Page 1

FREE GIFT! STITCH MARKERS INSPIRING PROJECTS for Creative Crocheters

insidecrochet.co.uk SIMPLE MOTIFS

COMFY AND COSY Trendy granny square cardigan

GIVE US A TWIRL!

SWEET BALLERINA Hook this adorable ami today

EXPERT TIPS AND TRICKS

How to crochet Pick up a hook today!

19 STUNNING PATTERNS

BRIGHT IDEAS

Easy-hook projects to take you through the seasons

PURE COTTON

ROLL UP, ROLL UP! Make a starburst stitch hook roll

FINISH IN A WEEKEND

STYLISH STRIPES Cute cardie in super-soft yarn

bags of colour!

Pretty and practical tote

GREAT NEW-HOME GIFT

FABULOUS FLORALS Contemporary cushion cover

TAPESTRY CROCHET ❤ NECKLACE ❤ BABY SHOES IC#81_01[Cover]SP4RD2.indd 1

£5.99 ISSUE 81 81

9 772040 105014

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Purplelinda Crafts

Love to Crochet

Kits available at a special price

Brighten up your home with this wonderful Circular Rug in DMC Natura XL

Visit us online for the largest selections of Crochet Supplies in the UK

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PO Box 6337, Bournemouth BH1 9EH Subscription enquiries t. +44 (0)1202 586848 chris@tailormadepublishing.co.uk

Meet the team Editor Rhian Drinkwater rhian@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Group Managing Editor Sarah Moran sarah@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Styling & Photoshoot Editor Claire Montgomerie claire@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Technical Editors Rachel Atkinson, Jane Czaja, Claire Montgomerie, Rachel Vowles Sub Editor Vicky Guerrero Online Marketing Executive Adrian Lito adrian@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Contributors Rachel Atkinson, Annelies Baes, Sonya Blackstone, Twinkie Chan, Shannen Nicole Chua, Helen Free, Emma Friedlander-Collins, Lucia Förthmann, Vicky Guerrero, Claire Montgomerie, Irina Palczynski, Helda Panagary, Red Sparrow Crochet, Jennifer Reid, Rico Design Team, Twinkle Design Co-op, Cassie Ward Models Grace Mumford, Lucy Scarfe Photography Leanne Jade Photography, Gavin Kingcome, Stephanie Lee, Kirsten Mavric, Ziska Thalhammer Hair and make-up Julia Edwards Design Stephanie Peat Ad Production Leila Schmitz Main cover image Kirsten Mavric Small cover images Leanne Jade Photography, Kirsten Mavric

Publishing Publisher Tim Harris

Group Advertising Manager Jennie Ayres jennie@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Advertising Manager Sophie Bunch sophie@tailormadepublishing.co.uk t. +44 (0)7798 526070 Circulation Manager Tim Harris Production Manager John Beare IT Manager Vince Jones Subscriptions Manager Chris Wigg (See page 60 for subscription details) Published by Tailor Made Publishing Ltd PO Box 6337, Bournemouth BH1 9EH t. +44 (0)1202 586848 Printed by Precision Colour Printing Haldane, Halesfield 1 Telford, Shropshire TF7 4QQ t. +44 (0)1952 585585 ©Tailor Made Publishing Ltd 2016 All rights reserved. No part of this magazine, or digital versions of the magazine, may be used, reproduced, copied or resold without written permission of the publisher. All information and prices, as far as we are aware, are correct at the time of going to press but are subject to change. Tailor Made Publishing Ltd cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Unsolicited artwork, manuscripts or designs are accepted on the understanding that Tailor Made Publishing Ltd incur no liability for their storage or return. Free gifts are available only with print editions, not with digital editions of the magazines. Tailor Made Publishing Ltd accepts no liability for products and services offered by third parties.

Welcome With August coming to a close, children about to go back to school and the evenings starting to get that little bit shorter once again, it feels like summer might be at an end – but that doesn’t mean we can’t take advantage of the last of the sunshine while it’s still here! This issue we’ve got a great range of transitional garments and accessories that will suit balmy days and cooler evenings alike. My favourite is Twinkle Design Co-op’s stunning lacy cardigan on page 36 – a real “wow” project that’s sure to draw admiration, and worked in a pure wool yarn that will keep you warm without overheating. I’ve also fallen in love with Helen Free’s gorgeous Sunrise Stole, made in beautiful late summer colours, and a perfect cover-up to keep away the chill or protect yourself from the sun. Elsewhere in the issue we’ve got beautiful bright homewares and accessories, including a striped throw that will work equally well pulled around your shoulders at the end of a long day, an adorable amigurumi ballerina and a sweet hook roll to store your crochet necessities safely. A few designs this issue use charts, and if you’re new to these we have a great introduction on page 84. This is my first full issue as editor, taking over from Claire who’s done such a wonderful job with the magazine over the past four years. I’ve worked with her on Inside Crochet for most of that time, and I hope to continue to bring you more of the beautiful designs she’s showcased over the years. I’ve got lots of great ideas for the coming issues – I hope you enjoy them too! Happy crocheting…

page

36

Rhian Drinkwater, Editor

www.pinterest.com/insidecrochet www.facebook.com/insidecrochet @insidecrochet www.insidecrochet.co.uk 03

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12

Win!

ISSUE 81

CONTENTS 48

Vintage inspiration Hook Rachel’s luxury spa washcloths PAGE 14

STUDIO STYLE WE CHAT TO DESIGNER SUSAN PINNER PAGE 24

72

NEWS & REVIEWS

FEATURES

06 IN THE LOOP

14 CONFESSIONS OF A PATTERN COLLECTOR

Get excited about the new Stylecraft Carousel CAL, discover Turnacre handspun yarn, meet designers Haafner Linssen and Luz Mendoza, plus hooking in teal for charity.

09 YARN REVIEWS We test out some new yarns this month including a woolly tweed from Patons, a King Cole cotton in brights and neutrals, plus a bouncy, chunky chenille from Sirdar.

11 OFF THE HOOK Back to school! The perfect time to treat yourself to some colourful new accessories.

12 BOOK REVIEWS Sparkling amigurumi circus characters, bags from Emma Friedlander-Collins, adorable baby shoes and stunning no-seam projects.

A textured vintage pattern inspires Rachel Atkinson to design two lovely stretchy washcloths using raised stitches.

24 STUDIO STYLE We explore the workspace of Susan Pinner, a designer who’s always been passionate about fashion, textiles and colour.

84 MINI MASTERCLASS Unsure where to start with charted crochet patterns? We take you through the basic principles and stitches.

98 FINAL THOUGHT

11

We chat to designer Janine Holmes about her love of amigurumi and learn how she creates her irresistible characters.

04 Inside Crochet

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Make it

Patterns in this issue

36 Teatime Cardigan

43 Florence Cape

45 Granny Shopper

47 Jersey Scarf

48 Cosy-Up Cardigan

51 Ray Of Sunshine

52 Sunrise Stole

54 Autumn Basket

57 Zinnia Cushion

62 Starburst Hook Roll

66 Giant Donut Pouffe

69 Tassel Tote

72 Beautiful Bridges

74 Ballerina Princess

78 Diamond Cushion

80 Striped Baby Cardigan

36 10

6

74

8

REGULARS 56 BACK ISSUES Fill in the gaps in your collection today – turn to our Back Issues page to order any missing magazines.

59 NEXT ISSUE Cosy up on cool mornings with easy layering, plus woolly blankets, comfy cushions and lace fashion.

76 Striped Espadrilles

60 SUBSCRIPTIONS SUBSCRIBE TODAY Save money every month with an Inside Crochet subscription. Turn to page 60 for details

Choose between two great crochet pattern books and have every issue of Inside Crochet delivered direct to your door, with no postage fees!

89 HOW TO CROCHET Turn here for our easy guide to all the crochet stitches and techniques you’ll need, sponsored by Stylecraft.

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News etc

IN THE LOOP BLOGS | BOOKS | REVIEWS | EVENTS | INTERVIEWS

C RO C H E T O N T HE HIGH ST R EET ➻ Rock the

boho look with this colourful tie-dye style top – just pair with skinny jeans and boots. £22.99, www.tkmaxx.com

[ S H O P S W E LOV E ]

[ C R O C H E T- A L O N G ]

Beckside Yarns & Needlecrafts

All the fun of the fair!

➻ Based in the beautiful conservation village of Clapham in the Yorkshire Dales, Sandra Oakeshott has been running Beckside Yarns & Needlecrafts, first established by her sister Jenny, for nine years. With the full, glorious range of Noro, Araucania and Mirasol yarns on show, Beckside Yarns is a must-visit. The shop offers a huge variety of other yarns too, from ranges as diverse as Debbie Bliss, Louisa Harding, Rowan, Juniper Moon Farm, Ella Rae, C+B, Lotus and Mondial. Sandra also has some fabulous sock yarns, including Ciao with aloe vera, Regia Arne & Carlos, plus Pony, Knit Pro, Brittany and ChiaoGoo hooks and needles. Says Sandra: “I’ve been knitting and crocheting for a long time so people can pop in any time and I can help them out there and then!” www.becksideyarns.co.uk

➻ Hop aboard the merry-go-round and relive the excitement of the fair in this vibrant new CAL from West Yorkshire based Stylecraft Yarns, designed by Susan Pinner. Says Susan: “My very first thought was the red and cream canopies you get with carousels and circuses!” The Carousel CAL begins on 13 September and runs until mid November. You can enjoy lots of interesting stitch combinations including raised stitches, join-as-you-go, popcorn stitch and a colourful ripple border. Create the blanket in Special DK (above left), or Stylecraft’s new Batik yarn (right) for a vintage look. We chat with Susan on page 24, plus find her at: www.shropshirescrappersuz.blogspot.co.uk. www.stylecraft-yarns.co.uk

HOM E SP U N BE AU T Y ➻ In the Yorkshire countryside near Halifax, at Turnacre Ryeland Wool Products, Julie Turner is busy spinning wool from her son and daughter-in-law’s pedigree Ryeland and Coloured Ryeland flocks – known for their fine, soft and fluffy fleece. “Yarn made with this wool is very springy with good elasticity,” says Julie. “The fibres have much crimp which, once spun into yarn, create pockets of air which make the yarn warm and cosy. Textured stitches and cables hold their shape particularly well.” Julie works with beautiful natural colours – Ryelands produce creamy white fleece, while Coloured Ryelands produce a solid colour or variations in one fleece, from the lightest to darkest grey or mid to dark brown, with sun-bleached tips. Turnacre also sells mill-spun Ryeland yarn from other breeders, plus patterns from designers including Jacinta Bowie. www.turnacre.co.uk

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IN THE LOOP

DIARY ✽ 16–18 SEPTEMBER

THE HANDMADE FAIR Join Kirstie Allsopp at Hampton Court Palace for this celebration of crafts, with hundreds of handmade items for sale and a huge choice of workshops. Over at the DMC marquee try your hand at amigurumi and create quirky crochet accessories. www.thehandmadefair.com

✽ 24–25 SEPTEMBER

YARNDALE

[CHARITY PROJECT]

Time for Teal

We Love

➻ We often hear how big life events motivate people to come together, and that’s just what happened when Pembrokeshire jewellery designer Lyn Roberts was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Lyn loves to knit and crochet, so she had a selection of natural yarns dyed a gorgeous teal and asked friends to design patterns for her project, Time for Teal, which includes three kits containing information on ovarian cancer. As Lyn says: “If this event raises awareness of the symptoms of ovarian cancer for one woman and she gets the help and treatment that she needs, in time, then it will have been worth it.” All funds go to Target Ovarian Cancer. For the kits, choose from basketweave crochet wrist warmers (£12), knitted spotty socks (£15) and a lacy knitted shawl (£18). Or crochet a bandana for your pooch, knit a hat/tea cosy by Belinda Harris-Reid or work a scarf-shawl with crochet edging by Caroline Bawn. Patterns £3, organic Merino DK teal yarn £9. Buy from www.gorgeousyarns.co.uk

Don’t Miss!

This creative festival of all things woolly and wonderful is now in its fourth year and is packed with demonstrations, textile workshops and stalls. Exhibitors include crochet designer Amanda Perkins, TOFT, Truly Hooked, Jane Crowfoot and more. Inside Crochet will also be there with a stall – we look forward to meeting you! Tickets £10 on the day, £8 with fees in advance. www.yarndale.co.uk

✽ ENDS 30 SEPTEMBER

STITCHES IN TIME This new exhibition looks at the knitting campaigns of World War I, exploring the knitting being done for the troops and hospitals during the war. www.sheringhammuseum.co.uk

✽ 5–9 OCTOBER

THE KNITTING & STITCHING SHOW

W E LOV E … This delicate bunting, made from intricate antique lace and vintage crochet doilies. It’ll add an instant touch of nostalgia to your home. From £35, www.daisiesblueshop.etsy.com

[C RA F T S H OW ]

Science meets crochet ➻ Did you know that while you’re hooking a flower, you’re using geometry? At Sheffield University’s Festival of the Mind exhibition, artists and academics are using crochet to help explain hyperbolic surfaces – surfaces which don’t lie flat, and which curve outwards at every point, like mushrooms, pinecones and ferns. Says organiser Kerry Rose: “This can be replicated with crochet by increasing at the same rates at regular intervals to achieve a variety of shapes. Crochet is unique in that it is the only tactile 3D format to demonstrate these principles!” So people can learn about the geometry in nature, Kerry is creating a “tactile crochet hyperbolic forest”. The installation is at Bank

Streets Arts from 14–25 September. Kerry is inviting crocheters to send in their creations, or share them on Facebook – just search for crochetukhyperbolicforest. www.festivalofthemind.group.shef.ac.uk

Head to Alexandra Palace for this annual show that’s packed with exhibitors, workshops, fashion shows and more. Tickets from £14.50 in advance. www.theknittingandstitchingshow.com

✽ 27–30 OCTOBER

THE STITCHING, SEWING & HOBBYCRAFTS SHOW This jam-packed exhibition is perfectly timed for Christmas and full of festive buys as well as workshops, demonstrations and exhibitions. Held at the SECC, Glasgow, tickets £8. www.ichfevents.co.uk

WORKSHOPS ✽ SATURDAY 3 SEPTEMBER

CROCHET FOR BEGINNERS AND IMPROVERS Join tutor Becky Murray and take your first steps in crochet, or improve your existing skills. The course is run again on 8 October and 5 November, £45, 10.30am–4pm. www.getknitted.com

✽ SUNDAY 18 SEPTEMBER

LEARN TO CROCHET AMIGURUMI Get to grips with all the skills needed to create your own animal from the Edward’s Menagerie collection. £15, 10am–12pm. www.thetoftalpacashop.co.uk

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[CAREERS]

We Love

CROCHET ENTREPRENEURS We chat to designer Luz Mendoza about boho bags, wearable items and being her own boss… www.luzpatterns.com

[ A M I G U R U MI K I TS ]

Bonjour, mes amis! ➻ Meet Charles the caterpillar, Tawny the owl and Cactus the prickly pear, your brand new amigurumi friends from French designers Frog and Toad Créations. Each kit has everything you need including the pattern, a 50g skein of Lang Yarns Quattro, a 100% mercerised cotton, stuffing, a 3mm hook and safety eyes as well as a guide to basic amigurumi techniques. The designers have put simplicity uppermost with these characters, so they’re great projects to develop your confidence. You’ll be pleased to hear the patterns are available in English too! From £23, www.frogandtoad.net

[ N E W YA R N ]

Radiant glory ➻ US yarn brand Knit Picks has launched Luminance, a stunning new laceweight yarn to tick your luxury wishlist, in 100% silk and available in an array of 15 gorgeous colours. With a lovely sheen and excellent drape, we think it’ll be wonderful for fine shawls and flowing scarves and even lightweight tops. To see some lovely knitted pieces, head to the Knit Picks blog at blog.knitpicks.com and search for Luminance. £9.89 for 50g, www.knitpicks.com

Spanish designer Luz Mendoza has always loved crafts, but it wasn’t until she found herself in a career she didn’t enjoy that she started to make creativity a priority again. “I used to be a software developer. I decided if I was going to do something with passion I should love it!” Luz explains. “I started making leather bags then amigurumi dolls, but having a two-year-old boy and twin baby girls I thought I couldn’t have a business selling handmade items. So, I sold my patterns instead.” It was a visit to a craft shop that set Luz on the right path. “I learned about Ravelry at a yarn shop in London after chatting with a German lady. She wrote the name down because I couldn’t understand!” laughs Luz. Luz also had some patterns published in Inside Crochet. “Working in software I had to write logs for testing, so it felt so natural to write a ‘how to’ for my crochet patterns!” Luz smiles. Luz lives in London with her English “better half” and three children. “I write crochet, knitting and sewing patterns. I do a fair amount of cooking too – no one ever told me that children can eat so much! In between I like to smell flowers, drink coffee, dance at Zumba classes and watch comedy movies.” She was brought up in a crafty family. “My grandma, mum and two aunties were creative and there were always hooks, needles, yarn and fabric around me. One aunty was a tailor – she made wedding dresses and formal

wear – so I spent free time at her side, stitching pearls onto lace. I remember making cardigans for my doll Nancy (the Spanish Barbie) and crocheted her clothes and bags,” reminisces Luz. Now Luz creates a range of patterns for accessories for all the family, from hats and gloves to scarves, cowls, shrugs, booties and bags. “I would describe my items as easy to wear. They have a casual, contemporary bohemian style, and I like granny square crochet too. If my kids don’t think it looks cool, they won’t wear it!” Luz’s favourite fibres are Merino wool and alpaca. “I love using them as they are super soft and feel very luxurious. I use Drops yarns quite a lot, but I like many other brands, it all depends on the project that I am working on.” Her most popular designs are her vibrant, feel-good boho bags. “I love bags more than anything else!” she laughs. “People love the colours! They not only enjoy making them, but also find them useful. It’s also a great way of using up all your ends of yarn!” To juggle her business with family life, Luz tries to leave the middle part of the day and evenings free to work on her designs. “Sometimes it works and sometimes those hours are taken from me, but I try to pick up where I left off.” For Luz, the best bit of running her own business is being her own boss. “I am my only maker, marketer and supplies manager!”

08 Inside Crochet

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[ YA R N R E V I E W ]

Add to your stash

YARNS WE LOVE

WORDS RHIAN DRINKWATER

50% wool/50% acrylic • 50g/75m/82yds £5.25, stockists TBC

[QUESTION TIME]

W E A SK ED OU R R E A DER S…

Don’t forget, we are now offering a free one-year subscription to Inside Crochet for our favourite response on Facebook or Twitter so send us your comments!

WINNER! Siobhan Spurle Tunisian crochet looks fascinating but I’ve yet to try it. Too many crochet WIPs on the go at the moment! (We know that feeling Faye! Inside Crochet team)

King Cole Giza Cotton 4ply This mercerised cotton yarn from King Cole comes in a range of wonderfully intense shades as well as a few soft neutrals, making it perfect for colourful garments, trendy homewares and adorable amigurumi. It creates a lovely lightweight fabric with a gorgeous sheen. It is quite loosely plied though, so can be a bit splitty as you work.

Yarn reviews

Is there a crochet technique or project you haven’t tried yet, but would like to?

Patons Tweed Style Tweedy yarns are great for giving a sophisticated effect with very little effort, and this new yarn from Patons has certainly won us over! It’s single spun but has a very consistent thickness, making it easy to hook, and though it has a nice woolly, “hairy” feel it’s very soft and smooth passing through the fingers as you work. It’s also machine washable at low temperatures.

IN THE LOOP

All The Yarn: Yes :) Besides my multiple

100% cotton • 50g/158m/175yds £1.99 from www.purplelindacrafts.co.uk

crochet projects that will take 150 years to complete… I’m going to make a child’s sweater.

Rowan Fine Silk

Kirsty Sullivan: Tunisian and Irish crochet!

Rowan has recently launched its new “Selects” yarn concept, offering a selection of luxurious new yarns as limited edition ranges – so snap them up while you can! One of the first offerings is this laceweight silk blend yarn, a tight single ply that creates a lightweight fabric with a gorgeously soft drape. It’s available in seven beautifully complementary colours.

I have a hook but it looks complicated… Barbara Munt: Tunisian, Bavarian, crochet

cables… the list is endless! Ma Adams: The crocodile stitch.

40% silk/30% wool/30% viscose 25g/150m/164yds £4.50 from www.laughinghens.com

Wendy Fleur DK This wonderfully light new yarn from Wendy is so soft and fluffy you’ll find it hard to stop yourself from stroking it! It’s a brushed yarn that has amazing yardage for a DK making it great value, and comes in eight delicate shades. It has quite a “sticky” feel when you’re working with it, so can be difficult to rip back in a similar way to mohair yarns.

Karen Woodburn: Crocodile stitch for me too! I finally tried Tunisian after looking at my hooks for two years and love it! Teresa Evans: Broomstick crochet. Mike G Burton: Going to be crocheting up my very first shawl for my girlfriend… just as soon as the yarn gets here from Germany.

44% cotton/27% tencel/28% acrylic 100g/350m/382yds £3.99 from www.wool4less.co.uk

Lucy Collin: I haven’t made a mandala yet, and I’d love to give it a go, especially the raised stitches.

Sirdar Smudge Make a statement with this chunky chenille yarn from Sirdar! Smudge is incredibly bouncy and soft, and is a great yarn for homewares as well as quick-hook garments and accessories, with great stitch definition. The yarn is smooth and round making it easy to work with, and it’s machine washable as well.

FOL L OW!

100% polyester • 100g/100m/109yds £3.99 from www.woolwarehouse.co.uk

Follow the Twitter fee d of designer Clare Trowbridge for ple nty of photographic inspiration plus links to her sweet designs and products. www.twitter.com/litt leconkers

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[ C R O C H E T- A L O N G ]

Christmas countdown ➻ If you’re looking for a new festive heirloom, TB Ramsden is running a splendid Christmas Advent Tree CAL, with the first instalment of the pattern released on Monday 12 September and yarn packs available at local yarn shops from 5 September. Weekly instalments will be available to download free from the website every following Monday, until you complete your project on 21 November. The tree is designed for Wendy Pure Merino DK and Robin DK, stands 50cm/20in tall and is adorned with 24 charming decorations including a sweet angel and snowman, festive holly, cracker and bell, all topped with a traditional gold star. To find out more, click on the CAL tab at www.tbramsden.co.uk

[ N E W TO C R O C H E T ]

Getting hooked Beginner crocheter Caroline Bawn continues her crochet journey… ➻ “I’ve taught myself the basics of Tunisian crochet using the instructions from issue 77. It’s an interesting mixture of knitting and crochet in that you use a hook, but on the forward pass you create stitches and keep them all on the hook, casting them off on the backward pass. “I’ve just practised the simple stitch (Tss) and created an oblong with some dc around the edge to make a placemat. It’s very quick to do and this stitch makes a firm texture. I used some DK cotton yarn – ideal as the placemat will be washable, and perfect to use on the table outside for late summer barbecues!”

Haafner Linssen

Blog

WE LOVE

byhaafner.blogspot.com Tell us about yourself… I live in a 19thcentury cottage in a lovely historic town near Amsterdam, close to the sea. I share my life and house with my partner of 20 years and two rescue dogs we’ve adopted from Romania. The dogs are also very much into crochet – mainly to munch my work though. Ha ha! How long have you been blogging? I began blogging in 2012, soon after I started crocheting. I still don’t know what possessed me to share my beginner’s work with the world then, but I’m glad I did. And when I say “world”… well, let’s say the two or three readers I had at the time! Have you made new friends through blogging? Some established crochet bloggers stumbled across my blog and did a feature on my work. One of them was the amazing Vanessa from CocoRose. That gave a kickstart to my blog. That’s what I love about blogging: it’s easy to get in touch with others. Do you use any other social media? I spend way too much time on Instagram. It’s still quite an interactive medium and it’s a quick way to share inspiration. I always try to answer every comment, because I really appreciate it if people leave a sweet comment. That’s what makes social media, social, isn’t it? How did you learn to crochet? Ah! I taught myself by watching videos on YouTube. There are so many great tutorials there from people who just want to share their love for the craft. It’s an amazing and empowering tool.

How did you start designing? It kind of happened, at first by altering an existing pattern to make it more to my liking and it took off from there. I’m always aiming for that synergy of material, colour and pattern, where it all falls in place. What item in your studio/workspace couldn’t you live without? In my studio I’ve surrounded myself with a staggering amount of yarn… Cotton, bamboo and linen mainly, it’s like an enormous explosion of colours and texture. I guess it’s the colourful equivalent of a white canvas for a painter, or a blank page for a writer. It’s exciting. It’s up to the artist to create something new, something beautiful or delicate or just plain weird! What are you working on at the moment? I always have a lot of projects going on at the same time. I find that creativity stimulates creativity. Apart from working on new designs I’m working on my first collection for a shop I will be opening, and there are plans for workshops in London this autumn. Who are your favourite other bloggers, designers or authors? I’m absolutely smitten with the Japanese aesthetics. Craft in general is greatly esteemed in Japan. And I’m always eager to find new-to-me techniques in the Japanese books. I’d love to do workshops there. Actually, I think I might add that to my project list! Also, I love the work of the Finnish designer Molla Mills, I find she has a very refreshing and contemporary take on crochet.

Read more at www.insidecrochet.co.uk and visit Caroline’s shop at www.gorgeousyarns.co.uk.

10 Inside Crochet

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IN THE LOOP

Off the hook

Time for a brew!

Seaside seagulls

Twinkling tealights

£30

£48

£12.95

Make every tea break a cheerful one with this diamond patterned teapot. www.sarahcampbelldesigns.com

Pop your essentials into a cute mini oil cloth tote and you’re ready for a trip out! www.poppytreffry.co.uk

Set the scene, inside or out, with a set of pretty enamel tealight holders. www.annabeljames.co.uk

NEW TERM, FRESH START It's back to school in September – a great time to plan new projects and treat yourself to some fabulous new accessories!

We Love

Moroccan magic £23 This colourful screen-printed cushion is finished with pretty beading and tassels. www.neemacrafts.com

Geo brights

Teatime treats!

£12.50

£6 per roll

Jot down your ideas and doodles in this trio of retro notebooks. www.colliercampbell.com

Wrap gifts and jazz up exercise books with these fun, retro biscuit sticky tapes by Nikki McWilliams. www.nikkimcwilliams.etsy.com

Inspired?

Oriental elegance

Give plain notebooks a special makeover with these pretty daisy cosies by Tracey Todhunter, from issue 72.

£25

Animal parade £6.50 Surprise your family and friends by knowing the collective nouns for animals! www.newtonandtheapple.com

Update a shelf with this stylish vase, inspired by origami. www.urbanara.co.uk To order back issues turn to page 56.

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BOOKS WE REVIEW NEW AND EXCITING RELEASES

WE ARE A L SO R E A DI NG...

35 Crocheted Bags Emma Friedlander-Collins CICO Books, £12.99 • UK terminology ➻ Inspired by designer Emma’s wish “to carry things with me that I genuinely love,” this collection of crocheted bags ensures you’ll always have the perfect holdall for every outfit and occasion. Designs range from chunky shoppers and rucksacks to colourwork totes and satchels, plus delicate handbags and a collection of accessories such as purses and phone cases. The patterns use a great selection of techniques including textured stitches and some fabulous colourwork. Turn to page 69 to make the colourful Tassel Tote design.

WIN! We have three copies of Amigurumi Circus to give away – head to www.insidecrochet.co.uk/ competitions for your chance to win.

Baby Shoes To Crochet

Amigurumi Circus

Lucia Förthmann • Search Press, £7.99 US/UK terminology

Amigurumipatterns.net • £12.99 • US terminology ➻ Roll up, roll up, for the winners of Amigurumipatterns.net’s annual design competition! This year’s contest (you may have guessed) had a circus theme, and this collection of 13 cheerful designs is the result, packed with sparkling characters and colourful personalities. Each pattern begins with a fun introduction telling us all about the toy, such as Loyal the Ringmaster’s sad lack of magical talent, or Leo the Brave, who dresses up as a lion to ensure the show goes on after his act’s original star escaped from his cage. The designs are packed with fun details, from candy-striped beach balls to the contrast edging on the ringmaster’s coat. Choppy the Clumsy Juggler even comes with the suggestion that you add magnets to his hands and clubs to ensure he never drops them! This level of detail means that many of the designs can be quite fiddly, but is definitely worth it for the finished effect. The patterns also include plenty of step-by-step colour photographs helping with key points such as the positioning of facial features or just how to attach legs and other body parts – the sort of amigurumi detail that it’s always worth spending a little more time on so the full personality of your toy shines through. This is a great book for any lover of amigurumi who still cherishes that childhood dream to run away with the circus…

Turn to page 98 to read our interview with Janine Holmes, one of the talented designers featured in this collection.

➻ There’s something particularly adorable about baby projects, the faster hooking time allowing for gorgeous finishing touches and miniature details. This collection of 16 sweet designs for babies is a must-buy if you – or someone you know – is expecting a little one, giving you full licence to make everything from tiny pink ballerina pumps to cowboy boots. Each design is sized for 0–3, 3–6 and 6–9 months, and if you just can’t wait then turn to page 76 right now to make the cute baby espadrilles.

Continuous Crochet Kristin Omdahl • Interweave, £16.99 US terminology ➻ If you’re not a fan of seaming then this is the book for you, as every project is designed to be hooked with a minimum of finishing. From hats and cowls worked in the round to textured shawls and wraps there’s a huge range of accessories, plus several garments using join-as-you-go techniques and spiralled designs. Patterns use written instructions and clear charts for ease of following. Our favourites are the sweet African Violets capelet and stunning Geisha Fan shrug, worked in two halves from a central foundation chain.

12 Inside Crochet

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Ticket Offer: Quote INSCRO16 for £2.50 OFF!* Alexandra Palace, London 5th – 9th October 2016 Harrogate International Centre 24th – 27th November 2016 The definitive event for anyone with a love of textile based crafts. Supplies, workshops and textile art. www.theknittingandstitchingshow.com 0844 581 1302 (+44 (0) 121 796 6100 from outside the UK) Image: Alice Kettle - Pause 2009 (detail) Photo: Joe Low

Workshops in association with:

UPPER STREET EVENTS by

*Valid on adult tickets in advance or £1.00 off concessions. Terms and conditions and £1.50 fulfilment fee applies.

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All yarn and accessories can be found online and in-store at Loop. www.loopknitting.com Quote InsideCrochet to receive a 10% discount on the Blue Sky Fibers yarn used in this project, until 21 September 2016

Confessions of a Pattern Collector

rachel rediscovers the joys of raised stitches to create highly textured fabrics… perfect for her new washcloth design!

D

espite having a rather substantial collection of patterns, that doesn’t mean I consider it “complete” – indeed, does any collector ever truly complete a collection? There will always be a way to expand it, following a path to a whole other aspect of one specific part of the entire collection. On a recent overnight stop at Mum’s I found a book titled Crochet Fashions For The Whole Family in her crochet pattern library. Published in the late 1970s, it covers basic crochet stitches alongside more decorative techniques, including tapestry crochet, fabrics for embroidering onto and how to incorporate beads into your crochet work. As the title suggests, the patterns include something for everyone regardless of age and gender and the range of ideas and techniques is quite amazing. My eye was immediately drawn to the bright orange Country Stroller jacket and

hat combo which uses front and back raised trebles to create the highly textured fabric which I particularly like on the hat. Front and back raised stitches are often used as rib for hats, mittens and sock cuffs as working them in tandem produces a lovely, stretchy fabric. Sometimes you will see them referred to as “post” or “treble relief” stitches, as they are in the Crochet Fashions book, and while they are great for ribs, when worked in different sequences they produce striking textured patterns – or when used singularly they can become interesting details or features within a larger piece. They also have the additional benefit of being reversible, with the bold textured patterns visible on both sides. I adore making washcloths; they are an instant gratification project and not only do they have a finished purpose, they are also the perfect way to try out new stitches. There is a stack of fresh cloths tucked away in my cupboard which I gift throughout the

year with a bar of soap, or use them when wrapping a chocolate gift. Once they’ve run their course for washing faces they can be downgraded to cleaning – make them in a sturdy cotton yarn and they’ll last an age. The cotton yarn I chose for my Spa Cloth set is a wonderfully soft, 100% organic cotton by Blue Sky Fibers, which is available from Loop and crochets into a lovely squishy fabric. I have designed two different cloths; one in a rib pattern and the second in a basketweave motif, a variation of which you can see in the shawl collared men’s cardigan above. If you are new to this style of crochet I recommend starting with the plain rib cloth until you are accustomed to working the stitches, and then progress to the basketweave pattern. Now, as for the book… I did say I’d only borrow it from Mum but it’s so brilliant I’ll have to track down a copy to add to my own collection. Collections are never finished, after all…

14 Inside Crochet

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ADD TO THE STASH yarn from Buy this luxurious cotton m op.co www.loopknittingsh

Luxury Spa Cloths Use simple raised stitches to hook these classic washcloths.

MATERIALS ● Blue Sky Fibers Worsted Cotton, 100% cotton, 100g/137m/150yds Shade: Bone 80 x 1 skein for each cloth ● 5mm & 5.5mm hooks ● Yarn needle

| Rachel Atkinson is a crochet designer and technical editor. Find her online at www.mylifeinknitwear.Com and on Ravelry, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest as Knittingtastic.

YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any worsted weight cotton to achieve a similar effect. TENSION Work 10 rtrf or rtrb to measure 10cm/4in using 5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS Finished washcloths are 24 x 24cm/9½ x 9½in. SPECIAL STITCHES Rtrf: Work as a normal treble but working around the post of the stitch in the previous row by inserting hook from front to back to front around the post. Rtrb: Work as a normal treble but working around the post of the stitch in the previous row by inserting

hook from back to front to back around the post. PATTERN NOTES This pattern uses 2ch as the treble turning chain rather than the usual 3ch. This is to maintain a straight edge due to the stunted height of the raised trebles. Check your cloth is square by folding along the diagonal. RIB CLOTH With 5mm hook, 37ch. Row 1: 1tr in fourth ch from hook, 1tr in each ch to end, turn – 35tr. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1tr throughout), 4rtrf (see Special Stitches), [5rtrb (see Special Stitches), 5rtrf] twice, 5rtrb, 4rtrf, 1tr in top of t-ch, turn. Row 3: 2ch, 4rtrb, [5rtrf, 5rtrb] twice, 5rtrf, 4rtrb, 1tr in top of t-ch, turn. Rep rows 2 & 3 a further ten times. Work row 2 only once more, but do not turn. START

Change to 5.5mm hook. Border Rnd: 1ch (does not count as st), loosely work 1dc in each row end and more tightly work 1dc in between

sts along top and bottom edges, working 2dc in each corner. Join in first st and fasten off. BASKETWEAVE CLOTH With 5mm hook, 38ch. Row 1: 1tr in fourth ch from hook, 1tr in each to end, turn – 36tr. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1tr throughout), 3rtrf, [4rtrb, 4rtrf] three times, 4rtrb, 3rtrf, 1htr in top of t-ch, turn. Row 3: 2ch, 3rtrb, [4rtrf, 4rtrb] three times, 4rtrf, 3rtrb, 1htr in top of t-ch from prev row, turn. Row 4: Rep row 3. Row 5: Rep row 2. Rep rows 2–5 a further five times turning at end of last row. Change to 5.5mm hook. Border Rnd: 1ch (does not count as st), loosely work 1dc in each row end and more tightly work 1dc in between sts along top and bottom edges, working 2dc in each corner. Join in first st and fasten off. FINISHING Weave in ends and block.

END

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Florence Cape by Jennifer Reid Using Stylecraft Special DK Pattern page 43

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catch the sun Make the most of the last days of summer with our stunning garments, lightweight accessories and fabulous fashion. Photographs leanne Jade photography and Kirsten mavric Styling claire montgomerie Hair and make-up Julia edwards

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Ditsy Teatime Cardigan by Twinkle Design Co-op Using Patons Merino Extrafine 4ply Pattern page 36

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Granny Square Shopper by Helda Panagary Using Scheepjes Catona Pattern page 45

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Sunrise Stole by Helen Free Using Malabrigo Silkpaca Pattern page 52

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Cosy-Up Cardigan by Cassie Ward Using Stylecraft Alpaca DK Pattern page 48

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Beautiful Bridges by Red Sparrow Crochet Using Stylecraft Special DK Pattern page 72

Ray Of Sunshine Necklace by Claire Montgomerie Using Boodles Textile Yarn and Rowan Cotton Lustre Pattern page 51 22 Inside Crochet

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Gorgeous knitting and crochet supplies YARN SOURCED FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD, HANDMADE & VINTAGE GIFTS, HABERDASHERY, BOOKS & PATTERNS, WORKSHOPS & GIFT VOUCHERS. WE POST EVERYWHERE!

A wonderful treasure of a book celebrating ten years of Loop, London. In collaboration with independent designers and yarn dyers who have been involved with Loop for over a decade, we bring you twelve patterns knit in ten bespoke colours for Loop from: Madelinetosh, Quince & Co., Koigu, DyeForYarn, Shilasdair, Viola, The Uncommon Thread, Old Maiden Aunt, Jade Sapphire and Shalimar. With gorgeous photography by Kristin Perers, there are three garments, as well as four shawls, scarves, mitts, a baby sweater, skating capelet and more from the following brilliant designers. It’s a roll call we are honoured to have worked with over the years:

Twelve patterns celebrating ten fabulous years of Loop London

Loop’s

Kirsten Kapur Stephen West Pam Allen Claire Montgomerie Paulina Popiolek Juju Vail Meghan Fernandes Donna Higgins Rachel Atkinson Ysolda Teague Tif Fussell (Dottie Angel)

9 780957 012820

90000 >

Susan Cropper

ISBN 9780957012820

Susan Cropper

WWW.LOOPKNITTING.COM 15 CAMDEN PASSAGE, ISLINGTON, LONDON N1 8EA 020 7288 1160

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an's | you can't beat one of sus s to ign des ful our col exuberant, put a smile on your face!

| above: some of susan's early stylecraft CAL sketches Right: the vibrant bead 'n' bezel necklace is a popular pattern.

MY SPACE

Rhian Drinkwater chats to Susan Pinner, author of Granny Squares and the designer behind the upcoming Stylecraft Carousel crochet-along.

W

ith an artistic family, and a childhood surrounded by “paints, yarns, knitting, crochet, embroidery and clay,” Susan Pinner says she never stood a chance of being anything other than a designer. “Although I do remember my Dad saying ‘Don’t you want to get a proper job?’ just before I started college!” she laughs. After being taught to crochet by her best friend’s grandmother at the age of ten – “I made my first blanket when I was about 14, someone gave me a bag of rug wool, so you can imagine it was a bit hard on the fingers!” – Susan went on to study for a degree in Fashion and Textiles and spent most of her career working in the textiles industry. “You name it I’ve probably done it!” she smiles. “Bridal, special occasion, hundreds of hats, ecclesiastical embroidery, illustration, pattern making, children’s fashions, life

size dolls, teaching… I’ve also worked in a mental health unit running a design/crafts department.” But it wasn’t until she took early retirement that crochet became Susan’s main focus. Describing herself as “late to the internet”, in 2008 she began to blog about her crochet, and her work was seen and admired by GMC Publications, who asked her to write a beginner’s crochet book for them. This became Granny Squares, Susan’s 2013 collection of 20 colourful

"A lecturer said my colour choices were diabolical! I still use some wacky colour combos today, but they seem to work." designs “with a vintage vibe”. Book two was published in 2015 – Granny Squares & Shapes, which expanded her designs into stunning garments and accessories – and book three is currently in progress. Her design process doesn’t end with publication either, as Susan also enjoys revisiting the patterns from her books in new yarns and colours and posting the results on her blog, continually giving fresh inspiration to readers and new life to her designs. It doesn’t sound like the most restful of retirements – but Susan is enjoying herself thoroughly. “Enjoy, can’t live without, totally addicted...” she laughs. “And I love it when I find a new yarn that’s in dozens of colours.” Susan describes her design style as “colourful, experimental and prolific,” and her use of colour is one of the most striking features of her patterns, creating gorgeously bright combinations that just beg to be hooked straight away. But her eye for colour wasn’t always appreciated. “While at college we were in a time of subtlety and harmony… a long time ago!”

24 Inside Crochet

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Susan explains. “I was always into bright contrasts, out of kilter with the style of the early ’70s. And a college lecturer said to me that my colour choices were diabolical! It hurt at the time, but it was the best thing he could have ever said. I’ve spent a lifetime studying colour, and still use some wacky colour combos today, but they seem to work.” Now Susan lives in Shrewsbury – “a beautiful county, with fabulous places of interest and lots going on too” – with her partner, adult son and four cats. “They love all the yarn and crochet as you can imagine,” she smiles. A typical day begins with a cup of tea, “then I crochet until shower time, then more crochet, and I can crochet all day until I fall asleep often…” says Susan. “But I am trying to make changes to this lifestyle, we all need input to get the best output! So I’m trying to take in more inspiration from trips out – yarn shows, sightseeing and all that’s going on in my county.” She’s conscious that it’s easy as a designer to spend too much time sitting down with a hook in hand. “The worst thing about this job is the weight gain, sorry – sitting all day, every day, is not good!” Susan laughs. Next year she’s hoping to get out running more: “a friend is trying to persuade me to take part in a cancer charity 5k run,” she explains. “I donated a flower pattern to the running group to make and sell flowers to raise some cash, and 36 of them wore flower bras to race this year – fabulous pictures and such fun!” Susan is keen not to let other designers influence her work – “It’s why a lot of crochet becomes the same online”, she muses – instead turning to what’s around her to inspire: “Nature, a photograph I’ve taken, a sketch I’ve done, a trip out…” During the day Susan typically works in her studio. “It’s really a conservatory so the light is fabulous in there, very important when working with lots of colours.” But she’s keen to emphasise that she crochets anywhere and everywhere she needs to!

STUDIO STYLE

Inspirations! BOOK

Any of Tricia Guild or Kaffe Fassett’s books.

BLOG www.motleycraft-o-ram a.tumblr.com WEBSITE Instagram

“Outside in the shade, in bed, on the sofa, in the car, on buses, on trains, in the park… I’m never without a crochet hook and some yummy yarn or another,” she laughs. Susan’s home is also full of the gorgeous blankets, accessories and homewares she’s designed over the years. “Crochet blankets everywhere, dozens of samples hanging up and boxes full of sample pieces – I keep promising to turn them out on the lawn one sunny day and sort them into categories, then make them into a giant flower blanket or granny blanket of mismatched pieces… One day!” In the meantime, Susan has got plenty for the rest of 2016, beginning with a Carousel crochet-along in association with Stylecraft, which launches in November. “The CAL is really important to me – it’s been almost 12 months of development and work,” she explains. And that’s not all, with “lots of new patterns in my head, several workshops booked, and Ally Pally in October,” she laughs. Visit www.shropshirescrappersuz.blogspot.co.uk to read Susan’s blog, and turn to page 6 to read more about her upcoming CAL with Stylecraft.

www.insidecrochet.co.uk 25

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*Covermount gifts not available with digital versions

£34.99 FOR 12 MONTHS £19.99 FOR 6 MONTHS

Digital subscriptions start from as little as £19.99 for six months

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hello cutie!

Anielle the Ballerina Princess by Shannen Nicole Chua Using DMC Natura Medium Pattern page 74

From adorable amigurumi to stylish accessories and homewares, our designs are sure to bring a smile to your face. Photographs leanne Jade photography, Gavin Kingcome, Stephanie Lee, kirsten mavric and Ziska Thalhammer Styling claire Montgomerie

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hello cutie!

above Starburst Hook Roll by Claire Montgomerie Using DMC Natura Medium Pattern page 62 above right Zinnia Cushion by Red Sparrow Crochet Using Stylecraft Special DK Pattern page 57

28 Inside Crochet

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below Diamond Cushion by Cassie Ward Using DMC Natura Just Cotton Pattern page 78 below left Autumn Crunch Basket by Sonya Blackstone Using Cascade Pacific Pattern page 54

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โžป

hello cutie!

lefT Tassel Tote by Emma Friedlander-Collins Using DMC Natura XL Pattern page 69

RIGHT Striped Espadrilles by Lucia Fรถrthmann Using Schachenmayr Catania Pattern page 76 30 Inside Crochet

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Jersey Scarf by Rico Design Team Using Rico Design Fashion Jersey Pattern page 47

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âž»

hello cutie!

lefT Giant Donut Floor Pouffe by Twinkie Chan Using Lion Brand Hometown USA and Red Heart Super Saver Economy Pattern page 66

RIGHT Striped Baby Cardigan by Annelies Baes Using Scheepjes Merino Soft Pattern page 80 32 Inside Crochet

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For the Love of Yarn

your one stop shop for all your crochet needs.

Based in Scotland, For the Love of Yarn is an independent Crochet Haven! From a studio based in Glasgow, indie dyer Lisa Harland makes handmade ergonomic crochet hooks in a variety of styles and designs custom made to your specifications. As well as hooks, Lisa also creates beautiful hand dyed yarns in a stunning array of colours and other crochet goodies, accessories and notions for people who live for their love of yarn. Specialising in a range of different yarn clubs to suit all budgets, these monthly subscriptions are available on a no minimum sign up - choose to dip in and out as you please. Choose from Hook club, All the smalls - Mini skein Collectors Club, Yarn club, Ombre club,, the list goes on! With prices starting from just £9 there really is a club to suit everyone. For details about the full range of Yarn Clubs available please visit our Etsy store or email us at : fortheloveofyarnuk@gmail.com

Find us on Etsy https://www.etsy.com/shop/ Fortheloveofyarnuk

www.fortheloveofyarn.co.uk

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YARNDALE Janie Crow is the home of designer Jane Crowfoot and all things crochet! We look forward to welcoming you to our stand at Yarndale Festival 2016 where will have plenty of lovely things to show you including hooks, needles, exclusive yarn kits and notions. You can find out more about us by visiting our website and can order online www.janiecrow.co.uk Free UK delivery on orders over £15

www.janiecrow.co.uk

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Coleshill Accessories www.coleshillaccessories.co.uk

Handeze Gloves

Pinking Shears Lightweight, super sharp. Best quality! Best price!

£17.95

Relieve pain from arthritis, tendonitis, carpel tunnel etc. while stitching or knitting. Available in beige or slate blue with or without the extra wrist strap, which gives more support. To measure for size place hand on piece of paper. Mark the paper each side of the knuckles, at the base of the fingers. Measure the distance between the 2 marks and select size. 2.0” – 2½” 51 – 64mm Size 2 2½” – 3¼” 64 – 78mm Size 3 3¼” – 3¾” 78 – 91mm Size 4 3¾” – 4½” 91 – 105mm Size 5

Regular £19.95 Wrist Support £20.95

Master Seat Stand A sit-on stand to hold any type of frame up to 18". Does the job of a floor stand with the versatility of a seat stand. Height and angle fully adjustable. Folds flat for travel and storage.

£39.50 Tail Catcher Secures the end of your thread when it is too short to use a needle. Thread the loop through your stitching, hook the short thread into the loop & pull through. Not suitable for wool. Choose from:Bee Celtic, Butterfly, Tortoise, Kingfisher

£21.95

Magnifying Chart Aid Keep your place on a cross stitch chart. Place the metal board under your chart and the magnifying clear plastic square on top. The red grid lines keep your place as you stitch. The corner magnets hold needles and scissors securely. Size 10cm x 8cm.

Needle Park Avenue Stitch faster by parking your working threads on the Needle Park. Have more needles threaded and darn in your threads less often. Magnetic. £7.95

Complete Chart aid £15.95 Magnifying Top only £10.95

De Luxe set of Knit-Pro Interchangeable needles

Lowery Floor Stand Simply the best! Metal construction. Strong and stable, deep clamp holds any frame just where you want it. Height, angle and reach fully adjustable with easy to use levers. Accessories available include chart holder, light bracket, daisy dish and an adaptor for extra wide frames. Available in Silver grey satin finish or in Stainless steel.

Silver grey £79.95 Stainless steel £139.99

in tough, rainbow coloured birch. The birch wood tips screw into the cables, enabling you to change size quickly and economically. You can knit round or straight. Great for arthritic hands. Has 8 pairs of needles sizes 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0mm and 4 cables to make 60, 80, 100 and 120 cm circular needles!

£59.95

Postage & packing. Orders up to £12 – £2.95 . Orders £12 to £25 - £3.95. Orders over £25 - £4.95

Order from Siesta Frames Ltd (Please make cheques payable to Siesta Frames Ltd) Unit D. Longmeadow Ind.Est. Three Legged Cross, Wimborne. BH21 6RD

Telephone. 01202 829461 www.coleshillaccessories.co.uk Other items available at www.siestaframes.com

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YOUR PATTERN INSTRUCTIONS START HERE BEGINNER

Ditsy Teatime Cardigan

EASY

INTERMEDIATE

Twinkle Design Co-op

Florence Cape

Jennifer Reid

Granny Square Shopper

Page 36

Page 43

Helda Panagary

Jersey Scarf

Rico Design Team

Cosy-Up Cardigan Cassie Ward

Claire Montgomerie

Page 45

Page 47

Page 48

Page 51

Sunrise Stole

Autumn Crunch Basket Sonya Blackstone

Page 52

Page 54

Helen Free

Tassel Tote

Emma Friedlander-Collins Page 69

Beautiful Bridges

ADVANCED

Zinnia Cushion

Ray of Sunshine

Red Sparrow Crochet

Starburst Hook Roll

Claire Montgomerie

Giant Donut Floor Pouffe

Page 57

Page 62

Page 66

Ballerina Princess

Twinkie Chan

Striped Espadrilles

Diamond Cushion

Striped Baby Cardigan

Page 78

Page 80

Red Sparrow Crochet

Shannen Nicole Chua

Lucia Förthmann

Page 72

Page 74

Page 76

Cassie Ward

Annelies Baes

www.insidecrochet.co.uk 35

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● Patons Merino Extrafine 4ply, 100% wool, 50g/170m/185yds Yarn A: Chartreuse 74 x 8 (9, 10, 10) balls Yarn B: Navy 50 x 1 (2, 2, 2) ball(s) Yarn C: Burgundy 33 x 1 ball ● 3.5mm hook ● Seven (seven, eight, nine) buttons YARN ALTERNATIVES Any 4ply weight wool with a similar tension will achieve a similar effect. TENSION Work 3 patt reps and 11 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 3.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Follow Twinkle Design Co-op on Instagram @jacinta_bowie or visit their website at www.knitweardesignjbowie.co.uk.

Ditsy Teatime Cardigan BY TWINKLE DESIGN CO-OP

ADD TO THE STASH from Buy this colourful pure wool yarn www.mcadirect.com

This cute cover-up goes well with a vintage tea dress or is perfect for glamming up some skinny jeans or office wear.

SPECIAL STITCHES Raised treble front (rtrf): Work as a normal treble but working around post of stitch in previous row by inserting hook from front to back to front around post. Raised double treble front (rdtrf): Work as a normal double treble but working around post of stitch in previous row by inserting hook from front to back to front around post. Raised double crochet back (rdcb): Work as a normal double crochet but work around post of stitch in previous row by inserting hook from back to front to back around post. 4dtr cluster chain (4dtrClch): 8ch, *yrh twice, insert hk in fourth ch from hk, yrh, pull through, (yrh, pull through 2lps) twice; rep from * three more times, yrh pull through all 5 lps, 4ch. 3ch picot: 3ch, sl st in first ch. PATTERN NOTES This crochet fabric is two sided with no right or wrong side, however when shaping always work in the same direction to keep texture consistent. To shorten or lengthen body or sleeves omit or add rows 1–6 of full pattern. This will alter length measurements by +/- 5cm/2in.

36 Inside Crochet

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3 chain picot Chain stitch Treble stitch Double treble

Front post double treb

turn

bpdc Back post double turn

2 3 7

slip stitch

1

slip stitc Double crochet

Half treble stitch 3 chain

3 chain picot

4

Chain stitch

6 8

Treble stitch Double treble

collar

Collar pattern chart

4dtr cluster chain Colour B Colour C

Treble s

Colour A

Double

Front post double treble

Double

Half treble stitch

3 2 3

7 9

7

Half treb2

4dtr cluster chain

1 4

2 3

6 8

Collar pattern chart

Front p

bpdc Back post double crochet bpdc Ba Double crochet

1

Chain s

4

1

Colour B

4dtr cl6

4

Colour C

Colou8

Colour A

Colou

6 7 Hem pattern chart 8

Colou

Collar pattern chart

1

2 4 6

3 7

1

9

3 7

BODY Made in one piece to armhole. Follow the charts for shaping details. With yarn A and 3.5mm hook, 268 (286, 313, 322)ch, turn. Foundation Row: 1dc in ninth ch from hook, *3ch, miss 3ch, 1dc in next ch, 5ch, miss 4ch, 1dc in next ch; rep from * to last 8ch, 3ch, miss 3ch, 1dc in next ch, 3ch, miss 3ch, tr in next ch, turn. Row 1: 4ch, 4tr in first ch-sp, *1dc in next 3ch-sp, (4tr, 2ch, 4tr) in 5ch-sp; rep from * to last 2 ch-sps, dc in 3ch-sp, 5tr in last ch-sp, turn. Row 2: 3ch (counts as first tr), 1tr in next 3tr, *miss 3 sts, 3tr, 1ch, 1tr start

9

8 hemband Hem pattern chart in next ch-sp, 1ch, 3tr; rep from * ch-sp, 3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp, *5ch, to last 7 sts, miss 3 sts, 1tr in next miss 6tr, 1dc in next ch-sp, 3ch, 1dc 3tr, 2ch, rtrf (see Special Stitches) in next ch-sp; rep from * to last 3tr, around turning ch, turn. 2ch, miss 3tr, 1tr in top of t-ch, turn. Row 3: 3ch, 1dc in 2ch-sp, *5ch, Rows 1–6 form pattern. miss 6tr, 1dc in next ch-sp, 3ch, 1dc Rep rows 1–6 three times more. in next ch-sp; rep from * to last 6tr, 5ch, dc in turning 3ch-sp, 2ch, dtr Size S only in same place, turn. Work rows 1–3 again. Row 4: *(4tr, 2ch, 4tr) in 5ch loop, dc in next 3ch loop; rep from * to Size M only end, last dc in turning loop, turn. Work from chart (overleaf). Row 5: 3ch, miss 1tr, *1tr in next 1 3tr, 1ch, 1tr in next ch-sp, 1ch, 1tr 2 Size L only 3 4 row 1 again. in next 3tr, miss 3 sts; rep from * to Work end, ending last rep with 1tr in 6 7 Size XL only turning dtr, turn. 8 Row 6: 5ch, miss 3tr, 1dc in next Work rows 1–4 again.

Hem pattern chart

turn slip stitch 3 chain picot Chain stitch Treble stitch Double treble Front post double treble Raised double treble front bpdc postcrochet doubleback crochet RaisedBack double Double crochet Half treble stitch 4dtr cluster chain Colour Yarn B B Colour Yarn C C Colour Yarn AA

Collar pattern chart www.insidecrochet.co.uk 37

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3

2 4

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Size Extra Large Size Extra Large

Size Large Size Large

Size Medium Size Medium

HEMBAND Work directly onto Body. With yarn A and 3.5mm hook, 236 (262, 288, 312)dc evenly along bottom edge of Body. Fasten off.

Join in yarn B at opposite end to fasten off. Row 1: Dc in each st to end, turn. Row 2: 3ch (counts as first tr), 1rtrf in each st, turn Row 3: 1ch (counts as first dc), 1dc in each st. Fasten off. Rejoin yarn A in same place as fasten off. Row 4: 2ch, 1dc, *3ch, miss 4dc, (1tr, 3ch, 1tr) in next dc, 3ch, miss 4dc, 1dc in next st, 1ch, miss 2dc, 1dc in next st; rep from * to end keeping pattern correct, 1dc in end st, turn. These four rows set pattern. From this point follow instructions for hem from row 5 of Hemband chart (page 37) onwards. There are 18 (20, 22, 24) pattern repeats along hem. CUFFS Work directly onto sleeves. With yarn A and 3.5mm hook, 62 (72, 82, 82) dc evenly along bottom edge of sleeve. Fasten off. Join in yarn B at opposite end to fasten off. Row 1: Dc to end, turn. Row 2: 3ch (counts as first tr), 1rtrf in each st, turn Row 3: 1ch (counts as first dc), 1dc in each st. Fasten off.

pattern repeat chart pattern repeat chart to show working into to show working into

extra large

Double crochet Double crochet

turn turn slip stitch slip stitch Chain stitch Chain stitch Treble stitch Treble stitch Front post double treble Front post double treble

large

Row 8: Rejoin yarn B at same place as last fasten off, 4ch, (1dtr, 1tr, 1htr) in ch-sp, *rdcb (see Special Stitches) around cluster, 8tr in 5ch-sp, rdcb around cluster, (1htr, 1tr, 1dtr) in next ch-sp, 3ch picot (see Special Stitches), (1dtr, 1tr, 1htr) in next ch-sp; rep from * to last 2 clusters, rdcb around cluster, 8tr in 5ch-sp, rdcb around cluster, (1htr, 1tr, 1dtr) in last ch-sp, 1dtr in end. Fasten off.

Rejoin yarn A in same place as fasten off. Row 4: 2ch, 1dc, *3ch, miss 3dc, (1tr, 3ch, 1tr) in next st, 3ch, miss 3dc, 1dc in next dc, 1ch, miss 1dc, 1dc in next st; rep from * to end www.insidecrochet.co.uk 39

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Size Extra Large Size Extra Large 86 ch 86 ch

Size Small Size Small 68 ch 68 ch

Size Large Size Large 78 ch 78 ch

Size Medium Size Medium 77 ch 77 ch large 78ch

extra large 86ch

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MATERIALS ● Stylecraft Special DK, 100% acrylic, 100g/295m/322yds Yarn A: Graphite 1063 x 8 (10, 12, 14) balls Yarn B: Shrimp 1132 x 1 (1, 2, 2) ball(s) ● 4mm hook ● Two self-cover buttons, 38mm/1½in ● One small inner button ● Yarn needle YARN ALTERNATIVES Any DK yarn would work as a suitable alternative. TENSION Work 20dc and 20 rows to measure 12.5 x 10cm/5 x 4in using 4mm hook, or size needed to obtain tension. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Jennifer Reid loves all things craft, but holds a special torch for crochet. She’s fascinated by vintage crochet and creating complex textiles from simple shapes. View more of her designs on Ravelry at www.ravelry.com/ designers/jenny-reid. SPECIAL STITCHES Spike stitch (SP): Work dc in stitch two rows below the next stitch. PATTERN NOTES Cape is worked side to side with the edging worked afterwards. CAPE With 4mm hook and yarn A, 120 (126, 132, 138)ch. Row 1: (RS) 1dc in each ch to end, turn – 120 (126, 132, 138) sts. Row 2: (WS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), 109 (115, 121, 127)htr, 10dc, turn. Row 3: 1ch (does not count as st) 10SP (see Special Stitches), htr to end, turn. Rows 2 & 3 form patt. Cont in patt as set working SP in st two rows below until work measures approx 69 (74, 79, 84)cm/27 (29, 31, 33)in at neckline ending on a row 3. START

Florence Cape BY JENNIFER REID

Cover up with this easy to wear cape, perfect for early autumnal evenings.

Next Row: 2ch (counts as 1htr), 92 (98, 104, 110)htr, 5ch, miss www.insidecrochet.co.uk 43

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

73.5 (79, 84, 89)cm 29 (31, 33, 35)in

With RS facing rejoin yarn A to neck edge and work 1dc in each side along top of neckline. Next Row: 1ch, [1dc, dc2tog] to end. Fasten off yarn A, join in yarn B. Next 2 Rows: 1ch, dc to end. Fasten off. EDGING With RS facing, rejoin yarn B to the top corner of left neckline. Work three rows in dc working down left front, around bottom edge and up right front to right

90)cm 79 79(82.5, (82.5, 86.5, 86.5, 90)cm 31(32.5, (32½, 34, 35.5)in 34, 35½)in 31

5 sts, 5htr, 5ch, miss 5 sts, 2htr, 10dc, turn. Next Row: 1ch (does not count as st), 10SP, 2htr, 5htr in 5ch-sp, 5htr, 5htr in 5ch-sp, htr to end, turn. Next Row: As row 2. Next Row: As row 3. Rep last two rows until work measures 73.5 (79, 84, 89)cm/ 29 (31, 33, 35)in at neckline edge, ending on a row 3. Fasten off.

240 240 (249, (249,258, 258,267)cm 267)cm 94½ (98, (98, 101½, 94.5 101.5, 105)in 1055)in

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neck edge. Turn work at end of each row. Fasten off and weave in all ends.

Row 5: [3dc, 2dc in next st] around – 30dc. Fasten off and weave in all ends.

BUTTONS Make two With yarn B and 4mm hook make adjustable ring. Row 1: 6dc in ring. Row 2: 2dc in each st around – 12dc. Row 3: [1dc, 2dc in next st] around – 18dc. Row 4: [2dc, 2dc in next st] around – 24dc.

FINISHING Fix crochet rounds to buttons and attach to cape, making sure to line up with buttonholes. You can attach a small button to the inside of the cape as it folds under at the top, to fix to a gap in the dc and keep the neckline shape. END Steam to loosen the fabric for more drape.

WIDTH AT NECK

LENGTH

WIDTH AT BASE

S

M

L

XL

73.5

79

84

89

cm

29

31

33

35

in

79

82.5

86.5

90

cm

31

32½

34

35½

in

240

249

258

267

cm

94½

98

101½

105

in

Granny Square Shopper BY HELDA PANAGARY

This pretty yet practical bag is perfect for all your summer shopping!

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions Rnd 2: Join new yarn in any 3ch-sp, 3ch (counts as 1tr), (3tr, 3ch, 4tr, 1ch) in same sp, (4tr, 3ch, 4tr, 1ch) in next 3 ch-sps, sl st to top of 3ch to join. Rnd 3: Join new yarn in any 3ch-sp, 3ch (counts as 1tr), (3tr, 3ch, 4tr) in same sp, *1ch, miss 3tr, 1tr, 1ch, miss ch-sp, 1tr, 1ch, miss 3tr, (4tr, 3ch, 4tr) in corner ch-sp; rep from * twice more, 1ch, miss 3tr, 1tr, 1ch, miss ch-sp, 1tr, 1ch, sl st to top of 3ch to join. Rnd 4: Using yarn A, join yarn in any corner sp, 3ch, (3tr, 3ch, 4tr) in same sp, 1ch, *miss 3tr, [1tr, 1ch, miss 1ch] three times, 1tr, 1ch, (4tr, 3ch, 4tr) in corner sp, 1ch; work from * twice more, sl st to top of 3ch to join. Fasten off. ASSEMBLY Using your preferred joining method make two rectangles, each made of 12 squares – four rows of three motifs each. EDGING With wrong sides together, using yarn P work around all four sides of rectangle. Work through both Front and Back pieces at the sides and bottom of the bag, plus just the Front at the top, as folls: Rnd 1: Work 3dc in each corner and 1dc in each dc around. Row 2: 1ch, dc in each dc around, sl st to join. Now rejoin yarn to the top of the Back panel, and work rows 1 & 2 again across just this side, to match the Front. Fasten off and weave in ends.

MATERIALS ● Scheepjes Catona, 100% cotton, 25g/62m/68yds Yarn A: Tropic 253 x 2 balls Yarn B: Cyan 397 x 1 ball Yarn C: Powder Blue 384 x 1 ball Yarn D: Ultra Violet 282 x 1 ball Yarn E: Crystalline 385 x 1 ball Yarn F: Light Navy 164 x 1 ball Yarn G: Parrot Green 241 x 1 ball Yarn H: Poppy Rose 390 x 1 ball Yarn I: Apple Green 389 x 1 ball Yarn J: Royal Orange 189 x 1 ball Yarn K: Vivid Blue 146 x 1 ball Yarn L: Tyrian Purple 128 x 1 ball Yarn M: Kiwi 205 x 1 ball Yarn N: Lime Juice 392 x 1 ball Yarn O: Lemon Chiffon 100 x 1 ball Yarn P: Yellow Gold 208 x 1 ball Yarn Q: Lemon 280 x 1 ball ● 4.5mm hook

● Pair of hinged yellow faux leather bag handles, 58cm/23in with pre drilled holes ● Lining fabric TENSION Exact tension is not critical for this design. MEASUREMENTS The finished bag is 45cm/17¾in tall and 34cm/13½in wide. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Helda is hopelessly devoted to yarn. See how she transforms it into modern crochet at her blog, www.heldasland. blogspot.co.uk. PATTERN NOTES The bag is three squares across

and four squares down on each panel. There are two panels. Use any combination of colours in the first three rounds, and work every rnd 4 in yarn A. Use whichever joining method you prefer. If you wish to work the “join as you go” method, make all squares up to rnd 3. Then with yarn A, follow rnd 4 joining each square as you work. MOTIF Make 24 With 4.5mm hook and yarn of your choice, make adjustable ring, then work in ring as folls: Rnd 1: 3ch (counts as a 1tr), 3tr, 3ch, (4tr, 3ch) three times, sl st to top of 3ch to join. START

LINING Measure the flattened, unlined handbag and cut lining fabric according to measurements leaving 1.5cm/½in extra seam allowance along the long edge and 1cm/½in at the top edge. Fold lining in half with right sides together and iron the fold. Fold down top edge to WS and iron. Unfold top fold, and sew 1.5cm/½in seams up both sides. Press side seams open. Square the corners of the bottom of the bag. Fold down the top fold and sew 1cm/½in seam around top edge. Pin lining into bag and sew to bag along top edge. END Sew handle through lining and bag fabric.

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MATERIALS ● Rico Design Fashion Jersey, 64% cotton/36% polyamide, 50g/72m/79yds Yarn A: Yellow 003 x 1 ball Yarn B: Beige 002 x 1 ball Yarn C: Azure 007 x 1 ball Yarn D: White 001 x 1 ball Yarn E: Powder 004 x 1 ball Yarn F: Black 008 x 1 ball Yarn G: Smokey Blue 006 x 1 ball ● 8mm hook TENSION Exact tension is not crucial for this pattern. MEASUREMENTS Finished scarf measures approximately 14 x 156cm/ 5½ x 61½in. PATTERN NOTES Work stripes of scarf in following sequence: one row each in yarns A, B, C, D, E, F, A, G. SCARF Using yarn A and 8mm hook, 252ch, turn. Foundation Row: 1tr in third ch from hook, 1ch, miss 1ch, *1tr in next ch, 1ch, miss 1ch; rep from * to last 2ch, 1tr in each of last 2ch. Change to yarn B and cont in stripe sequence (see Pattern Notes). Row 1: 2ch (counts as first tr throughout), miss first tr, 1tr in next tr, 1ch, miss 1ch, *1tr in next tr, 1ch, miss 1ch; rep from * to last 2tr, 1tr in each of last 2tr, turn. The last row forms patt. Work six more rows in stripe sequence. Fasten off. START

Jersey Scarf BY RICO DESIGN TEAM

Hook this colourful, lightweight scarf to keep you snug on cooler nights. ADD TO THE STASH t jersey yarn Buy this chunky-weigh t.com che cro ove w.l ww from

MAKING UP Weave in any loose ends. Cut 24cm/9½in lengths of yarn and make 18 tassels using two strands of different colours. Space nine tassels equally across short edges of scarf. Pin out scarf to the measurements given. Cover with clean, damp tea towels and leave until dry. See ball band for washing and END further care instructions. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 47

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● Stylecraft Alpaca DK, 80% acrylic, 20% alpaca, 100g/240m/262yds Yarn A: Storm 6014 x 5 (5, 7) balls Yarn B: Cream 6010 x 3 (3, 5) balls Yarn C: Olive 6021 x 1 (1, 2) ball(s) Yarn D: Cinnamon 6016 x 1 (1, 2) ball(s) Yarn E: Charcoal 6020 x 1 (1, 2) ball(s) Yarn F: Mistral 6013 x 1 (1, 2) ball(s) ● 3.5mm (4.5mm, 5.5mm) hook YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK yarn that works to the same tension. TENSION One motif measures approximately 7 (9, 11)cm/ 2¾ (3½, 4¼)in square using 3.5mm (4.5mm, 5.5mm) hook, or size required to obtain tension. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Cassie loves vintage clothing and finds lots of satisfaction in making pieces for herself. PATTERN NOTES As this design is motif based, the different sizes are worked by increasing the hook size to increase the size of each motif. Cardigan shown is size M. The smallest size has a 70cm/27½in chest so is suitable for a younger teenager. Smaller or larger sizes can of course be made by increasing or decreasing the hook size further, but in this case you may wish to choose a thicker or thinner yarn to suit.

Cosy-Up Cardigan BY CASSIE WARD

This simple motif cardigan is perfect for snuggling up on cool autumn evenings.

ADD TO THE STASH n from Buy this super-soft yar www.deramores.com

To adjust the length of the sleeves, you can work more or fewer rows of dc at the cuff. To increase the length more significantly (especially if working the smallest size), you can work an extra row of square motifs on each sleeve. To do this you will need to make ten more full squares (five per sleeve) and four more diagonal half squares (two per sleeve). The length of the body is also easily adjusted by working one more or less row of full squares. Please note that these

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30 (39, 47)cm 11¾ (15½, 18½)in

52.5 (67.5, 82.5)cm 20¾ (26½, 32½)in to shoulder

38.5 (49.5, 60.5)cm 15 (19½, 23¾)in to armhole

70 (90, 110)cm 27½ (35½, 39½)in and

Full squares (104)

Diagonal Half Square (18) Diagonal Half Square (2)

adjustments will mean you will potentially use more or less yarn than asked for above. Garment as shown is made of 104 squares, 2 half squares and 18 diagonal squares. All shapes are made up of four rounds, fourth round of every shape is worked in yarn A. Rnd 4 can be worked as a normal rnd or can be used to join the squares using the continual joining method. Work first three rounds as folls: SQUARES Make 13 squares in each of the foll colour combinations: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn C, Rnd 2 in yarn B. Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn C. Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn E, Rnd 2 in yarn B. Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn E. Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn D, Rnd 2 in yarn B. Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn D. Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn F, Rnd 2 in yarn B.

Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn F. DIAGONAL HALF SQUARES Five of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn D, Rnd 2 in yarn B. Four of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn E. Three of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn C. Two of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn F, Rnd 2 in yarn B. Two of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn E, Rnd 2 in yarn B. One of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn D. One of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn F. RECTANGULAR HALF SQUARES One of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn B, Rnd 2 in yarn D One of: Rnds 1 & 3 in yarn E, Rnd 2 in yarn B. SQUARE Make 104 With 3.5mm (4.5mm, 5.5mm) hook and appropriate yarn (see Pattern Notes), 4ch, sl st to first ch to form ring. Rnd 1: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in START

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V1

1

Rectangular Half Square

e

MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

SQUARE

DIAGONAL HALF SQUARE

RECTANGULAR HALF SQUARE

4

4

3

3 2

2

1

1

V2

1

2

chain stitch (ch) slip stitch (sl st)

4

ring, 2ch, (3tr, 2ch) three times, and appropriate yarn, 4ch, sl st join with sl st in 3ch, turn. to first ch to form ring. Rnd 2: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in Rnd 1: 3ch, 1tr, 2ch, 3tr, 2ch, 2tr ch-sp, (2ch, 3tr) in same space, in ring, turn. [(3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in next ch-sp] three Rnd 2: Insert hook between 3ch times, join with sl st in 3ch, turn. and tr at beg of previous rnd join Rnd 3: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr in in new yarn, 3ch, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) ch-sp, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in next ch-sp, in first space, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in [3tr in next ch-sp, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in second space, 1tr in space chain stitch (ch) next ch-sp] three times, join with between last 2tr, turn. sl st in 3ch. Rnd 3:(sl Join slip stitch st)in new yarn, 3ch, 3tr Rnd 4: Either work one further in next space, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in round in yarn A as set, or use this corner space, 3tr in next space, half treble crochet (htr) rnd to join squares using continual (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in next corner joining method. space, 1tr in top of 3ch, turn. Rnd 4: Either work one further DIAGONAL HALF SQUARE round in yarn A as set, or use Make 18 this rnd to join squares using chain stitch (ch) With 3.5mm (4.5mm, 5.5mm) continual joining method. slip stitch (sl st) hook and appropriate yarn, 4ch, sl st to first ch to form ring. FINISHING reble crochet (tr)Rnd 1: 3ch, (3tr, 2ch, 4tr) in Join all squares as shown in ring, turn. schematic on previous page, Rnd 2: Insert hook between first arranging colour combinations 2tr of previous rnd, join new yarn at random or by referring to and work 3ch, 3tr in same space, photographs. Join squares either (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in corner space, by dc through back loops only or 3tr in space between last 3tr and using continual joining method. 3ch of previous rnd, 1tr in top of 3ch, turn. Join sleeves to main body of Rnd 3: Join new yarn, 3ch, 3tr as cardigan. in previous row, 3tr in next space, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in corner space, 3tr Work eight rows of dc around in next space and 3tr in last space, the sleeve cuffs. 1tr in top of 3ch, turn. Work two rows of dc along the Rnd 4: Either work one further bottom of the cardigan round in yarn A as set, or use this rnd to join squares using continual To finish, work four rows of dc joining method. from bottom left around entire cardigan edge, up the front, RECTANGULAR around the neck, back HALF SQUARE down the front and END Make two around the bottom. With 3.5mm (4.5mm, 5.5mm) Weave in all ends.

3

treble crochet (tr)

chain stitch (ch) slip stitch (sl st) treble crochet (tr)

S ACTUAL CHEST

LENGTH TO SHOULDER SLEEVE SEAM

M

L

70

90

110

cm

27½

35½

43½

in

52.5

67.5

82.5

cm

20¾

26½

32½

in

30

39

47

cm

11¾

15½

18½

in

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Ray of Sunshine Necklace BY CLAIRE MONTGOMERIE

This fabulously simple statement necklace is so easy and quick to make!

MATERIALS ● Boodles Textile Yarn, 100% recycled jersey, 450g Yarn A: Orange/Yellow x 1 spool ● Rowan Cotton Lustre, 55% cotton/35% modal/ 10% linen, 50g/80m/87yds Yarn B: Parsley 376 x 1 ball Yarn C: Marjoram 373 x 1 ball Yarn D: Harebell 375 x 1 ball ● 4.5mm & 10mm hooks ● Yarn needle ● Button, 2cm/¾in

NECKLACE With 10mm hook and yarn A, 43ch. Row 1: (RS) 1sl st in fifth ch from hook (to create button loop), 1sl st in each of next 9ch, [1dc in next ch, 2dc in next ch] twice, 1dc in next ch, 1htr in each of next 2ch, [2tr in next ch, 1tr in next ch] twice, 2tr in next ch, 1htr in each of next 2ch, [1dc in next ch, 2dc in next ch] twice, 1dc in next ch, 1sl st in each of next 10ch – 47 sts. Fasten off yarn A.

YARN ALTERNATIVES Any superbulky yarn will substitute for the Boodles yarn used here – try cutting up an old t-shirt or stretch fabric into roughly 1cm/½in wide strips if you can’t find any. This project uses very small amounts of each yarn, so about 10m/11yds of homemade fabric yarn should be enough. For the contrast yarn, any yarn that is lighter than chunky weight will work well. Try a yarn with a sheen, like the Rowan tape yarn used here, for a pretty contrast.

Do not turn work, but with right side facing and 4.5mm hook, join yarn B with a sl st to first sl st of row 1. Row 2: 1ch (does not count as st), 3dc in same st, working in bottom loop of ch, 1ch, (3dc, 1ch) in bottom loop of each ch to end – 141dc. Fasten off yarn B.

TENSION Exact tension is not essential for this pattern. MEASUREMENTS Necklace measures approx 46cm/18in around neck. “Bib” section is 6cm/2½in wide at widest part of centre front. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Claire Montgomerie is a textiles designer specialising in knitting and crochet, constructing fabrics, garments, creatures and accessories which are fun, quirky and modern. Find out more at www.montyknits.blogspot.com.

START

Rotate work 180 degrees and with right side facing and 4.5mm hook, join yarn C to bottom of base chain with a sl st. Work next row in each unworked bottom loop of base chain. Row 3: 1ch (does not count as st), 2dc in same st, working in bottom loop of ch, 2dc in bottom loop of each ch to end – 78dc. Fasten off yarn C. Do not turn, but with right side facing and 4.5mm hook, join yarn D with a sl st in first dc made in row 2. Row 4: 1sl st in each dc to end – 78sl sts. Fasten off yarn D. FINISHING Weave in all ends and block lightly to shape. Sew button to necklace END on opposite end of row to button loop.

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● Malabrigo Silkpaca, 70% alpaca/30% silk, 50g/384m/420yds Yarn A: Sunset SA096 x 1 skein Yarn B: Pollen SA019 x 1 skein ● 3.5mm hook TENSION Exact tension is not critical for this pattern. When blocking, stretch the fabric as much as you reasonably can. After blocking the stole will shrink slightly as the yarn regains some of its elasticity. MEASUREMENTS Length approx: 140cm/55in. Width approx: 45cm/17¾in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Helen Free is a designer and tutor living in the Cambridgeshire Fens. She loves working with colour and creating quirky designs as you can see on her website at www.enfys.me.uk. STOLE Row 1: 2ch in yarn A, 3dc in first ch, turn. Row 2: 3ch (counts as first tr here and throughout), 2tr in first dc, 4ch, miss 1dc, 3tr in next dc, turn. Row 3: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, miss 2tr, 5tr in ch-sp, miss 2tr, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 4: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 4ch, miss 3tr, 1dc in next tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr, 4ch, miss 3tr, 3tr in third ch, turn – 3 ch-sps. Row 5: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 4ch, 1dc in next ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp] twice, 4ch, 3tr in third ch, turn – 4 ch-sps. Row 6: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 4ch, [1dc in next ch-sp, 3ch] three times, 1dc in next ch-sp, 4ch, 3tr in third ch, turn – 5 ch-sps. Row 7: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 5tr in next ch-sp, [1dc in next ch-sp, 5tr in next ch-sp] twice, 3tr in third ch, turn – three groups of 5tr. Row 8: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 4ch, miss 3tr, 1dc in next tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr, [3ch, miss 3tr, 1dc in next tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr] twice, 4ch, miss 3tr, 3tr in third ch, turn – 7 ch-sps. Rows 9 & 10: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, START

Sunrise Stole BY HELEN FREE

A light and lacy stole created with a baby alpaca and silk blend yarn for a sumptuous feel. ADD TO THE STASH silky yarn Buy this super-soft and k e.u s.m nfy w.e ww from

52 Inside Crochet

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4ch, 1dc in next ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 4ch, 3tr in third ch, turn – 9 ch-sps. Row 11: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 5tr in next ch-sp, [1dc in next ch-sp, 5tr in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn – five groups of 5tr. Rows 12–39: Repeat rows 8–11, seven times – 19 groups of 5tr. Row 40: 4ch, 2tr in first of these ch, miss 4tr, 1dc in next tr, [3ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr, 3ch, miss 3 sts, 1dc in next tr] to last 4 sts, 4ch, miss 3tr, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 41: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 4ch, 1dc in next ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 42: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 1dc in next ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 4ch, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 43: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, [5tr in next ch-sp, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn.

Change to yarn B. Row 44: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, miss 4 sts, 1dc in next tr, [3ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr, 3ch, miss 3 sts, 1dc in next tr] to last 4 sts, 4ch, miss 3tr, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 45: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 4ch, 1dc in next ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 46: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 1dc in next ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 4ch, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 47: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, [5tr in next ch-sp, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn. Change to yarn A. Rows 48–67: Rep rows 44–47, five times. Change to yarn B. Rows 68–75: Rep rows 44–47 twice. Change to yarn A. Rows 76–91: Rep rows 44–47, four times.

Change to yarn B. Rows 92–103: Rep rows 44–47, three times. Change to yarn A. Rows 104–115: Rep rows 44–47, three times. Change to yarn B. Rows 116–131: Rep rows 44–47, four times. Change to yarn A. Rows 132–139: Rep rows 44–47 twice. Change to yarn B. Rows 140–159: Rep rows 44–47, five times. Change to yarn A. Rows 160–163: Rep rows 44–47. Change to yarn B. Rows 164–167: Rep rows 44–47. DECREASE ROWS Row 168: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, miss 4 sts, 1dc in next tr, [3ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr, 3ch, miss 3 sts, 1dc in next tr] to last 5 sts,

miss 4 sts, 3tr in third ch, turn. Rows 169 & 170: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 1dc in next ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 171: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 1dc in next ch-sp, [5tr in next ch-sp, 1dc in next ch-sp] to last ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn – 17 groups of 5tr. Rows 172–207: Rep rows 148–151 – one group of 5tr. Row 208: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, miss 4 sts, 1dc in next tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr, miss 4 sts, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 209: 3ch, 2tr in first tr, 1dc in next ch-sp, 3tr in third ch, turn. Row 210: 1ch, insert hook in first tr, yoh and pull loop through, insert hook in third ch, yoh and pull loop through, yoh and pull through both loops on hook. Fasten off, sew in ends and block.

END

www.insidecrochet.co.uk 53

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● Cascade Pacific, 60% acrylic/ 40% Merino wool, 100g/195m/213yds Yarn A: Burnt Orange 25 x 2 balls Yarn B: White 02 x 1 ball Yarn C: Moss Heather 63 x 1 ball Yarn D: Beet 53 x 1 ball ● 5.5mm hook ● Stitch marker ● 20 wooden beads, 10mm/½in ● Yarn needle ● Hot glue gun and sticks YARN ALTERNATIVES Any similar aran weight yarn will work well here. TENSION Exact tension is not critical for this design.

Autumn Crunch Basket BY SONYA BLACKSTONE

Inspired by a walk in the autumn forest, this basket is full of texture and rich in fall colours.

ADD TO THE STASH from Buy this colourful yarn m www.lovecrochet.co

MEASUREMENTS Finished basket is 20cm/8in across bottom and 13cm/ 5¼in tall. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Sonya is a US based indie crochet designer. She has always had a passion for crafting, but crochet stole her heart! You can find more from Sonya at www.ravelry.com/designers/ sonya-blackstone. PATTERN NOTES Pattern is worked using yarn doubled throughout. Wind off half of yarns B, C and D into two balls in order to work with two strands. Alternatively take one end from the start and one from the centre of the yarn ball and work with these together. BASKET Using two strands of yarn throughout, make an adjustable ring with yarn A. Rnd 1: 1ch (does not count as st), 8htr in ring, pull ring tight, pm to show start of rnd – 8htr. Rnd 2: 2htr in each st around – 16htr. Rnd 3: [2htr in first st, 1htr] around – 24htr. Rnd 4: [2htr in first st, 2htr] around – 32htr. Rnd 5: [2htr in first st, 3htr] around – 40htr. START

Rnd 6: [2htr in first st, 4htr] around – 48htr. Rnd 7: [2htr in first st, 5htr] around – 56htr. Rnd 8: [2htr in first st, 6htr] around – 64htr. Rnd 9: [2htr in first st, 7htr] around – 72htr. Rnd 10: [2htr in first st, 8htr] around – 80htr. Rnd 11: Htr blo in first st, sl st blo in next st, [htr blo in next st, sl st blo in next st] around, sl st to first htr, turn – 40htr, 40sl sts. Rnds 12–16: 1ch, htr in first st, sl st in next st, [htr in next st, sl st in next st] around, sl st to first htr, change to yarn B at end of rnd 16, turn – 40htr, 40sl sts. Rnd 17: 1ch, dc around, sl st to first dc, change to yarn C, turn – 80dc. Rnds 18–20: As rnd 12, change to yarn B at end of rnd 20 – 40htr, 40sl sts. Rnd 21: As rnd 17, change to yarn D, turn – 80dc. Rnds 22–24: As rnd 12, change to yarn B at end of rnd 24 – 40htr, 40sl sts. Rnd 25: As rnd 17, change to yarn A, turn – 80dc. Cont in yarn A to end. Rnds 26–30: As rnd 12 – 40htr, 40sl sts. Rnd 31: As rnd 17 – 80dc. Fasten off. FINISHING Cut 30 x 15cm/6in strands of yarn C and separate into groups of three. Set aside. Cut 30 x 15cm/6in strands of yarn D and separate into groups of three. Set aside. Fold each group of three strands in half and thread looped end through a wooden bead for a total of 20 beaded tassels. Starting in any stitch, slip looped end of yarn C tassel through flo, slip tails through fringe loop, and pull tight to fasten. Miss 3 sts and repeat using yarn D fringe. Continue in this way, alternating colours, until all tassels have been added to basket. Trim fringe tails to desired (equal) lengths. Place a small dot of hot glue to back of each bead and press down to basket to hold it END in place. Weave in all ends.

54 Inside Crochet

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Zinnia Cushion BY RED SPARROW CROCHET

A beautiful contemporary cushion with zinnia-inspired floral motifs.

MATERIALS ● Stylecraft Special DK, 100% acrylic, 100g/295m/322yds Yarn A1: Parchment 1218 x 1 ball Yarn A2: Duck Egg 1820 x 1 ball Yarn B: Tomato 1723 x 1 ball Yarn C: Graphite 1063 x 1 ball ● 5mm hook ● Feather cushion pad, 50 x 50cm/20 x 20in ● Two squares of fabric, 52 x 52cm/20½ x 20½in YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK weight acrylic yarn to achieve a similar effect. TENSION Work each square to measure approximately 16 x 16cm/ 6¼ x 6¼in using 5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 57

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions Don’t worry if flower doesn’t lie flat, this adds to its raised “puffiness” on the cushion. SQUARE Make nine – four using yarn A1, five using yarn A2 for centre With yarn A1 or A2, 4ch, sl st to first ch to make ring. Rnd 1: 3ch (counts as first tr), 15tr in ring, sl st to top of 3ch – 16tr. Fasten off yarn A1/A2, turn. START

Rnd 2: Join yarn B to any st, 1ch, Rnd 2 Bobble (see Special Stitches) in same st as join, 1ch, [Rnd 2 Bobble in next st, 1ch] in every st around, sl st to top of first Bobble, do not turn – 16 bobbles. Rnd 3: Sl st in first ch-sp, 1ch, [Rnd 3 Bobble (see Special Stitches), 2ch loosely] in every ch-sp around, sl st to top of first bobble, turn. Fasten off yarn B. Rnd 4: Join yarn C to any 2ch-sp, 2ch (counts as first htr), 1htr in same sp, 1ch, *2dc in next 2ch-sp, 1ch, 2htr in next 2ch-sp, 1ch, (2tr, 3ch, 2tr) in next 2ch-sp for corner, 1ch, 2htr in next ch-sp, 1ch; rep from * around, finishing with corner sts and 1ch in final sp. Sl st to top of 2ch, do not turn.

MEASUREMENTS Finished cushion measures 50 x 50cm/20 x 20in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Esme Crick of Red Sparrow Crochet is a crochet designerteacher with a serious hook habit. Find out more at www.facebook. com/redsparrowcrochet. SPECIAL STITCHES Round 2 Bobble: [Yrh, insert hk in st, draw up loop] three times, yrh, pull through first 6 loops, yrh, draw through final 2 loops. Round 3 Bobble: [Yrh, insert hk in st, draw up loop] four times, yrh, pull through first 8 loops, yrh, draw through final 2 loops. PATTERN NOTES Square is worked in the round. Turn work and work on reverse side for rnds 2 & 3. Turn work again to work on front side for rnds 4–6.

Rnd 5: 3ch (counts as first tr), 1tr in each st around, working 1tr in every 1ch-sp and (2tr, 3ch, 2tr) in each corner, sl st to top of 3ch, do not turn – 18tr along each side. Rnd 6: 3ch (counts as first tr), 1tr in each st around, working (2tr, 3ch, 2tr) in each corner, sl st to top of 3ch – 22tr along each side. Fasten off, weave in ends. FINISHING With yarn C, join nine squares together using dc join through both squares (using photo as a guide). Sew the two pieces of fabric right sides together, 1cm/½in from edge, around three sides. Turn inside out and insert cushion pad. Sew final edge closed. Sew edge of crochet cover with tiny running stitch onto front edge of fabric cover so that it END fits the outline of the cushion.

58 Inside Crochet

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IC#81 IC#81_60-61[subs]SP2vgRD.indd 61

11/08/2016 15:07


MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● DMC Natura Medium, 100% cotton, 50g/75m/82yds Yarn A: Mint 137 x 1 ball Yarn B: Pink 134 x 1 ball Yarn C: Pale Pink 04 x 1 ball Yarn D: Rust Orange 109 x 1 ball ● 4mm hook ● Small button ● Yarn needle YARN ALTERNATIVES Use any aran weight yarn for a similar effect. TENSION Work three repeats in pattern to measure 10cm/4in using 4mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS Finished roll measures 18 x 25cm/ 7 x 10in.

through, yoh, draw through 2 lps] six times, 8 lps on hk (fig 4), yoh and draw through all lps on hk (fig 5). Last cluster of row (lcl): Yoh, insert in blo of next st, draw lp through, yoh, draw through 2 lps on the hook, [yoh, insert in blo of next st, draw lp through, yoh, draw through 2 lps] three times (fig 6), 5 lps on hook, yoh and draw through all lps on hk (fig 7). PATTERN NOTES When working the first row of chain loops, (which hold in the hooks on rows 3, 8 & 13), try one of your hooks in the loop to see if it holds – you can increase or decrease the amount of chain in between each dc to hold your hooks more securely. HOOK ROLL With 4mm hook and yarn A, make 50ch. Row 1: (WS) 1dc in second ch from hook, * miss next 3ch, 7tr in next ch, miss next 3ch, 1dc in next ch; rep from * to end of row, turn – 6 shells. START

DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Claire Montgomerie is a textiles designer, writer, teacher, editor and stylist, specialising in knitting and crochet. She enjoys constructing fabrics, garments, creatures and accessories that are fun, quirky and modern, reinventing the products of ancient and traditional needlecraft processes, while retaining all their intricacies and comforting charm! Visit her blog at www.montyknits.blogspot.com.

Starburst Hook Roll BY CLAIRE MONTGOMERIE

A simple yet striking hook roll to store all your hooks safely in one place.

ADD TO THE STASH n from Buy this pure cotton yar s.co.uk www.purplelindacraft

SPECIAL STITCH PATTERNS Back loop only (blo): Insert hook under back loop only of next stitch. Front loop only (flo): Insert hook under front loop only of next stitch. Double crochet back loop only (dcblo): Dc in back loop only of next stitch. Double crochet front loop only (dcflo): Dc in front loop only of next stitch. First cluster of row (fcl): 3ch (counts as first tr), yoh, insert in blo of next st, draw lp through, yoh, draw through 2 lps (fig 1), [yoh, insert in blo of next st, draw lp through, yoh, draw through 2 loops] twice, 4 lps on hk (fig 2), yoh and draw through all lps on hk (fig 3). Cluster (cl): Work a half finished treble into blo of each of next 7 sts, then finish them off together: yoh, insert in blo of next st, draw lp through, yoh, draw through 2 lps, [yoh, insert in blo of next st, draw lp

Change to yarn B. Row 2: (RS) 1fcl (see Special Stitch Patterns), 7ch, *miss next st, cl (see Special Stitch Patterns) over next 7 sts, 7ch; rep from * to last 5 sts, miss next st, lcl (see Special Stitch Patterns) over last 4 sts, turn. Row 3: (WS) [3ch, 1dcflo (see Special Stitch Patterns) in next tr at same time as keeping 7ch on WS, 3ch, 1dcflo in next cl] across row. Do not turn. Fasten off yarn at end and rejoin to beginning of row without turning. Work row 4 into stitches from row 2, ignoring row 3. Row 4: (WS) 3ch, 3tr in same cl of row 2, 1dcflo in same tr as dcflo from row 3, enclosing the 7ch from row 2 within the dcflo at the same time (figs 8 & 9), * 7tr in blo of next cl, 1dcflo in same tr as dcflo from row 3, enclosing the 7ch from row 2 within the dc at the same time; rep from * to lcl of row 2, 4tr in lcl, turn. Change to yarn C. Row 5: (RS) 3ch (does not count as st), miss first st, cl over next 7 sts, * 7ch, miss next st, cl over next 7 sts; rep from * to last st, 3ch, 1dcblo

62 Inside Crochet

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FIG 1

FIG 2

FIG 3

FIG 4

FIG 5

FIG 6

FIG 7

FIG 8

FIG 9

(see Special Stitch Patterns) in last st, turn. Row 6: (WS) 1ch (does not count as st), 1dcflo in first st of row 4, 7tr in next cl, * 1dcflo in next tr, enclosing the 7ch within the dc,

7tr in next cl; rep from * to last st, 1dcflo in last st of row 4, turn. Change to yarn D. Rows 7–9: Rep rows 2–4. Change to yarn C.

Rows 10 & 11: Rep rows 5 & 6. Change to yarn B. Rows 12–14: Rep rows 2–4. Change to yarn A. Rows 15: Rep row 5. Do not turn or fasten off.

EDGING Rnd 1: 1ch, turn work 90 degrees and work evenly in dc down the side of piece, work 3dc in the corner, work evenly along bottom of piece in dc, work 3dc in corner, work evenly in dc up other side of piece, work (2dc, 1htr) in next corner, work evenly in htr along top of piece by working sts into row 15 and enclosing 7ch at the same time, work (1htr, 2dc) in last corner, join rnd with sl st. Rnd 2: 1ch, work evenly around edge in dc to half way up third side, work 7ch (or ch big enough to create a loop to fit your desired button), sl st back down into bottom of chain, work evenly in dc along remainder of this side. Fasten off yarn, weave in all ends and block lightly to shape. Fill with hooks, then roll up and place marker at desired position of button in corresponding place to button loop – this should be roughly in the centre of the hook roll on RS. Sew button to marked END position with yarn D or matching sewing thread. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 63

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rib


MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● Lion Brand Hometown USA, 100% acrylic, 142g/74m/81yds Yarn A: Honolulu Pink 102 x 5 skeins Yarn B: Madison Mustard 159 x 7 skeins Yarn C: Los Angeles Tan 099 x 1 skein ● Red Heart Super Saver Economy, 100% acrylic, 198g/333m/364yds Shade: Small amounts of assorted colours for sprinkles ● 5mm & 9mm hooks ● Yarn needle ● Stitch marker ● Four 900g bags polyester stuffing TENSION Work 9dc and 11 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 9mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS Finished pouffe is 66cm/26in in diameter and 38cm/ 15in high.

Giant Donut Floor Pouffe BY TWINKIE CHAN

Your guests will be fighting over who gets the sweetest seat with this classic glazed donut floor cushion!

This colourful design is taken from Twinkie Chan’s Crocheted Abode À La Mode: 20 Yummy Crochet Projects For Your Home (Creative Publishing international, £12.99).

DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Twinkie Chan is a popular designer, blogger and YouTube personality who specialises in bright, quirky food-based crochet designs. She’s written two books, Twinkie Chan’s Crochet Goodies For Fashion Foodies and Twinkie Chan’s Crocheted Abode À La Mode. Visit her website at www.twinkiechan.com. SPECIAL STITCHES Invisible Decrease (invdec): Insert hook into flo of the next stitch, then insert hook into flo of the following stitch, yoh and pull through the 2 sts, yoh and pull through the remaining 2 loops. PATTERN NOTES If you’ve never crocheted a donut shape before, it may help to do a practice piece first using aran weight yarn and a 5mm hook. Donut is worked from the inner hole to the outer edge, and then back to the hole. RS shows on outside of donut.

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DONUT With 9mm hook and yarn A, 54ch. Join with sl st to first ch to form ring, being careful not to twist ch. Place marker for beg of rnd. Rnd 1: 1ch, dc in each ch around – 54dc. Do not join, but work in a continuous spiral. Rnds 2–15: Dc in each dc around. Rnd 16: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 5dc] nine times – 63dc. Rnd 17: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 6dc] nine times – 72dc. Rnd 18: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 7dc] nine times – 81dc. Rnd 19: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 8dc] nine times – 90dc. Rnd 20: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 9dc] nine times – 99dc. Rnd 21: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 10dc] nine times – 108dc. Rnd 22: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 11dc] nine times – 117dc. Rnd 23: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 12dc] nine times – 126dc. Rnd 24: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 13dc] nine times – 135dc. Rnd 25: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 14dc] nine times – 144dc. Rnd 26: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 15dc] nine times – 153dc. Rnd 27: [2dc in next dc, dc in next 16dc] nine times – 162dc. Rnds 28–33: Dc in each dc around. Rnd 34: Dc in each dc around, join with sl st in next st. Rnd 35: Working in flo, sl st in each st around, keeping sts loose and even, join with sl st in first sl st. Fasten off yarn A. START

Join yarn B. Rnd 36: Working in blo, dc in each st in rnd 34. Do not join (fig 1). Rnds 37–41: Dc in each dc around. Rnd 42: Dc in each dc around, join with sl st in next st. Fasten off yarn B. Join yarn C. Rnds 43 & 44: Dc in each dc around. Rnd 45: Dc in each dc around, join with sl st in next st. Fasten off yarn C. Join yarn B. Rnds 46–59: Dc in each dc around. Rnd 60: [Invdec (see Special

Stitches), dc in next 16dc] nine times – 153dc. Rnd 61: [Invdec, dc in next 15dc] nine times – 144dc. Rnd 62: [Invdec, dc in next 14dc] nine times – 135dc. Rnd 63: [Invdec, dc in next 13dc] nine times – 126dc. Rnd 64: [Invdec, dc in next 12dc] nine times – 117dc. Rnd 65: [Invdec, dc in next 11dc] nine times – 108dc. Rnd 66: [Invdec, dc in next 10dc] nine times – 99dc. Rnd 67: [Invdec, dc in next 9dc] nine times – 90dc. Rnd 68: [Invdec, dc in next 8dc] nine times – 81dc. Rnd 69: [Invdec, dc in next 7dc] nine times – 72dc. Rnd 70: [Invdec, dc in next 6dc] nine times – 63dc. Rnd 71: [Invdec, dc in next 5dc] nine times – 54dc. Rnds 72–90: Dc in each dc around, join with sl st in next st. Fasten off, leaving a tail 1m/1yd long for sewing (fig 2). Weave in short end of foundation ch. SPRINKLES Make 22 With 5mm hook and desired colour, 3ch, join with sl st to first ch to form ring. Place marker for beg of rnd. Rnd 1: 1ch, work 8dc in ring – 8dc. Do not join, but work in a continuous spiral. Rnd 2: Dc in each dc around. Rep rnd 2, stuffing lightly as you go, until piece is 9cm/ 3.5in long, join with sl st in next st. Fasten off, leaving a tail 61cm/24in long. Thread tail through 8 sts and pull to close. Weave in the short end.

FIG 1

FIG 2

FIG 3

ASSEMBLY Whipstitch the last rnd of donut to foundation ch, using 1m/1yd of yarn A at a time and stuffing donut as you go (fig 3). Sew 10 sts at a time and be sure that stuffing is full and smooth before sewing further. END Sew sprinkles to donut as desired. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 67

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Tassel Tote BY EMMA FRIEDLANDER-COLLINS

This colourful tote uses tapestry crochet and a soft cotton yarn for a practical and tactile bag you’ll love.

MATERIALS ● DMC Natura XL, 100% cotton, 100g/75m/82yds Yarn A: Yellow 92 x 1 ball Yarn B: Dark Orange 10 x 1 ball Yarn C: Burgundy 06 x 1 ball Yarn D: Blue 71 x 2 balls Yarn E: Grey-white 73 x 1 ball ● 6mm hook ● Yarn needle ● Brown belt or strap, 2cm/¾in wide, 104cm/41in long ● Sewing needle ● Gold embroidery thread ● Jump ring, 2cm/¾in ● Decorative feather and belt clip (optional) www.insidecrochet.co.uk 69

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Tension Work 12dc and 13 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in after blocking using 6mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. Measurements Finished bag is 22 x 30cm/ 8¾ x 11¾in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Emma is an author and designer and can be found as Steel&Stitch on Etsy, Ravelry, Instagram and at www.steelandstitch.blogspot. com. She has written three books of crochet designs, Crochet Dress-Up, Big Hook Crochet and 35 Crocheted Bags.

start

Bag Using yarn A and 6mm hook, make 26ch.

Row 1: 1dc in second ch from hook (missed ch does not count as st), 1dc in each ch to end, turn – 25 sts. Row 2: Using yarn B, 1ch (does not count as st throughout), 1dc in each st, turn. Row 3: Using yarn C, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Row 4: Using yarn D, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Row 5: Using yarn E, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Rows 6 & 7: Using yarn D, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Commence tapestry crochet pattern and work in dc, changing colour as indicated and working stitches over the unused yarn as you go. The number indicates the amount of stitches and the letter

denotes the yarn colour. For example; 5A, 4B, 5A means work 5dc in yarn A, 4dc in yarn B, 5dc in yarn A. See chart (above) for reference. Row 8: 12D, 1A, 12D, turn. Row 9: 11D, 3A, 11D, turn. Row 10: 10D, 5A, 10D, turn. Row 11: 9D, 3A, 1B, 3A, 9D, turn. Row 12: 8D, 3A, 3B, 3A, 8D, turn. Row 13: 7D, 3A, 5B, 3A, 7D, turn. Row 14: 6D, 3A, 3B, 1C, 3B, 3A, 6D, turn. Row 15: 5D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3B, 3A, 5D, turn. Row 16: 4D, 3A, 3B, 5C, 3B, 3A, 4D, turn. Row 17: 3D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 1E, 3C, 3B, 3A, 3D, turn.

Yarn A

Yarn B

Yarn C

Yarn D

Yarn E

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Row 18: 2D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3E, 3C, 3B, 3A, 2D, turn. Row 19: 3D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 1E, 3C, 3B, 3A, 3D, turn. Row 20: 4D, 3A, 3B, 5C, 3B, 3A, 4D, turn. Row 21: 5D, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3B, 3A, 5D, turn. Row 22: 6D, 3A, 3B, 1C, 3B, 3A, 6D, turn. Row 23: 7D, 3A, 5B, 3A, 7D, turn. Row 24: 8D, 3A, 3B, 3A, 8D, turn. Row 25: 9D, 3A, 1B, 3A, 9D, turn. Row 26: 10D, 5A, 10D, turn. Row 27: 11D, 3A, 11D, turn. Row 28: 12D, 1A, 12D, turn. Now work with one colour per row as follows: Rows 29 & 30: Using yarn D, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Row 31: Using yarn E, 1ch, 1dc

in each st, turn. Row 32: Using yarn D, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Row 33: Using yarn C, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Row 34: Using yarn B, 1ch, 1dc in each st, turn. Row 35: Using yarn A, 1dc in each st to end, turn. Row 36: Using yarn A, 1ch, 1dc blo in each st, turn. Row 37: Using yarn B, 1dc in each st to end, turn. Rows 38–40: Rep rows 3–5. Row 41: Using yarn A, 1dc in each st to end, turn. Rows 42–46: Rep rows 2–6. Rows 47–67: Using yarn D, 1dc in each st to end, turn. Rows 68–72: Rep rows 31–35. Fasten off. MAKING UP Weave in loose ends and block to measurements.

Using gold embroidery thread, whip stitch the sides together. TASSEL Cut two 25cm/9¾in lengths of each of yarns A–E. Fold in half around a 2cm/¾in jump ring and bind the top 2cm/¾in with gold embroidery thread. Add any other decorations to the jump ring that you like – we used a feather shape cut from a piece of scrap leather. HANDLE Cut the buckle off the belt and

using an awl, make a hole in each end. Attach to the bag on the third row down, using a length of matching coloured yarn – make sure you slip the jump ring with your decorations over the belt before stitching it down. FRINGING Cut 25 x 20cm/8in lengths of yarn E and thread each one through a stitch along the bottom of the bag by making a loop, posting it through END the stitch and pulling it back through itself.

This colourful design is taken from 35 Crocheted Bags by Emma Friedlander-Collins (CICO Books, £12.99). Photography by Gavin Kingcome © CICO Books. Call 01256 302699 quoting HW1 to purchase a copy at the special price of £9.99 including free UK P&P. For more information, please visit www.rylandpeters.com.

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Pattern instructions

Beautiful Bridges BY RED SPARROW CROCHET

Is it a shawl or is it a throw? It’s both! Cosy around chilly shoulders, but equally lovely thrown over the sofa, this pretty design is worked in this season’s must-have colours.

MATERIALS ● Stylecraft Special DK, 100% acrylic, 100g/295m/323yds Yarn A: Mustard 1823 x 4 balls Yarn B: Graphite 1063 x 4 balls Yarn C: Parma Violet 1724 x 1 ball Yarn D: Boysenberry 1828 x 1 ball ● 5mm hook ● Piece of cardboard YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK weight yarn to achieve a similar effect. TENSION Exact tension is not essential for this pattern. MEASUREMENTS Length: 170cm/67in. Depth: 80cm/31½in (excluding tassel edging). DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Esme is a crochet addict, teacher and mum. Follow her crochet musings at www.facebook.com/ redsparrowcrochet.

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80cm/31½in

170cm/67in

PATTERN NOTES Work all trebles into back loop only of stitches from previous row, except the first and last stitch of each row which are worked into whole stitch. A “block” refers to row 2 followed by row 3. SHAWL With yarn A, loosely work 248ch. Row 1: 1tr in fourth ch from hk, 1tr in each ch to end, turn – 246tr. START

Row 2: (1dc in first st, 2ch) (counts as first tr), 7tr blo, [7ch, miss next 6 sts, 8tr blo] to end, working last tr into both lps, turn. Row 3: 1dc in first st, 2ch (counts as first tr), 7tr blo, [2ch, loosely work 3dc around fourth of 7ch, 2ch, 8tr blo] to end, working last tr in top of 2ch, turn. Rows 2 & 3 form one pattern block. Cont in two row pattern blocks working colour sequence as folls: Rows 4–9: Three blocks in yarn A. Rows 10–13: Two blocks in yarn B. Rows 14 & 15: One block in yarn C. Rows 16–23: Four blocks in yarn A. Rows 24–27: Two blocks in yarn D. Rows 28 & 29: One block in yarn B. Rows 30–37: Four blocks in yarn A. Rows 38–41: Two blocks in yarn B. Rows 42 & 43: One block in yarn D. Rows 44–51: Four blocks in yarn A. Rows 52–55: Two blocks in yarn C. Rows 56 & 57: One block in yarn B. Rows 58–65: Four blocks in yarn A, turn.

Cont in yarn A only working into both lps as folls: Row 66: 1ch, 8dc, [6ch, 8dc] to end of row, turn. Row 67: 1dc in first st, 2ch (counts as first tr), 7tr blo, [1tr in each ch of 6ch-sp, 8tr blo] to end. Fasten off. EDGING Keeping sts loose so work drapes well cont as folls: Row 1: Join yarn B to centre of first tr post on short edge of shawl, 1dc around this post, [2ch, 1dc around next tr post] to end ignoring row 66, turn – 65 2ch-sps. Row 2: 1ch, *(1dc, 1htr) in first 2ch-sp, 2tr in next 2ch-sp, 2ch, miss next 2ch-sp, 2tr in next 2ch-sp, (1htr, 1dc) in next 2ch-sp; rep from * to end, ending with (1htr, 1dc) in final 2ch-sp – 13 2ch-sps. Fasten off. Repeat on other end of shawl. TASSELS Take a piece of cardboard 18–20cm/7–8in in length. Wrap yarn B around card 16 times. Cut through all wrapped yarn at bottom of card to make 16 strands of equal length. Thread all strands halfway through any 2ch-sp on edging, folding them over to make them all the same length. Take another 40cm/15¾in length of yarn B and tie firmly around tassel about 2cm/1in under fold. Snip all ends of tassel to same length. END Rep for each 2ch-sp along each edge. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 73

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Anielle the Ballerina Princess BY SHANNEN NICOLE CHUA

Anielle is the sweetest ballerina in the land. Her twirls and jumps are as perfect as can be, even with a tiara on her head. ADD TO THE STASH n from Buy this pure cotton yar s.co.uk aft acr nd leli urp w.p ww

MATERIALS ● DMC Natura Medium, 100% cotton, 50g/75m/82yds Yarn A: Natural 03 x 1 ball Yarn B: Pale Pink 04 x 1 ball Yarn C: Yellow 09 x 1 ball Yarn D: Taupe 11 x 1 ball ● 4mm hook ● Yarn needle ● Toy stuffing ● Safety eyes, 12mm/½in ● Stitch marker YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any high bulk DK or aran-weight yarn here. TENSION Tension is not important in this project. Just make sure that you crochet tightly to ensure the filling does not show. MEASUREMENTS Finished ballerina is approximately 16.5cm/6½in high. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Shannen aims to make the kid in everyone shine with sweet and simple patterns perfect for all. Explore her designs at www. sweetncutecreations.tumblr.com.

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SPECIAL STITCHES Picot: 3ch, sl st in bottom of chain. PATTERN NOTES Pattern is worked in spirals, without joining each round, unless otherwise stated. Place a marker at the beginning of the round and move up each round. BUN With yarn D, make an adjustable ring. Rnd 1: 4dc in ring and pull to tighten – 4dc. Rnd 2: 2dc in each st around – 8dc. Rnd 3: (1dc in next st, 2dc in st after) four times – 12dc. Rnd 4: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2dc in st after) four times – 16dc. Rnd 5: 1dc in each st around. Rnd 6: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, dc2tog) four times – 12dc. Rnd 7: (1dc in next st, dc2tog) four times – 8dc. Fasten off leaving a long tail for sewing. START

HAIR With yarn D, make an adjustable ring. Rnd 1: 6dc in ring and pull to tighten – 6dc. Rnd 2: 2dc in each st around – 12dc. Rnd 3: (1dc in next st, 2dc in st after) six times – 18dc. Rnd 4: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2dc in st after) six times – 24dc. Rnd 5: (3dc, 2dc in st after) six times – 30dc. Rnd 6: (5dc, 2dc in st after) five times – 35dc. Rnds 7–11: 1dc in each st all around – 35dc. Rnd 12: 4dc, 10htr, 1sl st, 12tr, 4htr, 4dc. Fasten off leaving a long tail for sewing. Sew on the bun to the hair. Make sure that the sl st is at an angle (so that it will look like side swept fringe). HEAD AND BODY With yarn A, make an adjustable ring. Rnd 1: 6dc in ring and pull to tighten – 6dc. Rnd 2: 2dc in each st around – 12dc.

Rnd 3: (1dc in next st, 2dc in st after) six times – 18dc. Rnd 4: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, 2dc in st after) six times – 24dc. Rnd 5: (3dc, 2dc in st after) six times – 30dc. Rnd 6: (5dc, 2dc in st after) five times – 35dc. Rnds 7–12: 1dc in each st around – 35dc. Rnd 13: (5dc, dc2tog) five times – 30dc. Rnd 14: (3dc, dc2tog) six times – 24dc. Rnd 15: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, dc2tog) six times – 18dc. Attach safety eyes along rnd 10. Rnd 16: (1dc in next st, dc2tog) six times – 12dc. Rnd 17: (1dc in next st, dc2tog) four times – 8dc. Sew on the hairpiece to the head. Optional: Sew on a little mouth using red embroidery floss. Change to yarn B. Rnds 18 & 19: 1dc in each st around – 8dc. Rnd 20: (1dc in next st, 2dc in st after) four times – 12dc.

Rnd 21: 1dc in each st around – 12dc. Rnd 22: (1dc in next st, 2dc in st after) six times – 18dc. Rnd 23: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, inc in st after) six times – 24dc. Change to yarn A. Rnds 24 & 25: 1dc in each st around – 24dc. Rnd 26: Working through front loops only, (3tr, sl st in next st) 12 times. Rejoin yarn B to start of rnd 24. Working through the back loops of rnd 24, (3dc, 2dc in st after) six times – 30dc. Hide the ends of yarn A by sewing it inwards (so that it’s inside the body, not outside). Rnd 27: (3dc, dc2tog) six times – 24dc. Rnd 28: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, dc2tog) six times – 18dc. Stuff the head and body. Rnd 29: (1dc in next st, dc2tog) six times – 12dc. Rnd 30: (1dc in next st, dc2tog) four times – 8dc.

Fasten off leaving a tail for sewing, thread yarn onto a yarn needle and weave end around the bottom edge of body. Pull up tight to close the hole and secure yarn. ARMS With yarn A, make an adjustable ring. Rnd 1: 4dc in ring and pull to tighten – 4dc. Rnd 2: 2dc in each st around – 8dc. Rnds 3 & 4: 1dc in each st around – 8dc. Rnd 5: (1dc in each of the next 2 sts, dc2tog) twice – 6dc. Rnds 6–10: 1dc in each st around – 6dc. Fasten off leaving a long tail for sewing. Lightly stuff arms, then thread yarn onto a yarn needle and weave end around the bottom edge. Pull up tight to close the hole and secure yarn. LEGS With yarn A, make an adjustable ring. Rnd 1: 5dc in ring and pull to tighten – 5dc. Rnd 2: 2dc in each st around – 10dc. Rnds 3 & 4: 1dc in each st around – 10dc. Rnd 5: (3dc, dc2tog) twice – 8dc. Rnds 6–12: 1dc in each st around – 8dc. Fasten off leaving a long tail for sewing. Lightly stuff legs, then thread yarn onto a yarn needle and weave end around the bottom edge. Pull up tight to close the hole and secure yarn. TIARA With yarn C, make 40ch and join into a round, being careful not to twist the chain. 1ch, 17dc, 1htr, 1tr, 1dtr, picot (see Special Stitches), 1dtr, 1tr, 1htr, 17dc, join rnd with sl st. Fasten off, leaving end for sewing. ASSEMBLY Sew on the arms to the top of the body (where you changed colours). Sew legs to bottom of body Weave in all ends and fasten off neatly. Place the tiara on the END head and stitch into position. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 75

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● Schachenmayr Catania, 100% cotton, 50g/125m/137yds Yarn A: Flesh 257 x 1 ball Yarn B: Canary 208 x 1 ball Yarn C: Cyclamen 114 x 1 ball Yarn D: Red 115 x 1 ball Yarn E: Tangerine 209 x 1 ball ● 2.5mm hook TENSION Exact tension is not critical for this pattern. If you want to check it before you work, crochet the sole rnds 1–5 and check that it matches the measurement below. MEASUREMENTS To fit 0–3 (3–6, 6–9) months. Length of sole approximately 10 (11, 12)cm/4 (4¼, 4¾)in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Lucia is a German designer and author who has written several books of crochet patterns. View more of her fun and colourful designs on Ravelry at www.ravelry. com/designers/lucia-forthmann.

Photographs by Ziska Thalhammer

SPECIAL STITCHES Inc: Work 2 sts into next st. PATTERN NOTES Be sure to apply little rubber stickers (sock stop) to the undersides of booties for babies who can stand or walk. SOLE The soles are all worked in rnds. Work 1ch at the beginning of the rnd, and finish the rnd with 1sl st into the first st of the rnd. Do not turn. Work 13 (15, 16)ch in yarn A. Rnd 1: Work 1dc (1htr, 1htr) into second ch from the hook, 1dc (1htr, 1htr) into the next 10 (12, 13)ch, 3dc (3htr, 3htr) into the last ch. Do not turn work, but continue crocheting on the other side of starting chain, 10dc (12htr, 13htr), 2dc (2htr, 2htr) into the last ch (the ch you worked the first st into at the beginning) – 26 (30, 32) sts. Rnd 2: Inc (see Special Stitches), 10 (12, 13)dc, [inc] three times, 10 (12, 13)dc, [inc] twice – 32 (36, 38) sts. Rnd 3: 6 (8, 8)dc, 3 (3, 4)htr, 3tr, [2tr into 1 st] six times, 3tr, 3 (3, 4)htr, 6 (8, 8)dc, [inc] twice – 40 (44, 46) sts. START

Striped Espadrilles BY LUCIA FÖRTHMANN

These simple shoes are perfect for girls and boys. Why not crochet a whole range of them in different shades?

These adorable shoes are taken from Baby Shoes To Crochet by Lucia Förthmann (Search Press, £7.99). Turn to page 12 for our review.

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1

2

3

4

5

0–3 months

1

2

3

4

5

3–6 months

1

2

3

4

5

6–9 months

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Rnd 4: Inc, 5 (7, 7)dc, 3 (3, 4)htr, 6tr, [2tr into 1 st] six times, 6tr, 3 (3, 4)htr, 6 (8, 8)dc, [inc] four times – 51 (55, 57) sts. Rnd 5: 1dc into each st of the previous rnd – 51 (55, 57) sts. Rnd 6: 1rtrb in each st of the previous rnd – 51 (55, 57) sts. Rnd 7: 1rtrf in each st of the previous rnd – 51 (55, 57) sts. Fasten off. Join yarn C to stitch 37 (41, 43) on the previous rnd. Continue working in rows. Work 1ch and turn the work at the end of each row. Row 1: Working in blo, 1dc into each of the next 25 sts – 25 sts. Change to yarn B. Row 2: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 25 sts. Change to yarn D. Row 3: Working in blo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 25 sts. Change to yarn E. Row 4: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 25 sts. Change to yarn C. Row 5: Working in blo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 25 sts. Fasten off. FRONT OF SHOE Work in rows, working 1ch and turning work at the end of each row. Size 0–3 mths only Row 1: (Top) With yarn C, 21ch, 1dc in second ch from hook, 1dc into each of the remaining 19ch – 20 sts. Change to yarn B. Row 2: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn D. Row 3: 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn E. Row 4: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn C. Row 5: 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn B. Row 6: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn C. Row 7: Dc2tog, 6dc, [dc2tog] twice, 6dc, dc2tog – 16 sts. Change to yarn E.

Row 8: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 16 sts. Change to yarn D. Row 9: Dc2tog, 4dc, [dc2tog] twice, 4dc, dc2tog – 12 sts. Change to yarn B. Row 10: Working in flo, dc2tog, 2dc, [dc2tog] twice, 2dc, dc2tog – 8 sts. Change to yarn C. Row 11: Working in blo, [dc2tog] four times – 4 sts. Change to yarn E. Row 12: Working in flo, [dc2tog] twice – 2 sts. Fasten off. Size 3–6 mths only Row 1: (Top) With yarn D, 21ch, 1dc in second ch from hook, 1dc into each of remaining 19ch – 20 sts. Change to yarn E. Row 2: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn C. Row 3: 1dc in each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn B. Rows 4–14: Work rows 2–12 of instructions for age 0–3 mths. Fasten off. Size 6–9 mths only Row 1: (Bottom) With yarn B, 21ch, 1dc in second ch from hook, 1dc into each of remaining 19ch – 20 sts. Change to yarn D. Row 2: 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn E. Row 3: Working in flo, 1dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn C. Row 4: Dc into each st of the previous row – 20 sts. Change to yarn B. Rows 5–15: Work rows 2–12 of the instructions for age 0–3 mths. Fasten off. All Sizes Place the front section onto the shoe with the last row at the toe, and use mattress stitch to sew the front part to the remaining 26 (30, 32) sts of rnd 2. Sew each st of rnd 2 of the shoe either to the end of a row of the front part or to a st END in the last row. Repeat for the second shoe.

Diamond Cushion BY CASSIE WARD

Hook our striking vintage-inspired shabby chic cushion.

ADD TO THE STASH n from Buy this pure cotton yar o.uk s.c aft acr nd www.purpleli

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MATERIALS ● DMC Natura Just Cotton, 100% cotton, 50g/155m/170yds Yarn A: Ivory 02 x 2 balls Yarn B: Gris Argent 09 x 2 balls Yarn C: Amaranto 33 x 2 balls Yarn D: Rose Soraya 32 x 2 balls ● 2mm & 3.5mm hooks ● Cushion pad, 30 x 50cm/ 12 x 20in

the sense of originality when she designs something from scratch.

YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any 4ply cotton yarn that works to the same tension to achieve a similar effect.

Row 1: Change to yarn B, 3ch (counts as first tr), miss first dc, 1tr, 1htr, 1dc, *2ch, miss 2dc, 1dc, 1htr, 2tr, 2dtr, 2tr, 1htr, 1dc; rep from * to last 6dc, 2ch, miss 2dc, 1dc, 1htr, 1tr, turn. Row 2: 3ch (counts as first tr), 1htr, 1dc, *2ch, miss 2ch, 1dc, 1htr, 2tr, 2dtr, 2tr, 1htr, 1dc; rep from * to last 6 sts, 2ch, miss 2ch, 1dc, 1htr, 2tr, turn. Row 3: Change to yarn A, 1ch (does not count as st here and throughout), 4dc, 1dc in each of 2 missed dc in row 1, [10dc, 1dc in each of 2 missed dc in row 1] to

TENSION Exact tension is not critical for this pattern. MEASUREMENTS Finished cushion: 30 x 50cm/ 12 x 20in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Cassie loves creating new interiors for her home, and loves

CUSHION COVER With 3.5mm hook and yarn A, 119ch. Set-up Row 1: 1dc in second ch from hook, 1dc in each ch to end, turn – 118 sts. Set-up Row 2: 1ch, dc to end, turn. START

last 6 sts, 1dc in each of 2 missed dc in row 1, 4dc, turn. Row 4: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Row 5: Change to yarn C, 1ch, *1dc, 1htr, 2tr, 2dtr, 2tr, 1htr, 1dc**, 2ch, miss 2dc; rep from * to end, ending last rep at ** and working last dc in top of t-ch, turn. Row 6: 1ch, *1dc, 1htr, 2tr, 2dtr, 2tr, 1htr, 1dc**, 2ch, miss 2ch; rep from * to end, ending last rep at ** working last dc in top of t-ch, turn. Row 7: Change to yarn A, 1ch, [10dc, 1dc in each of 2 missed dc in row 5] to last 4 sts, 4dc, turn. Row 8: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Rows 1–8 form pattern and are repeated. Cont in patt working next two rows in yarn D and cont in stripe patt as set: two rows in yarn A, two rows in yarn B, two rows in yarn A, two rows in yarn C, two rows in yarn A, two rows in yarn D; until work measures 60cm/23½in. Fasten off.

TRIM Make two With 2mm hk and yarn A, 72ch. Row 1: 1tr in sixth ch from hk, [1ch, miss 1ch, 1tr in next ch] to end, turn. Row 2: 1ch, 1dc in first tr, [5ch, miss 1tr, 1dc in next tr] to last 5ch, 5ch, miss 1tr and 1ch, 1dc in next ch, turn. Row 3: 1ch, 1dc in first dc, 7dc in each 5ch-sp to end, 1dc in last dc, turn. Row 4: 5ch (counts as 1tr, 2ch), miss 3dc, 1dc in next dc, [5ch, miss 6dc, 1dc in next dc] to last 4dc, 2ch, 1tr in last dc, turn. Row 5: 1ch, 1dc in first tr, 5ch, 1dc in 2ch-sp, (1dc, 5ch, 1dc) in each 5ch-sp to end, working last dc in third of 5ch. Fasten off. FINISHING Sew in ends. Fold main piece in half and sew trim to each short edge. END Insert filler. Neatly seam long edge.

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Striped Baby Cardigan BY ANNELIES BAES

Hook this comfortable and cute baby cardigan, worked in trendy happy colours.

ADD TO THE STASH n from Buy this super-soft yar co.uk www.woolwarehouse.

MATERIALS ● Scheepjes Merino Soft, 50% Merino wool/ 25% microfibre/25% acrylic, 50g/105m/114yds Size 0–6mths Yarn A: Carney 636 x 2 balls Yarn B: Soutine 615 x 1 ball Yarn C: Michaelangelo 603 x 1 ball Size 6–12mths Yarn A: Munch 620 x 3 balls Yarn B: Cézanne 617 x 1 ball Yarn C: Michaelangelo 603 x 1 ball Size 1–2yrs Yarn A: Hogarth 605 x 3 balls Yarn B: Michaelangelo 603 x 1 ball Yarn C: Carney 636 x 1 ball ● 4.5mm hook ● Four (five, six) small buttons ● Tapestry needle ● Scissors, ruler, pins and mat for blocking YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK weight yarn to achieve a similar effect, although a soft yarn suitable for babies is recommended.

TENSION Work 15htr and 13 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 4.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Annelies Baes believes each thing is possible in crochet. She enjoys trying out new techniques to achieve unique results, and loves to see more crocheted items in fashion. View more of her designs at www.ravelry.com/ designers/vicarnos-mama. SPECIAL STITCHES Vst: (1htr, 1ch, 1htr) in next ch-sp. PATTERN NOTES 2ch at beginning of row or round does not count as a stitch – work 2ch, 1htr in first st (counts as 1htr). Sleeves are worked in the round, turning at the end of each round. Close the round in the first htr, not in the chain. When working sleeve decreases work 2ch in first st and work first

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BODY START Row 1: (RS) With yarn A, 45 (49, 51)ch, 1htr in third ch from hook, htr in every ch to end, turn – 43 (47, 49)htr. Row 2: (WS) 2ch, 7 (8, 8)htr, (1htr, 1ch, 1htr) in next htr, 5 (5, 6)htr, (1htr, 1ch, 1htr) in next htr, 15 (17, 17)htr, (1htr, 1ch, 1htr) in next htr, 5 (5, 6)htr, (1htr, 1ch, 1htr) in next htr, 7 (8, 8)htr, turn. Row 3: 2ch, 8 (9, 9)htr, Vst (see Special Stitches), 7 (7, 8)htr, Vst, 17 (19, 19)htr, Vst, 7 (7, 8)htr, Vst, 8 (9, 9)htr, turn. Row 4: 2ch, 9 (10, 10)htr, Vst, 9 (9, 10)htr, Vst, 19 (21, 21)htr, Vst, 9 (9, 10)htr, Vst, 9 (10, 10)htr, turn. Row 5: 2ch, 10 (11, 11)htr, Vst, 11 (11, 12)htr, Vst, 21 (23, 23)htr, Vst, 11 (11, 12)htr, Vst, 10 (11, 11) htr, turn. Work a further seven (eight, nine) rows increasing with Vst on each row as set.

9¾ (11, 12½)in

The buttonholes are on the left front side. If you prefer, you can make them on the right side instead.

24.5 (27.5, 31.5)cm

htr in next stitch. On rnds with no decreases work (2ch, 1htr) in first stitch.

16.5 (19, 22)cm 6½ (7½, 8¾)in

48 (50, 55)cm 19 (20, 22)in

Change to yarn C. Row 15 (16, 17): 2ch, htr to end, turn. Work another 14 (17, 22) rows in htr as set changing colour on each row working A, B, C and ending with yarn B (B, A). Fasten off.

SLEEVES Both the same Note: You will notice extra sts made in ch-sps at underarm from where sleeves were separated. Rnd 1: With RS (WS, RS) facing, rejoin yarn A at underarm with sl st, 2ch (does not count as st),

1htr in first htr, 30 (32, 35)htr, sl st to first htr to join (here and throughout), turn – 31 (33, 36)htr. Rnd 2: (Dec) 2ch, 30 (32, 35)htr, sl st to join, turn – 30 (32, 35)htr. Rnd 3: (Dec) 2ch, 29 (31, 34)htr, sl st to join, turn – 29 (31, 34)htr.

DIVIDE FOR SLEEVES Size 0–6mths only Row 13: 2ch, 18htr, 1htr in next ch-sp, miss 27htr for sleeve, 1htr in next ch-sp, 37htr for back, 1htr in next ch-sp, miss 27htr for sleeve, 1htr in next ch-sp, 18htr across front, turn – 77htr. Size 6–12mths only Row 14: 2ch, 20htr, 1htr in next ch-sp, miss 29htr for sleeve, 1htr in next ch-sp, htr2tog, 37htr, htr2tog, 1htr in next ch-sp, miss 29htr for sleeve, 1htr in next ch-sp, 20htr, turn – 83htr. Size 1–2yrs only Row 15: 2ch, 21htr, 1htr in next ch-sp, miss 32htr for sleeve, 1htr in next ch-sp, 1htr in next ch-sp, 43htr for back, 1htr in next ch-sp, miss 32htr for sleeve, 1htr in ch-sp, 21htr, turn – 89htr. All sizes Change to yarn B. Row 14 (15, 16): 2ch, htr to end, turn – 77 (83, 89)htr. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 81

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Rnd 4: (Dec) 2ch, 28 (30, 33)htr, sl st to join, turn – 28 (30, 33)htr. Rnd 5: 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first st, 27 (29, 32)htr, sl st to join, turn – 28 (30, 33)htr. Rnds 6–13 (14, 17): As rnd 5. Change to yarn B. Rnd 14 (15, 18): (Dec) 2ch, 27 (29, 32)htr, sl st to join, turn – 27 (29, 32)htr. Change to yarn C. Rnd 15 (16, 19): (Dec) 2ch, 26 (28, 31)htr, sl st to join, turn – 26 (28, 31)htr. Change to yarn A. Rnd 16 (17, 20): 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first st, 25 (27, 30 )htr, sl st to join, turn – 26 (28, 31)htr. Work zero (one, zero) more rnd(s) as last rnd. Rnds 17–20 (19–23, 21–24): 1ch, 1dc in every htr, sl st to join, turn – 26 (28, 31)dc. Change to yarn C. Rnd 21 (24, 25): 1ch, dc to end, sl st to join. Fasten off.

BOTTOM EDGING With RS facing rejoin yarn C (C, B) with sl st to bottom edge of body. Row 1: 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first htr, 1htr in every htr to end, turn – 77 (83, 89)htr. Repeat last row twice more. Fasten off. LEFT FRONT EDGING With RS facing rejoin yarn C (C, B) with sl st to top edge of left front. Row 1: 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first st, 1htr in every row end, turn. Row 2: (WS) 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first st, 1htr to end, turn. Buttonhole Row: (RS) 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first st, [2ch, miss 1htr, 7htr] four (five, six) times, htr to end of row. Fasten off. RIGHT FRONT EDGING With RS facing rejoin yarn C (C, B) with sl st to bottom edge of right front. Row 1: 2ch (does not count as

st), 1htr in first st, 1htr in every row end, turn. Row 2: 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first st, 1htr to end, turn. Row 3: 2ch (does not count as st), 1htr in first st, 1htr to end, do not turn. Final Rnd: 1ch, work along neckline and small part of front edging as folls: 2dc in first st, 1dc in every st and ch of neckline foundation ch. At end of row work 3dc in last st then work 1dc in every htr, and 2dc in every

ACTUAL CHEST

RAGLAN DEPTH

FINISHING Weave in all ends. Block cardigan. Sew on buttons.

END

0–6MTHS

6–12MTHS

1–2YRS

48

50

55

cm

19

20

22

in

9

10

11

cm

4

in

SLEEVE LENGTH 16.5

LENGTH

2ch-sp down left front. At end of row work 3dc in last st, work 1dc in every htr along bottom edge of cardigan working 3dc in last corner, work 1dc in every htr along right front. At top of row work another 2dc in first st of round to create corner, sl st in first dc to close. Fasten off.

19

22

cm

in

24.5

27.5

31.5

cm

11

12½

in

82 Inside Crochet

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MINI MASTERCLASS

MINI MASTERCLASS

Charting Crochet Want to use crochet charts but not sure what to make of all those symbols? Read our easy-follow guide to the basics…

T

hey say a picture tells a thousand words – and in that case, a simple crochet chart may well tell the same story, more clearly, than a detailed writtenout pattern. Crocheted charts can often seem mysterious or confusing at first if you’re not used to using them, but if you give them a chance you’ll often find them much clearer and easier to use than a text pattern. It can often be difficult to specify exactly where to work a stitch in a motif, or explain just how a combination of stitches makes a specific shape that can be worked into at various points on the

next round. But with a chart, we can represent all the stitches used and show exactly how they relate to each other. In the motifs for our Cosy-Up Cardigan (page 48), for example, we can show clearly at which side of the motif each row starts, and which chain-spaces each cluster of trebles are worked into. And in our Ditsy Teatime Cardigan (page 36), we can use charts to show the different shaping for different sizes clearly, in a way that would take pages of dense text to explain in words. Read on and we’ll take you through the basics of following a crochet chart, so you’ll never get lost in a pattern again!

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The first thing you’ll notice is that every crochet chart is made up of a variety of symbols. These are fairly standardised throughout the crochet world, and you’ll find a basic key at the end of our How To Crochet guide, on page 97. Each chart will often come with its own key as well, explaining specific stitch patterns or clusters. 23

22

21

20

19

17

30

28

The basic stitches Sizeare Small all drawn to look slip stitch (sl st) similar to the actual double crochet (dc) stitch. So a slip stitch, which has no depth to it and is often just worked as a join, is shown as a small dot. A chain is shown as a single loop, and a double crochet is a cross or “x”, representing the Size Medium dense, almost square appearance of that stitch. chain stitch (ch)

half treble crochet (htr) half treble crochet (htr) half treble crochet (htr)

As the stitches become taller, treble crochet (tr) treble crochet (tr) treble crochet (tr) so do their chart symbols. A half double treble crochet (dtr) double treble crochet (dtr) double treble crochet (dtr) treble is shown Size Large as a T shape, while a treble is a slightly taller T with a bar across it. This pattern continues as you work taller and taller stitches – a double treble has two bars, a triple treble has three, and so on.

Size Extra Large turn

slip stitc

Chain st

Treble st

Front po pattern repeat chart to show working into foundation chain

Double c

The most useful part of a chart is often that it can show you just where in the previous row to work your stitch. For example, in the shell stitches used in the Ditsy Teatime Cardigan (above), you can see exactly how the first row of trebles are worked into the larger chainspaces, with double crochets worked into the smaller spaces. Then, in the next row, you can see how some sets of trebles are worked directly into the trebles below, while others are worked into the chain-spaces in between them. In cases like this, the charts provide a really useful check as you work the pattern, helping you reassure yourself that you’re working every stitch into the correct place on the row below. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 85

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MINI MASTERCLASS

Square

SEE IT, CROCHET IT

2 1

2 3

1

5

Next we’re going to look at a more complicated pattern – the hemband at the bottom of the Ditsy Teatime Cardigan (below). You’ll see that this uses colours in a slightly different way, to indicate the yarn colour changes, which also helps you It’s not just compare what you’re working easily with worked in back loops about which the photographs of the cardigan. You’ll also stitch to work see that the stitches are upside down, as worked in front loops into, either – you’re working down from the body of the charts can also show you when to work into cardigan. If you find this confusing, you can the front or back loop only of the next stitch. of course turn your magazine upside down Again, these symbols, placed below the main as you work! stitch symbols, are drawn to represent thechain stitch (ch) First, you’ll see the initial row of double actual front or back of the stitch below, so slip thatstitch (sl crochet stitches, followed by a row of treble st) following them quickly becomes intuitive.treble crochet stitches with little “hook” shapes at the (tr) bottom of them. These are raised treble front BUILDING UP A MOTIF stitches, worked (or “hooked”) around the Having seen the individual stitches, we’ll post of the stitch below. now take a quick look at how they fit together You can then see the layers of stitches to build up a simple pattern – in this case, the building up as before, with the chart showing square motif from the Cosy-Up Cardigan. clearly where to work each stitch. On rows 8 and 9, you’ll also see the chart using cluster As this is worked in the round, we stitches, built up from the symbols of the start in the centre, where you can stitches that are combined, and picot stitches, see four chains, plus a slip stitch. made of three chains, joined with a slip stitch. This corresponds to the Hopefully you now feel a bit more foundation ring – 4ch, joined with a sl st. confident about following crochet charts. Why not try out a pattern like the Cosy-Up Next we start rnd 1 of the Cardigan where you can follow both the motif, indicated by a written and charted instructions, before 1 small “1”. You can see moving on to a purely charted design? three chains working up away from the ring, and then two trebles, forming the first granny cluster. There are then two chains, each shown at the same height as the top of the trebles, and then another three trebles worked into the ring. This pattern repeats around the motif, until finally you’ll see a slip stitch next to the original chain, showing where the round is joined. You’ll also note that each round is shown in a different shade (here the chart alternates grey and black rounds). This makes it nice and clear which round stitches belong to, and enables you to easily follow the round you’re working on.

If you want to learn more about following crochet charts, especially more detailed designs, there’s a great Craftsy course by technical editor Charles Voth that takes you through every step. The course consists of seven video lessons, which you stream online to your computer, in which Charles explains all the basic theory as well as more complicated stitches, threedimensional patterns and more. The course uses US crochet terms, but this also demonstrates one of the great advantages of crochet charts – that the symbols are universal, and can help you to follow vintage or foreign patterns you might otherwise struggle to understand. The course also includes a stylish cowl pattern worked alongside the lessons, and you can easily speed up or slow down the videos to suit you and ask questions through the Craftsy platform. £36.38, www.craftsy.com

© Craftsy.com 2014

4

3

4

7

6 8

Collar pattern chart

1

5

3

7

9

Hem pattern chart

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTS

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HOW TO CROCHET

TEACH YOURSELF

Crochet Howto

IDE TO OUR COMPLETE GU BLE AT CROCHET IS AVAILA

How to hold the work, chains, double & treble crochet, slip stitch and more

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k

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Crochet is a craft that often looks deceptively

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looping and pulling of yarn! But once you’ve got the hang of a few simple movements, you’ll find it’s easy to work all the stitches you need, meaning you can make anything from simple granny motifs to complex garments worked in elaborate stitch patterns. Claire Montgomerie has put together this great guide to all the crochet basics, in association with Stylecraft, who have a wide range of affordable, high-quality yarns, perfect for beginners and more experienced crocheters. From basic Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

stitches to slip knots, tension, abbreviations, working in the round and more, our guide will take you through everything you need to know to make a start on your new favourite hobby. Claire’s number one tip is to practise the chain stitch before you move on to anything else, as once you’ve got the hang of creating smooth, even chains, you’ll find it easy to move on to all the other techniques. Crochet is a wonderful hobby that can give you many hours of pleasure as well as beautiful finished makes, so turn the page to get started today!

TURN THE PAGE FOR ALL YOU NEED TO GET STARTED

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HOW TO CROCHET

GETTING STARTED

THE BASICS To crochet smoothly and efficiently, you must hold the hook and yarn in a relaxed, comfortable and consistent fashion. This will also ensure that your tension is even and accurate. There are two main ways of holding the hook and two main ways to tension the yarn. You can choose whichever combination feels more natural for you, or a variation on these.

SLIPKNOT

CHAIN

A slipknot creates the first loop on the hook.

Most crochet projects begin with a length of chain. This is the perfect stitch to practise your hold and tension with.

HOLDING THE HOOK

KNIFE GRIP

PENCIL GRIP

Hold the hook in your dominant hand as you would a knife.

Hold the hook in your dominant hand as you would a pencil.

1 Make a loop in the yarn around 10–20cm/4–8in from the end. Insert hook through loop, catch the back strand of yarn and pull it through to the front.

Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

HOLDING THE YARN

FOREFINGER METHOD

MIDDLE-FINGER METHOD

Wrap the ball end of the yarn around the little finger of your opposite hand, under the next two fingers and over the forefinger. Hold the work steady with your middle finger and thumb, then raise your forefinger when working to create tension.

Wrap the ball end of the yarn around the little finger of your opposite hand and over the other fingers. Hold the work steady with your forefinger and thumb, then raise your middle finger while you are crocheting to create tension.

Working left-handed To croch e t le ft-h and ed, simply do the opp osit e to . the righ t-h and ed hol ds Hold a mirror up to any to p ic ture in this gu ide

see how to wor k.

TOPTiPabcdgg It doesn’t ma t te r if your sti tch es te nd tow ar ds be in g sli gh tly tig ht or ev en a lit tle loose; you ar e ai mi ng for an ev en te nsion th roughout to ac hi ev e a pr of ession al fin ish .

1 Holding just the hook with point up in your dominant hand, and the yarn in the other, grip the slipknot with the yarn holding hand. Work a yarn round hook (yrh or yoh) by passing the hook in front of the yarn, under and around it.

2 Pull the ends of the yarn to secure the knot around the hook, but not too tightly or it will be hard to pull the first loop of chain through.

TOPTiPabcdgg The action of working stitches causes a constan t rolling of the hook in your fingers; hold the hook pointin g up when performing the yrh, then roll it round towards you to point down when pulling through the loops so that you don’t catch the hook in the stitches.

2 Roll the hook round in your fingers towards you to catch the yarn and pull through loop on hook. One chain made.

3 Ensuring the stitches are even – not too loose or tight – repeat to make a length of chain.

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THE MAIN STITCHES SLIP STITCH (sl st) A slip stitch is usually used to join one stitch to another, or to join a stitch to another point. It is generally made by picking up two strands of a stitch but when used all over, you usually only pick up the back loop.

Simple motif designs can quickly build up into larger projects, such as this stunning blanket from Stylecraft Pattern 9298

Double crochet stitches are perfect for making amigurumi, while treble crochets are used to create the classic granny square design

DOUBLE CROCHET (dc) The smallest stitch, creating a dense fabric perfect for amigurumi. 1 Insert hook into st or chain required. Yarn over hook, as when you make a chain. Pull a loop through all stitches/ loops/work on hook to finish slip stitch.

1 Insert hook into chain or stitch, front to back. Yarn over hook and draw through stitch to front, leaving you with two loops on the hook. Yarn round hook. 2 Draw through both loops to finish the stitch. Double crochet completed.

Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

COUNTING A CHAIN The right side of your chain is the one that looks like a little plait of “v” shapes. Each “v” is a stitch and must be counted. When you are working the chain, you do not count the slipknot, but begin to count your chain when you pull through the first loop. To count the chain afterwards you count the slipknot as the first stitch, but not the loop on the hook, or “working” loop.

HALF TREBLE CROCHET (htr) Slightly taller than a double crochet stitch, with a softer drape to the resulting fabric. 1 Yarn over hook, insert hook into st from front to back and draw loop through stitch only. This gives you three loops on the hook. Yarn round hook.

2 Draw yarn through three remaining loops on the hook together to complete half treble.

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TREBLE CROCHET (tr) The tallest of the basic stitches, great for using within more complex patterns.

Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

➻ One of the most well-known and respected names in the hand knitting business, Stylecraft offers yarns which reflect the latest fashion trends together with those essential classics and irresistible baby yarns that are ideal for knitting and crochet. We pride ourselves on offering excellent quality yarn at great prices and our designs embrace garments for all the family as well as toys and accessories.

1 Yarn round hook, insert hook into stitch from front to back and draw loop through stitch only. This gives you three loops on the hook. Yarn round hook.

FASTEN OFF Pull up final loop of last stitch to make it bigger and cut the yarn, leaving enough of an end to weave in. Pull end through loop, and pull up tightly to secure.

COUNTING STITCHES Count the post or “stem” of each stitch from the side of your work. Each post counts as one stitch. Double crochet

2 Pull loop through two loops. Two loops on hook. Yarn round hook.

Treble crochet

Visit our website at www.stylecraft-yarns.co.uk for information on all our new and existing product ranges, plus some fantastic free patterns for you to enjoy too!

Finding a stockist near you ➻ To find your nearest local, independent yarn store that stocks Stylecraft yarns, please visit www.stylecraft-yarns. co.uk/stockists.php and enter your postcode into the online form.

TOPTiPabcdgg

3 Pull loop through the remaining two loops to complete treble, repeat to end of row.

Try t o coun t your st it ches a t regu lar int erva ls, usua lly a t the end of ever y, or ever y othe r, row and esp ecia lly a f t er an incr ea se or decr ea se row. It is b est t o try t o ca t ch any mist ake s a s q uick ly a s p ossib le, a s this will mak e them muc h ea sier t o rect i fy!

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USING THE STITCHES WORKING INTO A CHAIN

WORKING STRAIGHT

When working into a chain, you need to miss out the appropriate number of chain stitches called for with your particular stitch (see the information on turning chains, to the right). Now insert the hook from front to back into the next chain, under the top loop of the chain. Yarn over and draw a loop through to the front of the chain.

When working straight, you need to turn your work at the end of a row and then work a turning chain (t-ch) to the height of your intended stitch so that you can continue working along the next row. This chain often counts as the first stitch of the row and each type of stitch uses a different number of chain stitches for the turning chain.

WORKING INTO WHICH LOOP?

Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

Crochet stitches are always worked through both loops of the next stitch (this looks like a “v” on top of the stitch), unless the pattern tells you otherwise.

With htr and taller stitches, you now miss out the first stitch of the row, then work into every following stitch. This is because the turning chain is tall enough to count as the first stitch itself, so is counted as the first stitch of the row. This also means that you must remember to work the last stitch of a row into the top of the previous row’s turning chain.

For PDF versions of Stylecraft’s shade cards, visit www.stylecraftyarns.co.uk

Sometimes you are asked to work into a space or chain space. To do this, simply insert your hook into the hole underneath the chain and complete the stitch normally

KEEPING STRAIGHT EDGES Sometimes a pattern will ask you to work only through one loop of the stitch. To work through the front loop only (flo), insert your hook under the front loop of the next stitch, then bring it out at the centre of the stitch, then complete. To work through the back loop only (blo), insert your hook through the centre of the stitch, then under the back loop to the back, then complete the stitch. Sometimes you are even asked to work in between the stitches. In this case, ignore the top loops of the stitch and insert your hook between the posts of adjoining stitches.

WORKING INTO A SPACE Sometimes you are asked to work into a space or a chain space. To do this simply insert your hook into the hole underneath the chain, then complete your stitch normally. This is similar to working into a ring, as shown on page 94.

Knowing which stitch to work into when working straight can be a problem for beginners, because the turning chain has such a role to play. If you don’t know which stitch to work into after making your turning chain, simply unravel back to the last stitch from previous row and insert a thread or stitch marker into that stitch. Make your desired turning chain then miss out the stitch with the thread in (except with dc stitches), as your turning chain now counts as the first stitch of the row. Once you have worked across all stitches in the row, you must remember to put a stitch into the top of the previous row’s turning chain, as this also counts as a stitch. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 93

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CROCHET PATTERNS from

BLANKET AND CUSHION PATTERN 9306 Use simple-to-hook mitered square motifs to make these stylish homewares in Carnival Chunky and Special Aran.

WORKING IN THE ROUND When working in the round, instead of working backwards and forwards along the work, turning at the end of each round, you simply work with the right side facing you at all times and you do not turn. When working in the round, you generally begin one of three ways:

WORKING AROUND A RING

WORKING INTO A SHORT CHAIN

ADJUSTABLE RING

This method of working in the round creates a large hole at the centre of your work. Its size is dependent on the length of chain used.

You can create a smaller hole in the centre of your work by working into a chain as short as 2ch long.

This method is also referred to as the magic loop or ring, as it creates a round with no hole at the centre. Here it is demonstrated with double crochet.

Make a length of chain as required, then insert your hook into the first chain stitch you made. Yarn round hook.

For double crochets, as in this example, work 2ch. For htr you would work 3ch and for trebles, 4ch. Make a loop in your yarn, at least 15cm/6in from the tail end. Insert hook through the loop from front to back.

Text Š Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations Š Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

Insert hook into the top loop of the first chain as shown. Yarn round hook.

BLANKET AND CUSHION PATTERN 9300 Try the new Stylecraft Batik DK yarn to make these pretty projects with a vintage look.

BLANKET AND CUSHION PATTERN 9307 Combine Carnival Chunky and Special Aran to make this fabulous tessellated design.

Work a slip stitch to join, creating a ring, and then work your turning chain dependent on which stitch you will be working into the ring. Insert hook into the centre of the ring and work the first stitch into this ring.

Complete the first stitch in the chain as shown (illustrations show dc, but can be any stitch).

Work required number of stitches into the centre of the ring and join round with a slip stitch. Do not turn, but continue the next row around the last.

Now work the required amount of stitches into the same chain. The sheer amount of stitches worked into one place will cause them to fan out into a round. Now join this round with a slip stitch and continue with the pattern.

Pull yarn though to front of loop and complete the stitch around the loop and the tail end of yarn held double.

Work all the following stitches into the ring in the same way, over the two strands of yarn in the loop. Once all stitches have been worked, pull the loose tail end of the yarn to close the ring and join the round with a slip stitch.

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SHAPING, COLOURWORK & TENSION Once you’ve learned simple shaping stitches, you can create almost any garment – and add in different colours as you go with our simple technique. Make sure to check your tension first though, or your finished piece could be completely the wrong size!

INCREASING

JOINING IN A NEW COLOUR

TENSION/GAUGE

To join in a new colour (or a new ball of the same colour), you can simply fasten off the old yarn and then attach the new colour with a slip stitch into the top of the last stitch made. However, for a neater join, you can also work the colour change as follows: To work an extra stitch, you simply need to work into the same stitch more than once. Work one stitch as normal. Insert hook into same stitch you’ve just worked and complete another stitch. One stitch increased.

DECREASING

Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

To decrease a stitch, you need to work into two stitches without finishing them, then work them together.

For a double crochet (above), insert hook into next st, yarn over hook and draw a loop through the stitch, but do not finish the double crochet stitch as usual. Insert hook into following st, yarn over hook and draw a loop through the next st, so there are three loops on the hook in total. Yarn over hook and draw the loop through all loops on hook, drawing two stitches together. One stitch decreased.

For a treble crochet, work a treble into the next stitch until the last step of the stitch, two loops on hook. Do the same into the following stitch, three loops on hook. Draw through all three loops on hook to draw the two trebles together. One stitch decreased.

Work the last stitch in the colour you are using first, up to the final step, so that the stitch is unfinished. Pull the new colour through the loops on your hook, completing the stitch and joining the new colour at the same time. Working a new colour over double crochet

Working a new colour over treble crochet

Once you have joined in the new yarn, you can weave in the ends of both yarns as you go, by holding them on top of your stitches and working round them as you work into the following stitches. Do this for at least 5cm/2in then cut the remaining ends.

A tension swatch is used to ensure that you are working at the tension called for in the pattern. It is essential to check this, otherwise your finished garment is likely to be the wrong size! Crochet a small square of just over 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in in the main yarn and stitch used in the pattern, then count and calculate the average amount of stitches per cm. Chain a few more stitches and work more rows than the tension in the pattern suggests you’ll need for this size. Once you have completed the swatch, use a measuring tape or ruler, place some pins at 0 and 10 and take some average measurements – count how many stitches and rows to 10cm at different points over the swatch. If you find you have more stitches per cm than indicated in the pattern, then your tension is too tight and you need to work more loosely. The best way to do this is to increase the size of hook you’re using by a quarter or half millimetre until the tension is as close as you can get it. If there are fewer stitches than required, then you are crocheting too loosely, and you need to decrease the size of hook used in the same way.

TURN THE PAGE FOR CLUSTER STITCHES, TIPS AND A FULL GLOSSARY OF CROCHET ABBREVIATIONS, UK VS US TERMS AND HOOK SIZES

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CLUSTERS Clusters are groups of stitches worked into the same stitch, but rather than an increase, they still only equate to one stitch overall. Clusters can be confusing to work, so here are the details of some of the main cluster stitches.

BOBBLE

PUFFS

A bobble is a number of stitches (generally trebles), half finished and all worked into the same stitch. Work each stitch until the last step, omitting this final step. Once the desired number of half finished trebles have been completed, you will have one more loop on your hook than you have half finished trebles. Yarn round hook, then pull through all loops on hook to complete the bobble.

A puff is a number of elongated half trebles worked into the same stitch and then finished together, as follows:

POPCORNS Popcorns are a number of complete stitches worked into one stitch.

1 Yarn round hook, insert into next stitch, pull a loop through the stitch and then pull it up to the height of all other stitches in the row.

TIPS ANDTRICKS abcdgg

Working from a pattern ➻ Once you have “cracked the code” and understand the stitches’ abbreviations, a pattern becomes much easier to read. Don’t read a pattern fully before starting it as it may make it seem more complex, but do take a brief look through to check if there any abbreviations you are unfamiliar with. Consult the abbreviations tables opposite before beginning. ➻ Purchase yarn with the same dye lot number on the balls to avoid unwanted colour changes and choose light coloured yarn for your first projects to make sure that you can see your stitches easily – this helps prevent mistakes occurring.

Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

1 Once the sts are completed, remove your hook and insert back into the first stitch worked, then through the final loop.

2 Yarn round hook, insert into same stitch, pull a loop through stitch and pull it up to the height of all other stitches in the row. Repeat this step the desired number of times.

➻ If you are attempting a project with multiple size options, circle or highlight the instructions for the size you are making throughout the pattern to avoid confusion. The smallest size is listed first, then all following ones inside brackets, increasing in size and separated by commas. ➻ Where a pattern has an accompanying chart, use this for reference, as it shows the formation of the stitches as they will be worked and can help with tricky instructions.

2 Yarn round hook and pull through everything on the hook. Popcorn complete.

3 Yarn round hook and pull through all loops on hook. Puff made.

Choose light-coloured yarn for your first few projects to make sure that you can see all of your stitches easily – this helps prevent mistakes occurring

➻ Finally, and most importantly, for projects that need to have a good fit, always check your tension by swatching before you begin.

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A note on... Hook sizes

ABBREVIATIONS Note: Inside Crochet uses UK terms throughout alt · alternate bef · before beg · begin(s); beginning bet · between blo · back loop only ch(s) · chain(s) ch-sp(s) · chain space(s) cl(s) · cluster(s) cm · centimetre(s) cont · continue(s); continuing dc · double crochet dc2tog · work two dc together dec(s) · decrease(s); decreasing; decreased dtr · double treble crochet dtr2tog · work two dtr together ea · each ech · extended chain edc · extended double crochet

prev · previous rem · remain(s); remaining rep(s) · repeat(s) rev dc · reverse double crochet rnd(s) · round(s) RS · right side rtrf · raised treble front rtrb · raised treble back sl · slip sl st · slip stitch sp(s) · space(es) st(s) · stitch(es) t-ch(s) · turning chain(s) tog · together tr · treble crochet trtr · triple treble tr2tog · work two trebles together WS · wrong side yd(s) · yard(s) yoh · yarn over hook yrh · yarn round hook

etr · extended treble est · established fdc · foundation double crochet flo · front loop only foll · follows; following ftr · foundation treble crochet g · gram(s) gp(s) · group(s) hk · hook htr · half treble crochet htr2tog · work two htr together inc(s) · increase(s); increasing; increased in · inch(es) lp(s) · loop(s) m · stitch marker mm · millimetre(s) nc · not closed patt · pattern pm · place marker

adjustable ring sl st BREAKING THE LANGUAGE BARRIER UK and US terms have differing meanings which can create difficulty for thech crocheter. Here’s a handy reference guide to overcome any misunderstandings.

bl only

Text © Inside Crochet/Claire Montgomerie. Illustrations © Inside Crochet/Sean Miles

UK TERMS Chain Miss Slip stitch Double crochet Half treble crochet Treble crochet Double treble crochet Triple treble crochet Raised treble back/front

US TERMS Chain adjustable ring Skip Slip stitch sl st Single crochet ch Half double crochet Double crochet bl only Treble crochet Double treble crochet fl only adjustable ring Back/front post dc dc sl st

14

0.75

12

1 1.25

11adjustable ring 7

1.50

6

sl st

5ch

1.75 2

14

bl only

2.25

B/1

2.75 sl st

C/2

adjustable ring 2.5 12 adjustable ring 3sl st

10

3.5 bl only

9

ch 3.25 ch

bl only 3.75 fl 4fl only only 4.5 dc 5dc fdc 5.5 fdc 6 htr htr 6.5 7tr

8tr 9

dtr dtr 10 11.5

trtr 12

trtr

fl only dc

D/3 fdc E/4

htr

F/5 8

G/6

7

7

6

H/8

tr

5

dtr I/9

4

J/10

3

K-/101/2 trtr

2 0

L/11

00

rtrf M /13

000

N/15 O rtrb P

15

Q dc2tog

20

S

rtrf rtrf

tr2tog

tr2tog tr2tog

3-tr cl

dtr

rtrb

tr3tog tr3tog

popcorn

trtr

dc2tog

puff puff

linked tr

tr2tog

3-tr cl 3-tr cl

tr3tog

popcorn www.insidecrochet.co.uk popcorn

puff

linked tr linked tr

fl only

tr

sl st

dc

ch

fdc

bl only

htr

htr

dtr

0.60

rtrf

adjustable ring

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tr

US

puff

htr

fdc

htr

UK

dc2tog dc2tog

bl only

tr

dc

fdc

Metric (mm)

tr3tog

fdc

fl only

dc

CROCHET HOOK SIZES

rtrb rtrb

ch

CHARTS KEY

fl only

➻ Hook sizes and their designations vary from country to country. When following the recommendations in a pattern or on a ball band, make sure to check which size convention is being used.

trtr

rtrf dtr rtrb

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FINAL THOUGHT

”T he cute factor is a huge driver. It nev er ceases to amaze me how much character yo u can im part just by a ca refully embroidered smile.”

JANINE HOLMES

CUTE AND CUDDLY! We chat to Janine Holmes of Moji-Moji Design about her love of amigurumi and the benefits of working in your pyjamas!

Above: Janine has always loved playing with yarn. Below: Just some of Janine's amazing, cheery characters.

Turn to page 12 to read our review of Amigurumi Circus, which features two adorable designs by Janine.

Tell us about your life… I live in Worcester with my husband, three sons and four cats. The boys are entering their young adult years now so I can dedicate more of my life to creativity and crochet. We live close to the River Severn so the beautiful scenery around there is a big part of my life. Have you always been a creative person? Yes, card weaving and finger knitting were my first loves, then when I was about eight my Granny Elsie taught me the intricacies of knitting with needles. I used to love making clothes for my dolls and, much later, when my boys were little I’d spend all my spare time making them hats and jumpers and toys. I honed my skills while studying for a degree in constructed textiles where I designed for just about every textile medium, including felting, knitting, printmaking, embroidery and jacquard weaving. How did you get into crochet design? I was browsing the internet one Christmas looking for handmade presents when I stumbled on crocheted amigurumi. I’d always found juggling four double pointed needles for circular knitting problematic when making anything more complicated than a pair of socks or mitts, and I disliked joining flat-knitted doll seams with the laborious mattress stitch, so this method of working a continuous spiral round with a solitary hook appealed to me enormously! After watching a few videos on YouTube, and persevering until I got my tension right, I found the technique very freeing. It made creating my own designs a doddle as it was so easy to see the shapes appearing before my eyes, like a woolly version of 3D printing! Is it your “day job”? I feel lucky to be able to answer yes to that. I spend a large portion of the week dreaming up and creating new characters. As well as listing them in my online shops, such as Etsy or AmigurumiPatterns.net, I contribute designs to books and magazines. There is plenty of work behind the scenes too, from tending to my blog to proofreading and pattern testing, and of course shopping for yarn. I’ve pretty much got it all covered now, and only require the tiniest bit of help from my husband with computer related meltdowns.

How do you create your ami characters? I get a pretty clear picture in my head of how I think my latest creation should turn out while the hook and the yarn almost take on a life of their own. A simple penned outline of the shapes is usually a sufficient amount of sketchbook work. The cute factor is a huge driver for me so I aim to make my creatures look as friendly as possible, even the monsters. Monsters and aliens are fun to design as there is so much freedom to invent the craziest looking things in a mouthwatering array of cheery colour combinations. It never ceases to amaze me how much character you can impart just by the thoughtful positioning of a pair of eyes or a carefully embroidered smile. Occasionally my hook throws off something that doesn’t match my vision. I once tried to make a chameleon that ended up as a very convincing robot. What’s a typical day like for you? I pile blearyeyed into my studio as early as I can to check my emails and drink coffee in my pyjamas. Workplace pyjama wearing has to be one of the greatest perks of having a home-based job! After that I could be doing anything from hooking up a new design to sorting out a long forgotten stash of yarn. I try to get out of the house at least once every day for some exercise, usually a walk or cycle ride and occasionally a swim. What’s your favourite place to crochet? Almost anywhere there is a cat for company! I love to be in the garden during the summer months but in the colder months there’s nowhere cosier than in the studio, where I have a wingbacked chair next to a window with a garden view. Wherever I am at least one of my cats will be snuggled up snoozing nearby, or on my lap, and that always makes me really happy. What are your plans for the future? Everything is ticking along just fine with Moji-Moji Design at the moment (named after my cat, Mojo) so I’ll just be carrying on doing more of the same – you know how the saying goes – “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”! Check out Janine’s website at www.mojimojidesign.com, and her pattern store at www.mojimojidesign.etsy.com.

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Inside crochet issue 81 2016  
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