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V O LT

M A G A Z I N E PA P E R

THE NEW NINETIES

TOM WOOD

MAGASIN

RENZO ROSSO

VETEMENTS

I S S U E

JOHAN LINDEBERG

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1300G OF FRESH AIR


MAKE LOVE NOT WALLS


shop at samsoe.com


CONTENTS

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10 THE DENIM GENIUS 15 VETEMENTS 16 THE BEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF DUALITY 18 HAMRÉ S'IL VOUS PLAÎT 21 T H E S TO R K S O F B E R L I N

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2 4 THE NEW NINETIES 2 8 B AC K WA R D S I N TO T H E F U T U R E 3 8 P E R A S P E R A A D AU S T R A 42 T H E M AYA N P R I N C E S S O F F U N K

4 4 BECOMING JORI 4 6 H OW TO S TAY E XC I T E D 4 8 U N VOYAG E I N AT T E N D U 5 0 130 0GR AMS OF FRESH AIR 5 6 S H AT T E R I N G T H E G L A S S C E I L I N G

EDITOR S NOTE

Springtime, oh what a blessing! Irrevocably a time for more sunlight, an array of colours and the most beautiful thing of all – warmth. If that isn’t enough, in your hands you have the brand new issue of your favourite Volt Magazine, number nine to be precise, packed with inspiration and very readable interviews and features.

voltfashion.com from their sofa at home, and experience our unique service and brand collection. Happy times! :) Regardless of the amount of time and focus on the webshop, we will continue opening beautiful physical stores in Scandinavia with the same confidence as before. As always, you will find us in malls and city centres for great shopping of men’s fashion.

A hint of what we’ve put together for you; we have talked to four different music artists, significant designers, an unique brand builder in denim, you’ll meet the interesting character Hamré S’ il vous plait and we have an important interview and strong pictures from Swedish multi artist Johan Lindeberg. As we are on the subject important, we also put the spotlight on the life-upholding matter of organ donation. So take your time and have an interesting read.

Until we meet again – have lovely spring- and summer time!

Volt is in constant movement forward in to the future so I’m happy to finally be able to tell you that 05.04.2017, we will have the Grand Opening on our webshop. Finally! Shortly everybody in Scandinavia will be able to shop at

EDITORI AL TE AM

Toni Collin toni.collin@volt.no

D I G I TA L

WRITERS

PUBLISHER

Audrey Camp, Anders Lundqvist, Cathrine Hoen, Jenny Thorell, Magnus Beckman, Rasmus Wingårdh, David Larsson.

PRINT HOUSE

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Patrick Ekblom patrick.ekblom@volt.no

FOLLOW US

Instagram: @voltfashion.com and #voltfashion Facebook: voltnorway, voltsweden and voltfinland

ART DIRECTOR

Mikal Murstad Strøm mikal.strom@volt.no

For more information, visit: www.voltfashion.com

C O N TAC T

Volt Fashion AS Nesøyveien 4, 1376 Billingstad

MittMedia Print AB, Sundsvall www.mittmediaprint.se COVER:

Model: Serge Rigvava Photo: Jesper & Mathias Photography

Volt M agazine is not responsible for unord ered submissi ons, and we reser ve the rig ht to edit. Volt is not responsible for printing errors in ar ticles or adver tisements. Reproducti on is prohibited without permissi on. Feel free to cite but always menti on the sourc e. Volts c ontent is stored digitally. E xternal writers and photographers must specify any reser vati on against digital storage and publishing. In principle material with such reser vati ons will not be published. Paid remunerati on includ es Volt Magazines right to publish digitally.

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N A M E : R EN ZO R O S S O B O R N : 15 .0 9 . 19 5 5 I N B R U G I N E , I TA LY LIVE S: B A S S A N O D EL G R A PPA , V EN E TO, I TA LY FA M I LY: S E V EN C H I L D R EN OCC U PATI O N : F O U N D ER O F D I ES EL & OT B G R O U P

TEX T J EN N Y T H O R EL L PH OTO D I ES EL

THE DENIM GENIUS how did a denim brand, selling 15000 jeans everyday, get to show off their advertisements in an exclusive photo exhibition at fotografiska in stockholm? we met up with renzo rosso, the founder of diesel, to learn about the denim adventure that started on his mother’s sewing machine half a decade ago.

Volt Magasin meets Renzo Rosso, the founder of the legendary jeans brand Diesel on a chilly night at a Lydmar Hotel in Stockholm. He is in town to open the Diesel advertisement exhibition at Fotografiska and the usually very private entrepreneur who is sitting on a velvet coach wearing distressed black jeans and looking like an aging rock star, is very talkative and relaxed. He takes a sip of his strong Italian coffee and starts telling about how Diesel changed the way we all look at a pair of jeans. – Diesel is the company that changed the world in terms of denim because our denim was very different from the denim that was in the market in those days. I wanted to do something fantastic, Rosso says with a strong Italian accent.

he took control of the brand himself and created one of the most sought after denim brands the world had ever seen. – From 1985 to 1990´s I worked on making a beautiful product that I loved and work on getting loyalty and respect from the consumer. When I felt the product was solid and very well done I started with the communication. And it was well worth the wait. Rosso didn´t just have the ambition to make high-quality jeans, he also wanted to make his mark on Diesels advertising campaigns. And he did just that. In the 90´s Diesel made headlines for the way they communicated. Their ads were provocative and not easily forgotten, to say the least. – We had a clear idea of what we wanted to do, something different from the existing campaigns. We wanted to communicate in our own way. I looked at so many ads and you could move a logo from one ad to another and it was no difference, everything looked the same. I wanted to sell product but also interact and give it my personality. And I wanted to use a lot of irony.

– I looked at so many ads and you could move a logo from one ad to another and it was no difference, everything looked the same.

Renzo has come a long way from where he grew up in the countryside in northern Italy. His father was a farmer and as early as 15 years old he knew he wanted to do something else than his parents. His sights were set on the fashion business. – I chose the fashion business because it was the easiest Rosso says with a big laugh. No not really, but I wanted to do my own jeans and the first pair I made where super skinny, very low waist and the legs where very wide. It was a big success with my friends and after that pair of jeans my friends wanted more. I used the sewing machine of my mama and that was my beginning. I started to work for a fashion company and I´m still there today. Rosso´s fashion career started in the mid 1970´s when he cofounded Diesel with fashion designer Adriano Goldschmied, known as “The Godfather of Denim”. And with the help of a 4000 dollars loan from his father, he was on his way. In 1985

Renzo and his team from the Swedish advertising firm Paradiset did so well that Rosso without a doubt can say that they changed the way we look at advertising forever. – It´s advertising before and after Diesel. It´s very intelligent advertising and we left it to the consumer to think, we didn´t just say: buy this product. It was very unique and we changed the way of advertising. In the 90´s and early 2000s Diesel was the brand on everyone´s lips but during the last few years the once cel-

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– Yesterday I had a fight with my ceo when he shows me a report of our sales. I don´t care about that! The numbers I´m looking at is already in the past

ebrated brand worn by everyone from Kanye West to Gwen Stefani was out in the cold. – We lost our way, we where too old, to big structure and we had to re-fresh the company. Rosso started to look around for a young, fresh mind to put Diesel back where it had once been. In 2013 he got the former Lady Gaga stylist and Margiela designer Nicola Formichetti on board. – I wanted Nicola to give Diesel a new vibration and coolness for the future. I find Nicola to be “the crazy one” like I was when I was young. And now I´m starting to feel satisfied again. I want Diesel to be cool and fantastic like before. And after two years working on the brand Nicola has really started to show his personality. One of the reasons that Renzo Rosso stands out in the fashion world is the way he interact with his employees and the way he works. Sitting behind a desk and reading sales report is not really his style. – Even yesterday I had a fight with my CEO when he shows me a report of our sales. I don´t care about that! The numbers I´m looking at is already in the past. I rather do it like this, I go to a Diesel store and ask the guy on the floor three questions: What does the customer like the most, what don´t they like and what do they ask for that we don’t have? And in one

minute you know what is right for your brand. Easy right? When it comes to style, Rosso also likes it to be easy. You never see him wearing anything that doesn´t look comfortable. He has that very relaxed style that you wish you could just copy in to your own wardrobe. So what is his prediction for men´s style in 2017? – I like to say people are more and more looking for simplicity, something different and feeling comfortable. Put these things together and you can´t go wrong. You have to find yourself and show who you are. And again, comfort is very important. It´s no surprise that Rosso has been called the “Jeans Genius” by Suzy Menkes, one of the world´s most influential style editors. And his take on jeans is just as simple and easy as his take on personal style. – Jeans for me is rebel, free, comfort, weekend, open space, blue sky, green gardens. Enjoy! And what about the future of Diesel, will this busy entrepreneur ever slow down? – I have so many things going on in my life that I hope to do, but I promised my children that when I´m 70 I won´t work in the fashion business, so I have 9 more years to go, he says with a big laugh to end our interview.

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why should you care about 800 dollar hoodies and dhl logo tees? well, kanye west does. and therefore sort of the rest of the world do too. creative director demna gvasalia and his label vetements is certainly one to watch.

VETEMENTS TEX T DAV I D L A R S S O N PH OTO L AU R I H A N N U S

The Parisian design collective (yes, collective, welcome to the 21st century) Vetements is regarded as one of the hippest things one could wear right about now. With their luscious materials, wicked silhouettes and playful shapes, Creative Director and Margiela alumni Demna Gvasalia has brought a reckoning of Eastern European flair – and frankly, fresh air - to the fashion scene.

An almost Andy Warhol like stunt that prompted hipsters worldwide to take to the actual DHL website to order the company’s own version of the shirt, naturally for a much more modest price. If they ordered 100.

Demna Gvasalia, who founded Vetements with his brother Guram, hails from Georgia. He studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerpen, which of course breathes a fine amount of the Antwerp Six into his DNA. He then went on to work for Louis Vuitton, the aforementioned Margiela and replacing the highly regarded Alexander Wang at Balenciaga – a position Gvasalia still holds, alongsides his work with Vetements.

And yes, Kanye West is a huge fan. Pictures of him wearing a black Vetements hoodie with oversized sleeves (which also happens to be a Rihanna favorite…) circled all around the internet in early 2016 and prompted GQ, among other respected publications, to write pieces titled “There’s an $800 Hoodie That’s Selling Out Everywhere”. Gvasalia has actually come to be a trusted collaborator of Kanye and his different endeavors in fashion, the most prominent being the ridiculously-hard-to-get sneakers Yeezy and his merchandise for the The life of Pablo album and its following tour.

Vetements is often compared to Supreme, another highly regarded player on the streetwear scene, but where Supreme excels in its hyped, often times kooky collaborations and apparent skate culture connotations, Vetements could be seen it’s even more ironic and blasé cousin. For example, in an statement gone marketing coup (or - for the more cynical readers - possibly the other way around) Vetements made a tee with the German logistics company DHL’s logo on it – limited, of course, to only 250 shirts – and selling them for some 300 dollars a pop.

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Needless to say, the hype went through the roof and naturally the whole thing went viral and helped sustain the myth.

Vetements also secured the award for International Urban Luxury Brand at The Fashion Awards 2016, where the brothers Gvaslia accepted the prize onstage from none other than Marilyn Manson (!) and in a short, but sweet, speech urged young people to follow their hearts, as it would bring them to the right destination. “Your destination”. A very earnest and heartwarming message, further adding some weight to the juxtaposition of the Vetements image.


THE BEARABLE LIGTHNESS OF DUALITY TEX T AU D R E Y C A M P PH OTO M I K A L M U R STA D ST R Ø M

bringing tom wood into the upper elite of fashion retailers across the world, is not something the norwegian duo mona jensen and morten isachsen did by accident. we talked to them about duality and driving towards perfect alignment. – It’s never been my goal to be the boss, says Mona Jensen, the soul and founder of Norwegian fashion house Tom Wood. Goal or not, Mona’s discerning eyes and direct energy make her a commanding presence. Perhaps this is because it’s hard to file her into any one category. Feminine or masculine? Intuitive or practical? Artist or businessperson? Tossed up against Mona and her understated confidence, binaries disintegrate.

focusing on the international market right from the start. Two shops in Oslo immediately recognised the originality of the line and made large orders; then came requests from several bigger stores. But Mona is strict about the distribution and only partners with shops whose concept will enhance the Tom Wood brand. Now you can find their jewellery all over the world. Tom Wood is known for its androgynous elegance, but also the element of surprise. Last year, they collaborated with Norwegian artist John Andre Hanøy on a ring rendition of Hanøy’s Mickey Mouse skull models. These super-exclusive rings were engraved by a Castro Smith, hand numbered, and launched at London’s Dover Street Market, making Tom Wood the first Norwegian designer to be showcased at the elite venue. – Things happen in life, and I jump on or I don’t, says Mona, with her pale hands folded in her lap. – Maybe it’s because I’m not so young anymore, but I can almost instantly see whether it’s a good or a bad choice. I trust myself.

After graduating from university with a degree in Economics in 1999, Mona was immediately hired by Price Waterhouse Cooper. She spent six months in their rigorous training program, but soon realised something was amiss. – I studied business because I’m so pragmatic. But it wasn’t what I wanted to do with my life. She left pwc to pursue a career in marketing and project management. Around the same time, Mona met Morten Isachsen, a free spirit who had opted out of the traditional educational path in favour of life experience. They married in 2010, and along the way, they’ve raised two daughters and launched several successful business ventures between them. – Morten is my best colleague, my best partner. I admire him for everything he can do. He helps me be as tough as I need to be in this business.

– I believe the world is moving toward a more ethical consumerism. There’s an increasing appreciation of quality, a desire for products that last a long time.

In 2015, Morten joined Mona at Tom Wood as Managing Director. The couple drives to work together almost every morning, talking about the day’s objectives. – These small, important conversations help us to be pretty much aligned at all times, says Morten.

While Mona is most comfortable in black, Tom Wood pops with more

colours each season. – I’m most excited about our denim launch this summer, says Morten. We’re doing two separate collections, Tom Wood Core Denim and blue by Tom Wood.

As life would have it, their marriage also planted an early seed for Tom Wood. – I don’t think of myself as very feminine, and I’ve never worn much jewellery, explains Mona. When we went looking for wedding rings, Morten found a pair of vintage, men’s signet rings. I had mine sized down, and we had our wedding date engraved on the flat face.

Mona swipes through an album of photos of the new line on her phone, captivating as she describes the decision to use denim dyed with natural indigo. – We use all natural fibres in our textiles and all natural stones in our jewellery. Visitors to the new Tom Wood shop on Oslo’s Prinsens gate - opened August 2016 - can hold fist-sized chunks of green marble and red iron tiger. The brindled-gold jasper looks like wood when cut flat and polished for inlay.

After building her own marketing agency, Jimmy Royal, into a successful business, Mona decided to step back and focus on doing something creative and personal. She decided to try her hand at ring design. – I made these pretty terrible drawings. They were signet rings, but modern and minimal. I started with a line of twelve. Several women’s magazines refused to advertise them at first, saying they were too masculine. But then something changed.

Sustainability has become one of those cross-industry buzzwords, familiar to the consumer who wants to shop with a casual responsibility to the environment or his fellow man. In fashion, sustainability is a tricky concept. This is a generative world, enslaved to what is, at least briefly, fresh. So much gets quickly cast aside. For Mona, however, sustainability is a byproduct of a pragmatic personal ethos. – I believe the world is moving toward a more ethical consumerism. There’s an increasing appreciation of quality, a desire for products that last a long time. Our collection meets that idea.

The rings were solid, simple, and Scandinavian, sincerely the work of her artistic heart, but also of her business savvy. She named the brand Tom Wood, after a worldly, whiskydrinking, guitar-playing muse. This was a calculated move,

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Mona is that rare creature, neither left- nor right-brained, but rather whole-minded. She sits back in a deep leather chair, wearing an oversized, black button-up shirt that reaches her knees. – Trends are passing, but style is personal. And my style is in the collection.

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HAMRÉ S'IL VOUS PLAÎT

HAMRÉ, S'IL VOUS PLAÎT

TEX T H O PJ U R V EL L PH OTO M I K A L M U R STA D ST R Ø M

“There is coffee, and then there is coffee”, he explains as he puts the espresso in front of us. “What I genuinely like about this place is the fact that the baristas show up a couple of hours before opening hours to roast their own coffee. True craftsmanship, whether it’s coffee, clothing or design is sadly like an endangered species, and something we need to cherish and preserve.” “Hamré S’il vous plait” is a man of diversity and multiple interests. Charismatic in a subtle and humble way, we sense that what hides behind the roundshaped glasses and neatly trimmed, but massive beard, is something we look forward to dive into. Volt Magasin meets up with HSVP at the Tim Wendelboe coffee roastery at Grünerløkka in Oslo to learn more about who, what and why. Easily recognisable as a regular by the barista greeting him by his first name as we enter the shop, HSVP orders a coffee tasting tray while we find an empty space. Being early morning in the start of January, finding a space is easy, as we notice people rushing by the window on their way to work. Collars up, barely visible faces hidden in big scarves, we sense that the speed also indicates the -15 degrees weather in Oslo this particular day. He goes on about the importance of mastering a skill, while we take a closer look on the man in front of us. Black cropped, wide trousers reveal a pair of white tennis socks, and we spot black limited edition sneakers on his feet – that looks boxfresh. A black hoodie over a white, mandarin collared shirt sums up his monochrome outfit, and we interrupt him by asking if he ever feels like dressing in bright colours. “Depends on my mood,” he replies”, “however, I often end up combining black with black, or white, or navy – if I’m feeling really blunt.” He smiles of his own joke, and explains that the easiest way to be well-dressed, is to keep your wardrobe tonal – this way you can be sure to avoid any unfortunate combinations. “If you look at a selection of the considered best dressed men in the world, they often are pictured in combinations of blue, black or grey. I think they’ve realized what I just said – appearing well-dressed is actually very easy.” Needless to say, we wonders what his source of inspiration is – what or who is it that makes him buy that particular piece of clothing, that specific design object or spend his time at that exact place. “Internet, and especially social media is a massive source of inspiration – not always in a good way”, he explains. “The ability to potentially tell or show a tremendous amount of people scattered all across the world about those pair of sneakers, that jacket, those posters

or this café in that city – in an instant, and get instant feedback, is probably the easiest way to draw inspiration.” He continues by telling about his love for architecture and design – the kind of beauty that lies in a perfectly constructed building, an amazing piece of furniture or an extraordinary photo. We sense a glimpse of a sudden

– Internet, and especially social media is a massive source of inspiration – not always in a good way. excitement when he dives into the works of architects like Le Corbusier, Richard Neutra, Ricardo Bofill and the Norwegian modernists Arne Korsmo and Geir Grung. “The thing is, for those guys, their initial thought and plan was so important to them, it surpassed everything else. For instance, when Geir Grung built his house Villa Jongskollen outside of Oslo in the 60’s, the whole structure had 18 violations to the current Building Laws when the inspector came. Geir Grung gave him a lecture in what his opinion was regarding the violations, threw him out, and closed the door behind him. The house was built without paying attention to any of the violations, and still stands there today, as solid and beautiful as it did in 1963.” He smiles and says that to be amazing in something, regardless what field, it often includes a combination of stubbornness, creativity and a dash of rebelliousness. A nod to the barista signalizes a second round of espressos to be made, as he whips out a cloth, removes his glasses and wipes them clean. We take a moment of silence to smell the coffee and reflect on the topics of our conversation, lingering at what he said about the qualities, or disqualites that often can be found in outstanding individuals. Quickly pushing the thought aside for later, we navigate the conversation back to fashion, and his role in the upcoming launch of the voltfashion.com universe. “The Volt webshop is going to be tremendously exciting, and we’re really pushing our boundaries to be able to present a universe that not only ref lects the physical Volt stores, but also by adding a certain f lare, a more personified online shopping experience for our customers – and that’s where I contribute,” he explains. “After all, through the 10 years of existence for Volt, we’ve

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experienced, evolved and refined - which is a constant process, so many aspects of the shopping experience. Based on feedback from our customers and close contact with all of our colleagues in each and every store, we’ve come to notice an array of things that matter. When it comes to shopping, and especially menswear, you have to work with the whole picture. For instance, if you focuse only on brands or prices – you’ll loose in the end. We want the shopping experience to be - an experience, in a positive way. From the moment you enter, there are all these senses that needs to be addressed, and affected. What kind of greeting you’ll receive from the staff, what kind of music is playing in the background, what sort of visual impressions you get by the interior, the items on display – all these things and more are important factors that can’t be ignored. Have you noticed how several stores has started added room scents? Our nose is one of the easiest senses to stimulate, and the sense closest linked to memory. It’s all about creating an experience, and preferably a pleasant and memorable one. “With the webshop,” he continues, “the missing ability to affect some of our senses, like the nose, is quite obvious. Therefore, we’ve enhanced and refined some of the other. We’ve put a tremendous amount of effort in the visuals, our online shop will be really visually appealing. When it comes to the human aspect, the service provided by our staff in our stores, that’s the toughest one to transfer to the digital world. The way one often can rely on staff expertise whilst trying to find a new outfit for example. “Hey, the guy at Volt Nordstan always knows exactly what fits me, and my exact taste, I’ll swing by him on my way from work.” “That’s where I come in”, he continues. “Whenever you see the HSVP icon in the webshop, you’ll know that there will be guidance, tips on everything from how to dress for special occasions, what you ought to buy to be on point with the current trends or simply read an interesting piece about a completely different subject than fashion. You know that guy I told you about at Nordstan – in the digital universe, I’m that guy.” So, to try to sum it up, we ask, the HSVP icon will act as the personification of the staff in your stores? Precisely, he answers, the bearded icon with the round glasses will be your buoy if you suddenly find yourself somewhat lost at the eternal ocean of fashion. Look for it, and you’ll be inspired. Hopefully, he adds, smiling. The voltfashion.com will be live at 05.04.17


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THE STORKS OF BERLIN

in our constant hunt for oracles within the pulse on the streets, what’s hot or not and tomorrows fashion – we this time chose to let the peacocks of pitti swagger around, feathers sparkling, indulged in their own reflection in the mirror, and set our compass to germany. we landed just in time to catch the fashion week, and with our heads held high, we hit the streets to see if maybe the storks of berlin could help us in our search for enlightment.

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C H R I S | 31 | FA S H I O N D ES I G N ER M EN S W E A R

DA N NY | 31 | A R C H I T EC T

1. Internett, sun cultures and urban living. 2. Pleated, wide trouser boxy fits. 3. Trousers 2nd hand, Vans, self made scarf, Lousylivin sweater, Ben Sherman.

1. Individual pieces that I like, weather conditions. 2. Same jacket, remove layers uderneath, light summer coat and shorts. 3. Asics, Yamamoto pants, Acne hoodie, Vintage jacket, Karstadt hat.

CHRIS

DA N NY

1. FR O M W H O O R W H AT D O YO U G E T YO U R I N S PI R ATI O N?

2. K E Y PI EC E /LO O K FO R S S17?

3. W H AT A R E YO U W E A R I N G TO DAY?

L AWR E N C E

S E BA STI A N

L AWR E N C E LE E | 27 | D J

S E BA STI A N | 4 0 | G R A PH I C D ES I G N ER

1. People, seen on the streets etc. 2. Henrik Vibskov pants and a plain white tee.

1. Weather, combine what I like. 2. Kung fu shoes, tonal colorways. 3. Sebago shoes, Indigofera, Herr von Eden coat, Nicaragua belt, COS sweater, Deuce e Machina shirt, Stetson hat, Eton scarf.

3. Acne jacket, Nowhere fotball club scarf, Adidas pants, Nike sneakers, Supreme hat.

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TU E | 37 | AG EN C Y CO - OW N ER

A N D R E A S | 3 0 | S A L ES AG EN T

1. From my own universe. 2. Piké, short sleeve. 80’s loom. 3. Masion kitsune, jacket. Adidas, bape. Wood Wood, pants & tee, Norse benie, Glasses han Köpenhamn.

1. I mostly get my inspiration from everyday life, music, movies, or whatever thing that catches my attention. 2.The Soulland silk pyjamas from the ss17 collection. I think the shirt is going to be my summer favorite. 3. I am wearing a Soulland shirt/jacket, turtleneck and trousers. Plus a pair of Nike sneakers.

TU E

ANDREAS

1. FR O M W H O O R W H AT D O YO U G E T YO U R I N S PI R ATI O N?

2. K E Y PI EC E /LO O K FO R S S17?

3. W H AT A R E YO U W E A R I N G TO DAY?

RICHARD

KAIMING

R I C H A R D | 3 2 | I L LU ST R ATO R

K A I M I N G | 29 | A R C H I T EC T

1. Fashion shows, museum, glamcult magazine’s, blogs. 2. White shirt with details, wide pants, 3/4 shorts loose, light shopping bag in beige/nude. 3. Cos blouse, trousers and top. Shoes opening ceremony, bag zign by Zalando.

1. Instagram. 2. Polish designer named von hoyden. 3. Marni coat, Comme des Garcons trouser, Converse, Rag & bone, no brand scarf.

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THE NEW NINETIES

You never had to wonder where a piece of clothing was from, back in the nineties. The brand’s label was impossible to miss, most of the time printed on the front or back of sweaters and jeans. I loved it, as did everyone I know. But we grew tired of it after a while, as is the normal way of life when it comes to trends. We got fed up with the logos and endless flaunting that came along with it. So we folded our Champions sweaters, packed them away and moved our tiny Prada backpacks from the front of our closets to the back. I could feel them sneaking back in a couple of years ago. Suddenly the brands were not shy from flashing their logos in a small, but still very visible manner. And since then the logos have appeared bigger and bolder in re-launches from power players such as DKNY, Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger and from pure sportswear brands booming back onto the scene. The love affair between luxury fashion houses and sports brands and street fashion is undeniably a strong one these days. Just the other day, iconic French fashion house Louis Vuitton launched their collaboration with skateboarding brand Supreme. Vetements designer Demna Gvasalia’s put logo-printed hoodies on the catwalk for French historic brand Balenciaga. Various sports brands are reclaiming their spot in the fashion limelight. Champion launched a capsule collection for Weekday last fall, Fila suddenly popped up in Urban Outfitters stores, and these are just a few examples of how the streets and sports are the biggest forces in fashion right now, be it in high fashion or the high street.

the top glam. After a direction like that, something new forms in the aftermath. And the nineties were quite simple. It wasn’t much more fuzz to an outfit than a backpack, a hoodie and some jeans when it came to dressing up and looking good. It was taking fashion back a few steps after the very lively eighties, to an easygoing style expression. Eventually the logo craze faded out, but as already mentioned the logos have become popular once more. The designer brands have used their logos for what its worth, and Gucci is one player offering a t-shirt for 400 euros, with their logo printed on it. And the athletic brands I wore as a teen – they are suddenly all the youngsters are wearing. Fila, Champion and Calvin Klein have experienced comebacks – and there are loads more probably just waiting for their chance to break – once more. “I am waiting for the Russell Athletic and Fruit of Loom revival” my friend says when talking to me about the brands we were fans of. For us, now in our thirties, there is heaps of nostalgia involved in this fashion trend. “It’s sort of the same as an old song. It can bring back memories, and a piece of clothing can do just the same thing”, she says. That is certainly true. Fashion has moved more and more towards the streets the last years and brands such as American Off-White, Danish Muf10 and Russian Gosha Rubchinskiy have gained critical acclaim and praise from the consumers. The casual and careless approach to fashion is here and looking to stay for a while. Rubchinskiy is among the brands doing collaborations with 90’s brands. He did a collab with Reebok, one of the much loved sneakers brands

“You have the teens and 20-something olds who see the nineties as a decade of powerful and most importantly, attainable expression.” These brands suddenly reappearing are surely a blast from the past for me. The nineties manifested logos as a trend and sportswear as daily wear. I lived for Champion sweaters, Sefa tights and sneakers from Adidas, Nike or Fila. Button-up Adidas track pants, Sefa tights, DKNY t-shirts, Russell Athletic hoodies – you name it – I most likely had it in my closet. I loved it, because as simple of an aesthetic as it may be, it has a big impact. The nineties consisted of a lot more style wise than just logos of course. It was the decade of minimalism and chokers, of Nirvana and grunge, the era where models became supermodels and launched restaurants along the same line as Hard Rock café, where Kate Moss came onto the scene and established the not so positive “heroin chic” look, where rave parties and ecstasy affected the way we dressed, and the Spice Girls made every young girl (and some boys) NEED platform shoes in their life. It was a cool decade to be a young tween. Fashion moves in circles. The eighties were about vibrant colours, big hair, fluffy fabrics, stonewash jeans and over

of the time, and had a slew of Italian sportswear brands, such as Fila, Kappa, Sergio Tacchini, showing their signature logo on his designs for spring summer 17. It is a fact that most of the models in the show were so young they were not born when these brands peaked. So you have us, the 30-something olds who remember the brands’ heydays, and you have the teens and 20-something olds who see the nineties as a decade of powerful and most importantly, attainable expression. Our approach may be nostalgia, and the youngsters’ approach may be turning their backs to the established and posh fashion world – letting, what’s not necessarily labeled as fashionable brands, become their fashion. The nineties were something of an anti fashion movement, because athletic wear became our everyday essentials and such a big trend. Anti fashion is playing an important role in the fashion industry right, with this being the essence: Everything old is new again, and everything that was out – is feeling very right.

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one of the biggest trends coming out of the nineties was logos printed on clothing and accessories. that combined with athletic wear getting a natural part in your closet, not just your gym bag, made the nineties one of the most laidback fashion decades. both the feeling and the look is now making a comeback.

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TEX T EL EN K R I ST V I K PH OTO M I C H EL E FEO L A


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ART, MUSIC & TAILORING

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PH OTO J ES PER & M AT H I A S PH OTO G R A PH Y H A I R & M A K E U P J E A N E T T E TÖ R N QV I ST

while the world is constantly moving, evolving and progressing SS1 7 – how can we be sure that it is for the better? do you sometimes get the feeling that everything history ever taught us, what we’ve experienced ourselves, or the stories passed down from our grandparents, or parents, purely are incidents of the past? perhaps you get the feeling, while noticing what’s going on in the world today, that the world is definitely on the move. Backwards into the future.


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PER ASPERA AD AUSTRA

Per asperad ad astra «through difficulties to the stars»

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it’s hardly surprising to learn that canadian electric pop act austra’s leader, katie stelmanis, is a fan of swedish music like robyn and the knife. nor that the admiration goes both ways.

– In fact, The Knife came to one of our shows, and told me that they thought that Canada has this cool and amazing music scene. “And I was, like; are you kidding? That’s how we feel about Sweden!” she laughs when I call her across the Atlantic Ocean two days before Austra’s North American tour, in order to promote their visionary new album, Future Politics. According to its press relea se, t he album is “a commitment to replace the approaching dystopia. Not just hope in the future, but the idea that everyone is required to help write it, and the boundaries of what it can look like are both fascinating and endless”.

Would you say that there’s a special kinship between Canada and Sweden? – I definitely think so. Both countries hand out a lot of grants for culture. We have a ton of artists in every field of the arts that depend on granting systems. I certainly wouldn’t be able to do what I do without it. How would you describe yourself to someone who hasn’t heard about you? – I usually just say I make kind of weird underground sort of pop music, I guess. I tend to emphasize ”underground”, because mainstream audiences are usually not familiar with Austra. They sometimes tend to be polite and go ”I’ve have heard of you!”, and I go ”no you haven’t!” hahaha! Some people find our music difficult. Even though we do pretty well in Canada, a lot of people seem to have a hard time

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digesting it. I can partly understand why, but in other ways I find our music quite basic. I suggest that one of the new album’s messages is that it’s possible to be realistic and optimistic at the same time. – That’s definitely part of it, she confirms.

– Some people only want the hits. Me, I play entire albums. It makes me feel good.

So who are today’s rebels? – Hmm. Probably the movement of indigenous pride. I think the most revolutionary group are the Black Lives Matter people, at least here in North America. In Canada we have A Tribe Called Red, who mixes dubstep with pow wow music. They do massive shows. And there are equivalents in South America as well.

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TEX T A N D ER S LU N D QV I ST PH OTO K AT E YO U N G

Has the album received many reviews so far, and do you feel that they “got it”? – The album isn’t out yet, so we haven’t had too many. Some seem to get it, but one or two found it boring. My guess is that they’ve only listened to it once. At work! What would you say are your greatest strengths and greatest weaknesses? – As a person?

Person, artist, bandleader - you choose. – I’m generally pretty optimistic – and diplomatic. But I just sent one of the band members an e-mail that wasn’t very diplomatic at all. Sometimes that’s OK, when you’re a boss; to go ballistic once in a while, in order to keep people in check. I think I’m good enough at making compromises for the rest of the band to want to work with me. I work well on my own, but I’m also good at getting people to understand my side. I’m also very spontaneous. I don’t know if that’s good, or bad. At times it feels like you use your voice as an instrument. – Yeah. I think I always kind of felt like I did, but this time I engineered the vocals myself, which gave me more flexibility to experiment. When we’ve used regular studios and engineers, there’s been a form of disconnect between performing and recording. Things get tense, because studio time is expensive. I did the vocals for Beyond Immortal probably 100 times, which is quite unusual for me. I tried everything: changing rooms, singing close to, or further away from the mike. And so on…


– Sometimes I’m afraid of being called pretentious. Everyone from a classical background is accused of being that.

PH OTO R EN ATA R A KS H A

How do you feel about Austras previous albums today? – I constantly go through love/hate relationships with them, but I’m basically proud of them. I was pretty naive when the first one came out. Listening to it now, I am like ”where did that come from?” The second one, Olympia I enjoyed making it, it was a real process. I like it, but having spent so much more time on the new album I can hear what I would have changed. For Olympia, we used a mixing engineer who was way out of our budget, which meant that we couldn’t change anything, once it was done. Also, we were on tour with The X X, so we were kind of removed from the process. This time we used our live engineer, who knows us really well. Have you been called pretentious, and what are your feelings on the word? – I don’t know. Sometimes I’m afraid of being called pretentious. Everyone from a classical background is accused of being that. But it’s not really a problem. And the music of Austra isn’t pretentious. Which album have you listened most to in your life? – I’m basically a product of the Nineties. Trip hop like

Portishead and Massive Attack. Nine Inch Nails. As a kid, I was obsessed with classical music, but it changed. I started getting into dance music five or six years ago. Do you think the album format is a dying artform? – Not really. I actually kind of feel it’s not. I just started using Spotify – I was really against it for a long time, but I got over it. Let’s face it, you have the most epic record collection, and it’s up to you what you choose to do with it. Some people only want the hits. Me, I play entire albums. It makes me feel good. You’re embarking on a month long tour on Friday. What are your hopes, fears and expectations? – Haha! I’m generally pretty nervous when we haven’t toured for a long time. It’s been a year and a half. And the first one is a big Toronto show. I’m kind of worried that I won’t remember how to move on stage – but I probably will. I hope they respond well to the new songs. The album comes out on the day of the first show, so most people won’t have heard it. It’s not like the album was delayed, so somebody must have thought it was a good idea!

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Norway, Sweden and Finland To be found at your nearest VOLT store. ahlershoes.com


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T H E M AY A N P R I N C E S S O F F U N K

curly hair, 80’s vibes and funk entwined, maya vik is on the move. as life unfolds, she has experienced how things occasionally shifts, as other things perhaps never do? TEX T AU D R E Y C A M P PH OTO M I K A L M U R STA D ST R Ø M

Maya Vik’s skin shines as though she’s just emerged from a swimming pool. Pushing through the doors of a downtown café on a freezing January afternoon, she’s like a breath of spring. The 36-year-old musician parks a pram off to one side of the table. Everything else about her reads right for winter in Oslo: ankle boots, a black leather biker, over a track suit in a deep red colour. Maya picks up her fivemonth-old daughter - her latest collaboration with with boyfriend, Øyvind Holmboe Basmo, and owner of Oslo Records - and gives the baby a squeeze. Maya got her start in Bergen, Norway at the age of nineteen as the bassist for Furia, an all-female rock band. – I played guitar first. When I was in high school, I spent a lot of time in my room practicing and listening to music - Ani DiFranco and PJ Harvey - female artists that played an instrument. When our band got a drummer, we realised one of us had to switch and play bass. I volunteered.

away from the commitment she’d made to Montée, and she officially left the band in 2012. – It was like a bad break-up, she admits. – It was the right choice, but I wonder if we would all handle it differently now. Since Château Faux-Coupe, Maya has released three albums Bummer Gun, Lay Low EP and Beyond the Basics and has been featured on a few Norwegian R&B records. Her own sound has moved that way, too. – Really, I consider myself a funk artist, she says, and names Janet Jackson and Prince among her main inf luences. – I was in the studio and wearing a Prince t-shirt the day I heard that he died.

– I need to feel Prince in my music, because that’s where it started for me.

Now as a solo artist, Maya’s eyes light up when she talks about her time with the bands in her past. She sneaks sips of coffee and shakes back her signature chaos of blond curls. After several years and three albums with Furia, Maya moved on. In 2009, she and two close friends, Erlend Mokkelbost and Anders Tjore, started Montée. Quickly, they began producing award-winning pop music. They toured Norway and played to crowds in Germany, the U.K., and China. Maya met her boyfriend in 2007, when Øyvind called to ask if she wanted to play bass on a record Oslo Records was producing with R&B artist Chris Lie. Maya declined, but soon thereafter, the couple began dating. – And later on, I did play bass with Chris. He helped to produce my solo debut. Maya decided to nurture her own creative impulses with a special solo project in 2011, though she was still playing with Montée. – I wanted to make my own music, but I also wanted to do something visual. The result was a multimedia art show-style record drop. Hosted at Oslo’s Mathallen, the event featured Maya’s album Château Faux-Coupe backed by an exhibition of avant garde portraits by photographer Pål Laukli. Maya, her razor-sharp cheek bones and upturned nose dusted with bright, gold glitter. Maya, curls fluffy and electric in the spotlight. The event was an enormous, collaborative effort, and she credits Pål, designer Gary Swindell, makeup artist Trude Mokkelbost Laukli and stylist Tommy Løland with finding the pulse of the project. Both the music and the photography garnered public praise. Unfortunately, stepping toward her own sparkling light meant stepping

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Given Maya’s dramatic, long-legged beauty and stage presence, it’s no surprise brands want to work with her as a model. – I love fashion, but for me, clothes and styling are an extension of my music, she explains.

This usually means an edgy, ‘80s vibe and bright colours. – Fashion and music are connected for me. It’s personal style and voice. Clothes can bring my music forward. I style all my own performances, and I come to my music videos with a point of view, too. These days her style is in f lux. Setting down her coffee, she realizes her chunky black sweater is on backwards. – That’s a mom-moment, she laughs, colour high in her cheeks. After spending much of the last three years in New York, Maya and Øyvind recently moved to a new home outside of Oslo. – My life has changed a lot, but I am working on songs. The plan is to record a new album,” she says, adding sheepishly. – I thought that after the baby, I’d have more time, because I’d just be at home. That’s not been the case at all. But we’re finding a way. The baby has been in the studio with us since she was a week old! Maya has begun to stretch herself as she pushes forward with music. She’s interested in singing more in her native Norwegian, as well as expanding her audience in the world of R&B. – Lately, creating music is taking longer. It’s more about singles. Spotify has so much to say, and getting on the right playlists is important. But I try to stay true to myself. Maya’s desire for authenticity is deep in the details. – I was very particular about my first album. I wanted it to sound like it was straight from 1984, with Prince using the Linn drum. People always tell me to sound current and renew myself, but I need to feel Prince in my music, because that’s where it started for me.


BECOMING JORI after almost ten years with his own band magenta skycode, and ten years of producing pmmp , jori sjöroos returned with rooxx in 2016. but now the project is no more, and he will release his forthcoming album under his real name, jori sjöroos. we caught up with him to learn more.

He describes Magenta Skycode as ”very beautiful music with lot of vocal harmonies, string machine layers, and guitars”, and says that living with both bands during the last decade was a great journey. – PMMP had a lot of success, won a lot of Finnish Grammys, and some other awards. That was very diverse pop music with a lot of different sounds, which kind of describes me as a producer and composer. The very first band Jori was involved with was a very slow metal band called Thergothon. – I played drums and guitars - wrote songs too and really started to think how one could make music for living. When some US label wanted to put our first demo out internationally, it had a huge wow effect on me: ”Someone likes this – there’s a mission …”. Jori describes himself as very yin and yang - and curious. He first got into music as a child, when his parents were listening to ABBA a lot. – When I heard ABBA music as a child it made me realized that I love music - I wanted to go to home as fast as possible from kindergarden to listen to them when I was five years old. I still love them, and I also have an ABBA tattoo. Jori has been making music since he was 12. – I have this need to create music I want to hear at the time I’m doing, for my own needs, and without distractions from, for example, the music industry. I love working within the music industry, with all of its talent, but at the same time I need to do my own thing so that I can fullfill my artistic needs.

TEX T A N D ER S LU N D QV I ST PH OTO L AU R I H A N N U S

to just release music that felt right. In late 2016, I found the sound and style on which I want to base the solo album. A sound that is a lot more stripped down, but also bigger and richer sonically. Do you have any idols or role models in life? – No, not really. So many people here have inspired me. I love to read books about people like, let’s say, Bowie, Einstein or Björk. But rather than being my role models, they’re inspiring human beings. What inspires you? – Music, people, talking with people, reading, films and nature. What makes you angry? – Right at this moment, the fact that no one really knows the truth about what’s going on in the world. Having realized that you can’t believe anything is frustrating. Whenever that kind of frustration appears, I usually think ”life is difficult - smell the flowers while you can”.

– There’s tons of amazing music coming from Finland that is just waiting to explode globally!

The fact that the music industry has always tried to give people the music they wanna hear, is totally fine by him. But at the same time he couldn’t do that if he didn’t have the privilege to do his own stuff. – ROOXX was based on the ideal and lifestyle of doing your own thing, and my solo album will be a continuation of that. So far, two great singers have worked with him, Ringa Manner and Markus Perttula. – I’ve also used some talented session musicians in the studio. I’m really not sure how many musicians or singers will be involved on the forthcoming album. When we played at Finland’s best festival, Flo Festival, I had Kasper Granroth on drums and guitar, and Juho Viljamaa on drums and percussion. Both of them are magnificent musicians.

I hear a lot of different styles in the three songs you released under that ROOXX moniker, from heavy riffs to electronic sounds, and pop elements. Was that the vision? – Those three songs were very diverse, and different from each other. To be honest, I didn’t have any clear vision but

Why did you decide to leave the ROOXX name behind? – I grew tired of that name. It has always been my curse that I get bored by names in a speed of light so since I’m not changing my given name, I will continue to release music under that name. There will be new songs soon, that will be followed by the album and some gigs. I might also play songs from my back catalogue regardless of what name they were released under. As always, Jori will keep making songs for other artists, and he was also part of the team behind the musical about Touko Laaksonen who drew all the amazing art for Tom Of Finland. It premiered in Turku City Theatre in late January. – It has always been my dream to be part of the team making a musical - and it’s been absolutely delightful! What’s the best and the worst part of being a Finlandbased artist/musician? – I think the worst part for me is the fact that Finnish people like to hear the songs in Finnish and I’ve always been into English music. Having said that, I didn’t mind doing five albums in Finnish with the band PMMP. I don’t really know what is the best part, except the fact that this country is very beautiful and most people are lovely too! Oh, and of course there’s tons of amazing music coming from Finland that is just waiting to explode globally!

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PH OTO A R I K I N G

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H OW TO S TAY E X C I T E D

six albums, including 2016’s kokoro, have established el perro del mar as one of the most interesting acts in recent years. we hooked up with the woman behind the band name to talk about how to stay inspired.

TEX T A N D ER S LU N D QV I ST PH OTO N I CO L E WA L K ER

Spending an hour together with Sarah Assbring soon ends up being more than a regular interview, where the artist mainly promotes the most recent album. Within minutes, it has turned into a conversation about the choices you make in life, artistic drive, and inspiration versus craft, integrity, and emotional honesty. We also touch on parenthood and her hopes for the future.

songwriter. These days, her listeners know that while the way the songs dresses may vary, her kind of pop will probably always be characterized by strokes of melancholy. – There seems to be this need for classification, from the industry – and from music journalists. Songwriters and musicians rarely want to put a name on what they do.

– I don’t like the idea of crowdpleasers, but sometimes it just means doing something for others.

Just like in her songs, Sarah manages to combine depth and honesty without being pretentious. She gives serious answers, but laughs a lot. Even as a child, she felt the urge to write. But it was when she started El Perro Del Mar that the path became clear. – It was partly rooted in a selfish need to comfort myself, and look for answers. I put together lyrics and music in order to create a world where I could feel good, whether the music was happy or not. It brought meaning to my life. The premises and motivations may remain the same, but it’s no longer a matter of life and death. – I truly feel that a new chapter in my life began when I became a parent. I immediately felt that there was someone in my life more important than myself. But I still return to the initial feelings, to remind myself of why I write songs and make music. Another important step in Sarah’s development has been starting to see songwriting as more of a craft. – A few years ago, I would have looked down on seeing it as “a job”. I used to think that inspiration had to come from nowhere, when you least expected it. These days, there’s more consistency. I don’t mind working hard, even struggling, for the magic to happen. There’s no dividing line – it’s all part of the creative process, she says. These insights have resulted in the feeling that her songwriting is not a well that could dry up, but, in fact, something that she may be able to continue doing for the rest of her life. She calls herself a musician, rather than an artist. – When people ask me what I call the music that I do, I tell them that it’s “some kind of pop music”. I have always seen it as being part of popular music, in the widest sense of the word. Having started out writing and performing on acoustic guitar, Sarah was initially somewhat pigeonholed as a singer-

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During the last ten years, a lot of pop music has been written with an explicitly

commercial purpose. – That’s not what I do, she stressed. If it sells, it becomes commercial, but that’s not the incentive.

As a matter of fact – and strange as it may seem – Sarah doesn’t want her music to become “too popular”. – I feel that I’m on a level that is comfortable to me, careerwise. When she has made a new album, she tends to live inside that album’s particular universe, and it’s difficult for her to find a place for her “back catalogue” in her current setlist. She thought about that around a gig that she did in Istanbul last autumn. – I could sense that they wanted to hear some of the older songs. I don’t like the idea of crowd-pleasers, but sometimes it just means doing something for others. And I try to find old songs that fit into the context of the current album, or one that still means a lot to me. It doesn’t have to be a compromise, as long as there is some kind of meeting, a connection. She does her best to avoid becoming jaded by her music – or bored with herself! – I really want to stay excited. But how do you stay excited, how do you surprise yourself, when you have made music all of your life, and you’re making your sixth album? I try to trick myself in different ways; for instance by buying a new instrument that opens up another musical world. This is part of the reason why my albums sound quite different from each other. Her most recent album, KoKoro, was her first new album in four years, is a case in point. Looking for inspiration in popular music from other parts of the world opened creative doors in herself that she never would have imagined. I make the suggestion that she may be making it a tad difficult for herself. – That kind of sums me up! And it’s probably how a lot of people think of me as well, Sarah smiles.


In the upcoming Édition Limitée collaboration, Rasmus Wingårdh and Magnus Beckman has created a collection completely independent of season.

UN VOYAGE I N AT T E N D U TEX T R A S M U S W I N GÅ R D H & M AG N U S B EC K M A N PH OTO FR ED R I K S KO G K V I ST

Being frequent travelers they usually travel over short periods of time. This inspired Rasmus and Magnus to create the 48h bag. The collection truly is the two designers ideal travel kit.

navy blue flannel wool with a discrete pinstripe.

The mission was to source fabrics suitable for all seasons from all over the world.

Rasmus wanted a shirt inspired by Julian Schnabel, so they created a hybrid shirt in 100% tencel, with a pajamas collar and tone-in-tone piping.

At first, they developed a light weight super 100s wool cavalry twill fabric, that was used in the suit. The suit is unconstructed, with wider lapels and patch pockets, perfect for a casual Italian style. The pants is a mix between a pair of drawstring pants and a classic suit pant, creating the perfect mix of casual comfort meeting sharp tailoring. A second pair of pants were designed to break up the suit for a less formal look. These pants is made out of a thin

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They made a t-shirt in a soft cotton/linen mix in both dark navy and black, a necessity on all trips.

Also included is a 100% cashmere sweater with raw edges in a perfect border-school grey melange color, ideal for airplane travel, and late night dinners. Finally, they put it all in a perfect sized nylon bag ready to carry on to any airplane, without the hassle of checking in your luggage. So pick up your pre-packed kit or simply just your favorite item soon at your local Volt store.


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CO L L EC T ED WO R KS FR O M A H M E D M ATE R , 3 0 EU R

HAMRÉ, S'IL VOUS PLAÎT H A N DWA S H FR O M F R A M A , 3 4 EU R

B ELT ESTA K K PI L LOW FR O M A N D R E A S E N G E SVI K , 14 0 EU R

FLOW ER P OT L A M P FR O M VE R N E R PA NTO N, 19 9 EU R

T E A T R O L L E Y FR O M A LVA R O A A LTO 2. 5 6 0 EU R

I N B E T W EEN C H A I R FR O M SA M I K A LLI O, 3 9 8 EU R

T R I V E TS FR O M M U UTO, 9 0 EU R

3 D PR I N T ER FR O M N E W M AT TE R , 37 5 EU R

A F T ER O O M C H A I R FR O M A F TE R O O M, 24 2EU R

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Heart, liver, kidneys, pancreas, intestines and lungs can all be transplanted. An average pair of lungs weigh 1300grams

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1300 GRAMS OF FRESH AIR what if you, or someone close to you, suddenly where in need of a new organ to survive? if every medical drug or treatment known to man suddenly had no effect. what kind of feelings occurs when you realize that your entire presence completely relies on someone else sharing a part of themselves?

André-Johan woke up woke up at the hospital. He had just survived a double lung transplantation. He was filled with feelings of gratitude, but at the same time lots of thoughts were running through his mind. He had just received someone’s lungs and that someone saved his life. Someone he will never know. - I had all these questions. Donors are anonymous and that made me curious about their story. Who was the donor? What was their age? I had many thoughts about that person’s family and their loss. It made me feel very humble and grateful. After some time these thoughts turned into an intention – he wanted to honour this gift by enjoying his life. For the both of them! Just a few weeks before, doing everyday things like walking the stairs felt like climbing a mountain and made him really exhausted. He had to take a break for several minutes afterwards. – My wife had to help me tie my shoelaces, he says. Even breathing while relaxing or sleeping was difficult, and he had to use an oxygen mask during the night.

TEX T C AT H R I N E H O EN I LLUSTR ATI O N H EL EN E EG EL A N D

to see a doctor and in 2013 he was finally diagnosed with pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is a rare disease that stricken about 1-2 in a million, frequently between 20- 40 years old. It is a chronic disease that makes the pulmonary arteries (blood vessels) thickens, making the blood flow more difficult. It causes higher blood pressure and affects the heart and lungs. As a result, the body does not get the oxygen that it needs. Some of the symptoms include fatigue, shortness of breath and chest pressure or pain. Without treatment this can cause heart failure. When he got the diagnosis in 2013, the disease had already developed into a serious stage. It is a progressive disease, so it will worsen over time. Treatment was an urgent matter and he was sent straight to St Olavs Hospital in Trondheim, where he lived at that time. He tried different types of medication, but they didn’t have optimal effect in this serious stage. In 2014, he was sent to Rikshospitalet in Oslo for further examinations. After a number of tests, they found that the only solution was double lung transplantation. But first they needed to find a suitable donor. T he w a it i n g l i st for org a n transplantations can be long and it’s consequences dramatic.

– It can be a bit surreal to think about having someone else’s lungs in my body.

At that time they didn’t know for how long he had to wait for a donor. And of course, living wit h t hat k ind of uncertainty affects your life. Every second becomes more precious. - My wife and I made a motto “You should not just sit down and wait, just because you are on a waiting list!” So we tried to find joy in the little things, moments in everyday life. Although we knew that I could not have survived waiting for another year or more.

The diagnosis André-Johan had felt short of breath for a long time, since his early teens. He had just assumed that he was, for some reason, out of shape. This made him a bit careful when doing physical activities. After a while, normal activities got very exhausting. He felt tired, exhausted and a racing pulse just by doing normal things like walking or taking a shower. The feeling of something being wrong took him

– I was lucky, because I didn’t have to wait for more than a few months before receiving my new lungs. He clearly remembers when he got the call from Rikshospitalet. It was in the middle of the night. Finally they had found a matching donor a nd he could come in to do the transplantation. He was given a second chance at life. – I don’t remember much of the time right after I woke up the next day, he tells me. Everything was a blur. My first thought was to open my eyes and look at my chest. It was a bit shocking to see the long bandage covering up my chest.

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– Imagine that you or one of your loved ones needed a second chance. What would you do?

It can be a bit surreal to think about having someone else’s lungs in my body. But I don’t really think about whether they are mine or ours anymore. They have adapted to my body and it feels very normal. The only thing I think about is that this person’s decision saved my life. Then all my thoughts come to gratitude. He had to spend some time adjusting to some new things, like how to get back in shape. – It felt amazing to be able to do the things that I used to think was impossible. And when you’ve been very sick, you quickly get into shape. I felt a great sense of achievement.

How do I say yes to organdonation? Tell your close ones that you’re an organ donor. They’re the ones that will pass on the information to the doctors. You can also fill out a donor card or app. That’s a confirmation that you’ve had the conversation. In Finland, you only need to register if you are not an organ donor. Is there an age limit for organdonation? No, there’s no upper or lower age limit to become a donor. Organs from children and senior citizens can be used to transplantation. When you are of age (16 years in Norway, 18 in Sweden and 18 in Finland), you have the right to decide for yourself.

A second chance Now he lives a normal life, a lot more active than before the transplantation. He has many things going on in his life and an optimistic view about the future. He is has put his former career as a real estate agent on hold to study a Master’s degree in Management at NTNU. Since 2015 he has married the love of his life – Christina Gerhardsen Tøgersen. She has been a great support during these difficult times. Together they have been travelling, climbed real mountains and gone on 25 km hiking tours – quite different from the staircases that used to exhaust him. In April the couple will have their first child. He expresses gratefulness for the possibility given by society for a second chance in life, and to live a normal life. - I know it sounds like a cliché, but it has definitely changed my perspective on life. My focus is now on what’s important, you know – the little things. Isn’t it weird how it often takes such dramatic events to remind ourselves of the things we take for granted?

If I’m on medication, can I still donate? Yes, use of medication is no obstacle for donating. Is there any diseases that excludes donation? Everybody can say yes, regardless of disease. If organ donation comes in question, there will always be a medical assessment whether the organs can be used or not. I can’t be a blood donor, can I still be an organ donor? Yes, there are several more rules, and stricter regulations to become a blood donor than an organ donor. How do different religious denominations react upon organ donation? Most religious denominations are positive to organ donation and transplantation and consider it the greatest humanitarian act,let the individual in question decide for themselves.

He now encourages everyone to make a stand on whether they would like to be a donor. – You could actually save lives! That’s what happened to me and I am very grateful for that. Talk about it with your friends and family. Imagine that you or one of your loved ones needed a second chance. What would you do? The only thing you have to do to become a donor is to say you are one!

Read more at: Organdonasjon.no (Norway) Blidonator.se (Sweden) Elinluovutuskortti.fi (Finland)

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JAC K E T FR O M SA M SØ E SA M SØ E, 13 9 EU R

B O M B ERJAC K E T FR O M WO N H U N D R E D, 3 9 5 EU R

S U ED E L E AT H ER JAC K E T FR O M SA M SØ E SA M SØ E, 3 9 9 EU R

HAMRÉ, S'IL VOUS PLAÎT O R GA N I C COT TO N S W E AT ER FR O M F I LI PPA K , 16 5 EU R

S W E AT ER FR O M SA M SØ E SA M SØ E, 8 9 EU R

Z I P P O LO FR O M TH E S E G LO RY DAYS, 79,9 0 EU R

S N E A K ER S FR O M H U M A N SC A LE S, 16 5 EU R

COAT FR O M F I LI PPA K , 3 9 5 EU R

T-S H I RT FR O M TH E S E G LO RY DAYS, 29,9 0 EU R

S H I RT FR O M TH E S E G LO RY DAYS, 79,9 0 EU R

S H O RT S L EE V E S H I RT FR O M TH E S E G LO RY DAYS, 59,9 0 EU R

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S H AT T E R I N G T H E GLASS CEILING johan lindeberg, behind eponymous brands j. lindeberg and blk dnm, is a creative outlet that won’t stop giving. drawing a huge amount of inspiration from women and his traveling, his style of depicting and portraying leaves the viewer in a sense of awe. read on to learn his thoughts on photography and why women will unite the world.

TEX T DAV I D L A R S S O N PH OTO J O H A N L I N D EB ER G

Why did you take on this project? – The photographs comes from my travels over the past two years. I went to Jordan and took photographs of Bedouins. I went to Nepal after the earthquake, and also to the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Everything stems from a personal interest. I’m a huge feminist, but I also want to understand the world better. The world is in such an important state right now, and when I did my traveling it was after a big break up. I felt I wanted to go deeper, understand more. – Nepal was also a special project in that way that I was shooting for a foundation that owns hospitals and schools there, and I went on to do an exhibition at Milk Studios in New York. We sold all the photographs and the profits from that went back to Nepal.

I admired women who fought for freedom. Women like Angela Davis, for example… I simply can’t photograph a woman as an object. Instead I try to empower her expression and apply a documentary style of photography. But I also draw a tremendous amount of learning from portraying women in different environments. Which makes it easier to photograph models, when I’m also out traveling and doing more documentary photography.

– There’s no one I’d rather listen too than a woman, hearing the way she sees the world.

How does this project differ from your more traditional photography assignments (editorials, portraits of more experienced models and such)? – There’s really no difference… I call my style “raw”, and I always try to depict that there’s a community beyond religion and country borders. I specifically displayed that in a project called Women of Integrity, where I photographed 16 strong women from 16 different countries in a collaboration with Franca Sozzani, an amazing woman who tragically recently passed away. How do you approach portraying woman, to avoid falling in to old, dangerous gender roles and stereotypes? – I grew up in a Swedish university town, Lund, during a political era. My father was a journalist and a big proponent of women having the right to become ministers in the 60’s.

How does the fact that you’re a father of a daughter play a part in this project? – Blue will always have a big affect on my life. We’ve always been close and she’s wise, and utterly herself, and inspires me a great deal. But I’ve, since an early age, always admired and been inspired by women.

You’ve said that it’s “time for women to take the lead” - could you elaborate on your thoughts on that? – There’s no one I’d rather listen too than a woman, hearing the way she sees the world. Men have had enough chances. It’s time to change the dynamics of the world and let women take over completely. It will create leadership with a different perspective and different values, which ultimately will be the only chance we have to unite the world. Finally, are projects like these something you search out to do more of as a photographer in the future? – I have many ideas, and firstly I want to explore the Middle East and Iran more. I’ve been on my way there many times this last year, but due to my work with J. Lindeberg I haven’t had the time.

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In Little Petra in Jordan we met Aeda. A bedouin took us, by donkeys to see her relatives, a people still living in caves.

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By chance I met 82 year old Jabarani Tamang, walking in the mountains of Nepal. Our eyes met in this incredible light where i captured her warm expression.

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A picture of the Wajuu aboriginals in northern Colombia

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This image of Hira Maya (76) from Nepal was exhibited at Milk Gallery in New York. The profit from the exhibiton was donated back to bulding schools and hospitals in Nepal.

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HUMAN SCALES SNEAKERS

WWW.HUMANSCALES.SE


memorize the date. the volt universe expands with our webshop, and we’ll present an arena where shopping, inspiration and guidance will blow your socks off. when they do, we’ll have a variety of new ones, alongside loads of your favourite items and brands – in addition to limited collections and web exclusives.

05.04.17

Volt magasin #9 2017  

Volt Magazine is the biggest fashion magazine targeting men in Scandinavia.

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