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VREDESEILANDEN vzw

ANNUAL REPORT 2008

A better deal for farmers


VREDESEILANDEN VZW ANNUAL REPORT 2008

A better deal for farmers

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Content 2

Introduction ................................................................................................................

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1 Strategic choices ......................................................................................................

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2 The South programmes ..............................................................................................

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3 Vredeseilanden in Flanders ........................................................................................

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4 The social balance of Vredeseilanden ..........................................................................

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5 Environmental policy of Vredeseilanden ........................................................................

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6 Vredeseilanden vzw – Financial annual report 2008 ........................................................

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Introduction

PROGRESS IN THE FIGHT AGAINST HUNGER AND FOR GOOD FOOD FOR EVERYBODY A crowded road with motorcycles, cars, noise, dust, and a lot of activity. In a sidestreet, you pass through an antique door of a somewhat dilapidated building, and take three steep stairs to access the three small offices of Vinastas. Vinastas is the national consumer organisation of Vietnam and was founded some twenty years ago by a few civil servants. Meanwhile, the organisation has evolved into a federation with branches in almost every city nationwide. We are in Hanoi, the busy capital of Vietnam. Toxic vegetables A few years ago, the population of Hanoi was startled by reports of hundreds of people being admitted in hospitals with alarming poisoning symptoms. Only a few weeks later, after many more people had become ill and some even died, the source of the poisoning was discovered: fresh vegetables sprayed with too much pesticide. For Vinastas, the panic of the authorities and the inhabitants of Hanoi was a golden opportunity to focus on the protection of consumer interests. They managed to persuade authorities to develop standards for “safe vegetables” and to launch a control system. Nevertheless, they soon ran into difficulties: how can you transport safe vegetables directly from the farmer to the consumer? How can consumers distinguish these “safe vegetables” from other vegetables? An obvious collaboration While Vinastas and the Vietnamese authorities were reflecting on these questions, the Vredeseilanden team in Vietnam contacted the consumer organisation. Vredeseilanden already supported small-scale farmers in villages that were de facto producing biological, “safe” vegetables. These contacts lead to a pilot project in which Vredeseilanden and Vinastas informed consumers on where to buy “safe vegetables” in town. On the other hand, through Vinastas, we advised the Vietnamese government to develop a legal framework (e.g. by certification) for “safe vegetables” from family agriculture. Because of the collaboration with the government, the small pilot project will probably enable, in the long run, more or all Vietnamese to buy “safe vegetables” from family farmers. Our main strength: collaboration as a basic choice This pilot project is a good example of the new strategy that guides our actions since the beginning of last year. We do not only strive for a sustainable and high production, but we also try to guarantee a fair income for farmer families and an increased control on the processing and commercialisation of their products. Our starting point and message is that farmers and their families are not “poor people”, but entrepreneurs that could get a better life for themselves and their environment by strategically using their possibilities. A central factor in our new strategy is the “chain approach”, examining the entire trajectory that agricultural products travel, from the field to the consumer. With the farmers, we search for problems and try to find out how they could get a better price for their products. For example, by “shortening” the “chain” – traders, processors and distribution –, or by partially converting farmers into traders, processors or distributors. After only one year, this approach seems to be very productive. In this annual report, you can find several illustrations of the positive effects. We are convinced that we are on the right way with our choice to consider the other actors in the chain not as competitors or as opponents, but rather as partners with an interest in the fact that farmers obtain a fair income. This choice for dialogue instead of confrontation also expresses the values of pluralism, respect, and inclusiveness, which have been the foundation of Vredeseilanden for several decades.

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Searching for levers: from small to big The results of our efforts in the field to reinforce the position of farmers in the chain are bringing Vredeseilanden and its partners to the political level. This is necessary to reproduce our “small-scale” innovations and experiments on “large scale”. How? For example, by stimulating large organisations to take over our strategy, or by convincing authorities to improve economic and political conditions to enable all farmers in a region, land or continent to better live of their work. Food crisis: what happens if family agriculture is neglected? In Belgian, the large interest for the food crisis was an opportunity to draw attention on the central role of family agriculture in guaranteeing enough food for everybody. A scientific consensus exists on this subject, but the policy does not completely follow. In this report, you can read how we managed to inform the large public through the media on the enormous potential of family agriculture, how we have played a part in defining the propositions of the Belgian government to fight the food crisis. Vredeseilanden also took a part in the official Belgian delegation at the “Food summit” of the FAO in Rome (June 2008). Because of that other – financial/economic – crisis, the food prices dropped again, and with the prices, also the attention for global food security. The structural causes for hunger and poverty of farmer families have not been treated. There are also new and worrying developments that undermine the chances of small-scale farmers. Several governments and big investors have bought gigantic farmlands in Africa to secure their own food supply or to produce biofuel. The purchase conditions offered by local authorities seem very questionable. This agrarian imperialism eats away the land of small-scale African farmers, who see their chance on a larger piece of fertile land slip away. With our partners, we will continue to plead for a policy that guarantees sufficient and good food for everybody in the world by long term investments in family agriculture. Help us to make our voice heard and to give concrete support to farmer families. Ready for the future In order to make our own functioning even more efficient, a fundamental internal reorganisation took place in 2008. These were the main elements: • The organisation structure was fine-tuned, personnel was decentralised. More collaborators now live and work in the rural areas of our main partners; • We have developed a new, worldwide system to better plan our functioning, to better evaluate the results and to quicker learn from our experiences; • A global personnel policy and a better system have been developed to evaluate our collaborators; • For our fundraising, a separate department was created, with diversification of our income sources as a central point of attention. Finally, the most important thing: the support and appreciation we get from volunteers everywhere in Flanders, the collaborators in Leuven and in Africa, Asia and Latin America, the more than one hundred thousand people and many organisations. Only through them, Vredeseilanden can continue to realise its mission to fight against poverty and for a humane life for family farmers in South and North. We thank you for your commitment, trust and support.

Fons Vaes Director of the Board

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Luuk Zonneveld General Director


ACCOUNTABILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY The problems of poverty, hunger and climate are interlinked. Therefore, it is not enough that we are scandalised about poverty in the world. It is not sufficient that we show solidarity by helping people elsewhere in the world to improve their living standards. If they raise their living standard to ours and emit as much CO² and consume as much water and raw materials as us, we threaten the survival of our own species. Sincere solidarity requires a worldwide transition towards a sustainable economy. An economy that respects to the limited capacity of our planet as the first axiom and that offers opportunities on a decent existence to everybody. The story of Vredeseilanden – of millions of farmer families that can escape poverty thanks to sustainable agriculture – is only a chapter in that main story. But a crucial one. Vredeseilanden wishes to advance this sustainability paradigm as a global framework. This explains the choice for reporting according to the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) format and the International Accountability Charter (IANGO) by the Board on 05/15/2008. GRI This annual report is the first to be drafted according to the GRI criteria. The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) has developed into a generally accepted system. A growing number of large companies and organisations throughout the world have already agreed to report according to this framework. What does GRI have to offer? • Sustainability as a specific approach; • Economic, social and ecological indicators; • A concrete framework that enables a comparison with other organisations; • Guidelines on sustainability reporting: principles to determine the content of the report and explanation on its structure; • In the future, specific guidelines will be elaborated for non profit organisations; • International recognition and use by (large) companies and NGOs; • Different levels of reporting are possible (C, B, B+, A, A+): there is a minimum set of indicators, but an organisation can gradually report on more criteria. According to these criteria, Vredeseilanden already complies with level ‘C’ of the GRI standard. The complete overview of the indicators we report on is integrated at the end of this report, according to the GRI logic, on pages 76 and 77.

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Strategic choices

A BETTER DEAL FOR FARMERS Vredeseilanden is a Belgian independent and pluralistic non-governmental organization for development cooperation. Vredeseilanden wants to contribute to viable livelihoods of organized family farmers and to reinforce their organisation, in South and North. Vredeseilanden reinforces the position of farmers in the entire agricultural chain, from the field to the end consumer. This is done with advocacy work, campaigning for better agricultural policies, and by encouraging consumers to choose for sustainable food.

WHY VREDESEILANDEN? A planet under pressure Increasing food prices eat our income away. Bread, rice, potatoes, meat... everything is becoming more expensive. We curse the cash receipt, but we can’t do much more. The consequences of global warming, expensive energy and ever more scarce raw materials, also influence our daily lives. 963 million persons live in extreme poverty Half a tomato or a quarter of an onion instead of an entire one... that’s what more expensive food means to them. Men, women and children. Day after day hungry for food, clean water, a roof above their heads, education, and dignity. They face enormous problems. Furthermore, more than two thirds of them are farmers The people who are supposed to produce food are hungry. How much sense does that make? No problem but a solution: farmers save the world Vredeseilanden looks beyond the problems of poverty and hunger, and joins the quest for solutions. These poor farmers in the South are not simply a problem or sad statistics. If we mobilize their talents, they will not only help themselves, but also (a little bit) the world. If • • •

these farmers succeed in earning a decent income from sustainable agriculture: They work themselves up from poverty. They feed the world. They ease the pressure on the planet.

OUR MAIN ROLE: A VIABLE INCOME FOR FARMER FAMILIES This is why Vredeseilanden actively wages on farmer families who earn a living through sustainable agriculture and who are looking for a place on the market. • That is why Vredeseilanden strengthens their position in the agricultural chain, so that they can take their future in own hands and get a fair price for their product. • That is why Vredeseilanden contacts governments and companies, to find out together how they can create win-win situations for farmer families. • That is why Vredeseilanden encourages consumers to choose for sustainable products, as everyone forms part of the solution.

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New alliances We cannot reach our goal by ourselves. Nor can governments or companies. Citizens seem equally helpless. This is why Vredeseilanden forges new alliances with front runners from various sectors, in North and South: to set up experiments and to learn from each other. To find the answers needed for the world of tomorrow, a world that will be sustainable, but just as full of quality. A world that once and for all must leave behind the destruction caused by hunger and poverty. This story starts with an income from sustainable agriculture. With the 152 partner organizations of Vredeseilanden and the many thousands of farmers they represent.

FROM FARMER TO CONSUMER... Guaranteeing a fair income for farmer families in the South. That is the goal partner organisations of Vredeseilanden pursue on in different ways. Through 8 regional offices, Vredeseilanden supports development programmes in Africa, Asia and Latin America. We closely cooperate with 152 organisations, mainly farmer organisations.

BELGIË

LAOS HONDURAS NICARAGUA COSTA-RICA

ECUADOR PERU BOLIVIA

SENEGAL GAMBIA

VIETNAM

INDONESIË BURKINAFASO TOGO BENIN NIGER

CONGO UGANDA TANZANIA

Agriculture is the basis In the most countries where Vredeseilanden is active in the South, family agriculture represents 40 to 70 % of the employment on the countryside. It is the main economic activity of the poorest part of the population and most national governments in the South consider agriculture as an important factor in reducing poverty. Agriculture takes up an important place as a motor for economic growth and is crucial for the realisation of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s). Years of experience For many years, Vredeseilanden has been supporting farmer families in the South in several ways. In the seventies, the activities of the organisation concentrated on the execution of agricultural development projects. Meanwhile, this has evolved into cooperation agreements with partner NGO’s, with Vredeseilanden being a coordinator and moderator. Making sure farmers have sufficient and healthy food throughout the whole year for their family, was/is our objective. In Belgium we have also elaborated collaboration agreements with farmer groups.

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Contemporary The past decennia, the agricultural sector has radically changed. Throughout the whole world, markets are being liberalised; governments – especially in the countries in the South where we are active – have less influence and most services that were offered by governments to farmers have been abolished. Farmer families are put under pressure to sell their products for new investments. The urgent need for money started nibbling on the food supplies of families. This increased the demand of farmer families towards Vredeseilanden to do something for their position on the market.

Luuk Zonneveld Director of Vredeseilanden

Armed for the future In 2007, the main principles of the new vision, mission and strategy of Vredeseilanden were elaborated, as you could find out in last years’ annual report. New strategies also imply the need for new capacities, knowledge and resources. Therefore, the country offices and the head office in Leuven were completely audited in 2008. An intensive process (“Organisational Capacity Assessment” or OCA) took place to evaluate our strong points and where we need to improve to effectively realise the ambitions of our organisation. As well for the country offices as for the head office, an adapted structure with specific functions has been established. In Leuven, this has lead to a better integration of the content and programme departments. In the South, the regionalisation process launched in 2007 was further extended. The most remarkable aspect is the creation of so called “field antennas” of 2-3 collaborators of Vredeseilanden in rural areas where our main partner organisations are localised. This way, we can offer an even more direct support. At the same time, the country offices are gradually being abolished and substituted by regional offices, which manage several field antennas in different countries. In East-Africa, for instance, we are evolving from three country offices into one regional office that manages 7 field antennas in Congo, Uganda and Tanzania.

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The South programmes

IS VREDESEILANDEN REALLY MAKING A DIFFERENCE? It is impossible to enter in to details on all of our activities. Therefore we choose to put forward one example of every region where we are active. On the following pages, you can get to know the organisations we will focus on in the following years. You will also find a website link after each story, to follow-up all evolutions in that region. We regularly publish new stories on these web pages. We tell you about families on the countryside, their children, affiliated organisations, but also about Vredeseilanden colleagues, traders and lobbyers, conscious or worried consumers, on making plans, on processing setbacks or celebrating successes. This way, we hope to explain to you what “development cooperation� means to Vredeseilanden. The numbers In 2008, we collaborated, based in eight regional offices (VECOs), with 152 partner organisations. Approximately one third are farmer groups, founded by farmer families. Sometimes, they have united because they live in the same region; sometimes because they grow the same (export) crop, such as coffee or rice. We also closely collaborate with other civil society organisations and networks that are lobbying with authorities. We also collaborate more and more with private companies in the agricultural chain. They don’t receive financial support from Vredeseilanden, but we need them if we want to improve the position of farmers in the agricultural chain. These organisations collaborate in larger contexts, sometimes internationally. Thanks to its activities, Vredeseilanden is a viable link in the chain in each and every one of these countries. In order to give you an indication on the extent of our programme, you can find on the following pages a list of our partner organisations in each country and the number of persons directly reached by each programme (component). For all our programmes, this amounts to nearly 60,000 men and 58,000 women. The impact of a development programme cannot only be evaluated by the number of people that is directly reached. In the regions where we implement our programmes, a large group is also indirectly benefitting from our activities. Participants in training further spread new ideas. Thanks to political action, laws are changing in favour of an entire group of people. Mentality changes are also difficult to evaluate in numbers. Vredeseilanden is also choosing to regularly setup a pilot project with a small group of people and to convince larger NGOs, companies or authorities to take over the positive aspects.

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VECO SENEGAMBIA In 2008, we crossed for the first time the border to Gambia to collaborate with a new partner. From now on, we talk about VECO Senegambia. Our action in Senegal and Gambia is built on three products: sesame, bananas and fonio (a local type of cereal similar to couscous).

SENEGAL GAMBIA

Our partners: • Association des Producteurs de la Vallée du Fleuve Gambie (APROVAG) • Fédération des Groupements de producteurs et productrices du Sofaniama Jimara de Kolda (PELLITAL) • Fédération des Unions des Groupements Associés du Niombato (UGAN) • Réseaux de producteurs et productrices de fonio dans la communauté rurale de Djendé • National Farmers’ Platform, The Gambia (NFPG) • Conseil National de Concertation et de Coopération des Ruraux (CNCR) • Groupement de Promotion Féminine de Bignona (GPF Bignona). This is a new partner. After one year, the collaboration was stopped because of a diverging vision. In 2009, three new partner organisations will be added to this list.

Number of persons directly reached

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1205 men, 2445 women


Senegalese banana producers are putting traders on the blacklist The Senegalese newspaper Le Soleil had the following headlines on the 24th of August 2008: “Banana producers in Tambacounda faced enormous problems to sell their bananas. 30 tons of bananas were lost. Rotten because of bad storage conditions and the absence of processing facilities. Nevertheless, the production was exceptionally high this year. Another problem is that the producers are still waiting for 60 million CFA (approximately € 91,500!) the traders have not paid.” “These wholesale buyers are not traders, but cheaters! They are often in debt and have criminal records,” says Ousseynou Konaté, Director of Aprovag, an organisation of banana producers in Tambacounda. The organisation cannot afford a second loss of this kind. Therefore, Aprovag gathered all members to find a solution. In the future, “good” and reliable banana traders get a discount of 10 CFA/kg if they buy at least 150 tons of bananas a month. They have also drawn up a blacklist of traders Aprovag refuses to trade with. The names of 4 defaulters have been spread in the entire action zone of Aprovag. This way, all farmers receive the necessary information. By the end of 2008, 1000 tons of bananas were lost. The construction of a new banana storage facility in Nguène was not a day to soon. Last year, a first load of 126 tons of biological bananas was stored and packed. VECO financed the first delivery of cardboard boxes. Aprovag will reimburse this loan by reinvestment in its activities. Next year, they want to double their production. In cardboard, bananas are better protected during transport and the price that farmers receive for packed bananas is also higher: 356 CFA instead of 150 to 160 CFA/kg (250 CFA = € 0.38). In several villages, quality controllers have been trained. This way, Aprovag wishes to further develop into a professional, reliable and quality partner in the Senegalese banana trade. www.vredeseilanden.be/senegal/bananen

Last year, a first load of biological bananas was stored and packed in a new warehouse.

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VECO WEST AFRICA Benin, Togo, Burkina Faso and Niger are sharing an important border market where a lot of (agricultural) products are being traded. Vredeseilanden wishes to reinforce its partners to enable farmers to reap the benefits of this regional West-African market. For a long time, we have been active in Togo and Benin and since 2008, we are also collaborating with a new partner organisation in Burkina Faso. In a later stage, new partners will be added in Burkina and Niger. This is also reflected in the structure. The regional office has been established in Cotonou. The project leaders are working from two antennas in Togo and Benin. Later, another antenna will be added in Burkina Faso.

BURKINAFASO TOGO BENIN NIGER

In Benin, our partners have mainly specialised in rice and manioc. • • • • •

Union Communale des Riziculteurs (in Glazoue, Dassa, Save, Savalou, Banet and Ouesse) Union des Riziculteurs du Centre (UNIRIZ-C) Conseil de Concertation des Riziculteurs du Bénin (CCR-B) Fédération des Unions de Producteurs du Bénin (FUPRO-Benin) Centre d’information, de recherche et d’action pour la promotion des initiatives paysannes (CIRAPIP) • Centre d’initiation et de recherche-action pour un développement durable (CEIRAD) • Ligue de Défense des Consommateurs du Bénin (LDCB) In Togo, our partner organisations are mainly active in vegetable cultivation. • • • • •

Réseau des Centrales d’Auto promotion paysanne (RECAP) Fédération des Organisations Paysannes de la Région des Savanes (FOPAS) PROCOPAS Coordination Togolaise des Organisations Paysannes et des Producteurs Agricoles (CTOP) Organisation d’Appui à la Démocratie et au Développement Local (OADEL)

Our first partner in Burkina Faso is Association Sons-Kouadba (ASK), a farmer organisation specialised in the popular bean variety Niebé.

Number of persons directly reached

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10205 men, 7937 women


Rice from Benin, weighed up “I can remember how happy I was as a child at a celebration or ceremony. We always had rice for dinner at these occasions. On weekdays, this was never the case: too expensive. Now, I am in the rice trade myself: I peal the rice with a machine and sell it. In our village, we even eat rice on weekdays. It is a very popular and affordable product. In town, people eat a lot of rice, because it is quick and easy to prepare. But most part of the rice is still coming from Asia and not from our own countryside.” Elisabeth Monfon, one of the processors in the rice programme of Vredeseilanden in the central province of Benin does the talking. The past year, women like Elisabeth learned a lot on quality norms, taste preferences of clients, processing and criteria of the Fair Trade Labelling Organisation. The visit of farmer organisations from Tchètti and Kpataba to the only FairTrade organisation in Benin (a pineapple cooperative) woke them up. “We had fallen asleep”, says Martine Adjo of Tchètti. “This exchange was very interesting and stimulates us to change our modus operandi. A lot of work still needs to be done! If we can put into place a good organisation and follow up their good advice, we will get there. We will not regret it.” It remains the ambition to sell a small part of the total rice production in Colruyt supermarkets through the Fair Trade label in 2010. In this context, it is important that the quality norms of Colruyt are respected. The rice farmers from Benin have sent four different kinds of rice to Belgium. A ‘taste panel’ evaluated these types. Their answer: approved! Two of the four rice varieties stood out: their moisture level was lower and fewer grains were broken. One of those varieties will be sown in the summer of 2009. It remains the goal to export a small part of their rice under FairTrade conditions, but even if rice farmers don’t succeed, they will be much stronger on their own market and the Nigerian market with their quality product. Last year’s food crisis forced the Benin government to put more energy and resources into rice production. The Ministry of Agriculture has been investing in research for some decades, distributes seeds and provides consultation between the different players in the rice trade. In 2009, the government will even put machines at the disposal of partner groups. In its rice programme, Vredeseilanden is working with 5000 farmers in total. Through our partner organisations, we are enabling experiences to be passed on to the national level, enabling the government to integrate these points in the programme. Nevertheless, one large problem remains unsolved. For many years, Japan is donating millions of tons of rice to Benin, under the banner of development aid. The rice is dumped on the market for giveaway prices. Import rice has always been cheaper and of better quality – whiter – than local rice. Vredeseilanden and the Conseil de Concertation des riziculteurs de Bénin have been protesting for years against this import. The food crisis of 2008 was a blessing in disguise. Suddenly, the import from Japan was greatly reduced, and local rice was seen as worthy alternative. Nevertheless, the government is still not willing to structurally reduce or stop the Japanese import. The Conseil de Concertation des riziculteurs de Bénin has organised a number of press conferences to put this problem under public attention. The last one was in May 2008. A number of concrete propositions were put on the table, but a government reaction remains forthcoming. You can read more on the Vredeseilanden rice programme in the Benin Reporter, written by VRTjournalist Greet Pluymers. For more information: info@vredeseilanden.be or Tel 016/31 65 80. www.vredeseilanden.be/benin/rijst

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VECO UGANDA

CONGO UGANDA TANZANIA

Our partner organisations in Uganda have considerably changed in the past year. Last year, we collaborated with some 20 small NGOs, farmer organisations and networks. This year, we have reoriented our action. Our main objective remains the income increase of farmer families. In order to put in place strong commercial activities on certain agricultural products, it seemed to be more interesting to collaborate with District Farmer Associations. They are our main partners now. Many of our former partner organisations are also member of the District Farmer Associations. This way, we continue to work for the same target group, in the same districts. But we are working in a different way and reaching more families. • • • • • • • •

Lira District Farmers Association Kumi District Farmers Association Iganga District Farmers Association Tororo District Farmers Association Bugiri District Farmers Association, Pallisa District Farmers Association Sironko District Farmers Association Sihubira Farmers Organisation, for the district Busia

In 2008, there was a lot of attention for market studies, analysis and activities in the peanut chain. Next year, together with our partners, we will evaluate a second product with interesting commercial opportunities. For the political action on national level, we are collaborating with: • Uganda National Farmer’s Federation (UNFFE) www.unffe.org • In 2008, we supported for the final time the Food Rights Alliance: they did not respect the agreements.

Number of persons directly reached

4790 men, 4963 women

Where is a good market for our products? “Those buyers are real imposters: they come with wrongly calibrated scales and also give us a low price!” Ugandan farmers did not hide their frustration in a discussion with Peter from VECO Uganda. Nicholas Oluka and Richard Ariong of the Farmers association in the Kumi district had similar questions and problems. “Where can we sell our peanuts for a fair price?”, they asked Peter. “If we have this information, we can create a company with our farmers and sell our peanuts together. If we manage to get a stable and good price, we can offer more income security to our members.” VECO organised and moderated a series of meetings between peanut farmers, processors, buyers, traders, local governments and agricultural spokesmen. Since Kumi is situated on the border with Kenya, customs authorities were also present.

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At one of these meetings, Mr. Henry Bwire, a customs official, said that traders export on average 100 tons of peanuts to Kenya a week: two loads during the week (on Tuesdays and Thursdays) and one in the weekend (on Sundays). A trader, Joseph, told that sometimes, trucks come from Kenya to buy peanuts in Uganda, but have to return empty because of the lack or absence of peanuts. This was not known to farmers. Joseph also explained how the market price fluctuates and depends on different factors, such as the exchange rate between the Kenyan and Ugandan Shilling and the available offer. With these new insights, Oluka and Richard returned to the farmers of Mukongoro, Atutur and Ngora. They explained to the farmers that it is rewarding to organise as a group, to be better informed and to negotiate as a group with the buyers. The demand for peanuts is large on the Kenyan market, as became clear in the meetings. This way, the Kumi Farmers’ Agricultural Commodity Marketing Cooperative Society (KUFACCOS) was born; the commercial wing of the Farmers Association in Kumi. The farmers are shareholders of this company. In 2008, KUFACCOS collected more than 30 tons of peanuts of the Serenut 2 type from farmers in two sub counties. These were sold to wholesale traders. KUFACCOS understood that it is important to establish direct contacts with the wholesalers in Busia to get first hand information on prices and quality conditions. This enables traders to give advice at certain moments of the year to wait, because a price increase is imminent. This has helped farmers a long way to make choices on the selling place and time. At the same time, they have found new markets. The Pentecost churches for example, a social NGO, have decided to buy peanuts for a fair price. KUFACCOS is also prospecting other markets. Will they manage to use all business opportunities? Will they succeed in establishing long term relationships with new traders and based on good conditions? Their activities and the results of next year will show it. www.vredeseilanden.be/uganda/pindanoten

For the first time, farmers are making contact with wholesalers to negotiate on the price and quality requirements of their peanuts.

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VECO TANZANIA Vredeseilanden has partners in three zones in Tanzania: 1. Same and Simanjiro district We have been working for more than 5 years in the Same district in the northeast of Tanzania. With our experience through economic activities, our team has started a new five year programme on the border region between Same and the neighbouring Simanjiro district.

CONGO UGANDA TANZANIA

Our partners in Same and Simanjiro: • • • • • • • • • •

Simanjiro District Council Same District Council Mviwata Kilimanjaro Regional Network Inyuat E Moipo Evangelical Lutheran Church of Tanzania (ELCT) The Roman Catholic Diocese of Same Same KAYA SACCOS Same Agricultural Improvement Programme (Saipro) Pamoja Vet Aid Number of persons directly reached

568 men, 613 women

2. Mkuranga district In the Mkuranga district, at some 100 kilometres south of the harbour town Dar es Salaam, we are working with groups (mainly women groups) specialised in manioc. Our main partners are the Tanzania Association of women leaders in agriculture and environment (TAWLAE) and Mkuranga District Council (MDC). Number of persons directly reached

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482 men, 347 women


3. Chunya district We are concluding a five year programme in Chunya district in the southwest of the country. Pressing oil from sunflowers was a success. If the Belgian Survival Fund approves a new project, we will continue for another five years. That programme will mainly focus on the marketing of the sunflower oil. Our partners in Chunya: • • • • • • •

Chunya District Council Farmers’ and environmentalists’ Association (FEA) SACCOS Caritas Small Industries Development Organization (SIDO) Mviwata Mbeya Regional Network Mbozi, Ileje and Isangati Consortium (MIICO) Number of persons directly reached

32.593 persons

For our advocacy efforts at the national and international level we work mainly with the following partners: • Participatory ecological land use management network (PELUM), a NGO that is creating national campaigns on different themes (example: GMOs, increase of national budget for agriculture) and information on these themes was spread through farmer groups • Eastern and Southern Africa Farmers Forum (ESAFF) and Eastern Africa Farmers Federation (EAFF). They are defending the interests of farmer families in the East-African region. • The Network of Farmers’ Groups in Tanzania (Mviwata), the national farmer movement in Tanzania. They are mainly aiming on networks of farmer groups and give training on different themes. Mviwata has 60,000 registered members throughout Tanzania.

Last year, Vredeseilanden started collaborating with a number of new partners in the Simanjiro district, including Inyuat e Moipo.

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The letter of Nairukoko Our colleague Dré Smessaert visited Tanzania in June of 2008. He left the asphalt road from Dar es Salaam to Arusha and arrived in a barren plain filled with large thorny bushes. There, he visited our new partner organisation: Inyuat e Moipo. With confidence, Nairukoko read her letter. Idadi – how much we have: “Four male goats, eleven female goats, lams and two cows.” She enumerated the main possessions of a group of women and spoke in their name. In Lerumo, her small village in the Simanjiro district, only 10% of the people can write and read. This is the case in most of the Maasai villages. The average alphabetisation level in Tanzania is about 70%. The Maasai belong to the poorest population groups of Tanzania. Nairukoko continued: jambo yetu – our problem. Every year, less water and grasslands are available to enable cows to survive. Maasai have been shepherds for thousands of years, but now, their world is changing. In the last 10 years, it has been raining less and less. They had never heard of global warming, but suffered the most. They had been thinking about it for years and discussed during three days. Under their large tree, they concluded that they should also keep goats next to cows. An agricultural expert of Vredeseilanden had accompanied them in their discussion. The problem was theirs; the solution should be as well. A responsible of the ‘district council’ explains us their conclusion. Goats offer advantages compared to cows. For the price of a cow, you can buy more than two goats; therefore, there are fewer risks if one dies. Goats can be kept by the women near to their clay houses, while they are caring for the children and the food. Women are allowed to sell goats, while cows in the Maasai culture can only be sold by men. Goats are full-grown after five months, reproduce faster and can be sold after one year. In a barren environment, they also tend to survive better because they need fewer grasslands. Five strong arguments. They are not becoming rich of their cows and goats. Most of them only eat once a day and they are often hungry. Cassava or manioc is an African root that is cultivated to be dried and grinded into flour. They make a thick warm dough that is their main source of food. Sometimes, they eat rice and vegetables, but these have to be bought on the market. Every family sells two to four goats a month to have enough money for food and clothes. For an entire year, they have to breed at least forty goats. They also need goats for flesh and milk. Thanks to the goat project, they can buy different vegetables and vitamins, enabling them to stay healthy and to be less vulnerable to illness. But even with goats, the water problem remains large. ‘Changamoto’, continues Nairukoko: the challenge. They want to build a dam to fight against drought and to preserve the pasture lands. Some farmers and the responsible of the ‘district council’ took us to the site where they want to build the dam. The new dam will be a clay wall of five meters high and hundred fifty meters long. It will collect and keep 9 km2 of water in an arch and form a large pool. This pool means drinking water for the herds, enough to survive one year, but will also irrigate the surrounding grazing lands.

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The dam will also solve another problem: the long-lasting conflict between farmers and nomads. In the Maasai steppe, a plateau of two hundred by three hundred kilometres south of the Kilimanjaro, Maasai nomads that have been wandering for ages with their herds, are in conflict with other population groups that are farming on the edges and water areas of this plateau. The herds have to be regularly brought to drinking sites and cows often damage the crops. Sometimes, the Maasai compensate farmers, but often this problem is unavoidable or the Maasai have no money. Thanks to the dam, the herds can graze in a larger area without agriculture and conflicts between two agricultural forms are avoided. Nairukoko ends the lecture of her Swahili letter with a clear ‘Thank you’ and is loudly applauded by all participants. She folds the letter with Idadi, Jambo yetu, Changamoto and the entire explanation, together with their hope and expectations, in a brown envelope and hands it over. ‘Mgeni rasmi’ is written on the envelope: ‘official people’.

Now what? In close deliberation with the district governments, Vredeseilanden will work in 4 of the 15 wards (group of villages) in the Simanjiro district: Loiborsoit, Ngorika, Msitu wa Tembo and Ruvu Remit. We will work with Maasai shepherds, but also with farmers. In the first place, the food production should increase thanks to the introduction of new productive and drought resistant varieties and through the renovation of irrigation channels that are running through the fields on the Ruvu River. The income of farmers also needs to increase. A market study has showed that onion offer the best market opportunities. Goats also seemed to be interesting, but mainly for own consumption. Business groups will be formed on these economic activities. The collaborators of our partner organisations will receive the necessary training to perform these tasks. www.vredeseilanden.be/tanzania

Nairukoko reads: “Every year, water and grasslands are becoming scarcer, and cows cannot survive.”

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VECO CONGO

CONGO UGANDA TANZANIA

Despite the war, most of the planned activities were implemented. The worst conflict areas were outside of our working area. For more than five years, we have been working in the region around Butembo (Northern Kivu) with the following partner organisations. These activities focus on improving the income of farmers in the region by reinforcing agricultural activities.

• • • • • • •

Coopérative Centrale du Kivu (COOCENKI) Syndicat pour la Défense des Intérêts Paysans (Sydip) Association des Producteurs de Vuhimba (APAV) Ligue des Organisations des femmes Paysannes au Congo (LOFEPACO) Watu Imara kwa Maendeleo na Amani (WIMA) Fonds à l’Entrepreneuriat Féminin (FAEF) Association des Paysans pour le Développement Rural (APADER) Number of persons directly reached

2420 men, 7678 women

We also coordinate a reconstruction program in South and North Kivu and Ituri. New roads are being built, swamps are laid dry and mills are constructed. There is also money for the purchase of seeds and fertilizers. In these activities, the following organisations are involved: • • • • • •

Comité Anti-Bwaki CIMBUSHI (Comité Inter Marais du Bushi) Umoja wa Wamama Wakulima wa Sud Kivu (UWAKI) Union Paysanne pour le Développement Intégré ACIAR The above-mentioned organisations COOCENKI and LOFEPACO are also involved.

Choosing between a Kalashnikov and a plough? “You can reassure everybody at Vredeseilanden that we are still alive”, we heard at the end of October from our collaborator Théo Mbaghi. “The Congolese population is fed up with this absurd war. Fugitives don’t receive aid and accept their sad fate.” The war in East Congo reached the news in Belgium. A weak government, corruption, coveted resources, interference of neighbouring countries that defend their interests with bullets... Just some of the causes of the misery in the region. Real peace has been absent in this region for a long time. Even though the media attention has disappeared, the horror stories of murder and rape have not ended.

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The Vredeseilanden Office is located in Butembo, some 240 km from Goma. Even if it the situation in the town of Butembo has been tense, the region where our partners are working was been spared from heavy fighting and large refugee streams. This means that our activity can continue more or less as planned. “Agriculture needs to be revaluated. Agriculture is a buffer for conflict. Whoever sells a bag of rice for $100, does not feel like grabbing a Kalashnikov rifle”, says Léopold Mumbere, the coordinator of our program in Congo. “The soil is very fertile, so there are a lot of opportunities for sustainable agriculture. I meet them every day, the farmers who are breathing ambition. Every child who has the opportunity to make money through trade and by working the land, is on less child who affiliates to a group of rebels to survive.” “One of those rays of hope is the new collaboration of our partners with the World Food Programme (WFP). This agency is, among others, delivering food to refugees in the war zones of Central Africa. Most of the times, they distribute American or European food. In 2007, Vredeseilanden, our Congolese partners and the food aid cell of the Belgian development cooperation needed a lot of convincing power to persuade them to buy local food. This stimulates local economy and the farmer movement of Northern Kivu can find a market for their products. It is also good for the WFP to be able to offer local food and to save on transport costs. Sydip and Coocenki, a farmer syndicate and a cooperative with 24,199 members, are still closing contracts with the World Food Programme. 790 tons of beans and 351 tons of maize flour have been distributed amongst refugees since 2007 (numbers of February 2009). The Belgian Development Cooperation agreed to finance two new mills. This is an answer to the enormous challenge to mill the tons of maize for World Food Programme, a work that until recently was done with small machines or manually. This also lowers the price to grind maize in the entire province, and of maize flour on the local market. There is more to come. USAID – the American agency for development cooperation – showed a lot of interest in the Belgian efforts for local purchases through the World Food Programme. More information was asked of the Belgian Development Cooperation and Vredeseilanden. On request of the American Congress, USAID evaluated the consequences of US involvement in this project. At the end of January 2009, this report was presented in Congress. Hopefully, this will rapidly convince the United States, as well as Belgium, to engage in this structural form of food aid. www.vredeseilanden.be/congo/wfp

“A revaluation of agriculture is required. Agriculture is a buffer for conflicts. Whoever buys a bag of rice for $100, does not feel the need to grasp a Kalashnikov rifle.”

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VECO MESOAMÉRICA In Central America, Vredeseilanden is working in three countries: Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Honduras. Four products are central: beans, sugar, vegetables, and cashew nuts.

HONDURAS NICARAGUA COSTA-RICA

As we mentioned last year, our action in Costa Rica is gradually reduced. This year, the following organisation received financing for the last time: • Costa Rican woman farmers union (CMC) • The Costa Rican network for Rural Organisations, Farmers, Native and Non Governmental Organisations for Alternative Development (COPROALDE) • The National Union of Agricultural Producers (UNAG Costa Rica) • Oro Verde S.A. • The Educational Corporation for Development of Costa Rica (CEDECO) Next year, we will only give direct support to the Costa Rican movement for biological agriculture (MAOCO), and the Consorcio Cooperativo de Mercados Locales Campesinos e Indígenas R.L. We are staying in contact with other organisations and we will continue to use them in exchange and training on certain subjects. Our partners in Nicaragua: • NICARAOCOOP • UNAG national and regional, the national union of farmers and cattle breeders. More specifically, VECO will establish a project with the UNAG department of Nueva Segovia on sugar, and with UNAG in Carazo on beans. There is also collaboration with UNAG Ceges, the commercial branch of UNAG. • FENACOOP • FEMUPROCAN – www.femuprocan.org • The Union of Cooperatives for sustainable agricultural services on the island of Ometepe (UCOOPSO). • La Alianza • The Group for Promotion of Biological Agriculture (GPAE)

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Our partners in Honduras: • La Surenita Limitada, or the Conglomerado de marañon. A cooperative that processes and exports cashew nuts, also to Europe. • Coordination Council of Farmer Organisations of Honduras (COCOCH) • Regional Association of Agricultural Services in the East (ARSAGRO) • Network for Alternative Common Commercialisation (RED COMAL) • The Committee for the Defence of the Rights of the Honduran Consumer (CODECOH) • La coalición Hondurena de accion ciudadana (CHAAC) • La Fundación Simiente • The National Union for Promotion of Biological Agriculture (ANAFAE) • Unie van Hondurese Boerinnen (UMCAH) Across the country borders, we are also supporting SIMAS, the information service on sustainable agriculture in Central America, and in the Andes Region also MAELA, the Latin American movement for biological agriculture. Vredeseilanden and the Dutch NGO Hivos are also the initiators of two Central American structures that stimulate collaboration between different cooperatives, farmer organisations and processing companies. • PECOSOL has 36 members in five countries. Nicaraocoop, Red Comal, UNAG and five of our partner organisations are affiliated. • PROAMO is a cooperation between seven organisations, among others Nicaraocoop and Oro Verde. Number of persons directly reached

7175 men, 6112 women

Alejandra, the face of the Vredeseilanden campaign in Belgium: “No beans no food.”

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Sweet teeth Nicaraguans have sweet teeth. One of their favourite snacks are rosquillas, biscuits made of maize, cheese and sugar. Many Nicaraguans living abroad – approximately one million – try to find rosquillas on shop shelves. The Nicaraguan biscuit bakers, rosquilleras, are always searching for good quality sugar. In Ocotal, in northern Nicaragua, Vredeseilanden has organised a deliberation between these women and the sugar farmers in the region. “Quality and price. Those are the things we pay attention to when we are buying sugar,” said the rosquilleras. “Sometimes we find dead bees in the sugar lumps. If you come and offer us sugar in dirty, sweaty clothes... We are questioning the hygiene in your companies!” The sugar farmers promised to put on a clean shirt. Local politicians and clients from the neighbouring country Honduras were also present at the deliberation. It was a starting meeting to better organise the sugar market and to give a better negotiating position to farmers. Therefore, we are collaborating with UNAG, the largest farmer association in Nicaragua. Some 36,000 small-and medium-scale farmers are affiliated. Vredeseilanden will collaborate in a pilot project with a cooperative of 127 sugarcane farmers. Pressing sugar out of sugarcane is heavy labour. In the workshop, men are grinding canes and collecting the juice. They warm the juice in a large tank and pour it into large sugar blocks. These panelas look like bricks. At this moment, a lot of trees have to be used as firewood, which is not very ecological. They could without a problem use the remains of the sugarcane plants. Therefore, a new furnace is required. The sugarcane farmers are planning to build three new sugarcane mills and have saved a considerable amount of money. They are also asking for government investments. If they register themselves as a cooperative, they can apply for subsidies (up to 60%). Vredeseilanden will help them with the paperwork. An average sugar farmer can make approximately 5,000 sugar blocks from one harvest. They sell the blocks along the main roads, in shops or in families. Because of the high calorie value of sugar, it is a very important part of the daily menu, certainly with poor farmers on the countryside. For farmers, this is an interesting product. The farmers get an average of 80% of their revenue from the sales of panelas. Despite the popularity of sugar and the profit for the farmers, there are very few new sugar cane farmers. The work is heavy and farmers can only process small volumes using traditional methods. They cannot or barely compete with the large sugarcane plantations.

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Therefore, UNAG developed a plan to aim for specific niche markets. Collaboration with the rosquilleras is one possibility. But brown grained sugar is also very demanded, especially on the biological market. Soda producers always need good sugar and the Nicaraguan coffee roasters add sugar to certain mixtures. The sugar producers, however, are not prepared to deliver to these demanding markets. This is why they ask for support of Vredeseilanden. To enable qualitative progress, a number of technical bottlenecks have to be solved. For example, purifying the sugar juice, improving general hygiene and packing sugar in an attractive way. Sugarcane is a plant that is not affected by diseases or plagues. The transition to biological production is not very difficult. Because of the large demand for sugar on the biological market, a number of sugar farmers will obtain the biological certificate for their panela. An auditor from Costa Rica will give the necessary training. Vredeseilanden will bear a part of the costs. The actual cost price for the audit will be carried by the farmers themselves. The intention is to obtain the biological label and they are going for it. www.vredeseilanden.be/nicaragua/suiker

The introduction of new ovens will make the use of firewood in the sugar production redundant.

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VECO ANDINO Since 2008, we are no longer working exclusively in Ecuador, but we have closed new collaboration agreements with partner organisations in Peru and Bolivia. In the Andes region, the focus will be laid on coffee and vegetable cultivation.

ECUADOR PERU BOLIVIA

These are our partners in Ecuador: • FAPECAFES (Federación Regional de Asociaciones de Pequeños Cafetaleros del Sur) sells coffee for the international and national market. They have also started with the export of banana crisps for the French market. Fapecafes respects the international FairTrade criteria. www.fapecafes.org.ec • FECAFEM (Federación de Asociaciones artesanales de Producción Cafetalera Ecológica de Manabí). But also an organisation that is concentrating on coffee sales on the international market. In order to not depend on the coffee sales, the organisation is also looking for other products with a good market potential. Peanuts/earthnuts are a possibility. • SENDAS (Servicio para un desarrollo alternativo del Sur) and Chuya Mikuna are collaborating on the production and commercialisation of vegetables in the province of Cañar. Direct sales to the consumer organisation in Machala and Cuenca. The organisation is also very active in environmental management. • Corporación de desarrollo “GRUPPO SALINAS” - www.salinerito.com • La Movemiento de Economía Solidaria del Ecuador (MESE) • El Colectivo Agroecológico and its members Probio and CEA (Coordinadora Ecuatoriana de Agroecología). They have been working on the promotion of agro-ecological products. The collaboration with CEFODI (Corporación Esmeraldeña para la Formación y Desarrollo Integral), MESA DE CACAO and APROCANE (Asociación de productores de la zona norte de la provincial de Esmeraldas) was terminated at the end of 2008 because of the reduction of our activities in the cacao chain in the past years. This year, we also collaborated for the last time with Petrino.

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In Peru, we are working with one organisation at this moment: • ANPE (Asociación Nacional de Productores Ecológicos) In Bolivia, we support two organisations: • AOPEB (Asociación de Organizaciones de Productores Ecológicos de Bolivia) • Centro de Información e Intercambio para la Agricultura Ecológica (AGRECOL) Across the country borders, we are supporting, as in Central America, also MAELA, the Latin American agro-ecological movement. Number of persons directly reached

3013 men, 1867 women

Our partner organisation Chuya Mikuna (‘Clean food’) is specialising in the production and sales of vegetables.

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Magnificent allies: the alliance of Chuya Mikuna with other ecological producer organisations Everybody who visited the farmer organisation Chuya Mikuna in 2006, would have met their dynamic leaders. They rowed against the stream to try and conquer a place on the shelves of the food market giants in Ecuador: Supermaxi and Mi Comisariato. The leaders of Chuya did not worry about the heavy conditions imposed by supermarkets. They didn’t care that one of the directors simply told them that “15% of the vegetables would not be paid because the quality would surely be bad.” They pretended not to care that the director received the vegetables without even giving them a look... While the farmers cultivated the vegetables with a lot of care and biological love. All leaders and members of Chuya Mikuna had a rock-solid belief in the quality of their products. “If consumers have a taste, they will not ask for another brand”, was their conviction. How could they to promote their products? The large supermarkets Supermaxi and Mi Comisariato kept an additional 5% of the profits of their vegetables for publicity, but in the leaflets, they barely spoke about the advantages of ecological products. Their beautiful fresh vegetables were put on display with all the fast food sold in the supermarkets. They decided to launch their own campaign and made banners, leaflets, organised taste sessions. They were convinced to succeed, because the vegetables were fresh and beautiful. They wanted to continue, but the conditions of the supermarkets were too hard: conceding 20% of the price was too much. The problem was discussed during one of the meetings of Chuya. What could be the solution? How could they break the dishonest circle that was skimming the forces and means of Chuya farmers? Marcelo, a collaborator of the local NGO SENDAS, which accompanied farmers throughout the entire process, was reflecting on a solution. While farmer leaders were discussing the problem of their commercial relationship with Mi Comisariato, he was thinking about women in the poor suburbs who have to fight every day to improve the life of their family. He was interested in the theme of Chuya, but thought that there might be a link that had to be laid. In the end, he decided to tell the people of Chuya that some time before, he had met a women organisation from Machala at a meeting, in the coastal region of Ecuador. A very dynamic organisation that sold vegetables on a wholesale market and in baskets, for a fair price, to women with few means. He did not have to say more. Everybody at the meeting reacted enthusiastically. The responsible persons of Chuya made the first contacts with the responsible persons of the women movement. Everybody was motivated. The women organisation had been talking for a while about a “solidary economy” and the necessity to extend the links of solidarity between the city and the countryside. They spoke about food baskets and the need for healthy food: lettuce, leaf beets, potatoes, tomatoes, fruit, etc. They had made a few attempts with other farmer organisations, but without success because of the lack in continuity in the supply or in volume throughout the year. At the end of the first discussion, everybody was convinced. The Chuya producers were capable of such an initiative: they had a good buying system, organisation and production planning.

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The collaboration between the women organisation and Chuya was a start, but on their own, they could not be successful. The women farmers of Chuya Mikuna were only cultivating 10 of the 17 vegetables the women wanted. They also had to take into account the harsh winters. Sometimes, a part of the vegetables was lost because of the cold weather. So they started looking for partners. During the meetings of the network Tierra y Canastas (‘earth and baskets’), they got to know ACT, a producer organisation of biological potatoes in Chimborazo. Visits were organised and criteria were elaborated for their trade relationship. Franklin, sales responsible of Chuya Mikuna, said the following to his new friends: “Our organisation is not making profits with the sales of your potatoes. Together, we determine the prices we pay to your farmers based on the production cost and add 30% for logistics. We want a good price for the producer. We add a percentage for transport costs to the consumer price.” At this moment, Chuya Mikuna is selling almost 95% of the products of the member organisations and pays fair prices to hundreds of producers from different provinces in Ecuador. It has not always been easy. At times when the potato prices went up, producers often chose to directly sell their products. New agreements were necessary. At the end of 2008, the leaders of Chuya are proud to have found these alliances. Magnificent allies that enable the delivery of 100 baskets with vegetables to the women movement and the improvement of the income of ecological producers in Ecuador. www.vredeseilanden.be/ecuador/chuyamikuna

“If consumers taste our vegetables, they will no longer want anything else.” Now, Chuya Mikuna delivers vegetable baskets to women groups in different towns.

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VECO LAO In Laos, the government does not allow local farmer organisations to develop outside of the official authorities. It is possible to register as a company. Therefore, Vredeseilanden supports 18 farmer group companies in the north of Laos (companies of farmer groups) in the districts Meung, Tonpheung, Houaysay and for the final year also in Paktha. They process and trade maize, peanuts and tea. We also closely collaborate with the district governments in those four districts.

Number of persons directly reached

LAOS

VIETNAM INDONESIĂ‹

2844 men, 2844 women

Addicted in the past, today company leader Northern Laos is rapidly changing. People are living in isolated villages in the mountains. New roads and hydro-electric power stations are built and rubber plantations are laid out. Foreign companies come in from China, Vietnam and Thailand. They want to invest in large scale plantations (rubber, manioc and maize). The Laotian government is giving the land in concession and the taxes crank up the national GNP. Against these steamrollers, the illiterate and indigent farmers are defenceless. In the eighties, some of the ethnic minorities were forced to move from mountain villages towards new lands in the lowlands. The Laotian government wanted to improve the access to health care and education for these population groups. Another advantage was a better control on the population. The forced move also radically changed the way of life of the people. In the first place, they were hungry. In order to escape misery, a lot of people started using opium and amphetamines smuggled in through Thailand. In 2004, Vredeseilanden launched its Food for Work program. In a third of the villages where Vredeseilanden was active, inhabitants were addicted to opium. Vredeseilanden proposed a hard detoxification program to the willing farmers. If they passed, they were entitled to training. Villages that asked for guidance and support of Vredeseilanden got what they needed if the opium cultivation stopped. Last year, we wrote in our annual report that this program was a success. All villages now have food surpluses. But they also really live from their agriculture and get a fair income? They have few options. They close a contract with a firm that buys non-processed products for a low price. They can also stop with their own activities on the field and work as a farm worker on a large rubber plantation. The Chinese are giving them ... â‚Ź 10 as a starting fee. Is there another way? Two years ago, Vredeseilanden started stimulating farmers to launch small companies in groups. This work starts yielding benefits. By the end of 2008, 18 companies were active. They process peanuts, maize or tea.

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There is a maize group in Ban Si Done Nyaeng. 11 members have put their savings together as starting capital. They are the shareholders. Mr. Noi Lat, the president, explains: “We dared to register together as a company. The government requires a minimum capital of $100,000. Not a small amount. But we even managed to take off with a starting capital of $120,000, by putting everything together: the value of our land, our houses, a large tractor, two trucks and six motor boats. Now we have the right to directly transport our maize from our villages to Thailand.” “Their business is going well,” says Stuart Ling, who coordinates the Vredeseilanden program in Laos. “The group started in 4 villages. Now, inhabitants from 12 villages are implicated. In the small factory, they extract the grains, negotiate with Thai traders, deliver seeds to farmers and give training. “But these are also very weak companies,” he continues. “You have to know that illiteracy is very high. In one village where we started working, I only found two literate people... For them, starting a company is an enormous challenge. They need to get to know the legislation, find a bookkeeper, and elaborate a business plan. This requires a lot of training: from land workers, they have to evolve into real entrepreneurs. The challenge is big. It is possible that some companies will cease to exist in a few years. But I have the feeling that we can really do something for the people. Other NGOs active in Laos closely follow our activities. And we really like to share our experiences.” www.vredeseilanden.be/laos

Creating a company is an enormous progress for illiterate farmers.

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VECO VIETNAM In Vietnam, the agricultural services of the district authorities are our main partners. We collaborate in the northern districts Lang Son, Son Duong, Van Quan, Yen Lap, Binh Gia and Viet Tri.

LAOS

VIETNAM INDONESIË

In function of the activities, our team contacts one or several services of the district: Agricultural Extension Stations, Plant Protection Station, Veterinary Stations, Agricultural and Rural Development Departments. A new partner is the Vietnam Standard and Consumers Association (VINASTAS). This consumer organisation gives information to consumers, treats complaints and tries to plead for favourable legislation for consumers. Number of persons directly reached

3086 men, 1652 women

Know what you eat! In China, the past months, hundreds of babies died after drinking milk poisoned with melamine. Also in Vietnam, food scandals are headlines in newspapers and on television. The past years, thousands of people got sick after eating poisoned vegetables. Hien of the Vredeseilanden office has her doubts when she goes to the market to buy vegetables. “How can I be sure that these tomatoes are healthy?” Consumers in Vietnam had been proud of their healthy kitchen for a long time, mainly consisting of vegetables and other fresh ingredients. Every morning thousands of farmers drive their van, bicycle or scooter to big cities like Hanoi to supply the street vendors. Population in Vietnamese cities is rising rapidly. Since the nineties, the country has had an enormous economic boom that made more and more people leave the countryside. Everybody in the cities needs to be fed and a high yield is necessary. Therefore, farmers are spraying a lot of chemicals. A lot of farmers are well aware of the health risks. “My family does not eat the vegetables I bring to the market” admits Ms. Dung. She is one of the farmers who participated in a recent inquiry of Vredeseilanden. “We have a small vegetable garden where we cultivate without pesticides. We use these vegetables in our own kitchen.”

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The consequences of this excessive use of chemicals are dramatic: in the period 2001 to 2005, approximately 23,000 serious cases have been documented. The public concern is enormous and last year, the government took measures. “Zones for safe vegetables” were marked out. These are zones where farmers are forced to cultivate vegetables with a minimum of pesticides. But who can guarantee that in the trucks, these vegetables are not mixed with vegetables from non-safe zones? Who is controlling the farmers? How can you recognise safe vegetables on the market? Since last year, Vredeseilanden has been collaborating with the consumer organisation VINASTAS. Together, they performed an inquiry on the consumer confidence in vegetables. Scepticism is getting the upper hand. “We don’t trust the government labels,” are saying the consumer organisations with one voice. In the newspapers, articles appeared of farmers that could buy the label of ‘safe vegetable’ from officials. “We need to protect our families. Therefore, we only trust the vegetables that can be directly bought from farmers and not the vegetables of the many street vendors,” was another recurrent claim. Our collaborators also visited the four supermarkets of Hanoi. They have a shelve with biological vegetables. Nobody could exactly tell where the vegetables were coming from... For many years, Vredeseilanden has had a strong functioning on the Vietnamese countryside, north of Hanoi. VINASTAS also has local departments in these regions. They decided to collaborate on transparent and reliable sales channels for vegetables. Two small farmer groups already made promises to respect the rules on food security. Vredeseilanden will try to establish contacts between these farmer groups and consumers in cities and companies in the surroundings. In Lang Son, a first stone has been laid. VINASTAS organised a meeting for officials, farmer groups, hotel owners, company leaders and women groups. During the tea break, two hotel owners talked to a farmer group. They did not know that safe vegetables were available in their environment and were very interested. Immediately, they closed a contract for 200 kg of vegetables. This year, VINASTAS and Vredeseilanden will look for a reliable system for consumers and farmers to close agreements on safe ways to cultivate vegetables. This guarantees consumers that the vegetables they are eating are safe and healthy. www.vredeseilanden.be/vietnam/veiligegroenten

Food scandals are headlines in newspapers in Vietnam: “We want to be able to buy safe vegetables, but we don’t trust the government labels.”

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VECO INDONESIA

INDONESIË Our programme in Indonesia has been, for many years, the largest with respect to the number of partners and the geographical spread. We chose to shrink our programme in Indonesia, so that we can better and more intensively collaborate with our partner organisations. Therefore the collaboration with these 11 partners has been gradually phased-out and stopped at the end of 2008. • • • • • • • • • • •

Yayasan Pembina Masyarakat Pedesaan (YPMP) Yayasan Lembaga Pengembangan Wilayah Tana Ai (YLPM-Bangwita) Yayasan Sambirio Yayasan Bina Cempe (YBC) Lembaga Studi Pengkajian Lingkungan (Lespel) Yayasan Sosial Nusantara (Yanusra) Yayasan Bina Sejahtera (YBS) Yayasan Pengkajian dan Pemberdayaan Rakat (YP2R) Lembaga Pengamabangan dan Pemberdayaan Masyarakat AL-Azhar Kediri (LPPMA Kediri) Lembaga Penelitian dan Pengembangan Sumberdaya Lingkungan Hidup (LPPSLH) Lembaga Pengembangan Potensi dan Keswadayaan (BABAD)

Now and in the future, we would like to concentrate on rice, peanuts, coffee, cacao and cashew nuts. We are mainly working with local NGOs and not with farmer organisations, as we do in other countries. Farmer organisations in Indonesia are a recent phenomenon. Under the reign of Suharto, farmer organisations were forbidden. Only after his downfall, at the end of the nineties, people were allowed to freely organise. At the end of 2008, we closed our first partner agreements with two farmer organisations that will get our support starting from next year.

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The partners we will collaborate with in the following years are: On the island of Java: • • • •

Lembaga Studi Kemasyarakatan dan Bina Bakat (LSK-BB), in the district Boyolali Yayasan Pengembang Kreatifitas Generasi Muda (YPKGM), in Lumajang Lembaga Pengkajian Kemasyarakatan dan Pembangunan (LPKP) Lembaga Pengembangan Partisipasi Demokrasi dan Ekonomi Rakyat (LP2DER)

On the island of Sulawesi: • Yayasan Duta Pelayan Masyarakat (YDPM), in the district Mamasa • Yayasan Jaya Lestari Desa (JALESA), in the district Toraja • Yayasan Komunitas Indonesia (YAKOMI), in the district Mamasa On the island of Flores: • • • • • • •

Yayasan Komodo Indonesia Lestari (Yakines), in Manggarai Yayasan Tana Nua (YTN), in Ende Delegasi Sosial (Delsos), in Manggarai Yayasan Mitra Tani Mandiri Ngada (YMTM-Ngada) Lembaga Advokasi Masyarakat (LAPMAS), in Ngada Yayasan Ayo Indonesia (YAI), in Ruteng Yayasan Ayu Tani (YAT), Flores Timur

On West-Timor: • Yayasan An Feot Ana (YAFA), in the district TTU • Yayasan Mitra Tani Mandiri (YMTM), in the district TTU On the island of Bali, we are working with Yayasan Bali Organic Association (BOA), a consumer association. For our political action, we mainly collaborate on national level with: • People’s Coalition for Food Sovereignty – Koalisi Rakyat untuk Kedaulatan Pangan (KRKP) • Aliansi Petani Indonesia (API), known for their fight on land rights • The Indonesian Organic Farming Network – Jaringan Kerja Pertanian Organik (JAKER-PO), the movement for biological agriculture

Number of persons directly reached

7700 men, 5142 women

37


Biological rice, simply the best solution Journalist Jan Bosteels travelled to Indonesia last summer. Not to the surf beaches in Bali, but to talk to farmers, traders and consumers that are active in the Vredeseilanden programme. This is his rice story from Boyolali, on the Island of Java. For many years, farmers of Dinglo have been poisoning themselves, their environment and consumers with chlorine bleached pesticide rice. Now that they are cultivating biological rice, they are healthier, more thriving and their clients happier. Rice is the main food crop in Indonesia. For breakfast, lunch and supper, rice is served. Mostly white, industrial rice, cranked up with chemical fertilizers and in some cases bleached with chlorine to be whiter than white. This is not the case in the Boyolali district in Java, where farmers passed on to sustainable agriculture with the aid of the farmer movement LSKBB. Of the 860,000 inhabitants of Boyolali, 31% is living under the poverty limit. This means that they have an income of less than 1 dollar a day. This was more than enough reason for VECO partner LSKBB to help farmers to cultivate, process and sell their rice. The tanned Cipto Mulyatno is leader of the farmer movement of Dinglo, an idyllic village not far from Solo. We are in a rice field and he passes with his right hand through the green rice plants. “We have always been cultivating rice here. From the seventies, with the help of fertilizers and pesticides.” Cipto has no good word to say about pesticides. “They generated higher production costs and the land dried up. I also developed asthma after spraying. I even had a kind of epileptic seizure, probably caused by the inhalation of this poison. I wasn’t using a mask or other protection.” About biological rice, nothing else than good. “We produce our own pesticide according to a traditional recipe, using tobacco leafs. We make our own fertilizer with cow dung and compost material. The productivity of the land increased, we are getting a better price for our rice and the taste is also better. I would like to recommend this to every farmer.” In his living room, Cipto shows me the analysis report of a university laboratory, which shows that the ground contains 0.0% of pesticides. Direct selling In the rice business, a lot of money is lost because of the middlemen and wholesalers. In order to get a better negotiating position, farmers have united in an organisation that sells the rice without middlemen. The biological rice of Dinglo is sold outside the rice market of Solo to the detail trade, the fast food chain KFC (Kentucky Fried Chicken) and to consumer groups. This has been a smart move in the marketing of rice. Aris of LSKBB has organised a meeting with the women of block 3, a lower middle class area of Solo. For more than two years, women are regularly meeting to store the rice that is directly delivered by the farmers. Under the direction of Yayuk, they discuss the quality of the offered product. These women have developed into more conscious consumers, who ask questions about the health impact of their non-biological products. Even more important, with their enthusiasm, they stimulate their neighbours to also learn to appreciate the rice of the Dinglo farmers. “These ladies are our best clients”, says Aris. “The upper middle class women prefer to buy their biological rice in the supermarket, for twice the price, but in a nicer packing. They know it is exactly the same rice.”

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Meanwhile on the island of Flores Yayasan Komodo Indah Lestari (Yakines) – another Vredeseilanden partner – is also conscious about the added value of biological rice. The production is going well, but there are also many challenges on marketing level. In 2005, Yakines created a shop that sold biological products for a lower price than average. But this wasn’t very successful. Nevertheless, the people of Yakines were convinced that healthy food should also be made available for people with less money. Therefore, they decided to make a distinction between rice varieties. Wojalaka and Rindeng were classified as “A-quality”. Sipagang and IR64 as “B-quality” and are sold for a lower price. Thanks to this distinction, they could aim at different markets. To find out what varieties their clients preferred, they organised taste tests in March 2008. This meeting with consumers was a turning point for Yakines. They discovered that the clients accepted a higher price if they are convinced that the product is of good quality and really ‘special’. Yakines also learnt that the availability of biological rice in the shops is an important factor in the price determination. Farmers want to be sure to get a good price for their rice. After the meeting, the Association of rice farmers of Lembor was created. They assumed the task to guarantee a constant supply of biological rice to shops and to negotiate on the price. You can order the entire Indonesia Reporter, with all stories of Jan Bosteels, by info@vredeseilanden.be or 016/31 65 80. www.vredeseilanden.be/indonesie/rijst

Cipto Mulyatno: “I got ill from using pesticides. Now, we produce our own pesticide using a traditional recipe. The sales of our biological rice are going well.”

39


EVERYBODY HIS DAILY BREAD? An Indonesian friend of mine asked his European colleague whether it is not boring to eat bread every day. His European colleague answered: “Well, it is like you Indonesians, who eat rice every day: for breakfast, lunch and supper.” De gustibus non est disputandum. Tastes differ. But it can be strongly determined by culture, habits and nature. In the past, there were different consumption patterns in Indonesia, in function of what grew on the different islands. These patterns were suddenly ruptured in the middle of the eighties. The government launched his green revolution with a strong campaign to cultivate and eat rice. Traditional crops disappeared. Since then, Indonesia is almost synonym for rice. From Sabang in the extreme West to Merauke in the Far East of our immense country. You can find rice everywhere. In some places, there is not enough rice for everybody. This situation worsened last year. The food crisis did not only strike Indonesia. The entire world felt it and everybody agrees that a solution is necessary. More investments, new agricultural technologies, more training for farmers. These and other promises were made. There is also another important aspect: promotion of traditional crops such as basic food. The reintroduction of traditional crops and rice varieties can be one of the methods to take care of our food security. This way, one is no longer dependent on one product or one seed supplier. Indonesians should get rid of their dependence on rice. The Europeans also of their dependence on bread. The motto of the FAO is “Fiat panis”, let there be bread. But more important is “Fiat nutrimens”, let there be food. Anna Hasbie, VECO Indonesia.

40


Vredeseilanden in Flanders

Social basis In Flanders, Vredeseilanden is a strong and known brand. The organisation can count on a loyal social basis. Every year, thousands of volunteers enter into action for Vredeseilanden. In January, young and old sell gadgets, such as our key holders, to thousands of sympathizers. They form the indispensable buttresses for the action of Vredeseilanden and our partner organisations and give us the right to speak. The basis of Vredeseilanden in numbers People have been contributing actively to Vredeseilanden in 2008: • Approximately 12,000 people are actively involved in the campaign. • 1,000 runners participated in the Run to Africa. • 460 people watched the movie “No food without beans” on mijnvredeseilanden.be. • 8,890 students in secondary schools watched the movie “No food without beans” in schools. • At least 3,000 youth association members participated in Foodhunt. • 50 volunteers of Vredeseilanden are active in a puller group of Fair Trade Towns. • 35 volunteers of Vredeseilanden are active in the Council for development cooperation in their hometown. • 390 core volunteers are local ambassadors of Vredeseilanden. • 71 students of five pilot schools work as a puller group in Change the Food. They have activated more than 2,500 students. With a content message, Vredeseilanden reached: • 310,000 radio listeners; • 760,000 television spectators; • 600,000 readers through newspapers and magazines; • 40,000 people personally received a leaflet during the campaign; • 20,000 people at festivals; • 8,000 people received the reporter magazine and the activity report; • 5,090 subscribers on the electronic newsletter; • 340 unique external visitors a day on different Vredeseilanden sites (in total: 120,000 visitors).

3 41


In 2008, Vredeseilanden could count on the financial support of • 8,292 donors that transferred one or more donations; • Some 106,000 people that bought a key holder or another gadget during the campaign weekend. Press and Media In 2008, more purposive press actions were executed or press releases were sent. Media and journalists were also informed on themes on which Vredeseilanden can deliver interesting content. During the year, the first benefits were reaped. This is proven in the above-mentioned contributions and also in different (smaller) messages spread through several media (Belga, MO*, newspapers and magazines). The themes and programmes of Vredeseilanden were treated in different content articles and reports in written and spoken media. Le nouveau Vredeseilanden est arrivÊ On the 4th of October, an event was organised in Leuven to present the renewed position of Vredeseilanden in a clear and appealing way to the different stakeholders. More than 350 enthusiastic participants gathered at this event. Website The Vredeseilanden website has been further developed into a central hub with links to different online activities. Since September 2008 there is a new site mijnvredeseilanden.be for volunteers. Previously this was part of the general Vredeseilanden website. Since September 2008, 340 unique visitors were counted for both sites. This is a significant increase with respect to 2007. 269 daily visitors for the integrated site (volunteer pages included). These numbers only apply on external visitors. Vredeseilanden employees are not included in these statistics.

42


The multilingual, general website of Vredeseilanden has also been adapted on content level: * General information on the organisation (translation of basic texts, see above); * Short country or regional information, reference to VECO office sites; * Focus on a few cases; * Available in English, Spanish, and French. From now on, content on our South programmes is also provided by the communications staff at the VECO Offices. A sustainable chain, from farmer to supermarket It is evident that companies, traders, processing industry and wholesalers have a crucial responsibility. If they really want to be socially responsible entrepreneurs, of course they have to be financially viable, but they also have to watch over a socially and ecologically sustainable agriculture. It is crucial that farmers, the first link in the chain and producers of food, get the place they are entitled to. They have to make sure farmers receive a fair salary and are able to farm in good circumstances. In Flanders, Vredeseilanden is working on the analysis and development of sustainable agricultural chains in cooperation with distribution chains. Vredeseilanden also launches projects to stimulate a favourable political and economic environment based on their own practice on sustainable agricultural chains. This is organised, among others, through multi-stakeholder platforms (cf. Kauri), exchanges, colloquia, campaigns... On the other hand, a lot of attention goes to projects that stimulate the purchase behaviour of consumers for the benefit of products from sustainable agriculture. Fair Trade Towns Fair Trade Towns (FTT) capitalizes on the availability and purchase of sustainable products from fair trade and sustainable agriculture. In 2008, 37 new towns registered for the campaign. This brings the total number of towns to 173 (end 2008). In 2008, 21 towns received the FTT title, bringing the total number of towns with the title to 62 by the end of 2008.

43


A comparison between towns with and without title, illustrates the impact of the campaign. Title towns have convinced three times more local actors than towns without the title. With peaks of 10 times more catering businesses, 7 times more schools and 6 times more companies. In title towns, inhabitants can shop, on average, in more than 11 shops and 7 catering businesses. The campaign has reached three kinds of shops: world shops (15%), supermarkets (39%). The remaining 46% consists of local shops, bakers, butchers, liquor stores, biological shops... The numbers on product sales are not yet available. Vredeseilanden is represented in the national steering group and receives the mandate to elaborate initiatives, tools... that support criterion six. • 18 new towns have paid attention to criterion 6: Aalst, Alken, Balen, Brecht, Izegem, Middelkerke, Nijlen, Overpelt, Rotselaar, Sint-Truiden, Vorselaar, Edegem, Haacht, Mol, Grobbendonk, Riemst, As, Diksmuide. • Sint-Truiden has brought 3000 bottles of local fruit juice into 14 shops. With bell ringing to the shop with a stamp on a savings card at the purchase of sustainable products. • Healthy, local snacks during the municipal sport weeks in Brecht. • Leaflets on local producers in Aalst, Bierbeek, Haacht and Holsbeek. • In Koksijde, all town employees receive a bio package for secretary day. • In Rotselaar, the inhabitants get to know ‘the juice from here and the juice from there’. • In Kasterlee, all newlyweds receive a basket with biological vegetables and fruit. • In Nijlen, all members of youth associations, on the youth association day, receive a fair and local breakfast. • Food teams in at least 7 towns: As, Eeklo, Ieper, Sint-Truiden, Riemst, Grobbendonk and Maldegem. In Bornem and Wijnegem, the sales of biological vegetables and fruit started through subscriptions in local shops. Knowledge transfer and policy influencing Vredeseilanden is an organisation that implements its programs in the South through the active presence of programme teams. The role of these teams is to enable farmer organisations and their members to take control of their own future. This takes place in close collaboration with other (strategic) actors: local service NGOs, public sector, private sector and other international collaboration organisations and institutions.

44


This enabled Vredeseilanden to gather thorough knowledge on the processes that take place at the base. This knowledge is constantly being translated into advocacy, to influence policy makers and the public. This forms the base of the unique Vredeseilanden approach: positive advocacy for policy change for the benefit of an innovative and favourable policy context, instead of negative advocacy to maintain the current (or even lost) policy context. In Flanders, this has lead to a large and very positive support Vredeseilanden can count on year in year out. The specialisation of Vredeseilanden in terms of sustainable agriculture and chain development is a guarantee to generate elaborate knowledge. This specialisation is also the reason why the different programmes generate high quality results; because we only focus on our main themes. A successful campaign at the occasion of the food crisis Since a few years, Vredeseilanden is making an effort to put food security and sustainable agriculture higher on the Belgian political agenda. In 2007-2008, there was a strong investment in the multistakeholder dialogue with different actors in the Belgian development cooperation. When in the spring of 2008 the food crisis broke out, Vredeseilanden decided to launch a mini campaign on the World Food Summit of the FAO in Rome, to ask to put into action policy recommendations discussed during the multi stakeholder dialogue, and to sensitize the public opinion on the food crisis, the causes and the possible solutions. Vredeseilanden wrote a MO* paper (‘Who starts a real green revolution’) to deliver the necessary argumentation that more investments in sustainable agriculture are necessary to solve the food crisis. This paper was published in June 2008. Argumentation was also gathered in our different country offices. Vredeseilanden took the initiative to elaborate, with other Belgian NGOs, environmental and farmer organisations, a joint position on the solutions for the food crisis. This joint position was largely communicated and discussed with the DGDC administration, the Ministry of Development Cooperation and members of parliament. Through the agriculture platform, a preparative consultation took place on the Belgian position at the FAO World Food Summit. Vredeseilanden was also member of the Belgian delegation which travelled to Rome. This way, we participated in the Belgian positions. Minister Charles Michel promised to increase the budget for agriculture in the Belgian development cooperation to 10% by 2010 and 15% by 2015. Vredeseilanden has also stimulated other countries to do the same and to put emphasis on family agriculture.

45


With a letter, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs was asked to give the necessary attention to the food crisis (in the framework of the Doha development round and negotiations on bilateral free trade agreements). Flemish and federal parliament members were also sensitized on the thematic through letters, information transfer, informal contacts... Through the Flemish Parliament members and the fraction collaborators in the Chamber and Senate, we have pleaded for a resolution on how to tackle the food crisis and have delivered successful input. In order to also reach the larger public opinion, an advertisement at the occasion of the world food summit was elaborated and published in three Flemish newspapers (De Standaard, De Morgen and De Tijd). Our opinion articles were published several times in newspapers and on websites. A cheerful film was also made and spread through different digital media and channels. Through these actions, Vredeseilanden has contributed to put the food crisis on the political agenda and to bring this theme into the media. Our publications and political actions give Vredeseilanden further authority on the subject (for example, requests to participate in debate).

46


The social balance of Vredeseilanden

THE PEOPLE BEHIND VREDESEILANDEN General Assembly: the general assembly is composed of some 70 stakeholders. These are volunteers, experts, members of the Board and former employees. The list of members of the General Assembly can be requested from Vredeseilanden or can be consulted on our website www.vredeseilanden.be/ mensen/algemenevergadering. The general assembly is the highest organ. It designates the Board and approves the annual accounts and the report. Board: Leen Bas, André De Smedt, Patricia Grobben, Marleen Iterbeke, Roosmarijn Smits, Alfons Vaes, Jan Van Eeckoute, André Van Melkebeek, Annelies Van Raemdonck. President of the Board: Alfons Vaes More on the members of the Board: www.vredeseilanden.be/mensen/raadvanbestuur. The Board is responsible for the general management. The operational responsibilities are delegated by the Board to the direction of the organisation. The president and all board members are volunteers. They are not paid for their mandate and don’t have an executive function in the organisation. Personnel Head office: the list of Vredeseilanden collaborators is published on the Vredeseilanden website. (www.vredeseilanden.be/mensen) Personnel Regional offices: regional offices for each region/country: Amidou Diallo – Togo/Benin; Jan Dewaal – Eastern Africa; Rogier Eijkens – Indonesia; Sandra Galbusera – Middle America; Stuart Ling – Laos; Hanneke Renckens – Andes; Liesbeth Van Brink – Vietnam; Roos Willems – Senegal. Vredeseilanden is represented in the following organisations: Coprogram: Vredeseilanden is member of the Board 11.11.11: Vredeseilanden is member of the Board Kauri: Vredeseilanden is member of the Board Alterfin: Vredeseilanden is member of the Board Mo* magazine: Vredeseilanden is member of the Board

THE ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE OF VREDESEILANDEN vzw

Internationaal Forum Algemene Vergadering

Vrijwilligers

Raad van Bestuur

(elke zes jaar)

Raad van Wijzen

Directie Regionaal Kantoor Nationale Raad

Regionaal Kantoor

Nationale Raad

Hoofdkantoor

Regionaal Kantoor

Nationale Raad

Regionaal Kantoor

Nationale Raad

Regionaal Kantoor

Nationale Raad

4

General Council

Regionaal Kantoor

Nationale Raad

Regionaal Kantoor

Nationale Raad

Regionaal Kantoor

Nationale Raad adviserende relatie

47


SOCIAL BALANCE (AS OF 31/12/2008) In this rubric, we give some numbers and explanation with respect to the Vredeseilanden personnel (situation on 12/31/2008).

Head office 2005 2006 2007 2008

41 44 45 51 Head office

2005 2006 2007 2008

34,24 34,50 36,96 42,59

number of members of personnel South Cooperatives Local collaborators 16 107 16 1241 17 1302 15 103 number of full-time equivalents South Cooperatives Local collaborators 16 16 17 1302 15 103

Total 164 184 192 169 Total

183,96 160,59

Head office The number of members of personnel and full-time equivalents went up slightly. The increase was caused by: • Recruitments in case of periodical projects in different services • Replacements during maternity leave, time credit and sick leave • Recruitments in the framework of some new functions Cooperatives (in the South) Cooperatives are mainly used for the following functions: • Responsible persons of Vredeseilanden in the country or the region • Specific expertise: marketing, access to markets and development of sustainable chains, content program coordination, knowledge management, sustainable agriculture, organisational reinforcement • Communication and networking Local collaborators (in the South) In case of a vacancy, we look in the first place for local collaborators. Only if a certain experience is not present in the country, we consider hiring (again) a cooperative for these functions. The expertise is more and more available in the countries where we are working and the knowledge of these local people is getting more and more important. Gradually, we will look for foreign collaborators in the large region in the South and not focus on recruiting European cooperatives. In 2008, 61% of the Vredeseilanden personnel consisted of local collaborators.

1 Except for Congo and Tanzania: no data available from external audit report. 2 Data from external audit report, Congo is estimated because of the absence of an audit report.

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Gender balance For the head office, the decreasing tendency for the number of men is continuing: 33%. 17 men and 34 are employed. Of the men, 15 are full-time employees, 2 part-time. For the women, 21 part-time and 13 full-time. In the South, more men than women are employed: 68% (80 men, 38 women) Head office

South offices

33%

32%

67%

68%

Men

Women

The salary equity between men and women is 100%. Men and women receive the same salary if they have the same function. This applies on the head office, cooperatives and local collaborators. Personnel turnover Head office IN UIT

11 6

South Cooperatives 3 2

Local collaborators 29 46

The number of recruitments and resignations in Belgian in 2008 was mainly caused by to temporary missions and replacements: 6 replacements for maternity and sick leave, 2 temporary assistants. Some new recruitment took place, in the framework of the new Vredeseilanden objectives: • PLA coordinator • SACD specialist • Collaborator communication service • Collaborator campaign work • General Director For the cooperatives: • In order to meet the new objectives of Vredeseilanden, 2 SACD collaborators and 1 OSID collaborator were hired • 2 collaborators were at the end of their contract For local collaborators: • The entrances into office and resignations mainly took place in the current regionalisation processes, the transfer from country offices to regional offices.

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Learning organisation Vredeseilanden strives to give its employees at all levels in North and South, individually and collectively, permanent opportunities to develop themselves. Vredeseilanden wants to be a flexible organisation, where people adapt to new ideas and objectives of the organisation and where mutual learning is stimulated. ‘Learning’ is therefore explicitly taken up as an objective in the strategic plan. In 2008, Vredeseilanden has spent 92,910 Euro in training for collaborators of the head office and cooperatives. 26,745 Euro was allocated for managing employees, 66,165 for the training of non-managing employees. On average, 1,400 Euro is spent for each employee (head office and cooperatives) on training. The majority of the training can be classified in the following themes: • Workshops organised by Vredeseilanden: PLA, SACD • Chain development • Sustainable alimentation • Language training • Training on fundraising • Organisational reinforcement • Other Every year, an evaluation meeting is organised with every employee. During this conversation, the general and function-related competences and annual objectives for the following year are extensively treated. It is also evaluated whether training is necessary to acquire/reinforce the necessary competences to realise the annual objectives. Social consultation Vredeseilanden employs less than 50 employees in the head office and is therefore not obliged to install a works council or a union representation. 2 official personnel representatives are appointed in the personnel meeting, of which 1 union representative. The personnel representatives organise personnel meetings. Personnel meetings are summoned 3 to 4 times a year. In 2008, 4 personnel meetings were organised. In 2008, one specific consultation was organised during the preparation of a new system for evaluation meetings. On the initiative of the personnel representatives, regular briefings were organised on the different steps of the Organizational Capacity Assessment (see also page 9).

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Environmental policy of Vredeseilanden

The environmental policy of Vredeseilanden fits in the framework of a global sustainability and accountability policy. This implies that, next to the financial – economic aspects of the organisation, we also render accounts on the social dimension and the environmental impact of our organisation. Vredeseilanden is engaging to minimise the direct and indirect consequences of its activities on the environment. In order to realise this policy, Vredeseilanden will develop an action plan in a number of domains: • The direct environmental effects of the head office in Leuven • The direct environmental effects of the country and regional offices • The indirect environmental effects of the North and South programmes This action plan contains an analysis of the beginning situation, the objectives, the annual actions to reach these goals and an annual internal audit to check the realisation. The action plan and realisations will be published every year. The direct environmental effects relate to the transport, waste production and use of water, energy, paper by the organisation. In order to limit the direct environmental effects: • The Vredeseilanden personnel will be stimulated to maximally use public transportation or an environment friendly means of transport; • The waste production will be maximally limited by prevention and recycling; • A minimum consumption of water, energy, paper and office materials is pursued; • Ecological consumption is stimulated by using a maximum amount of biological, fairtrade and ecological products. The indirect environmental effects of Vredeseilanden mainly relate to the effects caused by the activities of the South programme. The direct environmental effects generated by the execution of our development programmes are therefore limited to a maximum. This includes minimising the water consumption for irrigation, limited use of harmful fertilizers and pesticides, the fight against soil pollution or impoverishment, the reduction of energy consumption for production and transport of agricultural products, etc. The implementation of the action plan is planned as follows: • In 2007, the measurement was launched of the direct environmental effects of the head office. At the same time, an action plan on the direct environmental effects of the head office was drawn up for 2008. • In this annual report, the results of 2007 and 2008 are mentioned next to each other. Some positive evolutions are already noticeable. An action plan has been elaborated for 2009. • To measure the indirect environmental effects, a screening tool was developed in collaboration with external experts and other development organisations. • The country and regional offices are stimulated to develop an action plan in 2009 for the direct and indirect environmental aspects and to start as from July 2009 with measurements to obtain a beginning situation.

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Environmental realisations head office Vredeseilanden is member of the climate coalition. The climate coalition is an association of different organisations that trying to limit their CO2 emission. Vredeseilanden engages to measure the CO2 emission and to take measures to limit the emissions in the future. The under-mentioned data relate to activities of the Vredeseilanden head office. In the course of 2009, a registration system will be but at the disposal of the regional offices. realisation 2007

realisation 2008

262,500 6,500 100% 1,588,000

175,000 3,431 100% 1,448,300

43%

41%

38%

40%

23%

21%

17%

26%

PAPER Total purchase of A4 paper / year (pages) Total purchase of A4 paper for each person / year (pages) Part of recycled A4 compared to white paper Total purchase A4 paper / year for mailings (pages) The main part of the paper purchase is used for mailings to sympathisers. We try to limit this. The paper use in number of pages decreased, among others, because all old printers were substituted by new two sided printers. OFFICE SUPPLIES Amount of ecological office material compared to the total Planned actions in 2009: – Collaborate with suppliers with a large offer of ecological and sustainable office material. – At the purchase of office material for workshops, a maximum of ecological material will be bought. FOOD PRODUCTS Amount of food products with label Bio guarantee compared to the total purchases Amount of Fair Trade purchases compared to the total purchases Amount of purchases with the label Bio guarantee + Fair Trade label If a food product is offered in a variant with the label bio or Fair Trade, we choose to buy the labelled variant. 87% of the food products that are purchased have a bio or Fair Trade label. Planned actions in 2009: – Transition to food products with a label, if this did not yet take place. – At the purchase of food products for events, we will buy a maximal quantity of labelled products.

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realisation 2007

realisation 2008

80%

83%

274 6.09

252 4.94

608

528

1,621

1,564

18 0.8 0.9

4 0.7 0.8

MAINTENANCE PRODUCTS Amount of purchases ecological maintenance products compared to the total purchases All bought maintenance products are Ecover, except for air fresheners, toilet products... for which it is very difficult to find an ecological alternative. We continuously evaluate whether we can switch certain products for an ecological variant. WATER Annual consumption in m3 m3/person/year ENERGY Electricity Kwh/person/year Heating gj gas/person/year Since 2005, Vredeseilanden is using green electricity. In 2007, double glazing was installed everywhere where this was not yet the case, reducing consumption. Planned actions in 2009: – Participation in the “thick sweater” campaign – During the year, some sensitisation messages will be spread on careful use of heating. WASTE Quantity of waste per person each year (in kg) Quantity of PMD waste per person each year (in kg) Quantity of paper waste per person each year (in m3) Quantity of vegetable, fruit and garden waste per person each year (in kg) Quantity of drink packaging with deposits with respect to the total purchases of bottles

9.9 95%

95%

A feasibility study was done to evaluate whether composting was possible and how. The conclusion was that composting was not realistic. Our alternative was to choose for separate recycling of vegetable, fruit and garden waste. Because of this separate recycling since 2008, the quantity of rest waste for each person decreased drastically.

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realisation 2007

realisation 2008

9%

18%

70.22% 669,905

89.55% 413,530

227,600

140,850

MOBILITY Professional work transfers: part of public transportation Work transfers: part in km with trains, busses, bicycles of by foot Plane travels: km/year Recalculation plane travels in CO2 emission: kg CO2 emission/year A service bike is put to the disposal of collaborators. Planned actions for 2009: – From the 1st of January 2009, Vredeseilanden pays the home-work transport with public transportation for 100%. This way, we hope to encourage more people to use public transportation. – Every year, we participate in the campaign “I Kyoto”.

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Annual financial report 2008 Vredeseilanden vzw

ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

1. INTRODUCTION When we speak about Vredeseilanden’s financial report, we refer to the head office and to the different overseas offices in the countries where we are active. In order to present a correct image of Vredeseilanden we have endeavoured to provide overall figures for the entire group over the past few years. This is the integrated profit & loss account and balance sheet. The integration of the figures is complicated, since it requires a uniform reporting method from all countries. These reports are sent to head office and verified by the financial department. All offices are then visited by local auditors from the international audit firm Ernst & Young, who write reports on their findings. Finally, Vredeseilanden vzw’s statutory auditor, Mrs. Vandeurzen, draws up her final report after having read the different local reports and after having checked head office’s accounts. Last year, we managed to present a reliable integrated report on all countries, except DR Congo. This year, we have managed to organise an Ernst & Young audit in DR Congo as well. For the first time we are now able to present a full overview of the entire Vredeseilanden group, the result of many years of hard work. The financial reports consists of 3 parts: the profit & loss account, the balance sheet and the statutory auditor’s report. The balance sheet is an overview of Vredeseilanden’s possessions and debts on the final day of the year under report. The profit & loss account lists all of the organisation’s expenses and revenue over 1 year. The statutory auditor’s report contains an independent opinion on the reliability of the figures in the previous two parts. Apart from the integrated balance sheet and profit & loss account for the entire organisation of Vredeseilanden we also include a detailed profit & loss account for the head office.

6 55


2. PROFIT & LOSS ACCOUNT 2.1.

Integrated Profit & Loss Account

2.1.1. Expenses SERVICES AND MISCELLANEOUS GOODS (61 ACCOUNTS) These are operating expenses for both the head office and the country offices. REMUNERATIONS, SOCIAL CHARGES AND PENSIONS (62 ACCOUNTS) This is the overall wage expenditure for all staff members, for the staff at the head office in Leuven, for the expatriates and for local staff. DEPRECIATIONS AND PROVISIONS (63 ACCOUNTS) Depreciations are the impairment charges on investments in the current fiscal year. All the investments in the country offices are completely depreciated in the year in which they are purchased. In the head office investments are depreciated over several years, following the depreciation terms as determined by the Board of Directors. During the year 2008, we managed to take back several important provisions for risks and expenses, and very few new provisions were made. OTHER EXPENSES (64 ACCOUNTS) The main element of this account are the money transfers to the different partners in the South (for the country offices), and a number of direct payments to international cooperation structures (for the head office).

2.1.2. Revenue MEMBERSHIP FEES, DONATIONS, LEGACIES AND SUBSIDIES (73 ACCOUNTS) In the integrated profit & loss account all of the organisation’s regular revenue is mentioned under this heading. Most revenue for the countries is collected through head office. However, a number of smaller deposits by foundations or subsidisers enter the countries directly without passing through head office. More explanation on the revenue is to be found under 2.4.2. Overview of the head office’s revenue.

56


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

2.2.

Analytic profit & loss account Head Office

As opposed to the figures of the integrated profit & loss account we have divided head office’s expenses per department. The advantage is that we can thus clearly demonstrate how much is actually spent on operating each department and – more specifically – on general management, fundraising and the realisation of our objectives. The result for head office is –184,618 EUR. According to budget we should have reached a result of –790,000 EUR. That loss was supposed to be settled by the investment fund, after which the budgeted result should have been break-even. Following the approval of the General Assembly the final result will be settled with the investment fund. The reasons for this substantial difference are the following: • We notice that several departments have not fully spent the budgeted amount. The most remarkable are: • Fundraising • North programme • Coordination of the programme expertise The main reason is undoubtedly the restructuring (OCA) that was completed throughout 2008 and that caused a significant delay in the execution of several actions. The expenses for the investment fund were also only realised for little over fifty percent. • Globally speaking, the revenue falls below budget, more specifically private contributions and the contributions from NGOs, foundations and companies. The subsidies also fell below expectations, which can be explained by the fact that, due to the lower expenses for the north programme, part of the DGDC subsidies that were attributed to this had to be transferred to the following year.

57


RESULT 2008 compared to Budget 2008 and Result 2007 EXPENSES GENERAL MANAGEMENT Direction and executive bodies HR Finances Internal communication Secretariat TOTAL OVERALL MANAGEMENT FUNDRAISING Fundraising January Campaign TOTAL FUNDRAISING

RESULT 2007

BUDGET 2008

RESULT 2008

RES/BUDGET 08

314,197 147,751 403,066 280,256 139,505

320,493 118,480 427,633 200,342 153,737

335,082 177,194 343,315 249,050 144,580

4.55% 49.56% -19.72% 24.31% -5.96%

1,284,775

1,220,686

1,249,221

2.34%

330,864 194,813

251,833 338,268

210,592 354,043

-16.38% 4.66%

525,676

590,101

564,635

-4.32%

638,837

400,923 187,678

336,767 169,341

-16.00% -9.77%

638,837

588,601

506,107

-14.02%

PROGRAMMES NORTH PROGRAMME Programme North Social basis TOTAL NORTH PROGRAMME COORDINATION OF THE PROGRAMME EXPERTISE Advocacy SACD Credit – Learning – PLA Strategic Alliances External Communication for programmes

581,847

479,897

408,458

-14.89%

317,219

372,895

245,933

-34.05%

75,748 164,145

82,910 49,104

76,497 -70.08%

-7.73%

974,814

1,099,847

779,993

-29.08%

325,000

373,364

362,811

-2.83%

799,068

1,210,783

844,441

-30.26%

857,154 493,181 2,267,558 268,198 268,027 1,061,532 1,026,661 651,683 10,593 6,904,587

845,509 285,626 2,869,446 274,114 229,726 1,041,198 994,949 655,450

-1.99% 16.89% -9.85% 12.75% 0.48% 16.25% -1.28% 11.39%

7,146,018

828,679 333,870 2,586,743 309,077 230,835 1,210,430 932,823 730,134 18,901 7,181,491

8,028,655

8,730,165

8,388,742

-3.91%

11,452,757

12,229,400

11,488,698

-6.06%

487,881

1,000,000

287,365

-71.26%

TOTAL CURRENT EXPENSES

11,940,638

13,229,400

11,776,063

-10.99%

EXPENSES FOR THE INVESTMENT FUND OCA Direction/BoD/GA/Executive bodies Competence development HR Department Brand building Communication Extra fundraising actions Fundraising Supermarket action Campaign Culture Youkali Strategic Alliances Innovation project Programme North Structural adjustments South Country programmes South TOTAL EXPENSES FOR THE INVESTMENT FUND

RESULT 2007 14,392 2,047 66,774 67,174 18,856

BUDGET 2008 66,420 75,000 52,500 265,700 27,000 50,000 35,088 221,000 792,708

RESULT 2008 46,081

RES/BUDGET 08 -30.62% -100.00% -34.13% -44.51% -54.30% -50.00% -94.88% -38.97% -49.27%

OVERALL TOTAL EXPENSES

12,240,473

14,022,108

12,178,176

TOTAL COORDINATION OF THE PROGRAMME EXPERTISE SOUTH PROGRAMME PM Africa PM Amerasia Expatriates Countries/regions West-Africa 1 (Benin, Togo) West-Africa 2 (Senegal, Gambia) East-Africa (Uganda, Tanzania, DR Congo) Vietnam Laos Indonesia Central America (Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Honduras) Andes (Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia) Other

TOTAL SOUTH PROGRAMME TOTAL EXPENSES Overflowing accounts

58

19,287 111,305 299,835

34,584 147,430 12,339 25,000 1,798 134,881 402,112

0.50%

-13.00%


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

REVENUE GOVERNEMENT SUBSIDIES EU Project financing

RESULT 2007

BUDGET 2008

RESULT 2008

RES/BUDGET 08

220,384

67,583

105,872

56.65%

North Programme South Programme Structural expenses

617,832 4,629,719 635,680

921,768 4,563,480 301,140

800,057 4,563,480 301,140

-13.20% 0.00% 0.00%

Belgian Survival Funds – North Belgian Survival Funds – South

173,914 1,299,522

100,000 1,551,234

120,764 1,281,186

20.76% -17.41%

600,000

500,000

-16.67%

30,000 6,380 57,682

0 32,800

7,460 65,880 4,435

100.85%

5,315 7,350 10,000 176,062 57,859

42,100 0 13,000 140,000 76,000

35,701 7,350 13,457 206,543 88,566

-15.20%

70,324

50,000

83,312

66.62%

125,454

114,440

140,514

22.78%

8,123,477

8,573,546

8,325,715

-2.89%

304,308 761,791 25,000

280,213 1,350,226 11,100

282,892 1,124,509 30,000

0.96% -16.72% 170.27%

1,091,099

1,641,539

1,437,401

-12.44%

100,507 853,315 53,099 795,466

100,000 957,000 127,500 756,000

111,063 853,765 232,161 636,808

11.06% -10.79% 82.09% -15.77%

1,802,387

1,940,500

1,833,797

-5.50%

180,300 74,077

75,000

198,592 601

164.79%

254,377

75,000

199,193

165.59%

1,010,299

1,000,000

144,996

-85.50%

12,281,639

13,230,585

11,941,103

-9.75%

41,166

-791,523

-237,073

341,001

1,185

DGOS

Food aid Other federal authorities Flemish Community ALDO/ALT (Administration Agriculture and Horticulture) National Lottery PROVINCES West Flanders Limburg Antwerp East Flanders Flemish Brabant COMMUNES AND CITIES REMUNERATION SUBSIDIES (Maribel, Gesco, DAC) TOTAL GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES REVENUE FROM NGOs, FOUNDATIONS AND COMPANIES 11.11.11 FOUNDATIONS, NON PROFIT AND NGOs COMPANIES TOTAL REVENUE FROM NGOs, FOUNDATIONS AND COMPANIES PRIVATE REVENUE RUN TO AFRICA DONATIONS LEGACIES CAMPAIGN TOTAL PRIVATE REVENUE FINANCIAL + DIVERSE REVENUE INTERESTS DIVERSE REVENUE TOTAL FINANCIAL + DIVERSE REVENUE Overflowing accounts OVERALL TOTAL CURRENT REVENUE RESULT OF THE FISCAL YEAR Result after withdrawal from investment fund

3.51% 47.53% 16.53%

165,040 *

* The result of 165,040 EUROS will be integrated into the balance sheet.

59


2.2.1.

Analysis of the expenses and revenue

2.2.1.1. Oversight of the expenses

11% 6%

83%

General management Fundraising Realisation of the objectives

General management from the regular budget from the investment fund Fundraising from the regular budget from the investment fund Realisation of the objectives from the regular budget from the investment fund Total

2008 1,295,303 1,249,221 46,081 724,403 564,635 159,768 10,158,470 9,962,207 196,263 12,178,176

11%

6%

83%

2007 1,150,640 1,134,201 16,439 611,706 525,676 86,030 9,839,669 9,642,303 197,096 11,602,015

10%

5%

85%

General management General management expenses are the operational and staff expenses for supporting departments in the head office (secretariat, staff, finances, internal communication), for direction and for executive bodies. Our aim is to maintain this percentage at or below 10 %. Fundraising Fundraising expenses are staff and operational expenses for the January campaign on the one hand, and fundraising expenses throughout the year on the other hand. An important part of the fundraising expenses (especially for innovative initiatives) is financed from the investment fund. These expenses are taken into account for the calculation of the percentage of the expenses for fundraising. Costs for the realization of the objectives These are the total expenses after deduction of the expenses for general management and fundraising. These expenses apply to both the North and the South part. The North part consists of the expenses for the actual North programme and the expenses for the coordination of the programme expertise (see chapter 3: Vredeseilanden in Flanders). The South part comprises the expenditure in the different countries, as well as the expenses related to the support for the South programme in Belgium and expenses for the expatriates in the South. For a detailed overview of the activities in the different countries, see chapter 2: The South Programmes.

60


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

As of this year, this overview for the calculation of expenses for general management, fundraising and realisation of the objectives also includes the figures of the investment fund. This means that the 2007 figures concerning expenses for general management and fundraising in this report do not entirely correspond to the 2007 figures as mentioned in the previous annual report. 2.2.1.2. Overview of the revenue

2% 16%

12%

Government subsidies 70%

NGOs, foundations and companies Private revenue Financial revenue

Financing sources Government subsidies NGOs, foundations and companies Private revenue Financial revenue Total

2008 8,325,715 1,437,401 1,833,797 199,193 11,796,107

70% 12% 16% 2%

2007 8,123,477 1,091,099 1,802,387 180,300 11,197,263

73% 10% 16% 2%

Vredeseilanden’s revenue can be divided into 4 major headings, which we will now briefly discuss. Government subsidies This remains by far the most important source of revenue for Vredeseilanden. In absolute figures this revenue has steeply increased, although it has decreased in relative figures, which is a positive evolution. Nevertheless, we failed to meet the budgeted amount. In last year’s report we already mentioned our aim to reduce the share of this revenue to below 70 % by 2010. In 2008, we made some important steps towards this objective. Within this heading the federal Directorate General for Development Cooperation (DGDC) remains by far the main source of revenue. Additionally, we receive (rather modest) subsidies from a number of lower authorities in Belgium and a very modest amount from the European Union. NGOs, foundations and companies This source of revenue shows the most notable increase, both in absolute and in relative figures. This heading contains the allowances from a number of Belgian NGOs and foundations, of which 11.11.11 is undoubtedly the most important, allowances from a number of NGOs and foundations from other European countries and a contribution from 1 Belgian company.

61


Private revenue

Run to Africa Donations Campaign Total

2004 57,969 809,282 534,862 1,402,113

2005 53,723 1,078,667 694,854 1,827,241

2006 108,650 795,529 636,336 1,540,515

2007 100,507 853,315 795,466 1,749,288

2008 111,063 853,765 636,907 1,601,735

0

2,657,355

402,178

53,099

232,161

Legacies

Next to government subsidies this heading is the 2nd most important source of revenue for Vredeseilanden. It contains the donations that we receive throughout the year (standing orders, donations after mailings, ...), as well as the proceeds from the annual campaign and the Run to Africa. If we look at the evolution of that private revenue we notice an alternation between “better” and “worse” years. The legacies are mentioned separately, due to their exceptional and unpredictable nature.

2.000.000 1.800.000 1.600.000 1.400.000 1.200.000 1.000.000 800.000 600.000

Campaign

400.000

Donations

200.000

Run to Africa

0 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Financial revenue Of course not every euro that we receive is spent the next day, which is why we regularly invest cash surplus in totally risk-free short-term schemes with a guaranteed interest rate. We ensure that all these investments are as ethical as possible. Thanks to the extremely high short-term interest rates in 2008 we amply exceeded the budgeted amount.

62


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

3. BALANCE SHEET Vredeseilanden’s balance sheet consists of 4 major headings, which we will now briefly discuss. 3.1.

Fixed assets

Material fixed assets For the head office the main element in this heading is the building in the Blijde Inkomststraat that houses Vredeseilanden’s offices. The fixed assets also comprise some smaller elements, such as IT equipment and furniture. For the regional offices this heading is empty. They rent their office space, and because of the subsidy regulations the local investments are fully depreciated in the year in which the purchase is made. That explains why they are not included in the balance sheet. Financial fixed assets The most important element in this heading are our shares in Alterfin cvba, a cooperative organisation for credit loans to microfinancing institutions and fair trade organisations. It also includes several deposits for lease contracts, mainly in the country offices. 3.2.

Current assets

Stocks This heading contains the campaign materials that are stored in the head office. The value of these stocks has increased sharply in comparison to last year. Investments and liquid assets On the 31st of December, head office’s current and long-term accounts displayed a total amount of 5,217,000 EUR, which was a lot less than on 31/12/2007. The main reason for that difference is the fact that DGDC still owed us an important part of the financing for the programme 2008 on 31/12, whereas in the past the DGDC subsidy had always been deposited in the course of the programme year. The balance for the programme 2008 was deposited in February 2009. The bulk of our investments and liquid assets has been deposited into accounts at Triodos Bank, following the Board of Directors’ decision to invest as much money as possible in an ethical manner. However, we still depend on the traditional Belgian banks for our daily transactions, given the lack of a sound ethical alternative in that area. You may notice plenty of liquid assets in some country offices. Most of them are resources that had already been transferred by the head office to be spent in the first months of 2009. Overflowing accounts This heading consists primarily of subsidies for the fiscal year 2008 that had not yet been transferred on 31 December 2008. The most important are: the balance of the DGDC 2008 programme financing, a pre-financed amount to Indonesia for the 2009 DGDC programme financing and several amounts from approved projects from the Belgian Survival Fund (BSF) that had not yet been transferred.

63


3.3.

Equity

Vredeseilanden vzw’s equity contains several elements: Equity Head Office Association’s Funds Investment Fund Opportunity Fund Social Fund Transferred Result TOTAL

Amounts in euro 1,472,888 1,539,078 200,000 1,174,999 933,350 5,320,314 *

* Situation before the ventilation of the result 2008

Association’s funds These are the association’s original funds, which remained unchanged. Social fund This fund was established by head office for payments to staff members in the event of a (partial) cease of activities. The amount was calculated a few years ago, based on actual termination fees. Investment fund The investment fund was created by the General Assembly several years ago. It wished to assign a part of the equity to specific projects, actions and activities that are not directly financed but that allow us to improve our quality, both in the North and in the South. Every year a budget is presented to the General Assembly, together with a report on the expenses of the previous year. STATE OF AFFAIRS INVESTMENT FUND Budget total

OCA Competence development Brand building Extra actions for fundraising

Expenses 2006

Expenses 2007

Budget 2008

65,000

14,392

66,420

180,000

2,047

75,000

747,500

Expenses 2008

46,081

66,774

52,500

34,584

10,000

67,174

265,700

147,430

18,856

27,000

12,339

Available balance after 2008

Available balance after 2009

4,527

0

4,527

177,953

145,000

32,953

421,538

Major donor fundraiser

50,500 236,500

97,384

37,155

Supermarket action

100,146

31,146

Culture Youkali

100,000

25,000

0

50,000

25,000

50,000

25,000

25,000

Innovation project

100,000

19,287

35,088

1,798

78,915

28,260

50,655

South Studies

127,500

94,785

0

32,715

0

32,715

Structural adaptations

37,805

0

37,805

217,500

16,520

221,000

134,881

66,099

108,000

-41,901

Environmental actions

10,000

-10,000

Development and supervision HR manuals RO

38,257

-38,257

262,354

0

262,354

1,131,907

678,672

453,235

Not yet allocated TOTALS

64

Requested and transferred amounts for 2009

262,354 1,900,000

66,146

299,835

792,708

402,112


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

The amount that was spent in 2008, which totalled 402,112 EUR, will be deducted from the equity following approval by the General Assembly. Some overseas offices own some equity, which is the result of accumulated local revenue (not subsidies) from the past. 3.4.

Provisions

This heading contains a number of provisions for social and fiscal disputes in a few countries, as well as an important provision for subsidies to be returned to the European Union and the Belgian federal government (DGDC). Finally, there is a small provision for major repair works to the building in Leuven. The provisions are substantially lower than previous years, mainly because in the past some risks were overestimated or did not occur at all. 3.5.

Debts

If we compare the debts to the balance sheet total we notice that they are limited. The head office has some debts to suppliers and a number of social debts. Most country offices also have debts to suppliers or social debts. Vredeseilanden does not have any current loans. 3.6.

Overflowing accounts

These are the subsidies that had not been spent by the 31st of December and were thus transferred to 2009. It involves both DGOS programme financing and BSF financing.

65


Annex a: CONSOLIDATED PROFIT & LOSS ACCOUNT

I

II

INTEGRATED TOTAL

HEAD OFFICE

2008

2008

Codes

Euro

Euro

70/74

11,620,762

11,742,510

D. Membership fees, donations, legacies and subsidies

73

11,527,472

11,661,068

E. Other operating income

74

93,290

81,442

Operating income

Operating charges

60/64

11,924,490

12,169,076

B. Services and other goods

61

3,546,875

1,661,423

C. Remuneration, social security costs and pensions

62

4,202,241

3,004,645

D. Depreciation of and other amounts written off on formation expenses, intangible and tangible fixed assets

630

230,267

42,758

635/8

-178,329

-174,784

G. Other operating charges

640/8

4,123,436

7,635,035

Operating profit (+)

70/64

0

Operating loss (–)

64/70

-303,728

F. Increase (+); Decrease (–) in provisions for risks and charges III IV

Financial income

75

282,438

198,592

B. Income from current assets

751

226,712

198,573

752/9

55,726

19

65

9,188

9,099

C. Other financial income V

Financial charges C. Other financial charges

652/9

9,188

9,099

VI

Profit on ordinary activities

70/65

-30,477

-237,073

Loss on ordinary activities

65/70

VII

Extraordinary income

76

14,151

D. Gain on disposal of fixed assets

763

14,151

66

0

VIII Extraordinary charges IX

Profit of the fiscal year (+)

70/66

Loss of the fiscal year (–)

66/70

-16,327

CTA to be incl. in fin. result (diff. average-closing rate on current year result)

-148,219

CTA to be incl. in fin. result (diff. average-closing rate on current year result)

-2,789

CTA to be incl. in fin. result (diff. average-closing rate on current year result)

-116

Profit (+) / Loss (–) of the fiscal year*

-167,451

* The results of the regional offices are mainly caused by exchange rate fluctuations of the local currency unit.

66

-426,566

-237,073

-237,073


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

BENIN/TOGO

SENEGAL

TANZANIA

UGANDA

DR CONGO

ANDES

MESOAMERICA

LAOS

VIETNAM

INDONESIA

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

696,872

321,002

755,654

761,884

754,663

626,337

965,883

232,903

316,185

1,050,389

696,872

321,002

753,165

761,884

754,663

626,235

957,777

231,752

316,185

1,050,389

0

0

2,489

0

0

102

8,106

1,151

0

0

696,872

321,000

701,384

755,184

764,967

628,900

923,461

241,548

322,903

1,003,272

176,300

109,425

484,532

245,039

71,032

90,274

143,217

188,074

126,614

250,945

161,173

103,786

121,831

232,330

33,672

120,846

103,438

50,914

121,154

148,454

30,608

5,045

95,021

35,575

2,960

1,196

2,377

1,215

1,987

11,525

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

9,718

-13,263

328,791

102,745

0

242,240

657,304

416,584

674,429

1,345

63,431

605,611

0

2

54,270

6,699

0

0

42,422

0

0

47,117

0

0

0

0

-10,304

-2,564

0

-8,644

-6,718

0

0

0

38,178

14,693

0

0

3,182

0

3,926

23,867

0

0

0

0

0

0

3,182

0

1,090

23,867

0

0

38,178

14,693

0

0

0

0

2,836

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

87

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

87

0

0

0

0

92,448

21,393

0

0

45,604

0

0

70,984

0

0

0

0

-10,304

-2,564

0

-8,731

-2,792

0

0

229

9,554

4,274

0

0

0

0

94

0

0

229

9,554

4,274

0

0

0

0

94

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

229

102,001

25,667

0

0

45,604

0

0

70,984

0

0

0

0

-10,304

-2,564

0

-8,731

-2,698

0

0

0

-52,727

-25,667

10,304

2,564

-43,697

8,731

0

-47,728

0

0

-1,893

0

107

369

1,925

0

0

-3,298

0 0

0 229

47,381

0

108

369

3,833

0

-2,698

19,958

67


Annex b: CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET ASSETS

Codes

HEAD OFFICE

2008

2008

Euro

Euro

FIXED ASSETS

20/28

I

Formation expenses

20

0.00

II

Intangible assets

21

0.00

III

22/27

419,554.27

419,554.27

22

384,799.10

384,799.10

22/91

384,799.10

384,799.10

23

33,735.60

33,735.60

1. In full property

231

33,735.60

33,735.60

C. Furniture and vehicles

24

1,019.58

1,019.57

1. In full property

241

1,019.57

1,019.57

28

64,656.28

49,504.74

284/8

64,656.28

49,504.74

284

44,027.08

44,027.08

285/8

20,629.20

5,477.66

Financial fixed assets C. Other financial assets 1. Shares 2. Amounts receivable and cash guarantees

CURRENT ASSETS V VI

29/58

8,756,514.05 6,684,632.72

Amounts receivable after more than one year

29

81.71

B. Other amounts receivable

291

81.71

30

173,162.00

173,162.00

30/36

173,162.00

173,162.00 173,162.00

Stocks and contracts in progress A. Stocks 4. Goods purchased for resale

VII

469,059.01

Tangible fixed assets 1. In full property

IV

484,210.55

A. Land and buildings B. Plant, machinery and equipment

Amounts receivable within one year B. Other amounts receivable

34

173,162.00

40/41

225,254.21

41

225,254.21

VIII Investments

50/53

IX

Cash at bank and in hand

54/58

6,801,945.39 5,130,178.96

X

Deferred charges and accrued income

490/1

1,394,760.37 1,293,986.73

20/58

9,240,724.60 7,153,691.73

TOTAL ASSETS

68

INTEGRATED TOTAL

161,310.36

87,305.03


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

BENIN/TOGO

SENEGAL

TANZANIA

UGANDA

DR CONGO

ANDES

MESOAMERICA

LAOS

VIETNAM

INDONESIA

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

13,607.23

1,544.31

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

13,607.23

1,544.31

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

13,607.23

1,544.31

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

13,607.23

1,544.31

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

402,074.61

45,059.25

507,052.04

299,966.91

156,839.13

113,687.65

164,541.86

39,224.80

51,979.41

338,169.92

0.00

0.00

81.71

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

81.71

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8,463.27

25,914.37

65,223.84

19,947.29

50,837.10

32,004.71

46,256.33

1,146.87

10,342.55

11,832.13

8,463.27

25,914.37

65,223.84

19,947.29

50,837.10

32,004.71

46,256.33

1,146.87

10,342.55

11,832.13

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

72,425.28

1,580.05

0.00

0.00

0.00

393,611.34

19,144.88

435,569.85

268,506.88

106,002.03

9,257.66

68,653.32

37,613.73

38,000.67

295,406.08

0.00

0.00

6,176.63

11,512.74

0.00

0.00

48,052.16

464.21

3,636.19

30,931.70

415,681.83

46,603.56

507,052.05

299,966.91

156,839.13

113,687.65

164,541.86

39,224.80

51,979.41

338,169.91

69


LIABILITIES

Codes EQUITY I

10/15

HEAD OFFICE

2008

2008

Euro

Euro

5,219,788.74 5,083,241.02

Funds

10

1,472,888.17 1,472,888.17

A. Starting funds

100

1,472,888.17 1,472,888.17

IV

Reserves

13

2,972,765.09 2,914,076.62

V

Profit carried forward (+)

140

1,200,678.03

933,349.50

Loss carried forward (–)

141

-426,542.55

-237,073.27

PROVISIONS VII

16

739,515.47

666,986.10

A. Provisions for liabilities and charges

160/5

443,117.23

370,587.86

1. Pensions and similar obligations

160

70,935.07

3. Major repairs and maintenance

162

29,622.85

29,622.85

163/5

342,559.31

340,965.01

168

296,398.24

296,398.24

4. Other risks and charges B. Provisions for revocable donations and legacies CREDITORS

17/49

VIII Amounts payable after more than one year B. Trade debtors IX

Amounts payable within one year

X

17 175 42/48

3,281,420.39 1,403,464.61 4,698.70 4,698.70 698,840.45

246,870.81 246,870.81

C. Trade debtors

44

349,421.46

E. Taxes, remuneration and social security

45

343,194.65

1. Taxes

450/3

63,175.63

2. Remuneration and social security

454/9

280,019.02

F. Other amounts payable Accrued charges and deferred income

TOTAL OF LIABILITIES

70

INTEGRATED TOTAL

48

250,020.06

6,224.34

492/3

2,577,881.24

906,573.74

10/49

9,240,724.60 7,153,691.73


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

BENIN/TOGO

SENEGAL

TANZANIA

UGANDA

DR CONGO

ANDES

MESOAMERICA

LAOS

VIETNAM

INDONESIA

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

2008

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

Euro

1,406.54

–43,463.83

72,001.03

0.00

1,974.04

8,744.19

47,535.36

0.00

944.14

47,521.83

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8,328.91

0.00

24,619.78

0.00

2.34

12,069.78

13,667.66

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

17,462.88

47,381.25

0.00

8,077.88

7,061.45

33,867.70

0.00

4,318.79

149,274.17

-6,922.37

-60,926.70

0.00

0.00

-6,106.18

-10,387.04

0.00

0.00

-3,374.65

-101,752.34

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8,028.45

0.00

0.00

31,208.14

33,292.78

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8,028.45

0.00

0.00

31,208.14

33,292.78

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8,028.45

0.00

0.00

31,208.14

31,698.48

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1,594.30

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

414,275.30

90,067.38

435,051.00

299,966.91

154,865.09

96,915.01

117,006.36

39,224.82

19,827.13

257,355.31

0.00

0.00

0.00

4,698.70

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

4,698.70

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

18,354.34

56,802.12

8,720.17

97,121.64

1,882.12

14,088.90

28,988.52

20,962.60

1,627.69

0.00

6,611.62

0.00

1,504.62

90,897.29

1,882.12

11,924.93

20,526.94

15,499.89

301.75

0.00

11,742.73

56,802.12

7,215.55

0.00

0.00

2,163.97

8,461.57

5,462.71

1,325.94

0.00

3,184.62

56,802.12

295.47

0.00

0.00

1,567.48

0.00

0.00

1,325.94

0.00

8,558.11

0.00

6,920.08

0.00

0.00

596.49

8,461.57

5,462.71

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

6,224.34

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

395,920.95

33,265.26

426,330.84

198,146.58

152,982.96

82,826.10

88,017.84

18,262.22

18,199.44

257,355.31

415,681.84

46,603.55

507,052.04

299,966.90

156,839.13

113,687.65

164,541.72

39,224.82

51,979.41

338,169.91

71


Annex c: STATUTORY AUDITOR’S REPORT

M. Vandeurzen Company reviser

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE MEMBER MEETING OF THE VZW VREDESEILANDEN ON THE ANNUAL ACCOUNTS ON THE FISCAL YEAR CLOSED ON THE 31ST OF DECEMBER 2008

In conformity with the legal dispositions, we report to you in the framework of the mandate of the commissioner. This report contains our judgement on the faithful image of the annual accounts and the additional mentions and information. Declaration on the annual accounts without reservations We have executed the control of the annual account, of the fiscal year closed on the 31st of December 2008, drawn up based on the accounting reference regime applicable in Belgium, with a balance total of 9,240.725 EUR of which the results account is closed with a loss for the fiscal year of 167,451 EUR. The redaction of the annual account is the responsibility of the management organ. This responsibility includes the following aspects: putting in place, implementing and keeping an internal control with respect to the redaction and faithful representation of the annual account that does not contain any abnormalities of material importance, caused by fraud or errors; choosing and applying the proper appreciation rules; making accounting estimations that are reasonable under the given circumstances. It is our responsibility to give a judgement on these annual accounts based on our control. We have executed our control in conformity with the legal dispositions and according to the control standards applicable in Belgium and issued by the Institute of Company Revisers. These control standards require that our control is organised and executed in a way that guarantees a fair amount of certainty that the annual account does not contain any abnormalities of material importance, caused by fraud or errors. In accordance with the above-mentioned control standards, we have taken into account the administrative and accounting organisation of the association, as well as the procedures of internal control. The responsible and the direction organs of the association have given us the necessary clarifications and information. Based on random checks, we have examined the accountability of the amounts in the annual accounts. We have judged as a whole the justification of the appreciation rules, the fairness of the meaningful accounting estimations made by the association, as well as the representation of the annual accounts. In our opinion, these proceedings form a fair base for our judgment. With respect to the expenses abroad, since the fiscal year 2006, the gradual integration of the country offices was launched (VECO Country Offices or VECOs) in the annual accounts of Vredeseilanden VZW. The VECOs report according to a standard financial scheme. The audit of the VECOs and the conformity of their accounting with the standard financial scheme is performed by local audit offices of Ernst&Young under coordination of Ernst&Young Brussels. In 2008, 10 VECOs were integrated. For VECO Indonesia, VECO Laos, VECO Vietnam, VECO Uganda and VECO Tanzania, a statement without reservation was delivered by the local Ernst&Young office.

Maurits NoĂŤstraat 59 3054 Vaalbeek Tel/Fax 016 400812

72

m.vandeurzen@skynet.be VAT 639.276.322 Bank: 001-3276133-34


ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008

M. Vandeurzen Company reviser

VZW VREDESEILANDEN For VECO Senegal, VECO Andes, VECO Togo – Benin, VECO Meso-America and VECO DR Congo, a statement with reservation was delivered. With respect to the formulated remarks, provisions were foreseen and/or accounting corrections performed by the head office in order to offer a solution for the formulated reservations. In our judgement, the annual accounts closed on the 31st of December 2008 give a faithful image of the capital, the financial situation and the results of Vredeseilanden VZW, in conformity with the in Belgium applicable accounting reference regime. Additional statements and information The respect by the association of the Law of the 27 of June 1921 on associations without profit aim and foundations, as well as the statutes, are the responsibility of the direction organ. It is our responsibility to integrate in our report the following additional statements and information that do not change the reach of our statement on the annual account: Without prejudice to the formal aspects of lesser importance, the accounting was performed in conformity with the in Belgium applicable legal and administrative legal prescriptions. As well as in the preceding years, the actions of the local Vredeseilanden committees (in Flanders) are not integrated into the accounting of the association. The comparative figures on 2007 were adapted with the figures of VECO DR Congo. These figures were not integrated in 2007 because no audit took place. Meanwhile, this has happened and the figures of 2007 have been adapted. Otherwise, we don’t have to communicate any transactions or decisions that are in violation with the status or the Law of the 27th of June 1921 on associations without profit aim and foundations.

Vaalbeek, 3rd of June 2009

M. VANDEURZEN Commissioner

Maurits Noëstraat 59 3054 Vaalbeek Tel/Fax 016 400812

m.vandeurzen@skynet.be VAT 639.276.322 Bank: 001-3276133-34

73


Annex d: LIST OF DONORS Donor

Amount

11.11.11

282,892.03

ALT/ADLO

65,880.00

Argus

10,000.00

Colruyt

30,000.00

Cordaid

380,325.00

DGDC BSF DGDC Programme North

800,056.86

DGDC Programme South

5,013,906.26

DGDC Food aid DKA

509,169.56 25,000.00

EU Project Financing

105,880.97

Towns and Communes

83,311.78

Gilles foundation

53,148.00

ICCO

166,000.00

Ileia

50,000.00

Salary subsidies

140,513.97

Misereor

237,314.00

National Lottery Novib

4,434.92 100,000.00

Brot fuer die Welt

12,722.34

Province of Antwerp

13,456.50

Province of Limburg

7,350.00

Province of East Flanders

206,543.00

Province of Flemish Brabant

88,565.50

Province of West Flanders

35,700.59

Talita Koum

90,000.00

Flemish Community

74

1,402,194.91

7,459.93


Annex e: LIST OF TOWNS Town

Amount

Aalst

6,046.15

Aartselaar

6,000.00

Antwerp

8,045.60

Bierbeek

1,300.00

Diest

3,000.00

Genk

1,096.85

Genk

819.57

Grimbergen

5,098.00

Halle

2,500.00

Hasselt

2,500.00

Hasselt

2,700.00

Hasselt

3,000.00

Herent

2,675.31

Herenthout

800.00

Heusden-Zolder

3,000.00

Holsbeek

1,200.00

Ieper

250.00

Lanaken

585.00

Lommel

1,144.12

Londerzeel

2,800.00

Maaseik

1,500.00

Maasmechelen

1,639.00

Malle

2,125.19

Malle

2,000.00

Mechelen

2,558.00

Mol

1,607.14

Oostende

3,540.60

Oud-Heverlee

1,700.00

Riemst

1,500.00

Schilde

2,500.00

Tessenderlo

2,000.00

Tienen

450.00

Waasmunster

125.00

Wichelen

431.25

Wommelgem

900.00

Zuienkerke

50.00

75


Oversight of GRI reported on in this annual report GRI-indicator

Description

Page

PROFILE OF THE ORGANISATION

76

1.

Strategy and analysis

1.1

Vision and strategy on ST, MT and LT

2.

Organisation profile

2.1

Name of the organisation

2.2

Main products, brands and/or services

7

2.3

Operational structure of the organisation, incl. branches, departments...

47

2.4

Location of the head office

2.5

Number and name of the countries where the organisation is active

2.6

Property structure and legal form

2.7

Markets (geografic, sectors,‌)

2.8

Extent of the organisation (employees, turnover, own property, quantity of products and services)

47-50

2.9

Significant changes to the structure during the reporting period

9

2.10

Distinctions received during the period

3.

Report parameters

3.1

Report period

Colophon

3.2

Date of the preceding report

Colophon

3.3

Reporting cycle

Colophon

3.4

Contact for questions with respect to the report

Colophon

3.5

Process followed to determine the report content

Colophon

3.6

Delimitation of the report

Colophon

3.7

Specific limitations for the reach of the report

52-53

3.8

Reporting on collaboration links and branches

47

3.10

Explanation on consequences of changes to information in preceding reports

3-4, 7-8

Colophon

Colophon 11-46 Colophon, 47 11

55, 60

3.12

GRI content table

4.

Good governance

4.1

Management structure of an organisation

47

4.2

Does the president also have an executive function within the organisation?

47

4.3

Number of independent directors

47

4.4

Possibilities for participation of employees, volunteers and stakeholders

50

4.14

Oversight of relevant stakeholders

41

4.15

Inventory and selection of relevant stakeholders

41


GRI-indicator

Description

Page

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Environmental indicators EN1

Materials used by weight or volume

52-53

EN3

Direct energy consumption by energy source

53

EN8

Total water consumption/source

53

EN22

Total weight of waste by type and disposal method

53

EN29

Significant environmental impacts of products and transporting of employees

54

Economic indicators EC1

Direct economic value generated by the organisation

55-73

EC4

Significant financial assistance received from government

;

Social indicators

LA1

Total workforce by employment type, employment contract and region

48

LA2

Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender and region

49

LA10

Hours of training per year per employee by employee category

50

LA14

Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category

49

61

Public policy SO5

Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying

41-44

77


COLOPHON For general questions on this year report, please contact: Jo Vermeersch Head of the Communication Department 016/31 65 80 jo.vermeersch@vredeseilanden.be For questions on the financial report, please contact: Kris Goossenaerts Head of the Finances Department 016/31 65 80 kris.goossenaerts@vredeseilanden.be Vredeseilanden vzw Blijde Inkomststraat 50 3000 Leuven www.vredeseilanden.be info@vredeseilanden.be Vredeseilanden is member of 11.11.11, the umbrella organisation of the Flemish North-South movement. This report treats the calendar year 2008. The previous report was on calendar year 2007. The reports are drawn up every year and discuss the global activities of Vredeseilanden in Belgium and overseas countries as mentioned on pages 11-40, unless otherwise stated. This report has been elaborated by a work group with representatives from the concerned departments by authority of the direction.

78


Vredeseilanden vzw | Blijde Inkomststraat 50 | 3000 Leuven Tel. 016-31 65 80 | info@vredeseilanden | www.vredeseilanden.be


Vredeseilanden/ VECO Annual Report 2008