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VERONICA ANN PLISCHKE


Urban Development, Year 4, 2013

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Restaurant, Year 4, 2012

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Apartment Building, Year 3, 2012

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Fire Station, Year 4, 2013 10 Emergency Housing, Year 3, 2012

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Boardwalk, Year 3, 2011 12 Instrumental Music and Cultural Center, Year 3, 2011 14 Hotel, Year 2, 2011 16 Print Making, Year 5, 2013 18


Urban Development Chicago, IL Spring 2013

A “mile long building� interpereted as an opportunity to test ideas of urban development and revitalization. Located on the south side of Chicago near an old rail yard, this area is deteriorating and largely abandoned. The concept of this project is to create a new community and a bridge that connects the east and west sides of the river to allow easy access from one side to the other. Also incorporting new urbanism, the created community will include a mix of residential, retail and office spaces for easy walking in a city that already has a large population of residents who frequent public transportation and bicycles. The street system is laid out in a non-linear form to reduce redundancy and create a more interesting visual experience while walking from one place to another. The design provides many opportunities for vegetation and small parks to create a feeling of openness in a place where space is otherwise limited.

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RETAIL LOBBY DINING ROOM

BEDROOM

FITTING ROOM

FITTING ROOM

KITCHEN WC

FITTING ROOM

FITTING ROOM WC

BEDROOM

OFFICE WC

KITCHEN

STORAGE

WC STORAGE KITCHEN

STORAGE

BEDROOM

BEDROOM WC

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RESTAURANT

Monte Carasso, Switzerland Fall 2012

With the consideration of emotional reactions to a space, the primary intent of this project is to convey the idea of contrast through simple yet compelling architectural ideas. The principle elements being considered are, warm versus cool, dark versus light and horizontal versus vertical. Emotion is triggered by contact with one or more of the five senses. Touch, smell, sound, sight and taste can all have varying effects on ones demeanor, and combining them can create complex emotions. This concept is being considered in this project through the use of materiality, light and form. Wood and concrete are known for their specific properties, which make them exceptional materials for creating opposing emotions within the individuals experiencing the space. Wood possesses the warmer, more calming properties and concrete is characterized by the cooler, more rigid properties. Wood and concrete are also appropriate in the sense that they are able to trigger three senses in contrasting manners.

Wood is softer to the touch whereas concrete is much more firm, wood is a fragrant material while concrete is generally scentless, and wood is naturally darker in color whereas concrete is lighter. Lighting and form have been determined by the site and orientation. The form arose from datum lines that visually connect the building with its surroundings. It is also oriented in a way that captures the ideal amount of daylight over the course of a day. The height is determined by the amount of light and what volume of space is needed in the building to create the correct emotional reaction within. The circulation is laid out in such a way that someone moving within the space can feel the contrast between the horizontal and vertical elements. The exterior windows allow an individual to catch glimpses into the spaces, priming for what is to come. These windows also allow limited light into the space to create a warm and intimate interior.

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5


Kitchen

Courtyard

WC

Entry

WC

Dining Room

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APARTMENT BUILDING Roanoke, VA Spring 2012

Lounge

This project is intended to create a structure that fits into the overall fabric of Roanoke, while also providing some contribution to sustainable urbanization. The promt requires that the building maintain both its historic facade and the bus terminal that is currently located on the ground floor. Each student was given the freedom to decide what type of structure they felt was appropriate for this location. An apartment building seemed the most fitting because there is little housing near the bus terminal and walkable housing is one factor that helps create a more sustainable city. The building is laid out in such a way that each apartment has access to a public roof courtyard in order to allow for a greater sense of community within such a large city building. The design was influenced by idea of providing a “backyard” for each apartment while actually being in a multi story apartment building. Roanoke is a small city, but has little public parks or areas of dense vegetation. Providing “green” spaces for the tenants creates not only a physically healthy community but a social one as well.

Living/ Dining

Kitchen

Living/ Dining

Utility Closet

Kitchen

Hall

Bath

Hall

Hall

Kitchen

Bathroom

Bedroom

Hall

Bath

Hall

Hall

Kitchen

Bathroom

Bedroom

Hall

Bath

Hall

Hall

Kitchen

Bath

Bedroom

Hall

Residents Amenities

Lobby

Hall

Bedroom

Kitchen

Bedroom

Living/ Dining

Hall

Bus Terminal

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Master Bathroom Bathroom

Bedroom

Closet

Living/Dining

Cl. Master Bedroom

Walk-in Closet

2

Bathroom Bedroom

Living/Dining

Master Bedroom

Walk-in Closet Bedroom

Utility Closet

Living/Dining

1

Master Bathroom

Kitchen

Walk-in Closet

8

Cl. Kitchen

Bathroom

Utility Closet

Utility Cl. Closet Utility Closet

Kitchen

Kitchen

Living/Dining

Cl.

7 Elevator

Closet Elevator Elevator

Bathroom Closet

Utility Closet

Bedroom Cl.

Kitchen Bathroom

Bedroom Closet

Utility Closet

Bathroom

Master Bedroom

Closet

Utility Cl. Closet

5 Bedroom Utility Cl. Closet

Cl.

3

Master Master Bathroom Bathroom Master Bedroom

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Kitchen Walk-in Closet

Walk-in Closet

Bathroom

Living/Dining

Master Bathroom

Walk-in Closet Cl.

4

Master Bedroom

Living/Dining Kitchen

Closet

Elevator Living/Dining Bedroom

Bedroom

Walk-in Closet Master Bathroom Master Bathroom

Living/Dining Bathroom

Master Bedroom

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Walk-in Closet Kitchen

Master Bedroom


FIRE STATION

Alexandria, VA Virginia Society 3 Day Competition January 2013

As a hybrid of two different classes of enclosures, this fire station is designed with the intent to create a space that allows for a harmonious and cohesive coexistence of residents and firefighters. Each is given a space of their own while still being allowed access to public spaces such as the green roof and community room. These two spaces are shared between visitors, residents and firefighters to create communitiy spaces that are open and comfortable. The main focal point of the structure is the exterior of the building which is clad in perforated bronze to mimic the lighting effects of fire. The idea of fire is also considered in the use of mass vegetation and wood that are both surrounding the building and incorporated into it. The structure is a combination of wood and metal that work as subliminally contrasting elements. Metal is formed by fire, while wood is destroyed by it, therefore, inhabitants are given a constant reminder of the power which fire wields. The exact location on the site was determined by the existing infrastructure within the allotted area. This location allows for all of the existing school amenities to remain as they are for use by the students. This location also allows for the residents to have balcony views of the woods and river that run along the western side of the site. At a glance, the design seems simple, however on a subconcious level one experiences conflicting emotions which provide a deep architectural experience within each individual.

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EMERGENCY HOUSING

Cape Hatteras, NC Virginia Society 3 Day Competition January 2012

Lightly resting on the ground, the honeycomb structures provide semi-permanent housing along the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Due to the area’s vulnerability to hurricanes and violent storms, the shelters take advantage of tight construction, as well as extensive waterproofing on both the exterior and interior. The modular unit is hexagonal in plan, with a common angle of 120 degrees between adjacent walls; this is also the angle created when the roof meets the top of each wall. In this regard, the modular construction allows for the efficient assembly and disassembly of the units when necessary. Each hexagonal unit houses up to four people, and each shelter can be grouped with three identical modules; these modules are arranged in close proximity to one another, thus enclosing a common space in the center of the colony. Because the form of the shelter is hexagonal, adequate spacing is ensured between colonies and the possibility of multiple arrangements arises. Utilizing a rigid geometry as the basis of each unit, a definitive contrast is created between the constantly changing landscape and bold hexagonal structures.

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SEASIDE, FLORIDA

BOARDWALK

Seaside, FL Third Year 10 Day Competition

A path, lightly touching the ground, ascends the dune, providing a transition from the small community to a secluded space along the shore. The wooden structure acts as a bridge, working in both tension and compression to reduce the impact on the ground below, while lifting the path above the dune with thin steel cables to emphasize a sense of weightlessness as one wanders. A secondary transition occurs at the climax of walkway, where a platform projects across the peak of the dune. At this point, a shading system is introduced; this system, composed of a sequence of proportionally rounded ellipses that act as both a surface for harnessing solar energy as well as structural support, defines the space the traveler is encountering. The scale of the sequence begins small and increases as one approaches the midpoint of the platform, at which point the ellipses intertwine, drawing attention to the connection between the journey across the platform and the beginning of the descent to the beach below. A third transition is proposed as the structure shifts in placement from the left side to the right, allowing the clearest view as one progresses toward the end of the platform. The form of the shaded canopies allows for shadows to map the movement of the sun throughout the day, while providing shade to passers-by. The curves of the structure face the southern sun, making them an opportune surface on which to mount amorphous solar panels. The energy the panels produce from the collected sunlight powers evening lighting for the path, which is recessed in the underside of the curving canopy, allowing the light to be reflected along the curve and amplified from a small surface area. While forcing a gentle guidance from one end of the platform to the other and controlling one’s perspective, the structure instills a feeling of lightness through materiality, a lofty yet intimate, curvaceous form, and the careful placement of columns beneath the floor to create a nearly floating path.

NATCHEZ PAVILION

November 2011 Honorable Mention With Sidney Gardner

AMORPHOUS SOLAR PANELS

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INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC AND CULTURAL CENTER Blacksburg, VA Fall 2011

The intent of this project is to create a space for academic enhancement and cultural display. It is a place for the public to be informed about the Virginia Tech music program as well as enjoy the work produced by the students. The design of the instrumental music and cultural center is based upon the concepts of expansion and contraction in the way that sound waves move as well as providing appropriate spaces for high quality acoustics. The primary concepts are shown through the arrangment of the windows as well as the overall footprint of the structure. As one traverses the halls they are always led from a narrow area into a wide and more open space. This is also shown in the daylighting within the building. The main entrance is a two story atrium with one full wall being constructed of glazing. While the rear entrance has no windows and leads the occupant through a windowless pathway toward the atrium.

Open Area

Concert Hall Multipurpose Gallery

Archival Storage

Practice Rooms

Storage

Director Office

Classrooms

Conference Room

Computer Lab

Bookstore

Walkway

Lobby

Lobby

Stairwell

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D

CE

VI ER

R YA

Backstage 300sf

S

C SI MU AB/ E L IC F F O 42V 2

Concert Hall 1600sf

CE DN

F.

OF B/ LA IC 42T S 2 U

I

6

DN B7

D OA

DO

E EN P SC HO T S F LO 51 2

L

5

B7

H AS TR B73

4

2R

B7

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. AC PR 46 2 C. A PR 44 2

ON SI AB US G L RC HIN E P AC 249 TE

OR ID RR -2C CO CR ON SI US GE RC RA PE STO 245

MultiPurpose Gallery 1100sf

. AC PR 52 2

. AC PR 50 2

B

53

Director Office 200sf

T

ER

SC

E

P HO

S

D

OL

4

B5

N IO IN 72 OM B

OR ID RR 3 0A CO B5 23 Y ON C L BA

R AI ST 57 B

Y

ON

LC

BA

Curator Office 125sf Conference Room 150sf

D

Assistant Office 125sf Open Air Walkway

D UN P. SO QUI E 55 B ST VE 56 B

E AG ST 130

B8

Fellowship Office 240sf

Outdoor Performance Space 1000sf

DN

P

3

Elevator

C SI MU AB/ E L IC F OF 247

UP

OR ID RR -2C CO CR

Rest Room 100sf

E EN P SC HO S IFT L

EN

15

R ON PE INI UP OM OM D RO D L OL BAL

CK

NG

R TE

RA

7

B7

M

Service Elevator

DN

230A

Lobby Open Air

1

B7

UP 8

B5

E

AC

RR

TE

OR ID RR 0 CO B7

9

B6


HOTEL

Floyd, VA

Spring 2011 The overall intent of this project is to form a space that can perform multiple functions while not seeming overly complex. The primary focus is to create a building that fits easily in with the existing structures and landscape. The form and materiality come soley from the varying elevations of the existing landscape and locally sourced building elements. The rooms are designed to feel like personalized retreats with magnificent views of the landscape and large windows for natural lighting. The spa completes the resort like feeling that emanates from the atmosphere while still allowing the guests to get back to nature and take in the radiance of the blue ridge parkway through the use of materiality and glazing.

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Print Making Fall 2013

The process of print making used to create a monoprint. With graphic chemical ink, a printing press and a 10x10 grid, each print is created in a process ranging from one to seven hours of work time. With consideration for ideas learned in architecture, each design follows a specific theme. Project concepts include: mimimalism, a letter in motion, repetition, primary colors and a garden.

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Veronica Ann Plischke Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 2014

Architecture Portfolio  
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