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TRACK TEST MIR RIB PROTECTOR VEST MIR, TELEMETRIC RESULTS ON THE TRACK AND IN LAB

Bullet proof We are used to using “mechanical” sensors on karts, that is, the ones that register acceleration, movement and so on. But when you are “measuring” monitoring the human body, the driver’s, what do you use? In this case too, it depends on the data that you want to study: for example, through an EMG sensor (electromyography) you can register the action of muscles and nerves, which starts off by a very weak current, and with this information we can find important data concerning stress and driver’s reaction. Instead, for sweat, this changes the electrical activity of the skin, and for this reason special sensors for this “read” the skin through electrodes. The value you get from these sensors is directly in millivolts, therefore you compare the results u get under stress with results you get in normal mal conditions (for example 20°C when resting and so on). To check stress that the driver’s body is subject to, instead we used a normal triaxial sensor for accelerations, even if in this specific case we decided to measure one axis at a time (longitudinal or transversal) to differentiate the ones in acceleration from braking. This sensor was placed (stuck) on my rib protector vest at rib height. The rib protector being tested was the new MIR PRO-tor EIP (extreme impact protection) that applies this new “philosophy” to soften blows by allowing force to dissipate from a soft material instead of a stiff material. The tests were carried out in two separate moments, on the track with the driver and in the laboratory.

As the driver on the track said afterward, “there were no problems as far as sweat was concerned, while in the bumpy part of the track, it allowed me to press down on gas pedal without feeling any uncomfortable blow on the ribs”. What is the actual reason for this? Let’s see… On the track we measured acceleration both on kart (chassis) and driver, and we found the latter higher. The reason is simple, the sensor placed on the driver is at a higher level and the further we go from the ground the more the movement (hence stress) become lateral, with greater load transfer.

To give a more mathematical comparison the capability of absorbing blows guaranteed by the material used for making the MIR rib protector, we set up a small test in a laboratory: a steel sphere was dropped from the height of 1 metre and an accelerometer was put on the top of the “base” and the sphere, and then it was compared to the usual system plastic + foam rubber.

88 VROOM INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE

Vroom Kart International #183 - September 2016  

In this issue: FANTASTIC 4 Marco Ardigò (Tony Kart/Vortex – KZ), Fabian Federer (CRG/Modena Engines – KZ2), Pedro Hiltbrand (CRG/Parilla –...

Vroom Kart International #183 - September 2016  

In this issue: FANTASTIC 4 Marco Ardigò (Tony Kart/Vortex – KZ), Fabian Federer (CRG/Modena Engines – KZ2), Pedro Hiltbrand (CRG/Parilla –...

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