julian R. Dugas, Esq. Bev Costello The Rev. Hilary "Pete" Costello, Jr. The Rt. Rev. Kenneth Cragg Mrs. Grace D. Guthrie Mrs. Nancy M. D. Davidson Ms. Priscilla Andre-Colton Ms. Carol Dawson Dr. Barbara Day The Rt. Rev. James M. Dyer The Rev. Burton K. White, Jr. Mr. Robert G. C. Eads Family The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads Robert G. C. Eads The Rev. Dr. Roger A. Ferlo Catherine and Alan Ford The Rev. Dr. John F. McCard The Rev. Andrew T. O'Connor The Rev. Charles L Fischer III Ms. Susan Ford

The Rev. Jerry W. Fisher St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC Mrs. Ilse B. Fuller Mrs. Grace D. Guthrie The Rev. Charles M. Girardeau All Saints' Episcopal Church, Atlanta, GA The Rev. Dr. M. Douglas Girardeau Dr. and Mrs. C. Rodney Layton, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Edward Stone Gleason Alexandra Dorr People of Grace Church, Plymouth, NC The Rev. David A. Umphlett The Rev. A. Katherine Grieb, Ph.D. The Rev. Michael D. Chalk St. Mark's Episcopal Church, San Antonio, TX The Rev. Jacques B. Hadler, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Frank G. Dunn and Joseph A. Casazza The Rev. Cynthia Park Mr. Edwin King Hall Alexandra Dorr Mr. and Mrs. Edward Symes III

Below: Members of the class of 1959, pictured with their spouses, celebrated their 50th reunion this past October.


The Rev. Rebekah B. Hatch Ms. Paula Bokros The Rev. Dr. J. Barney Hawkins IV The Rev. Canon Nathaniel Luke Back The Rev. Dr. John F. McCard The Rev. Catherine D. Hicks Mr. Charles H. Bullock and Ms. Pamela J. Jewett-Bullock The Rev. Jessica K. Hitchcock Mr. and Mrs. Gene Hitchcock The Rev. Geoffrey M. St. J. Hoare Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Y. McGehee Katherine Hoben Mr. James E. Hoben The Rev. Canon Robert E. Holzhammer Ms. Tina Strauss Trinity Episcopal Church, Iowa City, IA The Very Rev. Martha J. Horne The Rev. Katherine M. Bush The Very Rev. and Mrs. Alan Kim Webster Mrs. Robert A. Burch The Rev. Peter G. Cheney The Rt. Rev. Jane Holmes Dixon Dr. and Mrs. Preston C. Manning, Jr. The Rev. Janet C. Watrous Mrs. Donnan Wintermute Dr. McDonald K. Horne III Dr. and Mrs. Preston C. Manning, Jr. The Rt. Rev. Sam B. Hulsey St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, Dallas, TX Temmie Jarrett Ms. Dorothy H. McLachlan The Rt. Rev. Shannon S. Johnston Mr. and Mrs. N. Pendleton Rogers The Rev. Dr. Richard J. Jones The Rev. Timothy W. Backus The Rev. Lila B. Brown The Rev. J. Todd Bruce Amelie and Charles Cagle Ms. Cynthia Darling Dr. Barbara Day The Rev. Eleanor L. Ellsworth Dr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Glover

Mr. and Mrs. Max Guggenheimer, Jr. Maj. Gen. and Mrs. Hal E. Hallgren The Rev. Judith A. Hefner Mr. and Mrs. Yuille Holt III The Hon. James A. Leach Mrs. Chrishelle Leonard The Rev. Sean T. Leonard The Rev. Allison S. Liles and The Rev. Eric J. Liles The Rev. Gayle M. Marsh The Rev. Carla B. McCook The Rev. Peter A. Munson The Rev. Judith Harris Proctor Dr. Newland F. Smith, 3rd The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Leon P. Spencer, Jr. The Rev. Leigh C. Vicens Miss Jane F. Williams Mrs. David W. C. Graham Ministry of The Rev. and Mrs. Richard J. Jones The Rev. C. Lloyd Lipscomb III Dr. Elisabeth M. Kimball Ms. Mary S. Kimball The Very Rev. Harry E. Krauss Ms. Adrienne Southgate Ms. Linda L. Lanam Ms. Priscilla Andre-Colton The Rev. Robert Lawthers on the 50th anniversary of his ordination The Rev. and Mrs. Robert Lawthers Mr. Caleb Lee Mr. and Mrs. J. Fred Rippy III The Rt. Rev. Peter James Lee Elizabeth Fleming Lacy Mr. and Mrs. John H. Bartol Dr. Barbara Day The Rev. Richard E. Fichter, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. David J. Greer The Rev. Charles R. Sydnor, Jr. The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Peter James Lee The Rev. Alexander D. MacPhail and The Rev. Karin MacPhail

The Rev. Dr. Lloyd A. Lewis, Jr. The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Cyril C. Burke, Sr. The Rev. Steve and Sandy Norcross Mr. and Mrs. George M. Scott, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Frank W. Young The Rev. Canon John A. Logan, Jr. Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, TX The Rev. Samuel M. Logan The Rev. William D. Evans III The Rev. Robert H. Lyles The Rev. Harrison T. Simons, D.D. MACE Mrs. Malinda W. Collier The Rev. Morgan M. MacIntire Mr. Michael S. Lockaby The Rev. Anne S. MacNabb Ms. Miriam Turner The Rev. Alexander D. MacPhail Alice and Ralph MacPhail, Jr. The Rev. Karin L. MacPhail Alice and Ralph MacPhail, Jr. The Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D. Mr. and Mrs. Edwin King Hall Mr. and Mrs. Mark MacGougan Mr. and Mrs. S. Keith Markham Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Draycott Mr. Anthony Markham Ms. Deborah Markham Mr. and Mrs. Michael Markham Ms. Abbie Sowden Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sowden Mrs. Rosemary Sowden

The Rev. Bollin M. Millner, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Robert J. Boyd, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Burton Newman The Rev. Dr. Richard B. Lampert The Rev. Dr. Murray L. Newman, Jr. Victor A. Brown (USA Ret.) The Rev. Kristin E. Orr on 15th Anniversary of Ordination Ms. Harriet S. Clowes Church of St. John the Evangelist Episcopal, Flossmoor, IL The Rev. Robert Outman-Conant St. John's Episcopal Church, Holbrook, MA Palmer Memorial Episcopal Church Mrs. Gregoria D. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Ron Smith Mrs. Monina B. Pangan The Rev. and Mrs. James C. Blackburn Harry P. Porter, Jr., Ph.D. Mr. and Mrs. Sedgwick L. Moss The Rev. John M. Porter-Acee III Mr. and Mrs. J. Marshall Acee, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Susan M. Prinz Ministry at St Michael's and All Angels' Episcopal Church, SC St. Michael and All Angel's Episcopal Church, Columbia, SC The Very Rev. and Mrs. Harry H. Pritchett, Jr. 50th Wedding Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Y. McGehee

Shireen Markham Mr. S. Keith Markham

The Rev. Robert A. Pruitt Mr. and Mrs. Gene Hitchcock

The Rt. Rev. Gerald N. McAllister The Rev. Mark E. Waldo, Sr.

Mrs. Julia E. Randle Alexandria Committee Of Colonial Dames, Alexandria, VA

Mr. Stephen Y. McGehee Mrs. Caroline Y. Brandt

The Rev. Dr. Harold Lewis The Rev. Canon Walter Szymanski

The Rev. Sheila N. McJilton Dr. and Mrs. C. Rodney Layton, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Lewis The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. C. Cabell Tennis

The Rev. Dr. Joyce A. Mercer Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Wagenius The Rev. Andrew T. P. Merrow Ms. Gretchen A. Redmond St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA

The Very Rev. Richard Reid The Rev. James P. Metzger The Very Rev. Joe D. Reynolds Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, TX

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The Rt. Rev. Sean W. Rowe The Rev. Katherine A. Carlson and Mr. Wendell Lynch The Rev. Henry M. Sabetti III Ms. Frances Randall

The Rev. Eleanor D. Whitelaw The Rev. Kedron D. Jarvis Dr. Norman Whitmire, Jr. Mrs. Dorothy D. Whitmire

The Rev. Cecelia Carlile Schroeder Ms. Susan Jaskot

The Rev. Barbara C. Willis Ms. Carole L. Frey Ms. Susan G. Swartz

Dr. Timothy F. Sedgwick Cathedral of All Souls, Asheville, NC

The Rt. Rev. Don Wimberly The Rev. and Mrs. David J. Greer

The Rt. Rev. James J. Shand Dr. and Mrs. C. Rodney Layton, Jr. The Rev. Sheila N. McJilton Mrs. Stephen G. Shepherd Rabbi and Mrs. Jack L. Moline The Rt. Rev. Andrew D. Smith The Rev. Bret B. Hays The Rt. Rev. Philip A. Smith The Rev. Paul Roger Bowen Ms. Susan D. Dawson The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Robert M. Moody The Rev. and Mrs. Malcolm E. Turnbull The Rev. Dr. Katherine Sonderegger The Rev. Constance M. Jones St. Luke's and St. Anne's Episcopal Church The Rev. David A. Umphlett The Rev. Canon Edward L. Stein Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, TX The Rev. Bradley J. Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Sullivan The Rev. Kristin L. Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Sullivan The Rev. Canon Rosemari G. Sullivan The Rev. Rebecca W. Dinan The Rev. Robert L. Tate Ms. Carolyn A. Johnson The Rev. Dr. Frank R. VanDevelder The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Richard J. Jones

The Rev. Rhett Y. Winters, Jr. The Rev. Edward W. Conklin The Honorable and Mrs. Ronnie A. Yoder Mrs. Mary Anderson

MEMORIAL GIFTS The Rev. John T. Arms IV Mr. David F. Wright Suzanne E. Bagley The Rev. Ann B. Willms The Rt. Rev. Scott Field Bailey Mr. Fritz-Alan Korth William O. Bailey, Jr., MD The Rev. and Mrs. Edwin P. Bailey The Rev. D. Clifton Banks, Jr. Mrs. Lynn H. Banks Christopher K. Barrus The Rev. and Mrs. Donald S. Barrus The Rev. Donald R. Barton Mrs. Lois Barton Mrs. Joan J. Bayfield The Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Bayfield The Rev. William A. Beal Mrs. William A. Beal The Rev. Dr. William R. Belury Mrs. William R. Belury Tom Bennett The Rev. Denise D. Giardina Peggy Bosmeyer The Rev. Patricia Merchant

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Mrs. Jean Laverack Bowie Ms. Heather Zdancewicz and Mr. Donald Zdancewicz

The Rev. Canon Richard W. Daniels The Rev. John I. Kilby

The Rev. Dr. Ralph P. Brooks, Jr. Mr. Donald Sutherland

Mr. and Mrs. George C. Dannals Mrs. Cortez T. Dannals

The Rev. Robert A. Burch Mrs. Robert A. Burch Alexandra Dorr Mr. Robert W. Wiseman

Dr. Vernon Perdue Davis Dr. Lyman W. Morgan

The Rev. Perry C. Burton Mrs. Sally C. Miller Mary Butler Ms. Barbara A. Forbes The Rev. Dabney J. Carr III Alexandra Dorr The Rev. Cynthia N. Taylor

Mrs. Cyane D. deBordenave Penelope deBordenave Saffer The Rev. Ernest A. deBordenave, Jr. Penelope deBordenave Saffer The Rev. Dr. Ellin K. Deese The Rev. Cynthia B. Walter The Rev. Marshall Esty Denkinger Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Denkinger

The Rev. John D. Chamblin The Rev. Beth H. Echols

The Rev. W. Gilbert Dent III Mrs. W. Gilbert Dent

Those who have died in the Class of 1961 The Rev. Dr. Emery Washington, Sr.

The Rev. Canon John H. Diehl III Mrs. John H. Diehl III

The Rev. E. Dudley Colhoun, Jr. Mrs. Sarah Hill Langhorne Colhoun Mrs. Bertram C. Cooper Mr. and Mrs. Bruce C. Dunbar, Jr.

The Rev. Dr. Morgan Dix Mr. Kenneth P. Isler The Rev. Charles J. Dobbins Mrs. Charles J. Dobbins

The Rev. J. Finley Cooper, Jr. Mrs. J. Finley Cooper

The Rev. Herbert Alcorn Donovan, Sr. The Rt. Rev. Herbert A. Donovan and Dr. Mary S. Donovan

The Rev. Charles V. O. Covell Judith H. Shaw

The Rev. Charles H. Douglass The Rev. Frank F. Smart, Jr.

Mrs. Marilyn F. Crowell The Rev. Richard S. Crowell

Nancy Carter Dugan Mr. David Q. Hall

The Rev. Robert Alan Croxson Mrs. Sarah C. Williamson

The Rev. Claude F. DuTeil Mrs. Claude F. DuTeil

The Rev. Jeffrey T. Cuffee Mrs. Jeffrey T. Cuffee

Mrs. Helen Hobbs Duvall Mr. Severn P. C. Duvall

Mary A. Currin Ms. Jean Jackson-Mason

Mr. Edward R. Dyer, Jr. Mrs. Edward R. Dyer, Jr.

Wilma Dando Mrs. Mary E. Duvall

Mr. John M. Eads, Sr. The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads Robert G. C. Eads

Tien V. Dang Alexandra Dorr

Mr. John M. Eads, Jr. The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads Robert G. C. Eads


Photo by Curtis Prather Mr. Lewis C. Eads The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads Robert G. C. Eads

David G. Fritsche Mr. and Mrs. C. Craighead Fritsche, Sr.

Mrs. Rosina N. C. Eads The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads Robert G. C. Eads

The Rev. Canon John R. Frizzell, Jr. Colonel Robert H. Clagett, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Alwin Reiners, Jr.

The Rev. William D. Eddy Dr. Harry W. Pollock

The Rev. Dr. Reginald H. Fuller Emmanuel Church at Brook Hill, Richmond, VA Mrs. Grace D. Guthrie Ms. Dori Selene Rockefeller

The Rev. Craig E. Eder The Rev. Benjamin Axleroad, Jr. Robinson F. and Mary Haskins Barker Charitable Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA The Rev. Christopher H. Barker, Ph.D. and Mrs. Mary P. Barker Mrs. Helen B. Eisenhart Mr. Earl E. Eisenhart, Jr. Mrs. Catherine G. Elliott The Rev. William T. Elliott Marian Elliott The Rev. William T. Elliott The Rev. Canon Roy Enquist The Rev. and Mrs. Richard A. Busch Robert Erickson The Very Rev. and Mrs. Jerry D. Adinolfi, Jr. The Rev. William C. Farrington The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick E. Scharf, Jr.

Margaret Gaughan The Rev. Rebecca W. Dinan The Rev. Churchill J. Gibson, Jr. Ms. Jane Edwards Mrs. Carl N. Ettinger, Jr. The Rev. C. Neal Goldsborough Dr. and Mrs. C. Rodney Layton, Jr. Mr. Luke M. Stephens The Rev. Charles W. Gilchrist Mrs. Charles Waters Gilchrist Mr. Adam P. Goren Christ Church Cathedral, Lexington, KY The Rev. Dr. Rosemarie L. Duncan Ms. Laine Covington Goren Mr. and Mrs. Gene Hitchcock The Rev. Jeffrey C. Huston The Rev. J. Patrick Gray The Rev. C. Neal Goldsborough The Rev. James M. Green The Rev. John Denham

Mrs. Alice E. Griffith The Rev. Norman E. Griffith, Jr. The Rev. Reginald C. Groff Mrs. Reginald C. Groff The Rev. Pettigrew V. Hamilton Mrs. Antoinette S. Hamilton Archer E. Hansen Dr. Hobart G. Hansen The Rt. Rev. Stanley F. Hauser The Rev. Benjamin Axleroad, Jr. Mrs. Stanley F. Hauser The Rev. Robert D. Herzog Mrs. Robert D. Herzog The Rev. Charles H. Hewitt Mrs. Charles Henry Hewitt Elizabeth P. Hobbs Mr. Severn P. C. Duvall Frederick H., Jr. and Elizabeth Hobbs Mr. Severn P. C. Duvall William A. Hobbs Dr. and Mrs. William A. Hobbs, Jr. The Rev. Charles B. Hoglan, Jr. Mrs. Charles B. Hoglan, Jr. Mr. Christopher M. Horne The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Mark S. Anschutz Ms. Jane Edwards

Above: Dorothy Linthicum, program coordinator for the Center for the Ministry of Teaching, leads a course for Christian educators on navigating the curriculum maze. Marjorie Hutchinson Mrs. Beryl O. Burke Robert J. Ingram Dr. Lynwood D.I. Day The Rev. Marlowe K. Iverson Mrs. Marlowe K. Iverson The Rev. Christopher Jones, Jr. Mrs. Elizabeth Root Jones The Rev. Dr. John H. Jordan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Crooks, Jr. Robert Kasle The Rev. William M. DuncanO'Neal Marie Kazigian Ms. Florence Clark The Rev. Dr. Robert O. Kevin Mrs. William A. Vogely The Very Rev. Edward Felix Kloman The Rev. P. Kingsley Smith Mrs. Daphne R. Williams

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The Rev. Alfred T. Knies, Jr. Mrs. Alfred T. Knies, Jr.

The Rev. Lex S. Mathews Mrs. Judith Wright Mathews

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Knight Mr. and Mrs. John L. Knight

Pat McCandlish Mr. Robert L. Montague III

John Henry Kreitler Mrs. Mary Anderson Ms. Lynn D. Ellison The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Peter G. Kreitler Dr. and Mrs. Dudley F. Rochester

The Rt. Rev. William Meade The Rev. Henry W. Austin

Muriel (Billie) Gwillim Kreitler Mrs. Mary Anderson Ms. Lynn D. Ellison The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Peter G. Kreitler Dr. and Mrs. Dudley F. Rochester Mrs. Catherine M. La Rue The Rev. Howard A. La Rue Mr. Merle Levy Mrs. Beryl Levy The Rev. Dr. Charles H. Long, Jr. Mrs. Nancy I. Long The Rev. James L. Lowery, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Louis C. Fischer III Jay Phelps Lukens Ms. Susan A. Lukens

Dr. Marianne H. Micks The Rt. Rev. E. Ambrose Gumbs The Rev. John C. Millen The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Frank R. VanDevelder The Rev. Claudius Miller III The Rev. and Mrs. Alwin Reiners, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Benjamin B. Smith, LHD James B. Miller The Rev. Dr. Sandra M. Levy and Dr. Leon H. Levy Lane G. Millner The Very Rev. Kathleen M. Bobbitt The Rev. Albert T. Mollegen The Rev. Blanche L. Powell The Rev. Dr. Ronald C. Molrine The Rev. and Mrs. Fielder Israel, Jr. Mrs. Ronald C. Molrine

The Rev. Arthur L. Lyon-Vaiden Mrs. Arthur L. Lyon-Vaiden

The Rev. Jane A. Morse Marjorie M. and Jerome F. Prochaska

The Rt. Rev. C. Gresham Marmion Mrs. C. Gresham Marmion

The Rev. P. Emmett Mullen The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick W. Willis, Jr.

The Rt. Rev. William H. Marmion The Rev. and Mrs. Claud W. McCauley

Dr. Peter James Thor Nelsen Mrs. Susan M. Nelsen

Betty Marquis St. Barnabas' Church, Berlin, NH The Rev. Arthur H. Marsh, Jr. Col. and Mrs. Richard H. Brownley Peter T. Marston Mr. F. Page Nelson The Rev. and Mrs. David F. Wayland The Rev. Charles O'Fallon Mastin Mrs. Charles O'Fallon Mastin

The Rev. Samuel S. Odom Mrs. Samuel S. Odom The Rev. William H. Olsen The Rev. Frances F. Cox and The Rev. Edwin M. Cox Elis and Signe Olsson Mary and J. P. Causey, Jr. The Rev. Robert M. Olton Mrs. Robert Matthew Olton Miss Louise Paggi Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ziegler

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Parents of Capt. and Mrs. William Harkins Capt. and Mrs. William D. Harkins, USN (Ret) The Rev. Reynell M. Parkins Mrs. Jean Parkins-Edens The Rev. Timothy Pickering The Rev. Webster G. Barnett The Rev. J. Edwin Pippin Ms. Patricia P. Moser Edythe Platt Mr. Kyle M. Oliver The Rev. Dr. Charles P. Price The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Winston B. Charles Mrs. Margaret S. Diederich The Rev. J. Carlyle Gill The Rev. Anne Duval Monahan The Rev. Blanche L. Powell The Rev. Carolyn J. Schmidt Mr. Bruce Stewart and Ms. Andra Jurist The Rev. Graham Pulkingham Dr. Betty Carr Pulkingham Aimee L. Punchak The Rev. Dr. William M. Lawbaugh Carolyn W. Quigley Ms. Diane H. Gay The Rev. Robert E. Richardson Mrs. Robert E. Richardson The Rev. Robert H. Richardson Mrs. Robert H. Richardson Erma Riddle The Rev. Dr. Charles M. Riddle III Nancy F. Robinson The Rev. Michael E. Robinson Ms. Joyce Rowe The Rev. Michele B. Bond The Rt. Rev. B. Sidney Sanders Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas G. Wilson III Dr. and Mrs. Bertram Sauerbrunn Ms. Jennifer Harper The Rev. Howard W. Saunders III Ms. Margaret D. Moore

The Rev. Richard H. Schoolmaster Mrs. Marcia H. Bennett The Rev. Canon Marshall E. Seifert Mrs. Marshall E. Seifert Mr. James W. Shaw Judith H. Shaw The Rev. Dr. Edward S. Shirley Mrs. Edward S. Shirley The Rev. Frank Morgan Smith, Jr. The Rev. Robert L. Bast David Soleau Mrs. Kay G. Glenday The Rev. John E. Soleau Mrs. Kay G. Glenday Mrs. Margaret J. Soleau The Rev. W. Holt Souder Mrs. Isabel Souder Correll The Rev. Dr. Clifford L. Stanley The Rev. Lewis W. Towler Elaine P. Stephens Mr. Luke M. Stephens The Rev. Charles Yancey Steptoe Mrs. Sarah D. Steptoe The Rev. Thomas M. Stuhr III Mrs. Geraldine M. Stuhr The Rev. Sydney C. Swann, Jr. The Rev. Catherine W. Swann and Mr. Robert Swann Betsey Taliaferro Capraro Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Taliaferro, Jr. Dale Terwilliger Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Bridges, Jr. The Rev. Conway Decavanac Thornburgh Mrs. Mary B. Thornburgh John T. Ticer The Honorable Patricia S. Ticer The Rev. Hollier G. Tomlin Ruth Tomlin Gronneberg


The Rev. Jesse M. Trotter The Rev. and Mrs. George E. Andrews II The Rev. and Mrs. James C. Blackburn The Rev. J. Ellen Nunnally Mrs. Stephen A. Trentman Mrs. Jesse M. Trotter Ms. Marian Trotter Mr. William P. Trotter The Rev. Robert Tsu Mrs. Robert Tsu The Rt. Rev. Beverly Dandridge Tucker Mr. and Mrs. W. Harding Drane, Jr. The Rev. Francis Bland Tucker The Rev. A. Dawson Teague, Jr. Lydia Patrice Turner The Rev. and Mrs. Melvin E. Turner The Rev. Sylvester M. Vaughan The Rev. Richard H. Lewis and The Rev. Sarah V. Lewis The Rt. Rev. Frank H. Vest, Jr. The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Dannals The Rev. Jay D. Hanson Mr. and Ms. F. Brook Voght Ms. Virginia V. Rocen The Rev. John O. Von Hemert Mr. and Mrs. Bowman Miller The Rev. E. Judson Wagg, Jr. The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Marlin L. Whitmer The Rt. Rev. John Thomas Walker Mrs. Gretel T. James Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. James Albert and Naomi Walthall The Rev. Dr. Charles L. Walthall The Rev. Marshall T. Ware Mrs. Marshall T. Ware (Tricia) Jeannette Louise Rawles Weems Mrs. Helen Weems Daley and Mr. Thomas M. Daley Wallace E. Weems Mrs. Helen Weems Daley and Mr. Thomas M. Daley

Mr. Rolf Williams Mrs. Rolf Williams The Rev. Frederic C. Wood, Jr. Jane Barber Smith

BEQUESTS The Rev. John Paul Carter, ‘47 Mrs. Robert N. Downs III The Rev. Irene C. Jones, ‘03 The Rev. James L. Lowery Eleanor M. Neumayer The Rev. William H. Olsen The Rev. Robert Morgan Shaw, ‘43 George C Thomas Trust Alfred E.W. Wheeler, Estate

GIFTS FOR THE PORTRAIT OF THE REV. LLOYD A. LEWIS, JR. The Rev. Peter K. Ackerman The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Gladstone B. Adams III The Rev. Deborah D. Apoldo Mr. and Mrs. David Booth Beers Ms. Jo J. Belser The Rev. and Mrs. Errol K. Booth The Rev. Kenneth H. Brannon The Rev. Charles F. Brock The Rev. Canon Dwight L. Brown The Rev. and Mrs. Percival G. Brown Dr. and Mrs. David H. Charlton Mr. Warren Clark, Jr. The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Patrick R. Close The Rev. Kim L. Coleman Mr. and Mrs. David Crosby The Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel, 3rd The Rev. and Mrs. Walter W. Dawson Dr. Barbara Day The Rev. Rebecca W. Dinan Diocese of Southwestern Virginia The Very Rev. Todd M. Donatelli The Rt. Rev. Herbert A. Donovan and Dr. Mary S. Donovan The Rev. Dr. Rosemarie L. Duncan The Rev. John G. Earls The Rev. Dr. Margaret A. Faeth and Mr. Paul Faeth Elizabeth H. Farquhar The Rev. J. Gary Fulton

The Rev. Fran Gardner The Rev. Fr. Liston A. Garfield The Rev. C. Neal Goldsborough The Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D. The Rt. Rev. Dorsey F. Henderson, Jr. Joan Holden The Very Rev. Martha J. Horne and Dr. McDonald K. Horne III Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, Alexandria, VA Ms. Kimberly S. Jackson The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Shannon S. Johnston Mr. John T. Jones and The Rev. Dr. Carol J. Jablonski The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Richard J. Jones The Rev. Dexter W. Kessler The Rev. Allison S. Liles and The Rev. Eric J. Liles Mrs. Elizabeth C. Lubelfeld The Rev. Nicholas P. N. Lubelfeld The Rev. T. Stewart Lucas and Mr. Douglas Campbell Dr. and Mrs. Cooper R. Mackin Capt. Janet Lewis Maguire Mr. Joseph L. Manson The Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, Ph.D. and Mrs. Lesley Markham Mr. and Mrs. M. Lee Marston The Rev. and Mrs. Samuel A. Mason The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. James R. Mathes The Rev. Nancy Horton McCarthy The Rev. Helen K. McKee Mr. William McMillen The Rev. Susan L. Merrin The Rev. Dewayne J. Messenger and Mr. Raymond Knapp The Rev. Catherine A. Metivier, D.D.S. The Rt. Rev. James W. Montgomery The Rev. Laureen H. Moyer The Rev. and Mrs. Donnel O’Flynn Mr. Kyle M. Oliver The Rev. Shelby O. Owen The Rev. Barbara D. Parini The Rev. William C. Parnell Mrs. J. Edwin Pippin Ms. Sissy Poland The Very Rev. and Mrs. Richard Reid The Rev. Jan C. Rudinoff Ray Sabalis The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. James J. Shand The Rev. and Mrs. William M. Shand III The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. William R. Shiflet, Jr.

St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, Milton, MA St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA The Very Rev. Dr. William S. Stafford and Mrs. Barbara M. Stafford The Rev. Frederick Stecker IV The Rev. Canon Edward L. Stein The Rev. David A. Umphlett The Rt. Rev. Orris G. Walker, Jr. The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Arthur E. Walmsley The Rev. Alexander H. Webb II The Rev. Ann B. Willms The Rev. Thomas L. Wilson The Rev. Dr. Marian K. Windel

GIFTS TO THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EPISCOPAL HISTORICAL COLLECTION The Rt. Rev. Nathan D. Baxter The Rev. and Mrs. Errol K. Booth Dr. Herman Bostick Ms. Maggie Alston Claud Mr. Steven L. Everett The Rt. Rev. Wendell N. Gibbs, Jr. The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church The Rev. Wayne C. Hodge, Sr. Mrs. Solomon N. Jacobs Mrs. Kay C. Murray The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. F. Neff Powell The Rt. Rev. Lawrence C. Provenzano The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. James J. Shand The Rev. Dr. John F. Woolverton Ms. Heather Zdancewicz and Mr. Donald Zdancewicz

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parish giving We give thanks to the parishes and missions that chose to support the 1% Plan at Virginia Seminary in 2009-2010.

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St. Mary's-on-the-Highlands, Birmingham, AL St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Birmingham, AL St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Mobile, AL St. John's Episcopal Church, Montgomery, AL St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Tuskegee Institute, AL St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Jonesboro, AR St. Clement's Church, Berkeley, CA St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Del Mar, CA St. Edward's Episcopal Church, San Jose, CA St. James Episcopal Church, Danbury, CT St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, Greenwich, CT St. Mark's Episcopal Chapel, Storrs, CT Cathedral Church of St. John, Wilmington, DE Christ Church Christiana Hundred, Wilmington, DE St. John's Church-Lafayette Square, Washington, DC St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish, Washington, DC St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, Washington, DC St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Boca Grande, FL St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Delray Beach, FL All Saints' Episcopal Church, Atlanta, GA Holy Trinity Parish, Decatur, GA King of Peace Episcopal Church, Kingsland, GA St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Tifton, GA Church of St. John the Evangelist Episcopal, Flossmoor, IL St. David's Episcopal Church, Glenview, IL Christ Church Cathedral, Indianapolis, IN Trinity Episcopal Church, Indianapolis, IN Trinity Episcopal Church, Iowa City, IA St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Garden City, KS Christ Episcopal Church, Bowling Green, KY Grace Episcopal Church, Hopkinsville, KY Christ Church Cathedral, Lexington, KY St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Louisville, KY St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Louisville, KY St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Madisonville, KY St. John's Episcopal Church, Murray, KY St. Georges Episcopal Church, Bossier City, LA Trinity Episcopal Church, Natchitoches, LA St. Mark's Cathedral, Shreveport, LA Church of the Good Shepherd, Rangeley, ME Church of the Nativity, Cedarcroft, Baltimore, MD Church of the Redeemer, Baltimore, MD Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, Bethesda, MD Church of the Transfiguration, Braddock Heights, MD Trinity Episcopal Church, Glen Arm, MD St. Thomas' Parish, Hancock, Hancock, MD St. James' Episcopal Church, Potomac, MD St. Barnabas' Episcopal Church, Upper Marlboro, MD Christ Church, I. U. Parish, Worton, MD Trinity Church in the City of Boston, Boston, MA St. John's Episcopal Church, Holbrook, MA Church of Our Saviour, Milton, MA St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Milton, MA Christ Church Episcopal and Trinity Lutheran Church, Sheffield, MA Christ Church Cathedral, Springfield, MA


St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Grand Rapids, MI St. Matthias Episcopal Church, Sault Sainte Marie, MI St. Katherine's Episcopal Church, Williamston, MI Trinity Episcopal Church, Natchez, MS St. John's Episcopal Church, Ocean Springs, MS St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Oxford, MS St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Kansas City, MO St. Barnabas' Church, Berlin, NH St. John the Evangelist Church, Dunbarton, NH Trinity Episcopal Church, Meredith, NH St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Montvale, NJ St. Chad's Episcopal Church, Albuquerque, NM Trinity Memorial Episcopal Church, Binghamton, NY Calvary Episcopal Church, Cairo, NY St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Hamilton, NY St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Mount Kisco, NY Trinity Episcopal Church, New York, NY Christ Episcopal Church, Poughkeepsie, NY St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Rochester, NY Cathedral of All Souls, Asheville, NC St. John's Episcopal Church, Battleboro, NC Church of the Holy Comforter, Burlington, NC Chapel of the Cross, Chapel Hill, NC Church of the Holy Family, Chapel Hill, NC Church of the Good Shepherd, Cooleemee, NC La Iglesia El Buen Pastor, Durham, NC St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Durham, NC St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Durham, NC Trinity Episcopal Church, Fuquay-Varina, NC All Saints' Episcopal Church, Greensboro, NC St. John's - St. Mark's Church, Grifton, NC Church of the Holy Innocents, Henderson, NC St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, Kernersville, NC Grace Episcopal Church, Lewiston Woodville, NC Church of the Messiah, Mayodan, NC St. James Episcopal Church, Mooresville, NC St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Oxford, NC Christ Church, Raleigh, NC St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Reidsville, NC All Saints' Episcopal Church, Roanoke Rapids, NC St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, Salisbury, NC Trinity Episcopal Church, Scotland Neck, NC St. Mary Magdalene, Seven Lakes, NC St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Smithfield, NC Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Southern Pines, NC St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Speed, NC St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Tarboro, NC St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Thomasville, NC All Souls' Church, Ansonville, Wadesboro, NC St. John's Episcopal Church, Wake Forest, NC Christ Episcopal Church, Walnut Cove, NC St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Washington, NC Right: Rising senior, Grace Episcopal Church, Weldon, NC Matthew Kozlowski, Church of the Advent, Williamston, NC at his Field Ed parish, St. James' Parish, Wilmington, NC St. John’s Georgetown.

St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, Wilson, NC St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC St. Philip's Episcopal Church, Circleville, OH Christ Church Glendale, Glendale, OH St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Altus, OK St. Paul's Cathedral, Oklahoma City, OK St. Johns Episcopal Church, Tulsa, OK St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Grants Pass, OR The Memorial Church of the Prince of Peace, Gettysburg, PA St. Christopher's Church, Gladwyne, PA St. Clement's Church, Greenville, PA St. Stephen's Cathedral, Harrisburg, PA All Saints' Episcopal Church, Hershey, PA St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Lebanon, PA Grace Episcopal Church, Ridgway, PA St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, Sunbury, PA St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church, York, PA Diocese of Rhode Island, Providence, RI St. Michael and All Angel's Episcopal Church, Columbia, SC Christ Episcopal Church, Denmark, SC Church of the Epiphany, Summerville, SC

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Church of the Holy Apostles, Collierville, TN Church of the Good Shepherd, Knoxville, TN Calvary Episcopal Church, Memphis, TN St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, Dallas, TX Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, TX St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, Houston, TX St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Huntsville, TX St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Plainview, TX St. Mark's Episcopal Church, San Antonio, TX St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Waco, TX All Saints' Episcopal Church- Sharon Chapel, Alexandria, VA Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, Alexandria, VA Olivet Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA Ascension Episcopal Church, Amherst, VA St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Annandale, VA St. Barnabas' Episcopal Church, Annandale, VA St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA St. James the Less Episcopal Church, Ashland, VA Church of the Good Shepherd, Burke, VA St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Burke, VA Vauters Church, Loretto, Champlain, VA St. Luke's Church, Simeon, Charlottesville, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Charlottesville, VA Buck Mountain Episcopal Church, Earlysville, VA ECW, North Farnham Episcopal Church, Farnham, VA Ware Episcopal Church, Gloucester, VA Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Greenwood, VA ECW, Cople Episcopal Parish, Hague, VA St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Hampton, VA St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Heathsville, VA ECW, Varina Episcopal Church, Henrico, VA St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, Herndon, VA Merchants Hope Episcopal Church, Hopewell, VA Grace Episcopal Church, Kilmarnock, VA St. Paul's Memorial Chapel, Lawrenceville, VA Grace Memorial Episcopal Church, Lynchburg, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Lynchburg, VA St. Dunstan's Episcopal Church, McLean, VA St. John's Episcopal Church, McLean, VA St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, McLean, VA Cunningham Chapel Parish, Millwood, VA Church of the Incarnation, Mineral, VA Trinity Ecumenical Parish, Moneta, VA St. James' Episcopal Church, Montross, VA St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Mount Jackson, VA St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Newport News, VA Christ & Grace Episcopal Church, Petersburg, VA Church of the Epiphany, Richmond, VA Emmanuel Church at Brook Hill, Richmond, VA Grace & Holy Trinity Church, Richmond, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Richmond, VA ECW, St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Richmond, VA

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Christ Episcopal Church, Roanoke, VA Diocese of Southwestern Virginia, Roanoke, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Staunton, VA Trinity Episcopal Church, Upperville, VA St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Virginia Beach, VA St. John's Episcopal Church, Waynesboro, VA St. John's Episcopal Church, West Point, VA St. Paul's-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, Winchester, VA Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Woodstock, VA St. John's Episcopal Church, Wytheville, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Cheney, WA Zion Episcopal Church, Charles Town, WV St. Matthias' Episcopal Church, Grafton, WV St. Timothy's in the Valley Episcopal Church, Hurricane, WV Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Keyser, WV Grace Episcopal Church - Middleway, Middleway, WV Trinity Episcopal Church, Wauwatosa, WI

STUDENT SUBSIDIES The following individuals, groups, parishes, and dioceses gave non-deductible tuition subsidy grants through VTS in 2009-2010. Many other gifts were made directly to the students and not through the Seminary.

All Saint Episcopal Church, Omaha, NE All Saints' Episcopal Cathedral, Fort Worth, TX All Saint's Episcopal Church, Briarcliff Manor, NY All Saints' Episcopal Church, Beverly Hills, CA All Saints' Episcopal Church, Concord, NC All Saints' Episcopal Church, Birmingham, AL All Saints' Episcopal Church, Frederick, MD All Souls' Memorial Episcopal Church, Washington, DC Barbados Diocesan Synod Berean Baptist Church, Washington, DC Bethesda-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, Palm Beach, FL Calvary Episcopal Church, Tarboro, NC Cathedral of All Souls, Asheville, NC Cathedral of St. Philip, Atlanta, GA Center for Scholarship Administration, Inc., Taylors, SC Christ Church Cathedral, Hartford, CT


Christ Episcopal Church, Monticello, FL Christ Episcopal Church, Blacksburg, VA Christ Episcopal Church, Elizabeth City, NC Church of the Epiphany, Atlanta, GA Church of the Good Shepherd, Rocky Mount, NC Church of the Nativity, Cedarcroft, Baltimore, MD Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, PA Church of the Redeemer, Cincinnati, OH The Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore, Inc., Salisbury, MD Diocesan Missionary and Church Extension Society, New York, NY Diocese of Alabama, Birmingham, AL Diocese of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ Diocese of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA Diocese of California, San Francisco, CA Diocese of Central New York, Syracuse, NY Diocese of Central Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA Diocese of Colorado, Denver, CO Diocese of Connecticut, Hartford, CT Diocese of East Carolina, Kinston, NC Diocese of East Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Diocese of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI Diocese of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN Diocese of Kentucky, Louisville, KY Diocese of Long Island, Garden City, NY Diocese of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA Diocese of Maryland, Baltimore, MD Diocese of Massachusetts, Boston, MA Diocese of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI Diocese of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Diocese of Mississippi, Jackson, MS Diocese of Nebraska, Omaha, NE Diocese of New Jersey, Trenton, NJ Diocese of New York, New York, NY Diocese of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania, Erie, PA Diocese of Olympia, Seattle, WA Diocese of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Diocese of Rhode Island, Providence, RI Diocese of Rio Grande, Albuquerque, NM Diocese of Rochester, Rochester, NY Diocese of Southeast Florida, Miami, FL Diocese of Southern Virginia, Norfolk, VA Diocese of Southwestern Virginia, Roanoke, VA Diocese of Upper South Carolina, Columbia, SC Diocese of Washington, Washington, DC Diocese of West Tennessee, Memphis, TN Diocese of West Virginia, Charleston, WV Diocese of Western North Carolina, Asheville, NC Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Moorefield, WV Episcopal Church Center-Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, New York, NY Episcopal Church Of Messiah, Murphy, MC Episcopal Church of Our Saviour, Silver Spring, MD Episcopal Church Women - North Carolina, Morehead City, NC Episcopal Day School, Augusta, GA First United Methodist Church, Pittsburg, KS Galilee Mission, Creswell, NC Grace Episcopal Church, Madison, WI Grace Episcopal Church, Washington, DC Grace Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA Grace-Calvary Episcopal Church, Clarkesville, GA

Grand Chapter, Guthrie, OK Grand Chapter - Maryland OES, Baltimore, MD Grand Chapter OES, Bloomington, MN Grand Chapter of WA-OES, Tumwater, WA International Chapter PEO Sisterhood, Des Moines, IA International Order of the King's Daughters & Sons, Gloucester, VA Julie Ann Jones Caroline Lindemann MC Scholarshop Foundation, Southport, CT The Charles McCamic Foundation, Wheeling, WV The Norfolk Foundation, Norfolk, VA Order of Daughters of the King Inc, Woodstock, GA R. E. Lee Memorial Church, Lexington, VA The Ridley Foundation, Norfolk, VA Scudder Association Inc., Darien, CT Society for the Increase of Ministry, Harford, CT St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Washington, DC St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Annandale, VA St. Ambrose Episcopal Church, Boulder, CO St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Burke, VA St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Morehead City, NC St. Barnabas' Episcopal Church, Annandale, VA St. David's Episcopal Church, Lakeland, FL St. Dunstan's Episcopal Church, McLean, VA St. Elisabeth's Episcopal Church, Bartlett, Memphis, TN St. Georges Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA St. George's Episcopal Church, Fredericksburg, VA St. James' Episcopal Church, Hendersonville, NC St. James' Parish, Wilmington, NC St. John in the Wilderness, Flat Rock, NC St. John's Episcopal Church, Oklahoma City, OK St. John's Episcopal Church, Fayetteville, NC St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Minneapolis, MN St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Salisbury, NC St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Merritt Island, FL St. Margaret's Episcopal Church, Palm Desert, CA St. Margaret's Episcopal Church, Washington, DC St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Huntersville, NC St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Suffolk, VA St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Crystal Lake, IL St. Michael & All Angels, Mission, KS St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Natick, MA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Delray Beach, FL St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Wellsboro, PA St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Arlington, VA St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Oxford, MS St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Del Mar, CA St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Durham, NC St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Fairview, PA St. Thomas' Episcopal Church, Lancaster, PA St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, Winston-Salem, NC Mr. Roy Terry George C Thomas Trust, Wilmington, DE Trinity Episcopal Church, Owensboro, KY Trinity Episcopal Church, Wauwatosa, WI Trinity Episcopal Church, Houston, TX Trinity Episcopal Church, Lawrence, KS Trinity Episcopal Church, Towson, MD Zion Episcopal Church, Charles Town, WV

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2010 Annual Giving Report

The Francis Scott Key Society Best known for writing the Star Spangled Banner, Francis Scott Key was one of the founders of Virginia Theological Seminary. In order to ensure the Seminary’s lasting good health, Francis Scott Key set aside one-tenth of all he earned throughout his life for charities, including the Seminary. Upon his death in 1843, the money was disbursed according to his wishes. Virginia Seminary wishes to thank the following thoughtful and loving friends who have followed the example of Francis Scott Key in the nearly 200 years since the Seminary’s creation.

The Rev. Ronald G. Abrams The Rev. M. L. Agnew, Jr. The Rev. Anthony F. Andres The Rev. Dr. Robert D. Askren The Rev. Dr. Roxana M. Atwood Canon Francis S. Banks The Rev. Cynthia O. Baskin The Rev. Dr. Ralph W. Bayfield Mrs. William A. Beal The Rev. Alden Besse The Rev. William Pierce Billow, Jr. The Rev. James C. Blackburn Mrs. William W. Blood Mr. and Mrs. Joel K. Bourne The Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Bowers The Rev. Sidney S. Breese Ms. Patricia Bridwell The Rev. Diane Britt The Rev. and Mrs. Ervin A. Brown III The Rev. J. Todd Bruce Mrs. Robert A. Burch The Rev. David W. Cammack The Rev. Canon Robert J. Carlson The Rev. Jeffrey O. Cerar The Rev. Michael D. Chalk The Rev. Charles H. Clark The Rev. Dr. Cheryl L. Clark The Rev. Carlotta Cochran Mr. Thomas Cochran The Rev. Dr. Georgia S. Cohen, Ph.D. The Rev. Edward W. Conklin Dr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Cook Mrs. Anne P. Cooper The Rev. Dr. Robert T. Copenhaver Miss Virginia P. Cowles The Rev. David A. Crump The Rev. Dr. Alexander S. Daley The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Dannals The Rev. and Mrs. John W. S. Davis Mr. Leverett B. Davis Ms. Mary D. Dianish The Rev. Starke S. Dillard, Jr.

The Rev. Mifflin H. Dove, Jr. Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Duvall The Rev. Charles Carroll Eads The Rt. Rev. A. Theodore Eastman The Rev. Don Raby Edwards, D.D. The Rev. Robert G. Eidson The Rev. William T. Elliott The Rev. Gail A. Epes Ms. Elizabeth H. Farquhar The Rev. and Mrs. Michael B. Ferguson, Sr. The Rev. A. Jeanne Finan The Very Rev. Zachary W. Fleetwood The Rev. Kimberly Spire Folts The Rev. Dr. Allie Washington Frazier, Jr. The Rev. Betty Works Fuller The Rev. H. Huey Gardner Dr. Amelia J. Gearey Dyer The Rev. and Mrs. Paul E. Gilbert The Rev. Dr. William S. Glazier II The Rev. C. Neal Goldsborough Dr. and Mrs. Albert S. Gooch, Jr. The Rev. Martin J. Goshgarian The Rev. James M. L. Grace The Rev. Earnest N. Graham III The Rt. Rev. Duncan M. Gray III The Rev. Dr. Roy D. Green, Jr. The Rev. Robert B. Greene The Rev. David J. Greer The Rev. Katrina L. Grusell Mr. David Grusell The Rev. Dr. William Hague Mr. and Mrs. Edwin King Hall Mrs. James I. Hardy The Rev. Robert A. Hargreaves Mr. and Mrs. Conrad K. Harper Mrs. William B. Hastings The Rev. Canon Victoria T. Hatch Miss Ellen Wofford Hawkins The Rev. Dr. J. Barney Hawkins IV The Rev. Susan Blackburn Heath The Rev. and Mrs. Douglas Hiza

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The Rev. and Mrs. Harry L. Hoffman III The Rev. Canon Elizabeth Green Holden The Very Rev. Martha J. Horne Dr. McDonald K. Horne III The Rev. George A. Hull The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Robert W. Ihloff The Rt. Rev. Carolyn Tanner Irish Mr. Robert C. Jackle The Rev. Richard P. Jennings The Rev. Dr. James A. Johnson The Very Rev. Mark S. Jones The Rev. Charles E. Kiblinger The Rev. Pierce W. Klemmt Mrs. Alfred T. Knies The Rev. Adam P. Kradel The Rev. Linda J. Kramer The Very Rev. Dean Harry E. Krauss The Rev. Canon Peter G. Kreitler The Rev. Thomas A. Lacy II The Rev. Canon Charles D. Lafond II Mr. Talmadge M. LeGrand Ms. Christy G. Lassiter The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Peter James Lee The Rev. Dr. John G. Lewis

The Rev. Canon Richard C. Lief The Rev. D. Fredrick Lindstrom, Jr. The Rev. Herbert K. Lodder Mrs. Frances Pinter Lodder Mrs. Charles H. Long, Jr. The Rev. Salin M. Low The Rev. Donald A. Lowery Ms. Susan A. Lukens The Rev. Dr. Joseph Walter Lund The Rev. Louanne Mabry-Loch Capt. Janet Lewis Maguire, (Ret) The Very Rev. and Mrs. Markham Mr. M. Lee Marston Mrs. Lex S. Mathews The Rev. Ernest G. Matijasic The Rev. James and Martha Maxwell The Rev. Roma W. Maycock The Rev. Nancy H. McCarthy The Rev. Thomas B. McCusker III Dr. James Kenneth McDonald Mrs. Lockhart B. McGuire The Rev. Jennifer G. McKenzie Mr. Kenneth McKenzie Mrs. Robert McLean Mr. Sheldon F. McLeod The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Jose A. McLoughlin


The Rev. Beth C. McNamara Dr. and Mrs. Harry T. McPherson The Rev. and Mrs. Loren B. Mead Mr. and Mrs. Hugh S. Meredith The Rev. Richard H. Merrill The Rev. Dewayne J. Messenger The Rev. Ann C. Charles Miller The Rev. and Mrs. David W. Miller The Rev. Laurence H. Miller The Rev. Robert M. Miller The Rev. William J. Miller-Coulter The Rev. Catharine W. Montgomery The Rev. Jennifer Glaze Montgomery Mr. Thomas M. Moore Dr. Florence M. Morrill The Rev. Dr. Genevieve M. Murphy The Rev. G. Thomas Mustard The Rev. Julie F. Nelson The Rev. Rita B. Nelson The Rev. J. Ellen Nunnally Mrs. John L. O'Hear The Rev. Dr. Philip J. Paradine The Rev. Caroline S. Parkinson Mr. Ralph W. Peters, Jr. The Rev. Joy Ogburn Phipps The Rev. Dr. Sam A. Portaro, Jr. The Rt. Rev. Frank Neff Powell The Rev. Stanley A. Powell, Jr. The Very Rev. and Mrs. Harry H. Pritchett, Jr. The Rev. Dr. F. Vernon Quigley, Jr. Ms. Laura Helen Randall Mr. Benjamin Reid The Rev. Jennie Lou Reid Mrs. Helen A. Reid The Very Rev. Richard Reid The Rev. Dr. Hill C. Riddle The Rev. Canon Robert G. Riegel The Rev. Dr. Thomas N. Rightmyer The Rev. Dr. Anne Gavin Ritchie The Rev. Grant H. Robinson Mrs. Emily Dryden Russell Ray W. Sabalis The Rev. Daniel H. Schoonmaker The Rev. A. Wayne Schwab The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. James J. Shand The Rev. William M. Shand III Mrs. Judith H. Shaw Left: The Archbishop of Canterbury visited with a VTS contingent this summer. Pictured left to right are: VTS faculty member, the Rev. A. Katherine Grieb, Ph.D.; the Rev. Christopher Garcia (‘10); Norman Whitmire (‘12); the Rev. Bright Chika Abanifi; and Melissa Bruckart (‘12).

The Rev. and Mrs. Stephen G. Shepherd The Rev. Andrew J. Sherman The Rev. Timothy K. Small The Rev. and Mrs. John M. Smith The Rt. Rev. Philip A. Smith The Rev. Thomas R. Smith The Rev. Robin Thomas Soller Mr. Peter F. Spalding The Rev. John R. Stanton The Rev. Isabel F. Steilberg Mrs. Sarah D. Steptoe Mrs. George C. Stierwald The Rev. David A. Storm The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Peter B. Stube Mr. Robert E. Stufflebeam The Rev. John G. Tampa The Rev. Janet E. Tarbox Mrs. George W. Tate Mrs. Herman Templin Mr. and Mrs. Philip Terzian The Rev. David H. Teschner The Rev. Patricia M. Thomas Dr. and Mrs. William G. Thomas III Mrs. George Fabian Tittmann Mrs. Jesse M. Trotter Mr. Otis L. Turner Mr. and Mrs. M. Waldron Vail II The Rev. Canon Samuel Van Culin, Jr. Ms. Patricia A. Vaughn The Rev. Guido F. Verbeck III Mrs. Frank H. Vest, Jr. The Rev. V. Alastair and Rhoda Votaw Mrs. Stephen C. Walke Joyce Bogardus Walker The Rev. and Mrs. Oran E. Warder The Rev. Gary L. Way The Rev. Alexander H. Webb II The Rev. Pamela C. Webb The Very Rev. Alan K. Webster Mrs. Carol J. Webster The Rt. Rev. Pierre W. Whalon Ms. Patricia South White The Rev. Christine R. Whittaker The Rev. Dr. J. Douglas Wigner, Jr. The Rev. Melissa Wilcox The Very Rev. C. Preston Wiles, Ph.D. Mrs. Ellis T. Williams The Rev. Barbara S. Williamson Mrs. J. Burks Withers, Jr. The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. R. Stewart Wood, Jr. Chaplain Carl Walter Wright, USAF Mr. David F. Wright The Rev. George Shaw Yandell The Rev. William A. Yon The Rev. George Zabriskie II Mrs. Allan N. Zacher

giving matters Gifts that Provide Income for Life

We offer several methods by which you can transfer capital to the Seminary but retain the income from the asset for your lifetime and/or the lifetime of your spouse or another person. You can fund a Charitable Gift Annuity arrangement, whereby you transfer capital and receive a guaranteed fixed income each year, paid quarterly. You can also invest in the Virginia Seminary Pooled Income Fund, a mutual fund type trust which combines many gifts, and receive a prorated share of the income earned by the fund each year, again paid quarterly. Or, for larger gifts, you can establish separate Charitable Trusts which will pay you either an annuity or percentage amount. The advantages vary according to your circumstance and objectives, but all of the plans at Virginia Theological Seminary offer you the following benefits: 1. Annual Income for yourself and/or another beneficiary. Often you can increase your expendable income because the Seminary can invest your asset at a higher yield. 2. Immediate federal income tax deduction. 3. Avoidance of a capital gains tax when giving appreciated property. 4. Investment Diversification. 5. Estate tax savings. When the last income beneficiary dies, the principal is transferred to the Seminary for a purpose of your choosing. We would be pleased to discuss any of these giving opportunities with you and your counsel. For additional information please contact the Rev. J. Barney Hawkins IV, Ph.D., Vice President for Institutional Advancement at 1-800-941-0083 or 703-461-1754, or by email at bhawkins@vts.edu.

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requiescant

Photo by Adam Jackson

Notification received since the last issue of the Journal. The Rev. Albert W. Anderson, ‘50 July 25, 2009

The Rev. Canon Charles P. James, CE October 26, 2008

The Rev. H. Wiley Ralph, ‘51 June 10, 2010

The Rev. Donald R. Barton, ’67 February 12, 2010

The Rev. Ann Brewster Jones, ’77 February 28, 2010

Dr. Charlotte H. Scott, ’06 (H) March 11, 2010

The Rev. Kenneth R. Blindenbacher, ‘77 December 14, 2009

The Rev. Irene C. Jones, ‘03 November 25, 2009

The Rev. Robert Morgan Shaw, ’43 February 23, 2010

The Rev. Gwyneth G. Bohr, ‘79 July 5, 2009

The Rev. Dr. John H. Jordan, Jr., ‘58 April 20, 2010

The Rev. Grant R. Sherk, Jr., ‘57 April 9, 2010

The Rev. Edward S. Brightman, ‘57 June 30, 2010

The Rev. Lewis M. Kirby, Jr., ‘60 April 8, 2009

The Rev. Weaver L. Stevens, ‘55 December 13, 2009

The Rt. Rev. John H. Burt, ‘43 October 20, 2009

The Rev. Edgar Lockwood, ‘60 October 10, 2009

The Rev. Sydney C. Swann, Jr., ’41 February 16, 2010

The Rev. Perry C. Burton, ‘54 May 9, 2010

The Rev. James L. Lowery, Jr., ’59 February 14, 2010

The Rev. Vernon W. Towne, ’76 February 27, 2007

The Rev. James D. Chipps, ‘90 January 5, 2010

The Rev. Joshua T. MacKenzie, ’61 February 3, 2010

The Rev. Todd H. Trefts, ‘61 October 5, 2009

The Rev. Holland B. Clark, ‘54 June 11, 2010

The Rev. D. Williams McClurken, ‘47 August 12, 2008

The Rt. Rev. C. Charles Vache, ’77 (H) November 1, 2009

The Rev. Charles S. Cook, Jr., ‘62 May 21, 2010

The Rev. Paul B. Miller, ’49 February 7, 2010

The Rev. Laurance W. Walton, Jr., ‘58 July 12, 2009

The Rev. Paulo Dallfollo, ‘54 November 17, 2008

The Rev. John C. Mott, ‘44 July 7, 2009

The Rev. Dr. Paul Wessinger, ’98 (H) May 22, 2009

The Rev. Lawrence J. Dunnewold, CE

The Rev. Albert S. Newton, ‘56 November 21, 2008

The Rev. Stewart B. West, ‘48 July 12, 2009

The Rev. Fred L. Nolting, ’46 March 31, 2009

The Rev. G. Richard Wheatcroft, ‘43 November 11, 2009

The Rev. William H. Olsen, ‘81 October 5, 2009

The Rev. Alfred T. Whitelock, ’60 March 4, 2010

The Rev. William W. Pendleton, ‘56 May 9, 2009

The Rev. Roland J. Whitmire, Jr., CE September 24, 2009

The Rev. J. Edwin Pippin, ‘72 January 6, 2010

The Rev. Wallace I. Wolverton, Jr., CE November 9, 2009

The Rev. Craig E. Eder, ‘44 November 22, 2009 The Rev. Pettigrew V. Hamilton, ‘69 May 4, 2010 The Rev. V. Richard Hawkins, ‘63 December 13, 2007 Mr. Peter Homans, ‘57 May 30, 2009 96  VIRGINIA SEMINARY JOURNAL


Jacques Hadler Article ...Hadler, continued from page 47.

JH: One thing we’ve tried to work with but never quite figured out how to do was to supervise for the multicultural dimension, to supervise the cultural side as well as the formation side. There wasn’t time to do both in the parish. When

we tried to get people to have a bi-focal vision, it didn’t work out too well. SS: How did you get involved in teaching Family Systems Theory? JH: I was in a disciplined colleague group that started meeting in 1979. We decided that we needed a consultant to keep ourselves honest. Our first two consultants, for two years each, were clinical psychologists who offered nothing more than their presence. Then, in 1984, Bill Tully, who was the rector at St. Columba’s, suggested we take a look at a Rabbi he knew, Ed Friedman. We took him on in an experimental basis. He immediately intrigued all of us because, unlike the clinical psychologist, he knew something about ministry from his

experience as a congregational Rabbi. He had a very clear theory about how people work – the Family Systems Theory, a wonderful way of looking at how congregations work, the congregation as a family. What he taught about con-

gregational dynamics helped many clergy make a difference in the way they led and ministered to their congregations – in a way that gave them energy and saved them from bad situations they’d gotten into (or that the congregations provided to them.) I was most intrigued with Ed’s thinking. When I got a sabbatical in 1987, I contracted with Ed to go deeper into some of my own family work. In 1990, he invited me to participate in his family systems seminars for clergy which I did until he died in 1996. Since then, I’ve continued learning from the faculty he left behind. In 1997, I decided that I’d like to start teaching Family Systems at VTS.

SS: What are the one or two problems that every parish runs in to at some time or another? JH: When clergy try to make a change in a parish, even if it’s a change that the parish has said that it wants, there is often resistance which can sometimes get volatile. Whenever a change is made in a family or in an organization, there’s going to be reactivity. The theory says this as does our knowledge about change, so it’s very important for clergy not to take it personally, to realize that this reactivity comes with the territory. Most clergy, when making a change, particularly when asked to make it, expect to be thanked for it. So it demoralizes clergy tremendously to find that people aren’t thankful for their efforts, especially when the results of change rub people the wrong way. Boy, do they let the clergy know! If we clergy can persevere instead of taking it personally and letting the pain of being targeted go, the people will often calm down and the change will be incorporated. SS: On what can/should parish priests focus their attention to better serve their congregations? JH: If there’s one issue that’s stood out for me in recent years, it’s that the older generation—my parent’s generation and maybe the generation I’m moving into—has a very hard time being generative with the younger generation. In other words, they want to keep things the way they were for their generation. They have not been turning over to the younger generation the authority to make changes and have not taken seriously the current

issues or changes that this generation wants to address. The desire to really form the next generation of leadership is rarely seen in parishes today. Maybe this phenomenon is true in every generation but I’m really noticing it. It’s certainly an issue to be addressed. SS: Regarding VTS mission trips, what has been one of the most moving or satisfying experiences that you’ve had? JH: There are many ways I could answer this... one of the most satisfying things has been to work with the teaching interns like Leslie Steffensen, John Newton, Meredith Holt, and Cynthia Park… the parish interns as well, Josiah Rengers, Allison Liles, Caron Gwynn, and before them, Frank Logue and Allison St. Louis … to see all of them make bonds with Tanzanians and to see how well they all did, some in very tough circumstances, and how it impacted their ministries and international relationships in the long-run. It shows that their learning wasn’t just about a course they had to take, but that it had some staying power. SS: What will you be doing now that you’ve retired? JH: I will follow some good clergy advice and for the first six months, do nothing additional, while continuing things like spiritual direction, clergy colleague groups, and my consulting and D.Min. relationships. I haven’t tossed out any of my papers so I have a lot of cleaning things up to do! After that, I’ll see where my appetites are with the notion that I will be itinerant, not settled with a particular institution. X

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faith@five: “Can adding a Rite 3

service really matter?

E

veryone wants to matter. And most everyone wants what they do to matter, to have a positive effect on something or to make a difference in someone’s life. This is especially true for today’s teenagers who are passionate about helping others and who are actively involved in youth service. Yet, according to the 2005 National Study on Youth and Religion (NSYR), despite the fact that the majority of teens say that their religious faith is important to them, only one-half of all Protestant teens attend church weekly or participate in Sunday school. Of the denominations listed in the survey, Episcopalian teens are ranked at the “low end of attendance” with less than half attending church once a month or more. Not surprisingly, regular church attendance tied directly to teens’ belief in God. According to the NSYR, 23% of Episcopalian teens report being unsure of their belief in God, a high number compared to other Protestant denominations. So how can the Episcopal Church, which wants the Good News (e.g., the grace, love, and mercy of Jesus Christ) to matter, stay connected with teenagers? How can the church get them in the door when there are so many other opportunities for distraction?

“They are listening again to the service – it’s fabulous.”

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Enter St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Old Town, Alexandria. Earlier this year, it’s Rector, the Rev. Oran Warder, and the


Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, dean and president of Virginia Theological Seminary and associate rector at St. Paul’s, initiated Faith@Five, a Rite 3 service, geared mainly toward teenagers and their busy families. At this Saturday night come-as-you-are gathering, there are no books, no choirs, or fancy garments. What you find is contemporary music, aptly led by the talented Josh Edwards, a basic table altar, and a large screen upon which words to the songs and slides for the sermon are displayed. “I think Rite 3 works best for the teenager,” said Markham, “and the family who finds Sunday difficult (all those sporting commitments) and needs a form of worship that uses the visual, plays contemporary music, doesn't require you to read a book, and offers a message that packs a punch.”

What the leadership at St. Paul’s has found surprising is how well the service is playing with all age groups. “Our mission is to attract teenagers but many life-long Episcopalians love the service,” exclaimed Markham, “They are listening again to the service – it’s fabulous.” Markham attributes the success of the Rite 3 service to the fact that it is restrained and respectful. “Hands don’t go into the air and not one expects to hear tongues,” he says. “It’s a very St. Paul’s type of contemporary.” And how is the service playing out with teens? According to Luke Markham, 14, "I like Faith@Five because it is God saying 'Relax. Chill.' God doesn't mind us not dressing up and being all fancy. God wants us to just to be ourselves.”

Pointed out Ian Markham, “Adding a Rite 3 Saturday night has mattered to St. Paul’s and to our teens. It has helped us reach another type of worshipper. Congregations that add to their offerings do ultimately grow.”

Far left: the Rev. Oran Warder, rector of St. Paul’s, gives a sermon using images on the large screen; below left, Josh Edwards leads the worship music for Faith@Five; above, the service is a draw for many young folks.

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Around Campus

How Does Your Garden Grow? by the Rev. David Gortner, Ph.D.

T

he seminary community garden began this year as a small experiment. Now, every couple of weeks, we are seeing beautiful harvests. And we are just beginning to see the potential of such a shared adventure with the land. A year ago, students came forward with a proposal for a community garden plot for herbs and vegetables. At the same time, some faculty members were coming up with proposals of their own for food-producing gardens and orchards. These ideas came from a common interest in improved stewardship of some of our unused land at VTS, in strengthening a Benedictine spirit of formation through shared prayer and work (ora et labora), and in creating a campus-based ministry of outreach. Graduates, board members, and leaders from various parts of the Episcopal Church began to express similar interests in getting VTS involved as a partner in environmental and community-building education through community gardens. Here we are, a year later, harvesting buckets of field greens and arugula, fresh onions and shallots, long flavorful carrots, spicy banana peppers and icicle radishes, bags of peas and beans, big heads of Chinese cabbage, and lots of juicy cucumbers, zucchini and golden squash. We have harvested tomatoes, peppers, and corn. We have watched perennials like asparagus, blueberries, blackberries, rhubarb, and many different herbs take root and develop. And we have planted fall crops. The little experiment this year is in the front yard of my home and in the back yard of Barney Hawkins’ home. Every Saturday, I have the joy of stepping out my front door to welcome and to join with students, staff, and family members who come to the garden to dig, plant, weed, water, feed, and harvest. Adults and children work side by side, and each of us learn from others how to improve the garden. One Saturday, I was weeding next to a visiting friend from California, who started munching on a couple of weeds she pulled. She and a student told me about

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schools, colleges, and communities. Yale University has a small one-acre “farm” run by students; elementary schools such as the Academy for Global Citizenship in Chicago are growing vegetables and fruits in urban plots, which they then use in their kitchens to feed to the children who grow them; churches like St. Mark’s in Eugene, Oregon, are dedicating their land to community gardens with the aim of raising enough food to feed the hungry in their surrounding communities; and Episcopal Relief and Development is seeing a rise in community garden initiatives around the globe.

some of the edible salad-weeds that turn out to be quite tasty – lamb’s quarters and purslane. They now make regular appearances in our salads at home. From small spaces, we are producing plenty of food! The pictures show some of what we have planted and harvested. The gardens have been a great living demonstration of the mysteries of new life. I planted, Apollos waters, but God gave the growth (I Cor. 3:6). Those of us who labor in the gardens harvest the vegetables and share them with our neighbors – students and families at Braddock-Lee Apartments, faculty and staff on campus.

None of this is new. Through community gardens and urban food-raising initiatives, we are revisiting and rediscovering old practices. The growing interest in local food and local craft recalls a period in industrial American and English history in the early 20th century that gave birth to the arts and crafts movement, “moral treatment” at farms outside of urban centers, and the settlement house movement. Barney and I are grateful to the many

people that made this little experiment this year possible – Evan Clendenin and Rebecca Edwards as primary organizers, Josiah and Katie Rengers, Andrew and Sarah D’Angio-White, Meg Holland, Jeanne McMillen, the Morris family, and Mark and Meredith Pilling, who helped till the soil, plant, weed, and harvest, Dave Mutscheller who moved topsoil for us and Mike Widenhofer who brought us fresh grass clippings, and the many other individuals and families who helped out at different points. Plans ahead include the creation of a much larger community garden area not far from Butterfly House and the dorms, as well as an orchard and meadow in another part of campus. Stay tuned for the latest garden news from VTS! X

Time in the garden is good for the soul. Conversations bubble up in ways that don’t happen as naturally during chapel, class, and lunch. We get to see each other in different ways, and we all get to see tangible results of our labors. It’s no surprise that community gardens have taken hold in so many churches,

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A NEW SCHOOL YEAR BEGINS...

From top left, clockwise: Members of the junior class practice their Biblical language skills over Starbuck’s coffee; Middlers B. Cayce Ramey and Elizabeth Lowe review homework; the North Carolina contingent was at it again, ensuring that the North Carolina flag flew proudly off of Aspinwall Tower for the first day of school; Middlers, Chuck McMillen, David Crosby, and Laura Cochran register for classes; Carrie English and Ann Hill on their way to Chapel; Melissa Bruckart, Tracey Kelly, Gary Taylor, and Anne Dale get ready to process into Chapel.

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The Seminary Community would like to give special thanks to Dave Mutscheller and the good souls in the Maintenance Department who worked tirelessly to ensure our safety and comfort during an especially difficult winter. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts!


WHAT’S NEW?

VIRGINIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 3737 Seminary Road, Alexandria, VA 22304

Nonprofit Organization US Postage PAID Alexandria, VA Permit No. 340

Introducing the Master of Arts at VTS Virginia Theological Seminary announces the inauguration of the Master of Arts Program. This academic Master’s Degree prepares students for competent Christian theological engagement and leadership in a variety of settings. Students deepen their theological understanding through rigorous academic engagement while exploring vocations and developing competencies to prepare for professional leadership in the Church. The program’s flexibility and variety of concentrations allow students to design personalized plans of study to match their academic backgrounds, the needs and expectations of the Church, and their professional goals. Areas of study include, theological studies, Christian formation, scriptural studies, ethics, religion and culture, and practical theology. The Center for the Ministry of Teaching provides particular strength for concentrations in Christian formation and education. The MA can be earned through part-time study, full-time residency, or any combination of the two. For more information and to apply, visit www.vts.edu or contact the Director of Admissions, Jan Sienkiewicz, at 703-461-1706 or by email at admissions@vts.edu.

ATTENTION Prospective students! Note the dates for the VTS Open House Information sessions: November 17, 2010: The Fall Ministry Conference This one day event provides a setting for prospective students in nearby diocese to hear what VTS has to offer. Registration opens mid-September. February 18-20, 2011: The Conference on Ministry Welcome Weekend Prospective students from around the US gather for information, fellowship and fun. Registration opens mid-November. To Register: Check the VTS website at www.vts.edu to register or contact the Director of Admissions, Jan Sienkiewicz, for more information. Tel: 703-461-1706 Email: admissions@vts.edu

Virginia Theological Seminary Journal, Fall 2010  

Annual magazine of the Virginia Theological Seminary, the largest Episcopal Seminary in the United States.