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Fostering the critical skills necessary for making connections today in order to communicate in a global future

2013 Fall Conference

October 31–November 2 Radisson Paper Valley Hotel Appleton, Wisconsin


The VOICE of WAFLT

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Table of Contents WAFLT Executive Board Contact Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 From Your President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keely Lake.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 From Your Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carrie Bergum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Pedagogy, Methodology and Policy The Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gerhard Fischer.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 It’s a SMART Focus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Justin Gerlach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 CIME: Help Others Gain an Experience of a Lifetime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Timothy Crow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2012-13 Contributor Lists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Affiliate Organization Newsletters The National Network for Early Language Learning – NNELL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin Association of Chinese Language Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Association of Teachers of French – Wisconsin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Association of Teachers of German – Wisconsin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin Association of Teachers of Japanese. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wisconsin Latin Teachers Association.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014 WAFLT Conference Presentation Proposal Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

45 47 48 49 51 52 53 55

Pre-Conference Booklet Conference Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Letter from Conference Program Co-Chairs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Linda Havas & Cathy Stresing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 High School Visitors’ Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 WAFLT Scholarship for Tomorrow’s Teachers.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Special Thursday Pre-Conference Workshop: Common Core Standards through World Languages: Building Literacy for 21st Century Learners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 “New Visions in Action: A WAFLT Task Force” Workshop.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Friday Morning Workshops.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Friday Special Interest Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Keynote Address / Awards Ceremony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Saturday Technology Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 / 36 Saturday Special Interest Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 / 37 Language Association Meetings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Conference Hotel Information / Area Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Online Registration Instructions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Mail-In Registration Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43


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The VOICE of WAFLT

WAFLT Executive Board & Contacts for Wisconsin Association For Language Teachers President Keely Lake, PhD Wayland Academy, Beaver Dam president@waflt.org President-Elect Vacant

New Visions in Action Subcommittee Chair / Finance Committee Chair Kyle Gorden Elkhorn Area High School gordky@elkhorn.k12.wi.us

Past-President

Communications & Publications Chair

Lynn Sessler Neitzel Clovis Grove Elementary, Menasha neitzell@mjsd.k12.wi.us

Lauren Rosen University of Wisconsin webmaster@waflt.org

Secretary

Member Services Subcommittee Chair

Dan Tess Brookfield Central High School danieltess@hotmail.com Treasurer Todd Schlenker University School of Milwaukee tschlenker@usmk12.org DPI International Education/World Languages Consultant Gerhard Fischer gerhard.fischer@dpi.wi.gov NNELL Representative Jessica Bradley Highland View Elementary jessica.bradley@greendale.k12.wi.us Fall Conference Program Committee Co-Chairs Linda Havas Greendale Schools program@waflt.org Cathy Stresing Mequon Thiensville Schools program@waflt.org

Christina Stuber Northland Pines High School, Eagle River cstuber@npsd.k12.wi.us The VOICE of WAFLT Subcommittee Chair/Editor Carrie Bergum Holmen High School voice@waflt.org Advertising Subcommittee Chair Josh LeGreve Lake Denoon Middle School, Muskego advertising@waflt.org Public Relations Committee Advocacy Committee Chair Justin Gerlach Mishicot High School advocacy@waflt.org Grants & Scholarships Committee Chair Lisa Hendrickson grants@waflt.org

Local Arrangements/Exhibits SubCommittee

Teacher in Training GrantsSubcommittee Chair

Janet Rowe Hortonville High School janetrowe@hasd.org

Paula Meyer Appleton North High School meyerpaula@aasd.k12.wi.us

Keli Reinke Hortonville High School kelireinke@hasd.org

Student Travel and CSC Grants Subcommittee Chair Stephanie Krenz River Bluff Middle School, Stoughton stephanie.krenz@stoughton.k12.wi.us

WiATJ President Atsuko Suga Borgmann UW-Milwaukee sugaatsu@uwm.edu WLTA President

Professional Development Committee / Member Services Committee Chair International Education Summit

Allan Lubben Homestead High School, Mequon awlubben@gmail.com

Anita Alkas UW-Milwaukee alkhas@uwm.edu

OWL Vacant WACLT President

Future Teachers Subcommittee Chair Vacant

Sarah Bailey UW-Marathon County bubsbailey@yahoo.com.hk

HS Guests Subcommittee Chair

WAATSP President

Tracy Sandberg tberg65@yahoo.com Emily Behnke JR Gerrits Middle School, Kimberly ebehnke@kimberly.k12.wi.us

Fred Cruz Brookfield Academy cruz@brookfieldacademy.org

Mentoring/Leadership Project Karen Fowdy mkfowdy@tds.net Summer Institute Deb Bowe-Weilgus Waukesha West High School dbowwie@waukesha.k12.wi.us Language Association Representatives AATF-WI President Justin Frieman Tremper High School, Kenosha jfrieman@kusd.edu AATG-WI President Mark Wagner Nicolet High School, Glendale mark_wagner@nicolet.k12.wi.us

WAFLT is a member of ACTFL, CSC, and JNCL-NCLIS. The VOICE of WAFLT appears twice annually, in the spring and fall, with copy deadlines of January 1 and May 15. Manuscripts describing world language pedagogy as well as study and travel opportunities and experiences are always welcome, and, if accepted, generally will appear in the next issue. Submissions for publication should be saved as a Microsoft Word document and sent as an email attachment to the editor. Any photos or graphics must be sent as separate attachments in a .jpg format.


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From Your President ... Both of these men were poets, not men of daring Sed fugit interea, fugit inreparabile tempus, deeds. Yet they guide us singula dum capti circumuectamur amore. to a life spent in the Vergil’s Georgics 3.284-5 moment, a life of accomplishment born But meanwhile time flees, flees irretrievably while we, out of a bold march to captured by our passion, recount individual details. the future in the simple step of today’s actions. Horace’s famous Time flies. It is an old cliché. It should sentiment is part of a poem chastising surprise no one that a Roman author a young friend for seeking the future coined the phrase. It comes from in grand hopes and fortune-tellers. “Be wise, strain the wine, and scale Vergil’s text on farming, the Georgics, back long hopes to a short time” (lines which was his stepping stone from the 6-7). Humans get lost in the future, Eclogues which garnered him the but we do at least look to words of attention of his patrons to the epic for wisdom to comfort us in our daily which he is most famous. He is struggles. We see similarities to chastising himself as much as his ourselves in the lives of others, and audience, however, as the line is a we see how much one pebble can transition between two topics. There is cause the pool to ripple if we just have much to say, and I must get onto it the courage to let go of the stone. without getting bogged down in my individual concerns. There is much to This compounding of result is the joy do as well, and it is that reminder that I we have in teaching languages. We take for myself. meet the people and learn the sentiments which give us strength as As teachers and scholars we spend we tackle the obstacles of today, much of our time looking to the future endure the grief of the next tragedy in for our results. What will our students the news, and survive the next be able to do by next month? When controversy in our district. We see the will that article be published? What passage of time, the continuity of needs to be done to get that next humanity, and the beauty of the contract, raise, or promotion? The smallest victory. We remember the poet Horace has an admonition for us bravery of individuals from around the concerning our plans for the future: world and see what has been endured for ages Dum loquimur, fugerit inuida before us. With that aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero. perspective, we see the Horace’s Odes 1.1.7-8 significance of the student who stops to say While we speak, envious age will have fled: thank you, the alumna seize the day, trust as little as possible in the next. who mentions how much she learned in your class, the administrator or parent who fights for you and your program.

Keely Lake

All of these things can sustain us, and we give each other that sustenance as well. We can say thank you to a colleague, volunteer for a committee to help a project in which we believe, and trust that our actions today are important. There is no certainty in the future, but perhaps we can remember that all we have to do is focus on today. If we look beyond ourselves we will see the great work that we can do together. Thanks to all of you, for it is our members who make this organization great and keep us moving to the future. I look forward to seeing you in November in Appleton. It will be here before we know it. Keely Lake


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From Your Editor ... ell, the summer raced by and here we are once again doing what we were called to do. The focus of our state is on the new testing, common core, and educator effectiveness. All of it is overwhelming, but like so many other things we take them step by step and eventually we can break the boulder into small stones that are more manageable in the landscape of our careers.

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As you peruse the pages of this issue of The Voice, there are two articles that focus on these things and how they can be helpful to us and to our students. We are valuable to the Core and we need to continue to move forward with positive attitudes that let others know how valuable we can be to the newest initiatives in our state and the nation. Over the years, there have been many changes in how things get done. This is no different than any other year. What needs to be kept at the forefront is our main reason for doing what we do – the students. Our students continue to benefit from world language learning and how it affects other classes in a student’s academic life. We can move forward and show how substantial we are to the common core and all other initiatives by working with our colleagues to build curriculums that work cross curricularly. We will need to work collaboratively with colleagues. Sharing ideas and helping one another will help us overcome this new endeavor and we will come out on top. Working collaboratively will benefit all of us. The WAFLT Fall Conference is just around the corner and once again will be filled with ideas and sessions that will be beneficial to all we do professionally. We can take these ideas back to our classrooms and our

colleagues and apply them to all of the new initiatives. Also, don’t forget that we have RTi and PBIS along with the previous mentioned initiatives. Working together and sharing of ideas will most definitely open doors and help each of us become better at what we do for students. There are numerous ways for you to get involved and learn. Attend the conference, even if for only one day. As I read through the language associations’ reports, I see that some of them are in need of people willing to be elected officials in their groups. Volunteer to help out your language association in whatever way is necessary. It is our reality that more and more is expected of our teaching profession. Being the professionals that we are, we will deliver.

Let’s not get lost in the negativity that seems to affect us more and more each day. With all that is required of us, remember to take time for yourself. Surround yourself with people who “fill your bucket.” Take time to attend professional gatherings that “fill your bucket.” World Language teachers can help so many other areas with all that we do but the key area that needs to be focused on is ourselves because we are no good to anyone else if we run ourselves into the ground. Become involved at the level your life will allow. Be the best you can be and move forward positively. See you in Appleton soon!!

Carrie Bergum

Professional Development Opportunities Wisconsin Association For Language Teachers (WAFLT) Fall Conference October 31-November 1-2, 2013, Appleton, WI | Information: waflt.org American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Conference November 22-24, 2013, Orlando, FL | Information: actfl.org FLESFEST March 8, 2014, Alverno College | Information: www.wi-nell.org Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages March 20-22, 2014, St. Louis, MO | Information: csctfl.org Join a Language Listserv: Communicate with other language teachers; post and/or read notices of importance to teachers of specific languages. Through DPI: To subscribe, send an e-mail message to: majordomo@badger.state.wi.us Write nothing in the “Subject” line. In body of message write: Subscribe French (or German, Japanese, Spanish, Latin) Through Your Language Association: Go to: waflt.org – On the home page, click on Wisconsin Language Associations. Contact the organization to find out how to join their listserv.


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The Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness System By Gerhard Fischer, International Education &World Languages Education Consultant, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

he new Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness System (http://ee.dpi.wi.gov/) will be implemented in the 2014-15 school year after two years of piloting the system in selected school districts. You may have participated in meetings in your local districts, you may have heard some rumors about the design and intent of the system, and you may wonder how World Language teachers can possibly demonstrate their effectiveness in a system that partially evaluates teachers based on student growth. Whatever it is that you may have heard about educator effectiveness, it is important for all of us to familiarize ourselves with the facts. Please take some time to read up on DPI’s plans and talk to colleagues and supervisors about how that system will be implemented in your district.

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The challenge for World Language teachers as for some other content areas without statewide student assessments will be to develop an evaluation system that adequately measures student growth and that can be used to document that growth in an evaluation process. When all of this is done right, the Wisconsin Teacher Effectiveness System provides an excellent basis for professional development and a way to have meaningful conversations about the value and purpose of learning world languages.

The foundation of the Wisconsin Teacher Effectiveness System is Charlotte Danielson’s 2011 Framework for Teaching (www.danielsongroup.org/default.aspx) and focuses on teacher practice and student outcomes. It is aligned with Teacher Standards and the Common Core Standards. The details of implementing this system in our schools are still being worked out during the pilot phase, and the 201314 school year will be used to provide models for specific content areas. World Language teachers are in an enviable position. We already have proposals and models that allow us to communicate World Language teacher effectiveness to supervisors, and we have been working for a long time on standards based teaching and learning. I have found the TELL Project (www.tellproject.com) to be an extremely useful tool in this process. It was developed by many of our colleagues nationwide and can be used as one component for evaluating the effectiveness of World Language teachers within the Danielson Framework and the Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness System. World Language teachers are also used to developing goals and measures for student learning within the framework of our Wisconsin Academic Standards for World Languages. The DPI’s “Planning Curriculum for Learning World Languages” is still an excellent guide for writing what is now known as SLOs (student learning objectives).

We are fortunate to have support systems in the family of World Language educators that help us to demonstrate and articulate effectiveness and student growth in the new framework. WAFLT is an incredibly strong family of excellent professionals. I will again rely on the leadership of our professional family to develop specific models for teacher effectiveness and student learning objectives. Please join this conversation to make our profession even stronger than it is now. We all know what our contributions to student learning are. Now we will have to learn to communicate this knowledge within the Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness System. I look forward to working with all of you on this important initiative.#

WAFLT Mission The purpose of WAFLT shall be to promote, strengthen, and facilitate the teaching and lifelong learning of world languages and cultures in schools and communities to meet the needs of our increasingly interdependent world.


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It’s a SMART Focus By Justin Gerlach, WAFLT Advocacy Chair ollaboration. It is the key word uttered at almost every staff meeting or professional development opportunity. We all talk about it, but how effective are we at implementing it? Collaboration can incorporate a broad context. Let’s focus on professional collaboration. What does it look like in your department, school, and district? Most importantly, how will it impact your classroom and teaching? My article from the spring edition of The Voice led with the previous introduction. It now sets the stage for my feedback on how our district successfully implemented the Professional Learning Community (PLC) model of professional development and collaboration.

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I will begin with a brief recap of our PLC process. Our PLC model was the focus of all of our district professional development opportunities this past school year and will continue to be the primary focus of professional development this current year and beyond. Within our district, our staff is divided into teams; content and grade level. We meet once a week at a predetermined time to carry out the SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Timely) goals established at the beginning of our school year. We are charged with data collection, revision and reflection, common assessment, and to establish a new goal once one is completed. The goal is to positively impact student performance in the classroom and shed new light on our teaching strategies to achieve such student performance.

Now it is time for a formative evaluation. Did we accomplish our goals to increase student achievement? Overwhelmingly the answer is yes. Now I realize that there are those of you who are thinking that I have to answer in the affirmative, but if I am true to the process, I would not. Please read further for the explanation. Apart from previous years of goal setting, typically completed in the fall of the academic year and not revisited until the last month of the school year, our SMART goal was the focal point of every weekly meeting that we had with our colleagues. There was no opportunity to forget about it. The goal drove our discussion, strategies, research, data, and classroom activities. This entire process was our professional initiative. There were no other additional requirements placed upon staff members to complete. With any initiative, there are opportunities of redirection along the way. First, it is about communication. As we progressed through the year it was a learning process for our entire staff. Keeping everyone informed of our progress and having periodic check points were important so that we maintained our focus on the goal and we all understood the steps and action plans in our processes. As we are a Google campus, Google Docs worked effectively to share agendas and documents. Second, it is about security. As the collaboration deepened, we put ourselves out in the open to have our lessons, our procedures, our interpretations examined by one another. This meant being comfortable

sharing materials, but also being comfortable receiving constructive feedback. It meant demonstrating the true value of the lessons and activities that we taught, to acknowledge the validity of such activities. This reflection brought to the table the reality that some lessons, while dear to our hearts, really did not engage and/or push student achievement and should be revised or removed from our curriculum. It was about making all of us equally better educators, not pitting educators against one another. Third, it is about growth. As we reflected on our goals and completed our summaries, it was evident that this first year essentially was the base line of data collection. Did we see/ demonstrate growth? We could all make the case that it was evident, but the true data will come from our subsequent years of collection and focus with these goals. In our year end goal meetings, the conversation built upon the idea that while the goal we focused upon may be completed, it is not forgotten. How will it influence and inform our future goals and continue to drive student achievement? Fourth, it is about commitment. The beauty of the PLC process is that it has the ability to transform the school culture. Collaboration takes on a whole new meaning, value, and process within and across departments. This process is not a one-year initiative. It is ongoing and evolving. It will continue to be the focus of our professional development for our district for years to come because it makes sense. Achievement is not accomplished overnight or in a PLC in just one year. It is a long-term


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commitment to the benefit of students, the professional staff, and the community in order to provide the very best learning and professional environment possible. As we move forward with our PLC process, I hope that it will continue to deepen and enrich our learning community. In the age of Common Core Standards and curriculum implementation, Smarter Balance Assessment, Response to Intervention, Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports, Teacher & Administrator Effectiveness, the political climate, lesson planning and teaching, there is a lot to balance and incorporate into our daily lives

as educators. The expectations will not cease, but through true and effective collaboration the work load can be easier shared. I look forward to your stories of collaboration and/or a PLC model. Begin to listen, reflect, and share your ideas and goals with your colleagues within your department, district, region, or even at our state conference. The art of collaboration is crafted by you, guided by one another, and to be shared for all to learn of the great learning environments that begin with you.#

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Donna Clementi Blue Ribbon School Award for Excellence in World Language Programs Do you have a school or district World Language Program that is worthy of praise? Do you have an exemplary program model, well-articulated curriculum, stellar staff, advocacy and outside community support, and program/student achievement results that speak to the excellence of your school(s)? If so, then nominate your school(s) for this special award!


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CIME: Help Others Gain an Experience of a Lifetime By Timothy Crow, UW-Superior y first contact with current CIME Director, José Martínez, occurred in the summer of 1998 when I made onsite visits to several institutes in Costa Rica, searching for an appropriate immersion program for UW-Superior students. José’s boundless energy and willingness to help others made a lasting impression on me. Shortly thereafter, I began working with a UWSuperior colleague in Social Work, Judy Dwyer, who was interested in developing international internships in Latin America. Over the intervening years, the two of us have remained steadfast supporters of José and his dedication to social justice. We have on several occasions experienced firsthand his 16-18 hour daily work routine.

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A few years ago, José was finally able to make his lifelong dream come true. He became a founding member of CIME: Center for International Multidisciplinary Education in San José. Teaching is done in very small classes with an emphasis on learning about the politics, social conditions, environmental issues, and human rights issues of Central America today. Courses are supplemented with guest lectures and discussions concerning the environment, culture, political processes, gender issues, and development. CIME is located only a few minutes by bus from downtown San José, and is close to the campus of the University of Costa Rica. The local area is quiet and residential; however, its proximity to the University makes a variety of restaurants and bookstores easily accessible. A main railway terminal is also located in close proximity.

CIME’s students come from all over the world. What they have in common is a shared sensitivity to the myriad of problems facing Central America and a desire to learn more about the region and its peoples through language training and experimental learning. All the instructors are highly qualified native speakers with years of teaching experience, who instill fun and creativity. There are many opportunities for community based projects for those students who are not participating in an international internship, but rather are at CIME to attend Spanish classes at Casa Tica. The contribution that each student can make to the community is limited only by individual schedules and desires. Casa Tica, an integral part of CIME, provides students with all necessary levels of Spanish instruction, and also serves as immersion segue for students participating in international internships. Students are often taught individually or in a class with a maximum of five students. Casa Tica has provided many UW-Superior Spanish students with upper-division courses on Central-American literature and culture, as well as other appropriate areas of study. Furthermore, this intensive immersion experience has served education students well as preparation for the Praxis II content exam. A returning student recently commented on his surprise upon finding himself originally placed in a class at Casa Tica with two other students: one from Yale and a second from Harvard—both of whom were preparing to do internships at Costa Rican hospitals.

One of the more interesting and ‘fun’ aspects of Casa Tica is Cooking with Mayra. Mayra, José’s sister and culinary whiz, delights in regularly guiding students through the realm of Central-American cuisine. On my most recent visit to CIME, Mayra was offering up some ‘tamales de cerdo’ that were absolutely ‘to die for.’ Students generally stay with host families who supply them with two daily meals and laundry service. CIME makes sure that families are available to students who prefer vegetarian or vegan menus. In addition, families are carefully screened to make sure as to their openness to race, religion, and gender issues. However, CIME will make alternative living arrangements for students who so desire. Among the major attractions of CIME is the excellent orientation program they give students, along with the personal security that CIME itself provides.

Child eats at St. Lazaro Soup Kitchen in San Jose - CIME

CIME has many open projects: School supplies for children, food for families, helping at medical facilities for illiterate patients, etc. Five percent of all monies paid in is donated off-the-top directly to children’s rights organizations, women’s groups, community soup kitchens, and


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animal shelters. A priority donation site is the Community Soup Kitchen of St. Lazaro where meals are served daily to hundreds of hungry kids. CIME will send upon request a complete list of the organizations the school helps to support.

Child receives shoes in Project Shoes Forever

In addition to the many open projects, CIME has initiated two specific permanent projects: Shoes Forever and Planting Trees Forever. Through the first project, CIME distributes shoes to children living in extreme conditions. Starting with just 20 pairs: 10 for boys and 10 for girls, José says that the machinery of the universe got started and CIME had sponsored well over 500 children by Christmas 2012. The second project began when a campesino family offered students farmland in order to start a small nursery for native species to be used for a local preservation project. The project has since expanded to encompass the preservation of a large piece of rainforest. All monies collected by CIME are reinvested in Costa Rica and Central America: host families, the maintenance of internship sites, and social projects. CIME is wholly owned, directed, and staffed by Costa Ricans. While students are given every opportunity to engage in varied social projects, CIME also arranges trips to beaches, rainforests, volcanoes, and

countless other venues for the more ‘passive’ students. The staff is always ready to facilitate leisure travel and accommodations in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. During my most recent site visit to CIME, the staff immediately began arranging a trip via bus to Granada, Nicaragua for me, upon learning of my interest in visiting that site. Their travel tips and booking of accommodations made the trip a unique and wonderful experience. CIME sponsors specific projects and permanent internship sites in Granada and other places in Nicaragua. Returning students always comment on the unique place that CIME is and the sense of family that they experience while there. Looking at some recent student comments: “José and the staff are great people—they really did help me so much.” “I learned so quickly. If

9

anything they were almost TOO giving at points.” “I received a very personalized education there—which for me contributed to why I learned so much so quickly.” “I think it is a great and flexible program, and I can tell they really care about their students.” Over the years José has directly enriched the lives of many UWSuperior students, who in turn, have made their own small contributions to social development in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. CIME’s philosophy on the importance of ‘giving back’ and not just ‘taking away’ makes it the ideal choice for both language immersion and international internships. Their priority is ‘people’ over profits. CIME prides itself on its ability and willingness to redistribute funds and resources to worthy grassroots projects and organizations in Central America.#

Moved recently? Changed jobs? Changed names? Update your own WAFLT profile! Your profile information is the main vehicle for WAFLT to keep in touch with you and pass on information about what is happening in our organization. It also ties in to all mailings, proposals, submissions, and conference registration information. Verify/update your own information today: 1. Go to waflt.org and click on “Login” from the right end of the menu bar at the top. — Don’t remember your password? Click on “Forgot Password” and retrieve it using your email address or login ID. 2. Type in your login ID or email address and your password to enter. — Still can’t login? DO NOT create a new login! Instead, contact webmaster@waflt.org for assistance. 3. On the left click account information. 4. Click edit at the top to make changes. Don’t forget to save! — If possible add a personal email address in addition to the school one as some schools block waflt.org.


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The VOICE of WAFLT

Unlock the Gateway To Communication

2014 Central States Conference

A joint conference of the Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and the Foreign Language Association of Missouri March 20 – 22, 2014 Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark St. Louis, MO

For more information, contact Patrick T. Raven CSCTFL Executive Director PO Box 251 Milwaukee, WI 53201-0251 Phone: 414-405-4645 Fax: 414-276-4650 E-mail: CSCTFL@aol.com Web: www.csctfl.org


The VOICE of WAFLT

Thank You, Contributors! WAFLT thanks the following individuals for their contributions in 2012–13. General Endowment Fund Linguiphile ($100+) Bette Brandenburg Donna L. Clementi Helena Curtain Roma Hoff Eddie R. Lowry Jr. E. Alan Magnuson Elizabeth Montavon Gale Stone Benefactor ($50-99) Paulette Coutade Marcia Fry Lisa Hendrickson

Gisela Nina Holmquist Constance Knop Sy Kreilein Jim Oakley & Anne Chartier Richard Olson JoAnn Polito Sponsor ($25-49) Deb Bowe-Wielgus Danielle Chaussee Martha Cole Margaret Draheim Justin Gerlach Jean M. Hindson

Deborah Hoem-Esparza Peg Jonas Keely Lake Karen Maharg Holly Morse Lauren Rosen Paul Sandrock Lynn Sessler Neitzel Contributor ($1-24) Anita Alkhas Linda Bjella Sharon Bradish Kathy Casey

Laura Dell Landazuri Kelly Ferguson Diane Flanders David Haakenson Chie Kakigi Kathy Mattern Natasha Pierce Lorraine Poplaski Susan Schmidt Diane Tess Deanna Willems Gerri Wrege Deana Zorko

Professional Development Scholarship Fund

Student Travel Scholarship Fund

(Honoring Dr. Roma Hoff, Dr. Connie Knop & Dr. Irène Kraemer)

(Honoring O. Lynn Bolton)

Linguiphile ($100+) Donna L. Clementi Paul & Nuria Hoff Roma Hoff Eddie R. Lowry Jr. Richard Olson Benefactor ($50-99) Bette Brandenburg Martha Cole Catherine Etheridge Peter Hoff Constance Knop Jim Oakley & Anne Chartier Sponsor ($25-49) Kit Chase Margaret Draheim Justin Gerlach Gisela Nina Holmquist Peg Jonas Jeanine Kopecky Wanda Meyer-Rimestad

Holly Morse Lauren Rosen Jeffer Scheuer Diane Tess Gladys Wisnefski Contributor ($1-24) Anita Alkhas Sharon Bradish Laura Dell Landazuri Byron Despres-Berry Kelly Ferguson Diane Flanders Ken Fleurant Karen Fowdy Chie Kakigi Mara Marks Kathy Mattern Michelle Nielsen Anne Rackow Lynn Sessler Neitzel Deanna Willems Gerri Wrege Deana Zorko

Linguiphile ($100+) Roma Hoff Eddie R. Lowry Benefactor ($50-99) Margaret Draheim Bridget Geboy-Helfenstein Peter Hoff Jim Oakley & Anne Chartier Richard Olson Sponsor ($25-49) Bette Brandenburg Kelly Ferguson Justin Gerlach Gisela Nina Holmquist Lauren Rosen

Contributor ($1-24) Anita Alkhas Sharon Bradish Lorraine Day Laura Dell Landazuri Byron Despres-Berry Diane Flanders Ken Fleurant Chie Kakigi Kathy Mattern Natasha Pierce Lynn Sessler Neitzel Deanna Willems Gerri Wrege Deana Zorko

Your Contributions Are Appreciated! Please consider contributing to one or more of these funds for 2013-14. You can do this online at waflt.org – log into your online account, and click “Endowment Contributions” on the top of the page to make your contribution, or mail your check to P.O. Box 1493, Appleton, WI 54912, noting to which fund(s) you would like your donation assigned.

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The VOICE of WAFLT

FLESFEST 2014 Early Start – Long Sequence

Lifelong world language learning, K-16 and beyond http://www.wi-nell.org

The Wisconsin Network for Early Language Learning (WI-NELL) in collaboration with the Wisconsin Association For Language Teachers (WAFLT) present

Do You Believe in Magic? Integrate tried and true fun “tricks of the trade” to build meaningful communication and relationships

Keynote Speakers: Donna Clementi and Bill Curtis

New

* General Session

* Breakout Sessions

* Book Sale

(cash & checks only)

* Luncheon

* Raffle

Saturday, March 8, 2014 from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM NEW LOCATION:

Coffee and rolls from 8:00-8:30 / General Session begins at 8:30

ALVERNO COLLEGE, 3400 S. 43rd St., Milwaukee, WI, Sister Joel Read Center

Quickest route (from all directions): I-94 toward Milwaukee to I-894. Exit at NORTH Loomis Rd. Go 0.1 mi. & turn left (north) on S. 43rd St. Alverno College is 1.4 mi. on right (northeast) side of street. Park in parking structure. Enter Sister Joel Read Center through Rotunda.

COST: $40 ($30 WAFLT Members/$25 Students) by February 15, 2014 No refunds after February 15, 2014 ($45 all registrations after 2/15/14, incl. on-site)

Registration includes materials, AM coffee and rolls and PM buffet luncheon

The Wisconsin Network for Early Language Learning (WI-NELL) FLESFEST is a one-day conference for those interested in promoting standardsbased, Early Start -- Long Sequence world language learning and in articulation between FLES (Foreign Language in the Elementary School), middle school, secondary and post-secondary language programs. Started in 1989 as an extension of FLES networking sessions held at WAFLT Fall Conferences in Appleton, WI, FLESFEST provides an opportunity for world language teachers of all levels and programs to share best practices, ideas and challenges, to learn from each other and to offer support for lifelong learning of world languages. It is held, annually, on the first or second Saturday in March.

Please complete, detach and return form below with payment; no purchase orders, please. Make checks payable to FLESFEST and send to: Jacquelyn Dove, W302 S2856 Bethesda Circle, Waukesha, WI 53188. Your canceled check is your receipt. Questions? Contact Jackie Dove, jldove@wi.rr.com.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name ______________________________________ Home Address _______________________________ ___________________________________________ Home Phone ________________________________ E-Mail ______________________________________ How did you hear about FLESFEST?

School ________________________________ School Address _________________________ ______________________________________ Language(s) ____________________________ Grade(s) _______________________________

 WAFLT  email  mailed flyer  friend or co-worker  other:__________________________________________________


2013 WAFLT Fall Conference Overview Thursday, October 31, 2013 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. $ Pre-Conference Workshop: Common Core Standards through World Languages: Building Literacy For 21st Century Learners 6:30–9:30 p.m. Registration is open – Atrium/Lobby 8:30 p.m. Conference Kick-Off Reception – Lawrence Room

Friday, November 1, 2013 7:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m. 7:45–8:15 9:00–7:30 8:30–11:30 11:45–1:15 1:15–1:45 1:45–2:45 2:45–3:15 3:15–4:15 4:15–4:45 4:45–6:30

Registration is open – Atrium/Lobby New Teacher/New Attendee Orientation Session – Salon D Exhibit Hall is open – Salons A, B, and C $ Friday Workshops $ Buffet Luncheon — Discover Languages Contest Awards – Empire Room Exhibit Break Special Interest Sessions A Exhibit Break Special Interest Sessions B Exhibit Break Keynote Address & Awards Ceremony – Terry Caccavale – Literacy: The Key to Second Language Learning – Salon D 6:30–7:15 Wine & Cheese Reception and Raffle – Exhibit Hall 9:30–10:30 Webizens – Intermezzo 9:30–11:30 Dance, Social – Evergreen Room

Saturday, November 2, 2013 7:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. 6:45–7:45 7:45–9:15 8:00–1:00 8:00–9:00 9:00–9:30 9:30–10:30 10:30–11:00 11:00–12:00 12:15–1:15 1:30–3:00 1:30–2:30 2:45–3:45 3:45

Registration is open – Atrium/Lobby WAFLT Business Meeting (Complimentary Continental Breakfast Door Prizes) – Empire Room $ Saturday Technology Sessions Exhibit Hall is open – Salons A, B, and C Special Interest Sessions C Exhibit Break Special Interest Sessions D Conference Tip Exhibit Break Visit the WAFLT website for updated Language Association Meetings conference information, online registration, and $ Buffet Luncheon – Empire Room complete descriptions of all sessions. $ Saturday Technology Sessions waflt.org Special Interest Sessions E Special Interest Sessions F Conference Closes

The creation of the 2013 WAFLT graphic on the cover of this publication was created by Susan Partin

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2013 WAFLT Fall Conference Languages: Literacy for Life Fostering the critical skills necessary for making connections today in order to communicate in a global future We look forward to welcoming you once again to Appleton for the 2013 WAFLT Fall Conference. This year’s theme, “Languages: Literacy for Life” focuses on literacy as a critical communication tool now and in the future. This year’s WAFLT Fall Conference will offer attendees an excellent opportunity to learn together with fellow World Language colleagues and friends at a variety of social activities as well as at a host of collaborative workshops or sessions.

We are also delighted to welcome Terry Caccavale as our keynote speaker. Terry was most recently the keynote speaker at the 2013 Central States Conference and has also spoken at a number of other state conferences. We invite you to join Terry to explore the importance of multiple literacies in 21st century world language education as students develop college and career readiness skills. We hope that you will also participate in some of the conference social activities. Please plan to attend the Awards Ceremony where we will honor the winners of the Frank M. Grittner and the Anthony J. Gradisnik Awards and hear a message from the 2013 Distinguished Language Educator, Marge Draheim. This is a wonderful opportunity for you to celebrate the achievements of your language colleagues. The wine and cheese reception, door prizes, webizens social, and dance social are all back again!

Back by popular demand, we are thrilled to once again welcome Paul Sandrock, ACTFL Director of Education, to present an updated version of his well-received session from 2012: Common Core Standards through World Languages: Building Literacy for 21st Century Learners. Thursday Workshop participants will experience and analyze numerous strategies that explicitly build students’ skills in interpretive listening and reading, presentational writing, and interpersonal listening and speaking.

On Saturday morning, join us for a complimentary continental breakfast and door prizes at the annual business meeting.

Registration opens Thursday evening at 6:30 p.m. and the conference will officially begin with the traditional kick-off reception in the Lawrence Room at 8:30 p.m. The registration fee includes attendance at any of the one-hour sessions on Friday afternoon & Saturday. Please note that Friday morning workshops, Saturday 90-minute Technology Sessions and meals not included in the registration fee are noted by the ($) symbol on the Conference Overview, page 14.

We encourage you to register online for the conference. You must have a current email address and create a login on the WAFLT website (www.waflt.org). As you register, be sure to carefully read instructions and note the sessions that require an additional fee. Remember to register early. Be sure to check deadlines for the conference and for hotel reservations. For the latter you should contact the Radisson Paper Valley Hotel directly.

You’ll also notice that the schedule has changed in response to member feedback. We hope that these changes (such as the new buffet luncheon on Friday and holding the awards ceremony immediately prior to the wine and cheese social) will better allow you to maximize your professional and personal connections to WAFLT while simultaneously remaining conscious of everdecreasing professional development budgets. Be sure to consult the 2013 WAFLT Conference Overview on page 14 for further details. New teachers and first-time attendees are encouraged to attend the informal orientation meeting Friday morning from 7:45–8:15. Sessions that may be of particular interest to new teachers are marked with this symbol ('). The Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Development and Licensure addressed in each session or workshop are noted in the brackets following the title of the session. You can find a list of the standards on page 22.

We invite you to share this document with your colleagues who are new to the profession and/or your building, as well as those who may not be WAFLT members. We also encourage you to renew your WAFLT membership by going online at www.waflt.org or using the form on page 43. WAFLT members receive many benefits throughout the year, such as reduced registration fees for the Fall Conference, FLESFEST, and the opportunity to apply for grants and scholarships. We look forward to seeing you at the 2013 WAFLT Fall Conference.

Linda Havas and Cathy Stresing WAFLT Program Co-chairs P 15 P


High School Visitors’ Program: Colleagues of the Future

Attention, High School Language Teachers: Nominate one (or more) of your students to participate in the High School Visitors’ Program: Colleagues of the Future at this year’s WAFLT Conference! C Students who arrive at the conference without pre-registering will not be admitted.

There is definitely a growing need for language teachers at all levels. The purpose of the WAFLT High School Visitors’ program is to provide a realistic, insightful, and entertaining view of the teaching of World Languages. We encourage you to promote this unique, interactive opportunity to your junior and senior language students. There are probably students in your classes who would make great teachers, but who have never considered that possibility. Perhaps they have already decided to pursue an education degree, but not as a teacher of languages. Those are the students we hope you will help us find!

C Registered students are also eligible to attend any of the one-hour sessions offered on Friday or Saturday, at no charge, provided they are accompanied by their nominating teacher. Special Application Procedures If you have students interested in attending the WAFLT High School Visitors’ Program, we ask that the teacher complete the student’s registration form. Please download and complete the registration information by visiting waflt.org and selecting “High School Visitors’ Program.”

WAFLT will offer student participants the option of choosing to attend this workshop from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Friday, November 1, OR from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, November 2. If the student is selected to participate in the program, a non-refundable $10.00 registration fee will be charged. Students will have the opportunity to attend the WAFLT luncheon at no charge on the day of their workshop. Please do not send any money with student application(s). Confirmation materials will arrive via email prior to the conference.

This form must be submitted via the teacher’s email address to: tberg65@yahoo.com by Friday, October 11, 2013 **Please note: registration is only available via email. We thank you for your interest in this program and sincerely hope that you will nominate potential “colleagues of the future.” If you have any questions about the program, please contact:

Please note: C The teacher nominating the student must be registered and present at the conference while the student is attending the workshop. However, teachers will not participate in the High School Visitors’ Program.

Tracy Sandberg High School Visitors Program Coordinator tberg65@yahoo.com (920) 921-2134

C Students who have not paid the required $10.00 registration fee will not be permitted to attend the High School Visitors’ Program.

* WAFLT is not liable for the participating students. P 16 P


WAFLT Scholarship for Tomorrow's Teachers

The Executive Board of the Wisconsin Association For Language Teachers is pleased to offer up to 10 scholarships available to college-level students preparing to become language teachers. The purpose of these scholarships is to provide teachers-in-training with financial assistance to attend the WAFLT Fall Conference. By attending the conference, teachers-in-training will have the opportunity to become familiar with WAFLT and the language-specific professional organizations which also hold meetings during the conference, meet and interact with teachers already in the profession, become more familiar with trends in language education, and learn firsthand the benefits of membership in WAFLT.

Application process: Application instructions and important details can be found under “Grants and Scholarships” at waflt.org and must be submitted electronically to grants@waflt.org by September 25. Please follow the specific steps listed (e.g., creating a login) before submitting application. IMPORTANT APPLICATION PROCEDURES: Student applicants must first go to WAFLT’s website,waflt.org. Please follow the prompts to join WAFLT as a student member. Be sure to keep your login and password accessible as you will need them whenever you access your information on the website or register for the WAFLT Fall Conference. (Do not register for the WAFLT Fall Conference until you have heard from the scholarship committee!) Students or nominators must submit the application electronically, including filling out and attaching the student application form, a one-page personal statement explaining why they wish to attend the WAFLT Fall Conference, and an individualized letter of recommendation from a methods instructor or cooperating teacher. All three documents should be submitted electronically to grants@waflt.org in one email by either the student or the nominator.

Scholarship Requirements C College/university juniors, seniors, or graduate students must be declared language teaching majors or minors. C Students who have completed or are currently enrolled in a language methods course are eligible. C Nominators (methods instructor or cooperating teacher) must be current members of WAFLT, must have been members for at least the two years preceding the nomination, and they may only nominate up to 5 students each. C At least one scholarship will be available for each of the languages represented on the WAFLT Board, including: Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Slavic Languages, Spanish, and one for Other World Languages.

Notification: The WAFLT Grants and Scholarships Committee will process the applications and make recommendations to the Executive Board. Scholarship winners will be notified by email in early October.

Scholarship Amount C Cost of registration for the WAFLT Fall Conference C Cost of a Friday Morning Workshop

Important! Scholarship applicants should not register for the conference until after receiving notification of their status.

The scholarship does not include meals or lodging.

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Special Pre-Conference Workshop Thursday, October 31 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Additional Fee – $45 Pre-Registration Required

Common Core Standards through World Languages: Building Literacy for 21st Century Learners

Emphasizing the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational), World Language teachers support and strengthen students’ literacy as described in the Common Core State Standards. Workshop participants experience and analyze numerous strategies that explicitly build students’ skills in interpretive listening and reading, presentational writing, and interpersonal listening and speaking. Participants will Identify approaches that simultaneously develop 21st century skills of creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration. They will also consider ways to engage and motivate students at all levels.

Presenter:

Paul Sandrock ACTFL Director of Education

$45 fee includes registration, lunch, and coffee breaks Register early; space is limited **Please note: participants in the Thursday Workshop must register for all or part of the WAFLT Conference on Friday and Saturday, November 1-2.

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New Visions in Action: A WAFLT Task Force Workshop &

A New Teacher’s Workshop

Friday, November 1 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. In the summers of 1999 and 2000, ACTFL and the National Foreign Language Resource Center at Iowa State University collaborated on an initiative that sought to address the issues in foreign language education and to outline a plan of action that will be undertaken by the profession. Five critical concerns were identified to be discussed:

workshop as a way to share your experiences, collaborate with colleagues, and get information on how you can become more informed and involved in the profession of teaching World Languages. The five topics and three questions will be discussed during the Workshops on Friday morning. While there is no cost for this Workshop, separate registration is required.*

1. Architecture of the Profession 2. Curriculum, Instruction, Articulation, and Assessment 3. Research 4. Teacher Development 5. Teacher Recruitment

Participants will be sent a finalized agendas and discussion papers once the registration forms have been received. Important Application Procedures

Following the ACTFL model, the WAFLT Executive Board discussed these five topics over the past decade. Now, WAFLT would like to invite all of its members to be part of the discussion. This year, two workshops will be held during the 2013 WAFLT Fall Conference. One will be for members to participate in the creation of a WAFLT “New Visions in Action” Task Force. As part of this task force, members will be asked to devote their time and expertise to refine the work that has already begun on the national and state level and to answer the following questions:

People wishing to take part in the “New Visions in Action: A WAFLT Task Force” Workshop, or “New Visions in Action: A New Teachers Workshop” should complete the application form found on the WAFLT website at waflt.org. Please email the downloaded and completed form by October 1, 2013 to: Kyle Gorden – WAFLT NVA Chairman gordky@elkhorn.k12.wi.us (262) 723-6316

1. What can WAFLT and its membership do? 2. What are the priorities for these actions? 3. Who will do the work?

* Participants must also register for the 2013 WAFLT Fall Conference.

The second workshop is geared toward teachers in their first years of the profession. If you are a new teacher in the first five years of your teaching career, consider this P 19 P


Thursday, 8:30–10:00 p.m. Lawrence Room ... Relax after your drive to Appleton ... Renew acquaintances ... Meet new people ... Enjoy a beverage and snacks ... Mix and mingle

Conference Kick-Off Reception

Snacks provided C Cash bar available Included in your registration packet will be a coupon for a complimentary beverage for this reception only.

Welcome to WAFLT 2013!

Friday, 7:45–8:15 a.m. Salon D

New Teacher New Attendee Orientation Session

Presenters

WAFLT Board Members Are you a new teacher or a first-time WAFLT conference attendee? Be sure to attend this Conference Orientation Session which will familiarize you with all the wonderful things that WAFLT and the 2013 Fall Conference have to offer. C Meet the WAFLT Executive Board C Discuss the conference layout C Receive many tips on making this a most rewarding conference

Sessions marked with this icon ( ' ) will be of particular interest to teachers at the beginning of their careers!

Friday, 4:45-6:30 p.m. Salon D

Keynote Address & Awards Ceremony

Keynote Address: Terry Caccavale will explore the importance of multiple literacies in 21st century world language education. Awards Ceremony: Recipients of the Distinguished Language Educator Award, Anthony J. Gradisnik, Frank M. Grittner New Teacher Award, and ISE Language Matters Award and more will be recognized.

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Personal Conference Planner Thursday, October 31, 2013 10:00–4:00 8:30 p.m.

$ Pre-Conference Workshop: Common Core Standards through World Languages: Building Literacy for 21st Century Learners Conference Kick-Off Reception – Lawrence Room

Friday, November 1, 2013 7:45–8:15

New Teacher/New Attendee Orientation Session – Salon D

8:30–11:30

$ Friday Workshop:

11:45–1:15

$ Buffet Luncheon – Discover Languages Contest Awards – Empire Room

1:15–1:45

Exhibit Break

1:45–2:45

Special Interest Session A:

2:45–3:15

Exhibit Break

3:15–4:15

Special Interest Session B:

4:15–4:45

Exhibit Break

4:45–6:30

Keynote Address & Awards Ceremony – Salon D

6:30–7:15

Wine and Cheese Reception – Exhibit Hall, Salon A, B, C

9:30–10:30

WAFLT Webizens – Intermezzo

9:30–11:30

Dance, Social – Evergreen Room

Saturday, November 2, 2013 6:45–7:45

WAFLT Business Meeting (Complimentary Continental Breakfast, Door Prizes) – Empire Room

7:45–9:15

$ Saturday A.M. Technology Session: – OR –

8:00–9:00

Special Interest Session C:

9:00–9:30

Exhibit Break

9:30–10:30

Special Interest Session D:

10:30–11:00

Exhibit Break

11:00-12:00

Language Association Meetings

12:15–1:15

$ Buffet Luncheon (Door Prizes) – Empire Room

1:30-3:00

$ Saturday P.M. Technology Session: – OR –

1:30–2:30

Special Interest Session E:

2:45–3:45

Special Interest Session F:

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Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Development and Licensure PI34 1) Teachers know the subjects they are teaching: The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for pupils.

7) Teachers are able to plan different kinds of lessons: The teacher organizes and plans systematic instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, pupils, the community, and curriculum goals.

What we teach: culture, language, context

Methods: curriculum and standards

2) Teachers know how children grow: The teacher understands how children with broad ranges of ability learn and provides instruction that supports their intellectual, social, and personal development.

8) Teachers know how to test for student progress: The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the pupil.

Developmental aspects of learning

Assessment

3) Teachers understand that children learn differently: The teacher understands how pupils differ in their approaches to learning and the barriers that impede learning and can adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of pupils, including those with disabilities and exceptionalities.

9) Teachers are able to evaluate themselves: The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effect of his or her choices and actions on pupils, parents, professionals in the learning community and others and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.

Methods: differentiation

Reflective practitioner: National Board Certification and action research

4) Teachers know how to teach: The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology to encourage children's development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

10) Teachers are connected with other teachers and the community: The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support pupil learning and well being and who acts with integrity, fairness and in an ethical manner.

Methods: how to teach

Community connections: outreach, exchange programs, professional involvement

5) Teachers know how to manage a classroom: The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

Conference Tip

Group work, learning environment, positive impact on student attitudes

The number in brackets after each title, e.g., [1] identifies the state teacher standard which applies to that session.

6) Teachers communicate well: The teacher uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques as well as instructional media and technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. Technology for pedagogical purposes

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Friday Morning — 8:30-11:30

Friday Workshops

Friday Morning Workshops Additional Fee – $20 Pre-Registration Recommended

FW-3

Ignite Creativity via Storytelling: Principles and Formulas that Make Writing Stories Easy [1, 4, 7] Presenters: Haiyun Lu, Chinese Language and Culture Teacher, University School of Milwaukee; Piyanut Sripanawongsa, Chinese Language and Culture Teacher, Middleton High School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

FW-1 Assessing What Matters [1, 7, 8] Presenters: Karen Fowdy, Independent Consultant , and Lisa Hendrickson, Independent Consultant, School District of Monroe Language: All Languages Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary Participants shift the focus from asking, "What will I teach on Monday?" to "What will my students be ABLE TO DO?" Participants will design culturally-rich authentic assessments that guide instruction and create rubrics that describe performance and advance proficiency.

Why are stories so essential in human existence? The presenters will take you on a quest to find answers based on brain research, master-storytelling principles, and creative storytelling formulas. Participants will work on authentic materials collectively to create engaging stories.

'FW-2 Central States Extension Workshop Presentation [7, 8, 10] Presenters: Stephanie Diedrich, Department Chair/Spanish Teacher, Catholic Memorial High School, Waukesha; Kate Rozman, German Teacher, Mukwonago High School Language: All Languages Level: High School

FW-4 Keys to Planning for Student Learning [4, 7] Presenter: Donna Clementi, Professional Development Consultant, ACTFL Language: All Languages Level: All Levels Participants examine a model unit from Keys to Planning for Student Learning, a new ACTFL publication, to identify how the 5 Cs, 21st Century Skills, and Common Core Standards are integrated into K-12 lesson, unit, and curriculum design.

Participants will gain a better understanding of Standards Based Grading and how it applies to our daily lives in the classroom. Participants are encouraged to bring their standards/essential leaning outcomes/SMART goals, assessments/rubrics, and unit/theme ideas for collaboration during this session.

FW-5

New Visions in Action: A WAFLT New Teacher Workshop [1, 8, 9, 10] Presenters: Lynn Sessler Neitzel, Japanese Teacher, and Susana Gorski, Spanish Teacher, Menasha Joint School District Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

Conference Tip If this is the first WAFLT Conference you are attending, please check the “first time attendee” box when registering to receive special instructions and recognition.

This workshop is designed to help new teachers navigate their way through those first few years to be a success in our profession. Various aspects will be highlighted, including the importance of engagement in professional organizations. P 23 P


Friday Morning — 8:30-11:30

Friday Workshops

'FW-6 Literacy: The Key to Second Language Learning [1] Presenter: Terry Caccavale, Keynote Speaker, Holliston High School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

FW-10 Mit Vorurteilen umgehen lernen [1, 2, 3, 4] Presenter: Sigurd Piwek, Teacher, Milwaukee German Immersion School Language: German Level: All Levels Today, whether at school or university, at work or at home, people from different cultural backgrounds live, learn, and work together. As such, it is becoming more and more important to teach intercultural awareness skills.

This interactive session will discuss best practices in reading and writing instruction in the second language classroom, including best practices in vocabulary skill development, the foundation of all literacy success.

FW-11 Classroom Re-enactments: Armor, Oratorical Gestures, Crowd Acclamations, and Legionary Training [1, 3, 7, 10] Presenter: Dr. Greg Aldrete, Frankenthal Professor of History & Humanistic Studies, UW-Green Bay Language: Latin Level: All Levels

'FW-7 Promoting your Program–ABC's of PR [6, 10] Presenters: Autumn Giddings, Public Relations Specialist, PREP; Michele LaPean-Usher, French/Spanish Teacher, Milton Middle/High School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

This session entails several activities used to bring the ancient world to life for students: constructing Greek and Roman linen body armor; learning gestures used by Roman orators and acclamations chanted by crowds; and staging a Roman Legionary training day.

Bring a laptop, a list of yearly events (contests, fieldtrips, performances, etc.), photos of your students, and we will help you to quickly and efficiently share the news. With a little PR, you will make your program shine!

FW-12 African Diaspora in the Americas: Touch the Drum. Feel the Energy. Connect Culturally. [1, 7] Presenter: Pablo Muirhead, Spanish & Education Instructor, Milwaukee Area Technical College Language: Spanish Level: All Levels

FW-8

Touch the World Through the Heart of a Child [1, 4, 7, 10] Presenter: Deb Kennedy, Spanish Teacher, Columbus Catholic Schools Language: All Languages; Spanish Level: Elementary; Middle School; High School; Other Participants will discover many creative and useful ways to stimulate lots of enthusiasm and desire for speaking the target language amongst their students of all ages, backgrounds, and abilities. Ready to use materials and ideas will be provided.

The inextricable nature of language and culture beckons us to rethink how we integrate the two in order to develop students’ intercultural competencies. Learn about the African diaspora in the Americas. As an ensemble, play the “Peruvian” cajón. This session will be in Spanish.

FW-9 Vive l'Histoire de Paris! [1, 2, 4, 7] Presenters: Julia Price, French Teacher, Westosha Central High School; Judith Michaels, Private Consultant, Green Bay Language: French Level: All Levels

FW-13 From the Maya to Madrid... [1, 4, 7, 8] Presenter: Marie Mattson, Retired Spanish Teacher, Ashland High School Language: Spanish Level: Middle School; High School Looking for variety when assessing cultural activities? The cultural lessons with assessments will include: Maya math, Maya glyphs, a virtual trip to Madrid, a lesson about the dancing horses of Spain, and the use of telenovelas in the classroom.

Connect Parisian monuments, architecture, art, and culture influenced by the revolution. Multi-media resources and ready-to-use activities are adaptable as separate units to enhance curriculum. Develop students’ savoir-faire and transferable life-long learning skills, providing a knowledge base for historical-cultural appreciation. P 24 P


Friday Morning — 8:30-11:30

Friday Workshops

FW-14 High School Student Workshop [7, 10] Presenters: Tracy Sandberg, Retired Spanish Teacher, Menasha High School; Emily Behnke, Spanish Teacher, JR Gerritts Middle School, Kimberly Language: All Languages Level: High School

FW-15 “New Visions in Action: A WAFLT Task Force” Workshop [4, 9, 10] Presenters: Kyle Gorden, WAFLT NVA Chair, Elkhorn Area High School; Jacquelyn Dove, Retired French Teacher, Elmbrook Schools Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

Special registration is required for this entertaining and interactive workshop offered to high school students considering a career in language education. Please refer to the HS Visitor’s Program link on the WAFLT website for further details and registration information.

This workshop is an initiative to create a “Task Force” to address the issues in language education and to outline a plan of action that will be undertaken by the profession. Five concerns of the profession will be discussed.

Friday Buffet Menu

WAFLT Luncheon

South of the Border

Languages: Literacy for Life!

Roasted corn and black bean salad Pico de gallo, guacamole, and fire roasted tomato salsa Blue and white corn chips Soft and hard shell beef and chicken tacos, with shredded cheese, diced tomato, shredded lettuce, jalapeno peppers, chopped onions, black olives, and sour cream Vegetarian refried beans con queso Mexican rice Homemade cinnamon churros

Friday, November 1 11:45–1:15 Empire Room

Join us in recognizing the student winners of the WAFLT Discover Languages Student Postcard and Video contests. Awards will be given to World Language students who designed a postcard and/or video that depicts the 2013 WAFLT Fall Conference Theme: Languages: Literacy for Life. These contests were open to all World Language students in Wisconsin PreK-16. Come celebrate and see how our students are helping Wisconsin Discover Languages and Discover the World!

Cost: $16.00

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Friday Afternoon — 1:30-2:30

Special Interest Sessions

'A-1 Wisconsin's Global Education Certificate [1, 10] Presenters: Gerhard Fischer, Education Consultant, Dept of Public Instruction; Laura Koebel, Spanish Teacher, Plymouth High School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

A-6

World Language Career Day Workshop [1, 4, 5, 10] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Anca Coleman, Educator Outreach, Regional Representative, Intercultural Student Experiences (ISE) Language: All Languages Level: High School

'A-2

Celebrating the Diversity that Exists within Your School & Community: Creating a Multicultural Festival [1, 5, 6, 10] Presenters: Natalie Dupor Schmidt and Theresa Kruschke-Alfonso, Spanish Teachers, Greendale High School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

A-7

News & Networking: Tomorrow's Technology Today [1, 2, 3, 5] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Thoma Bastin, National Content Specialist, Holt McDougal Publishers Language: French; Spanish Level: Middle School; High School A-8

Le Grand Heritage du PassĂŠ de la France [1, 2, 4, 7] Presenters: Judith Michaels, Private Consultant; Julia Price, French Teacher, Central High School, District of Westosha, Salem Language: French Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

'A-3

Google Tools and Apps in the World Language Classroom - WAFLT Summer Institute Showcase [3, 5, 8] Presenters: Deb Bowe-Wielgus, Summer Institute Coordinator, Waukesha West High School; Summer Language Institute Participants Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

A-9

Der deutsche Wald / The German Forest [1, 4, 5, 7] Presenters: John Stark, Faculty, Northern Illinois University; Charles James, Faculty, UW-Madison; Sigurd Piwek, Faculty, Milwaukee German Immersion School Language: German Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

A-4 Modeling Online Language Courses [1, 4, 6] Presenter: Mingyu Sun, Director, UW-Milwaukee Language Resource Center Language: All Languages Level: Post-Secondary A-5

Seal of Biliteracy: District & State Recognition of Student Language Proficiency [2, 3, 7, 10] Presenters: Pam Delfosse, Jenni Zupan, and Josh Forehand, Madison Metropolitan School District; Gerhard Fischer, World Language Education Consultant, DPI Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

A-10

Collaborative Literacy: Active Strategies for Reading and Listening [4, 7] Presenter: Joshua LeGreve, Spanish Teacher, Lake Denoon Middle School Language: All Languages; Spanish Level: Middle School; High School

Conference Tip After you have registered: C C C C

Look for a detailed receipt sent via email as soon as the registration is processed. Double check that you are signed up for the proper workshops and meal functions. Make any changes/additions to your registration by logging in to the WAFLT website prior to the conference. Please note that additions may require additional payment and on-site change requests are subject to availability.

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Friday Afternoon — 1:45-2:45

Special Interest Sessions

A-11

Understanding The UW System Spanish Placement Test [8] Presenters: Sonya Sedivy and James Wollack, UW Center for Placement Testing; Gail Gonzalez, Manuel Fernandez, Mary Alice Sicard, and Renee Craig-Odders, UW Placement Testing Committee Language: Spanish Level: High School; Post-Secondary

A-14

Turkish Germans and German Turks - New Identities [1, 4] (Exhibitor) Presenters: Katja Fullard, Director of the Language Department, and Anja Schmitt, Language Consultant, Goethe-Institut Chicago Language: German Level: High School; Post-Secondary A-15

Elevate Students’ Proficiency Level from Intermediate to Advanced Through Chinese Film [1, 4, 7, 8] Presenter: Xiaorong Wang, Lecturer, UW-Milwaukee Language: Chinese Level: Post-Secondary

A-12

Learning about the Indigenous Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World through Games [1] Presenter: Lina Martin, Target Language Expert, Carthage College Language: Spanish Level: Elementary; Middle School; High School

Conference Tip On the Conference Planner (page 21) you will notice a ($) symbol in front of the sessions or functions that require an additional fee.

A-13 Connections and CBI [1, 7, 10] Presenter: Kazuko Stone, Japanese Language and Social Studies Teacher, Denmark High School Language: Japanese Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

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Friday Afternoon — 3:15-4:15

Special Interest Sessions

B-1

Achieving Fluency through TPRS and other Comprehensible Input Strategies [2, 3, 5] Presenter: Marta Yedinak, Spanish Teacher, Waupun Jr/Sr High School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

B-7

Gearing Up: Interlocking the Modes of Communication [1, 3, 6, 8] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Kerry Santoro, Pedagogical Liaison, Langenscheidt Educational Services Language: German Level: Middle School; High School

B-2

B-8

Connecting to Others: Global Experiences that Connect Students, Colleagues, and Classrooms [7, 10] Presenter: Lynn Sessler Neitzel, Japanese Teacher, Clovis Grove Elementary School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

The Use of Technology in Teaching and Learning Chinese Tones [1, 4, 6] Presenter: Hongying Xu , Lecturer, UW-La Crosse Language: Chinese Level: All Levels B-9

Le top 2013 de la musique pour les profs [1, 3, 4] Presenter: Pascal Rollet, French Professor, Carthage College Language: French Level: All Levels

B-3

Beginning, Middle, End: Story Form as the Basis for Engaging Learning Experiences [4, 7] Presenter: Helena Curtain, Associate Professor (Emerita), UW-Milwaukee Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

B-10 Share the Fun in Summer School [1, 2, 4, 10] Presenters: Mari Peterson, French Teacher, Cindy Borski, German Teacher, and Yu Kitamura, Japanese Teacher, Lincoln High School, Wisconsin Rapids Language: French; German; Japanese Level: Elementary

'B-4

More “Target Language: Every Day / All Hour” [4, 5] Presenter: Lisa Hendrickson, Independent Consultant, School District of Monroe Language: All Languages Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

B-11

Using Essential Questions to Guide Instruction [4, 7, 8] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Mary Lindquist, Consultant, EMC Publishing Language: All Languages Level: Middle School; High School

B-5

Authentic Texts, Digital Media, and 21st Century Readers [2, 4, 7] Presenters: Deborah Jansen, French Teacher, Appleton East High School; Stephanie Rippl, French Teacher, Odyssey/Magellan Charter Schools Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

B-12

The University of Wisconsin System German Placement Test [8] Presenters: Monika Chavez, Professor of German, UW-Madison; Jim Wollack, Director, Testing and Evaluation, UW-Madison; Keith Rosenbaum, German Teacher, Middleton High School; Martina Lindseth, Professor of German, UW-Eau Claire; Richard DCamp, Professor of German, UW-Oshkosh; Richard Ruppel, Professor of German, UW-Stevens Point; Sonya Sedivy, Scientist, UW-Madison Language: German Level: All Levels

B-6

Shadowing Practice: A Great Technique for Pronunciation and Interpretive-Listening [2, 3, 4, 8] Presenters: Sueyon Seo, Lecturer, and Kazuhide Takeuchi, Graduate Teaching Assistant, UW-Milwaukee/FLL Language: All Languages; Chinese; Japanese; Less Commonly Taught Languages Level: High School; Post-Secondary; Other

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Friday Afternoon — 3:15-4:15

Special Interest Sessions

B-13 Learning to Read Authentic Latin [4, 7] Presenter: Michael Dybicz, Latin Teacher, Marquette University High School Language: Latin Level: High School

Conference Tip Look for hotel reservation information on page 41, and registration information starting on page 42 of this publication.

B-14 Die EU in dEUtsch [1, 4, 5, 7] Presenters: John Stark, Faculty, Northern Illinois University; Helene Zimmer Lowe, Retired Language: German Level: High School; Post-Secondary

To ensure your place at the conference, register online at waflt.org or complete your registration form and send it by October 19, 2013 Be sure you have a place to stay – make your hotel reservation directly with the Radisson Paper Valley Hotel by October 12, 2013, to receive special WAFLT rates.

B-15

30 Tips & Tricks for a Well-Managed World Language Classroom [2, 4, 5] Presenters: Erin Flesch and Kiley Ramirez, Spanish Teachers, Monona Grove High School Language: All Languages; Spanish Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

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Friday Afternoon — 4:45-6:30

Keynote Address | Awards Ceremony Salon D

Therese Sullivan Caccavale connects with language teachers! She speaks our language and understands our problems because she herself is a dedicated teacher. She has focused her teaching career on Immersion Education, emphasizing the exclusive use of the target language in the classroom. Terry is a doctoral student at Boston University with a specialization in Second Language Literacy. In addition to being the Keynote Speaker at CSCTFL 2013, she presented a workshop titled “Literacy: The Key to Second Language Development.”

Literacy: The Key to Second Language Learning

Nowadays, the role of a World Language teacher is not limited to teaching the language itself, but rather LIFE, through the target language. In order to negotiate life through another language, multiple literacies are needed, including communicative and cultural literacy. By developing these literacies on the part of our students, we help to develop the college and career-readiness skills demanded by the Common Core Initiative, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, and the College Board, as well as by local educational authorities. Join keynote speaker Terry Caccavale as she explores the importance of multiple literacies in 21st century world language education.

Terry completed her dual BA in Elementary and French Education at SUNY Cortland in 1975. In 2005, she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from this same institution. She received her MA in French Linguistics from Middlebury College in 1978, and her DEA (Diplôme d'Études Approfondies) from l'Université de Franche-Comté (Besançon, France) in 1978. In the Fall of 1979 she began the French Immersion Program in the Holliston, MA Public Schools, and in 1998 began the Spanish FLES Program, for which the district was awarded the Melba D. Woodruff Award for Exemplary Elementary Foreign Language Instruction in 2011 at the ACTFL Convention in Boston, MA.

Awards Ceremony

Terry has served as Secretary and President of the National Network for Early Language Learning, and has given workshops around the country. She was the Keynote Speaker in 2009 at the New York State Foreign Language Teachers Association Conference, and in 2012 at the Massachusetts Foreign Language Association Conference.

WAFLT will recognize members who have received special awards and recognitions during the past year, including recipients of the Distinguished Language Educator Award, Anthony J. Gradisnik Award, Frank M. Grittner New Teacher Award, and ISE Language Matters Award. Presider

Keely Lake, President Presenter

WAFLT President-elect Honored Attendee

Marge Draheim WAFLT 2013 Distinguished Language Educator

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Dance & Social

WAFLT Webizens

Friday, November 1

Friday, November 1

9:30–11:30 p.m. – Evergreen

9:30–10:30 p.m. – Intermezzo

Communicate, Collaborate, Participate! Not ready to call it a night? Join your colleagues and friends for our annual Dance and Social. Enjoy good music and dancing while you catch up with old friends

Wish you were doing more with technology in teaching and learning? Already integrating technology? Need some new approaches? Have a tech problem to solve? Meet with colleagues in real time to share, solve problems, and grow your ideas. Join WAFLT’s 21st Century Communications Committee for an informal social in Intermezzo.

2013 Conference Program Committee Linda Havas Program Co-Chair Greendale Schools Joan Blaha Retired, Muskego High School Marge Draheim Retired, Appleton East High School Kari Ewoldt De Pere High School Karen Fowdy Retired, Monroe High School Lisa Hendrickson Retired, Monroe High School

Cathy Stresing Program Co-Chair Wauwatosa East High School Chie Kakigi Treasurer, Wisconsin Association of Teachers of Japanese Jeanine Kopecky Woods School, Lake Geneva Keely Lake Wayland Academy, Beaver Dam Jody Reif Ziemann Berlin High School Keli Reinke Hortonville High School

Tammy Riedel Fox River Middle School, Waterford Janet Rowe Hortonville High School Tracy Sandberg Retired, Menasha High School Lynn Sessler Neitzel Clovis Grove Elementary, Menasha Jessica Swemke Lincoln High School, Manitowoc Deana Zorko LaFollette High School, Madison

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Continental Breakfast Danish Pastries, Muffins, and Bagels Coffee, Tea, Milk, Orange Juice Cost: Complimentary with Registration

Breakfast with WAFLT Saturday, November 2

u Attend the annual business meeting u Meet the officers and board members of WAFLT u Find out about the professional activities sponsored by WAFLT for this school year u Get information about the 2014 WAFLT Fall Conference u Win a door prize!

6:45–7:45 a.m. Empire Room

Saturday Morning — 7:45-9:15

A.M. Technology Sessions 'T-2 I'm Behind and I Can't Catch Up [5, 6] Presenters: Paula Meyer, Spanish Teacher, Technology Curriculum Integration Specialist, and Shelly Tesch, Spanish Teacher, Appleton North High School Language: All Languages Level: High School; All Levels

Saturday Technology Sessions Additional Fee – $10 Pre-Registration Recommended

Technology seems to continue marching forward leaving many falling further behind. This presentation will help improve basic skills so attendees feel more comfortable using common technologies to improve their instruction. Useful tips, tools, and applications will be presented.

T-1 Flipping Instruction: A Starting Point [3, 4, 7] Presenter: Danielle Chaussee, Spanish Teacher, NBCT, Oconomowoc High School Language: All Languages Level: High School

T-3

Interactive Online Vocabulary Learning Tools [1, 3, 4, 8] Presenters: Amy Buttner, Spanish Teacher, North Shore Middle School; Elena Lopez, Spanish Teacher, Lake Country School District Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

This hands-on workshop demonstrates how “flipping” can work for you! The presenter will demonstrate flipped classroom lessons using an iPad, Educreations, QR codes, and Audacity. Come with your iPad, a laptop, a headset/microphone, and a grammar lesson to “flip.”

Learn how to use and integrate the interactive online tools Zondle, Quizlet, and the Rich Internet Applications from the University of Michigan's CLEAR to engage students in online vocabulary practice. Bring a computer or tablet to fully engage in activities.

Saturday Morning — 8:30-11:30

High School Student Workshop

CW-1 High School Student Workshop [7, 10] Presenters: Tracy Sandberg, Retired Spanish Teacher, Menasha High School; Emily Behnke, Spanish Teacher, JR Gerritts Middle School, Kimberly Language: All Languages Level: High School

Special registration is required for this entertaining and interactive workshop offered to high school students considering a career in language education. Please refer to the HS Visitor’s Program link on the WAFLT website for further details and registration information.

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Saturday Morning — 8:00-9:00

Special Interest Sessions C-7

World Language + Global Knowledge: Natural Connection, Uncommon Practice [1, 4, 9] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Janice Holter Kittok, Independent Consultant, Educator in Service Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

C-1 Seriously; It's Elementary [6, 8, 10] Presenter: Lynn Sessler Neitzel, Japanese Teacher, Clovis Grove Elementary School, Menasha Language: All Languages Level: Elementary; Middle School C-2

Designing Culturally-Based Thematic Units for the Advanced Language Classroom [1, 4, 7] Presenters: Erin Falk and Nicolle Schroeder, Spanish Teachers, New Berlin Eisenhower Middle/High School Language: All Languages Level: High School

C-8 Suivez-moi [6, 7] Presenters: Andrea Behn, French Teacher, Parker High School; Justin Frieman, Chapter President, AATF-WI Language: French Level: All Levels

'C-3 Kick the Textbook Habit! [1, 4, 7, 10] Presenters: Mary Straub and Jennifer Schiltz, Spanish Teachers, Waterford Union High School Language: All Languages Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

C-9 Developing Skills for Text Types [1, 7] Presenter: Sabine Beirold, German Teacher, Rufus King High School, Milwaukee Language: French; German; Spanish Level: High School

C-4

Love, Anger and Song: The Iliad and Odyssey in the Classics or World Literature Classroom [1, 3, 4, 7] Presenter: William Brockliss, Assistant Professor, UW-Madison Language: Latin; Less Commonly Taught Languages Level: All Levels

C-10 Einfach Spaß! [3, 7] Presenters: Josef Neumayer and Lydia Ronning, German Teachers, Niles District 219 Language: German Level: All Levels C-11 Spanish Instruction in the Secondary Grades and the Common Core Content Standards: What Are the Curricular Implications for the Spanish Classroom? [1, 3, 4, 6] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Mario A Nuñez, Director; Santillana USA Professional Development Language: Spanish Level: Middle School; High School

C-5

Tomatematemus! : The Common Language of Harry Potter [3, 7] Presenter: Martha Goodge, French Teacher, EAGLE School of Madison Language: All Languages Level: Elementary; Middle School 'C-6 From Kinder to AP: A Thematic Approach to Curriculum [1, 4, 7, 8] Presenters: Theresa Kruschke Alfonso, Spanish Teacher, Greendale High School; Jessica Bradley, Spanish Teacher, Highland View Elementary, Greendale Language: All Languages; Spanish Level: Elementary; Middle School; High School

C-12 A Focus on Community: Addressing Place, Purpose, and Belonging through Target Language Communication [1, 5, 7, 10] Presenter: Paul Hoff, Professor, Spanish and Foreign Language Education, UW-Eau Claire Language: Spanish Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary C-13 Leyendo en niveles avanzados [1, 2, 4] Presenter: Gladys Wisnefski, Retired CAPP Spanish Teacher, Oshkosh West High School Language: Spanish Level: High School; Post-Secondary

Conference Tip The temperature in the hotel conference rooms varies due to room size and attendance numbers. For your comfort, you may want to consider dressing in layers or bringing a sweater.

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Saturday Morning — 9:30-10:30

Special Interest Sessions

D-1

Be Social! Building 3 Modes of Communication Through Facebook Groups [1, 6, 10] Presenters: Jeremy Wildenberg, Educator, UW-Green Bay; Lauren Rosen, Program Director, University of Wisconsin Language: All Languages Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

D-8

Technology in Testing and Other French Placement Concerns [8] Presenters: Hillary Engelhart, E. Nicole Meyer, and Kathleen Farrell-Whitworth, UW Placement Test Committee Members; Sonya Sedivy and James Wollack, Director, UW Center for Placement Testing Language: French Level: High School; Post-Secondary

'D-2 Easy Steps to Advocate Language Programs [10] Presenter: Jessica Miller, Associate Professor of French, UW-Eau Claire Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

'D-9 Authentic Cultural Bell Ringers and Class Starters [1, 3, 7] Presenters: Brian Wopat, French Teacher, Onalaska High School; Jennifer Olivares, Spanish Teacher, Holmen High School; Liselotte Kuster, French Teacher, Logan High School Language: French; Spanish Level: Middle School; High School

'D-3 Lesson Study: Collaborating with Our Colleagues in Other Languages [4, 7, 9] Presenter: Justin Frieman, French Teacher, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, IL Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

D-10 Grüne Welle mit Deutsche Welle--Neue Unterrichtsideen [1, 4, 6, 7] Presenter: Mark Wagner, German Teacher, Nicolet High School Language: German Level: High School; Post-Secondary

D-4 NNELL/FLES Networking Session [1, 2, 7, 10] Presenter: Jessica Bradley, Spanish Teacher, Highland View Elementary, Greendale Language: All Languages Level: Elementary; Middle School

D-11 Le choc cultural, existe-t-il toujours? [1, 7] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Tammi Brusegaard, Program Coordinator, Vistas in Education Language: French Level: All Levels

D-5

Want to Raise Your Child Bilingually? Start Before They are Born! [1, 2, 10] Presenter: Jackie Muirhead, Instructor, Milwaukee Area Technical College Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

D-12 Punto com: Our Top Ten List [3, 4, 6, 7] Presenters: Trisha Koch, Spanish Teacher, Middleton High School; Anne Cummings Hlas, Associate Professor of Spanish, UW-Eau Claire; Pamela Larson, Spanish Teacher, Eau Claire North High School Language: Spanish Level: All Levels

D-6 ¡Buen Viaje! [10] (Exhibitor) Presenter: Deanna Barczak, Spanish Teacher, Elkhorn Area High School Language: Spanish Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary D-7

World Mythology for the World Language Class [1, 3, 4, 7] Presenter: JoAnn Polito, Retired Latin Teacher, Beloit Memorial High School Language: All Languages; Latin Level: All Levels

Conference Tip Newer teachers will be particularly interested in the sessions marked with this icon: '

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Saturday Morning — 9:30-10:30

Special Interest Sessions

D-13 Becoming Literate in a Pedagogy of Multiliteracies [4, 7] Presenters: Mary Zuidema and Leah Wicander, Spanish Teachers, UW-Madison Language: Spanish Level: High School; Post-Secondary

D-14 Fostering Critical Thinking and Other 21st Century Skills : A Project-Based Approach [1, 4, 6, 7] Presenters: Masako Lackey and Atsuko Suga Borgmann, Senior Lecturers, and Shinji Takahashi, Lecturer, UW-Milwaukee Language: All Languages; Japanese Level: High School; Post-Secondary

Saturday Morning — 11:00-12:00

Language Association Meetings

LM-1 WACLT Business Meeting [10] Presenter: Sarah Bailey, WACLT President Language: Chinese Level: All Levels

LM-5 WLTA Business Meeting [10] Presenter: Allan Lubben, WLTA President Language: Latin Level: All Levels

The WACLT Business Meeting will be held to discuss matters and events related to WACLT, and ways of enhancing and promoting the teaching of Chinese in the state.

The Wisconsin Latin Teachers Association will elect officers for next year and discuss the current climate of teaching Latin and Greek in Wisconsin. Any teacher of Latin, Greek, or Classical Humanities is welcome to attend.

LM-2 AATF-WI Business Meeting [10] Presenter: Justin Frieman, AATF-WI President Language: French Level: All Levels

LM-6 Meeting for Other World Languages (OWL) [10] Presenter: Keely Lake, WAFLT President Language: All Languages; Less Commonly Taught Languages Level: All Levels

Come join us for an update on AATF-WI's work in 2013. Andrea Behn, 2013 Future Leader Fellow, will give us a presentation about the national association and talk about her ideas for our chapter.

Please come and share news and ideas for the promotion of less commonly taught languages in the state of Wisconsin. We hope to see you there!

LM-3 WI-AATG Business Meeting [1, 10] Presenter: Mark Wagner, WI-AATG President Language: German Level: All Levels

LM-7 AATSP-WI Business Meeting [10] Presenter: Fred Cruz, AATSP-WI President Language: Spanish Level: All Levels

Attendees will learn about upcoming program options for their students and be updated on the status of WI-AATG. They will have the opportunity to connect with other German teachers. Attendees will also hear from the 2013 WI-AATG Distinguished German Educator.

AATSP-WI will address language and culture topics as well as the results of the NSE and Concurso Oral. There will be the Distinguished Educator of the Year Award, our cultural presentation, and our “Regalos de vinos.”

LM-4 Wisconsin Association of Teachers of Japanese Business Meeting [10] Presenter: Atsuko Borgmann, WiATJ President Language: Japanese Level: All Levels

Conference Tip Make sure that you participate in all the social events available. This is an excellent way to renew old friendships, make new friends, and develop collaboration among language professionals. See the Conference Overview on page 14 for scheduled times.

Please join and connect with your peer Japanese teachers. Wisconsin teachers of Japanese will share news and exchange their ideas for instruction. A prospective statewide event that fosters collaboration between high school and college instruction will be discussed. P 35 P


Saturday Luncheon Menu Asian Influence Oriental noodle salad with pea pods Crab rangoon Sweet & sour pork Teriyaki chicken stir-fry Steamed white rice Stir-fry vegetables with fresh ginger Almond cookies and fortune cookies

Saturday Buffet Luncheon November 2 12:15-1:15 Empire Room

Cost: $16.00

Saturday Afternoon — 1:30-3:00

P.M. Technology Sessions

Saturday Technology Sessions Additional Fee – $10 Pre-Registration Recommended

T-4

Real-World Skills for Global Scholars [1, 5, 6, 10] Presenters: Holly Morse, Spanish Teacher, and Brett Lipshutz, French Teacher, University School of Milwaukee Language: All Languages; French; Spanish Level: High School

T-5 Canis Senex, Nova Artificia [1, 3, 7, 8] Presenter: Daniel Tess, Latin and German Teacher, Brookfield Central High School Language: Latin Level: All Levels Dearest old dog Latin can learn new tricks! Attendees will raise pub voices in a few songs and then analyze how interactive white boards can help us produce excellent TPRS experiences for students.

Participants in this workshop will be challenged to consider and develop innovative curriculum that will help their students become global scholars by connecting with the real world through project-based learning, community connections, authentic materials, media, and technology.

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Saturday Afternoon — 1:30-2:30

Special Interest Sessions E-8

National Board Certification in World Languages, Rigorous and Rewarding Professional Development [9] Presenters: Meg Graham, Spanish Teacher, Mukwonago High School; Sharon Bradish, Spanish Teacher, Columbus High School Language: French; Spanish Level: Middle School; High School

E-1 Intercambios Made Easy [5, 6, 10] Presenters: Emily Paprocki, Spanish Teacher, Greendale High School; Erin Falk, Spanish Teacher, New Berlin Eisenhower High School Language: All Languages Level: High School E-2 Four 21st Century Skills Students Need [6, 7] Presenters: Lauren Rosen, Program Director, University of Wisconsin; Deana Zorko, Spanish Teacher, La Follette High School Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

E-9

Preparing Students for the AP German Exam [1, 4, 7, 8] Presenters: John Stark and Katharina Barbe, Faculty, Northern Illinois University; Ninja Nagel, Faculty, Barington High School, IL; Sigurd Piwek, Faculty, Milwaukee German Immersion School Language: German Level: High School; Post-Secondary

E-3 Married to the Modes [4, 7, 8] Presenters: Anita Alkhas, Associate Professor, and Margaret Schmidt, Instructor, UW-Milwaukee Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

E-10 Designing Effective Online Oral Activities: How to Improve the Use of Digital Tools to Develop Oral Skills [4, 6] Presenters: Greicy Katerine Martínez Cruz and Pilar Fernández, Graduate Assistants, UW-Milwaukee Language: Spanish Level: All Levels

E-4

Real World Texts: Building Critical Thinking Skills and Cultural Understanding [1, 4] Presenters: Donna Clementi, Methods Instructor, Lawrence University; Paul Sandrock, Director of Education, ACTFL Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

E-11 Saca La Lengua [1, 3, 7] Presenter: Gladys Wisnefski, Retired CAPP Spanish Teacher, Oshkosh West High School Language: Spanish Level: High School; Post-Secondary

E-5

What's Your Mindset? Building "Global" into Any Curriculum [1, 7, 10] Presenter: Dina Wolf, K-16 Outreach Coordinator, Center for International Education, UW-Milwaukee Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

E-12 1492? There's more than Columbus! [1] Presenter: Peter Hoff, Spanish Teacher, UW-Whitewater Language: Spanish Level: High School; Post-Secondary

E-6

More Than Words: Integrating Social-Emotional Learning in the World Language Classroom Through Project-Based Learning [1, 2, 5, 10] Presenter: Gretchen Faith Miller, Spanish Teacher, University School of Milwaukee Language: All Languages; Spanish Level: Elementary; All Levels

E-13 Pero vs. perro: La enseñanza de la pronunciación en la clase de español [1, 4] Presenter: Isabel Alvarez, Professor, UW-Oshkosh Language: Spanish Level: All Levels

E-7

The Ins and Outs of Teaching a French Phonetics Course: Challenges, Difficulties, Solutions [4, 6, 7] Presenter: Andrzej Dziedzic, Professor of French, University of Wisconsin Language: French Level: High School; Post-Secondary

E-14 A Self-Guided Language Learning Project: Promoting Autonomous Learning Beyond the Language Classroom [3] Presenter: Takako Nakakubo, Instructor, UW-Madison Language: All Languages; Japanese Level: High School; Post-Secondary P 37 P


Saturday Afternoon — 2:45-3:45

Special Interest Sessions

F-1

Building Intercultural Communicative Competence One Activity at a Time [1, 2] Presenter: Pablo Muirhead, Spanish & Education Instructor, Milwaukee Area Technical College Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

F-7

There’s Nothing Like the Real Thing! Cross-Cultural Understanding Through Authentic Materials [1, 7] Presenters: Jeanne Schueller, Faculty Associate, and Lisa Yager, Melissa Sheedy, and Sara Mattavelli, Graduate Students, UW-Madison Language: All Languages; German; Italian Level: High School; Post-Secondary

F-2

From Athletics to Academics: Using Team-Oriented Teaching Methods in Language Classes [3, 4, 5, 7] Presenter: Patricia Muñoz, Target Language Expert, Carthage College Language: All Languages Level: High School; Post-Secondary

F-8

Using the Basics to Build Literacy and Communication Skills [1, 4, 7] Presenter: Jean Hindson, Associate Professor of Spanish, UW-La Crosse Language: All Languages; Spanish Level: All Levels

F-3

Meet Your First Globals -- Wisconsin's Global Youth Summit [1, 6, 10] Presenters: Gerhard Fischer, Education Consultant, Dept. of Public Instruction; Karen Fowdy, Retired German Teacher, Monroe School District Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

F-9 So lacht Österreich! [1, 4, 7, 10] Presenter: Lorna Sopcak, Associate Professor of German, Ripon College Language: German Level: High School; Post-Secondary F-10 Integrating the Six Themes in the AP Spanish Language and Culture Course [1, 7] Presenter: Andrew Schwei, Spanish Teacher, Jefferson High School Language: Spanish Level: High School; Post-Secondary

F-4

Reinvent the Wheel! Creative Tech Tools for the Language Classroom [4, 6, 7, 10] Presenters: Mingyu Sun, Director, Language Resource Center; Anita Alkhas, Professor, Department of French, Italian and Comparative Literature, UW-Milwaukee Language: All Languages Level: All Levels

'F-11 Thumbs up to Grammar! Teaching Preterite and Imperfect with Hand Gestures [4, 6] Presenter: Miguel Santos, Teaching Assistant, UW-Milwaukee Language: Spanish Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

F-5 A Sequential Model for Video Viewing [3, 4, 6, 7] Presenter: Tobias Barske, Associate Professor of German/Applied Linguistics, UW-Stevens Point Language: All Languages Level: Middle School; High School; Post-Secondary

F-12 More Than Just a Reader [1, 4, 7, 10] Presenter: Kelly Ferguson, Spanish Teacher, LaFollette High School, Madison Language: All Languages Level: High School

F-6

There's Something for Everyone! Student Engagement That Works! [2, 3, 4] Presenter: Andrea Behn, French Teacher, Parker High School Language: All Languages; French Level: Middle School; High School

Conference Tip Bring return address stickers so you don’t have to sign your name, address, and email address every time you order something from the exhibitors. Take advantage of exhibit breaks to visit the exhibit area and thank the exhibitors for their participation. P 38 P


Conference Sessions by Language All Languages A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4 A-5 A-6 A-10 B-1 B-2 B-3 B-4 B-5 B-6 B-11 B-15 C-1 C-2 C-3 C-5 C-6 C-7 D-1 D-2 D-3 D-4 D-5 D-7 D-14 E-1 E-2 E-3 E-4 E-5

E-6

Integrating Social-Emotional Learning Through Project-Based Learning E-14 A Self-Guided Language Learning Project F-1 Building Intercultural Communicative Competence One Activity at a Time F-2 Using Team-Oriented Teaching Methods F-3 Wisconsin's Global Youth Summit F-4 Creative Tech Tools for the Language Classroom F-5 Wisconsin's Global Education Certificate F-6 Student Engagement That Works! F-7 Cross-Cultural Understanding through Authentic Materials F-8 Using the Basics to Build Literacy and Communication Skills F-12 More Than Just a Reader FW-2 Assessing What Matters FW-3 Central States Extension Workshop Presentation FW-5 Ignite Creativity via Storytelling FW-6 Keys to Planning for Student Learning FW-8 Literacy: The Key to Second Language Learning FW-9 Promoting your Program–ABC's of PR FW-10 Touch the World Through the Heart of a Child LM-6 Meeting for Other World Languages (OWL) T-1 Flipping instruction: A starting point T-2 I'm Behind and I Can't Catch Up T-3 Interactive Online Vocabulary Learning Tools T-4 Real-World Skills for Global Scholars

A Sequential Model for Video Viewing Celebrating Diversity within Your School & Community: Creating a Multicultural Festival Google Tools and Apps in the World Language Classroom - Summer Institute Showcase Modeling Online Language Courses Seal of Biliteracy: District & State Recognition of Student Language Proficiency World Language Career Day Workshop Active Strategies for Reading and Listening Achieving Fluency through TPRS and other Comprehensible Input Strategies Connecting to Others: Global Experiences that Connect Students, Colleagues, and Classrooms Beginning, Middle, End: Story Form as the Basis for Engaging Learning Experiences More “Target Language: Every Day / All Hour” Authentic Texts, Digital Media, and 21st Century Readers Shadowing Practice: A Great Technique for Pronunciation and Interpretive-Listening Using Essential Questions to Guide Instruction 30 Tips & Tricks for a Well-Managed World Language Classroom Seriously; It's Elementary Designing Culturally-Based Thematic Units for the Advanced Language Classroom Kick the Textbook Habit! The Common Language of Harry Potter From Kinder to AP: A Thematic Approach to Curriculum World Language + Global Knowledge: Natural Connection, Uncommon Practice Be Social! Building 3 Modes of Communication Through Facebook Groups Easy Steps to Advocate Language Programs Lesson Study: Collaborating with Our Colleagues in Other Languages NNELL/FLES Networking Session Want to Raise Your Child Bilingually? World Mythology for the World Language Class Fostering Critical Thinking and Other 21st Century Skills : A Project-Based Approach Intercambios Made Easy Four 21st Century Skills Students Need Married to the Modes Real World Texts: Building Critical Thinking Skills and Cultural Understanding Building “Global” into Any Curriculum

Chinese A-15 B-6 B-8 LM-1

Elevate Students Proficiency Level from Intermediate to Advanced Through Chinese Film Shadowing Practice: A Great Technique for Pronunciation and Interpretive-Listening The Use of Technology in Teaching and Learning Chinese Tones WACLT Business Meeting

French A-7 A-8 B-9 B-10 C-8 C-9 D-8 D-9 D-11 E-7 P 39 P

News & Networking: Tomorrow's Technology Today Le Grand Heritage du Passé de la France Le top 2013 de la musique pour les profs Share the Fun in Summer School Suivez-moi Developing Skills for Text Types Technology in Testing and Other French Placement Concerns Authentic Cultural Bell Ringers and Class Starters Le choc cultural, existe-t-il toujours? The Ins and Outs of Teaching a French Phonetics Course


Conference Sessions by Language E-8

National Board Certification in World Languages, Rigorous & Rewarding Professional Development F-6 Student Engagement That Works! FW-11 Vive l'Histoire de Paris! LM-2 AATF-WI Business Meeting T-4 Real-World Skills for Global Scholars

C-4 F-7 LM-6 Spanish

German

A-7

News & Networking: Tomorrow's Technology Today A-10 Active Strategies for Reading and Listening A-11 Understanding the UW System Spanish Placement Test A-12 Learning about the Indigenous Cultures of the Spanish Speaking World through Games B-15 30 Tips & Tricks for a Well-Managed World Language Classroom C-6 From Kinder to AP: A Thematic Approach to Curriculum C-9 Developing Skills for Text Types C-11 Spanish Instruction in the Secondary Grades and the Common Core Content Standards C-12 Addressing Place, Purpose and Belonging through Target Language Communication C-13 Leyendo en niveles avanzados D-6 ¡Buen Viaje! D-9 Authentic Cultural Bell Ringers & Class Starters D-12 Punto com: Our Top Ten List D-13 Becoming Literate in a Pedagogy of Multiliteracies E-6 Integrating Social-Emotional Learning Through Project-Based Learning E-8 National Board Certification in World Languages, Rigorous & Rewarding Professional Development E-10 How to Improve the Use of Digital Tools to Develop Oral Skills E-11 Saca La Lengua E-12 1492? There's more than Columbus! E-13 Pero vs. perro: La enseñanza de la pronunciación en la clase de español F-8 Using the Basics to Build Literacy and Communication Skills F-10 Integrating the Six Themes in the AP Spanish Language and Culture Course F-11 Thumbs up to Grammar! Teaching Preterite and Imperfect with Hand Gestures FW-1 African Diaspora in the Americas: Touch the drum. Feel the energy. Connect culturally. FW-4 From the Maya to Madrid... FW-10 Touch the World Through the Heart of a Child LM-7 AATSP-WI Business Meeting T-4 Real-World Skills for Global Scholars

A-9 A-14 B-7 B-10 B-12 B-14 C-9 C-10 D-10

Der deutsche Wald / The German Forest Turkish Germans & German Turks: New Identities Interlocking the Modes of Communication Share the Fun in Summer School The UW System German Placement Test Die EU in dEUtsch Developing Skills for Text Types Einfach Spa?! Grüne Welle mit Deutsche Welle--Neue Unterrichtsideen E-9 Preparing Students for the AP German Exam F-7 Cross-Cultural Understanding through Authentic Materials F-9 So lacht Österreich! FW-12 Mit Vorurteilen umgehen lernen LM-3 WI-AATG Business Meeting Japanese A-13 B-6 B-10 D-14 E-14 LM-4

Connections and CBI Shadowing Practice: A Great Technique for Pronunciation and Interpretive-Listening Share the Fun in Summer School Fostering Critical Thinking and Other 21st Century Skills: A Project-Based Approach A Self-Guided Language Learning Project: Promoting Autonomous Learning WiATJ Business Meeting

Latin B-13 C-4

Learning to Read Authentic Latin Love, Anger and Song: The Iliad and Odyssey in the Classics or World Literature Classroom D-7 World Mythology for the World Language Class FW-13 Armor, Oratorical Gestures, Crowd Acclamations, and Legionary Training LM-5 WLTA Business Meeting T-5 Canis Senex, Nova Artificia Less Commonly Taught Languages B-6

Love, Anger, and Song: The Iliad and Odyssey in the Classics or World Literature Classroom Cross-Cultural Understanding through Authentic Materials Meeting for Other World Languages (OWL)

Shadowing Practice: A Great Technique for Pronunciation and Interpretive-Listening

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WAFLT Conference Hotel – Radisson Paper Valley October 31–November 1-2, 2013 Reservation Code Radisson Paper Valley Hotel 333 W. College Avenue (920) 733-8000 or 800-242-3499 www.radissonpapervalley.com

WAFLT

Cancellation Policy 24 hours prior to arrival date

Single

Double

Triple

Quad

$94

$104

$114

$124

Amenities Indoor pool, restaurants and lounges

Reservation Deadline: October 12, 2013

C C C C C

C

C

You may register by phone at 920-733-8000 or 800-242-3499 or online a www.radissonpapervalley.com. You will need a credit card at the time of reservation and you will receive a confirmation number. Specify WAFLT as the reservation code. “Concierge” accommodations are available at the Paper Valley Hotel (PVH). Call 800-242-3499 and request in-house reservations for additional information and rates. Specify WAFLT as the reservation code. The PVH has 387 rooms and the property is 100% smoke-free. No charges are applied to your credit card until you check out, unless you do not abide by the hotel’s cancellation policy. Tax exemption will be allowed if: (a) your school has a tax exempt number; (b) you have a purchase order; or (c) you have a letter stating the charges will be reimbursed by a tax exempt entity. This information has to be in the PVH system at least two weeks prior to arrival. Express check-out will save you time and will eliminate long lines. When you check in, make it clear how payment is to be made. You will receive a bill under your door the night before departure or you can access it on the TV. Then you can just leave your key in the room. Please allow for state and local taxes when making your plans. Contact the Paper Valley Hotel for further details.

Downtown Appleton Washington Street Ramp (entrances on Washington or Division) and Midtown Ramp (entrances on Superior, Appleton, and Lawrence Streets) have skywalks to the Paper Valley Hotel. Cost to park is $2.00 which is paid to an automatic machine on your way into the ramp and take your receipt to activate the gate.

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Online WAFLT Membership/Conference Registration Instructions Register online at waflt.org by October 18, 2013

WAFLT Online Membership Procedures C Login at waflt.org/asp/login.aspx – OR – create a new login at waflt.org/asp/newlogin.aspx C Click on “Account Information” C Click on “Edit,” update your personal information, and save C Click the “Join” or “Renew” button

WAFLT Online Conference Registration Procedures C C C C C

Go to waflt.org You must have a login to register for the conference. Create that first if you have not done so in the past. Follow the conference drop-down to the annual conference page and click the “Register now” link. You will be prompted to login. Complete the registration form. You will receive a detailed confirmation via e-mail when your registration has been successfully completed. C Pay with a credit card. Your registration will be finalized when you complete the registration process and pay with a credit card. – OR – C Pay by check. Complete the registration form online, print it, and mail the receipt and a check payable to WAFLT to: WAFLT Registration ~ P.O. Box 1493 ~ Appleton, WI 54912 The form contains a code that will allow us to finalize your registration once we receive the check. Checks must be included with this form. Any forms received without checks will be returned to you unprocessed. A $25 fee will be charged for checks returned because of insufficient funds. We cannot accept school purchase orders.

Please note: C Thursday offers a five-hour pre-conference workshop with an additional fee of $45 which includes lunch. C Friday morning is reserved for workshops with an additional fee of $20. Pre-registration is recommended. C Saturday offers 90-minute morning and afternoon technology sessions for an additional fee of $10. Pre-registration is recommended. C Onsite registration is an additional $10.00 on Friday and/or Saturday. C If you have any special needs under ADA, please advise us by email to program@waflt.org. ASL needs must be requested in writing by October 1, 2013.

Refund Procedure C Refund requests must be made in writing by November 30, 2013, and sent to WAFLT at P.O. Box 1493, Appleton, WI 54912. C A service charge of $20.00 is applied to all refunds. C No refunds for meals or workshop tickets are possible after October 19, 2013. C Membership dues are non-refundable.

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Important! If your school district submits your registration for attending the WAFLT Fall Conference, please double check that the proper workshops, meal functions, etc. are selected. You will receive a detailed receipt by email as soon as your registration has been processed. Prior to the conference you are able to make changes/additions to your registration by logging into your WAFLT account. Additions may require extra payment. Change requests made on-site at the conference cannot be guaranteed.


Mail-in WAFLT Membership Conference Registration October 31–November 1-2, 2013 Please Print Last Name

Home Street Address

First Name

Middle Initial

City

State

Zip

Telephone Number (

)

Name of Institution

School/Work Street Address

City

State

Zip

Telephone Number (

School/Work E-mail Address

)

Home E-mail Address

The above information is: “ a new home address “ a name change Previous name was All WAFLT materials should be mailed to: “ my home address

“ my work/school address

“ Check here if this is your first WAFLT conference Please check the appropriate spaces below: Language(s) Taught: Chinese French German Japanese Latin Spanish Other:

Position:

Level:

Teacher Administrator Department Chair Supervisor/Coordinator Student Teacher Other:

Elementary Middle/Junior High School College/University Other:

Instructions C Mail this WAFLT Membership/Conference Registration form by October 18, 2013 to: WAFLT ~ P.O. Box 1493 ~ Appleton, WI 54912 C Checks must be included with this form. Any forms received without checks will be returned to you unprocessed. C Payment must be in U.S. currency. No school purchase orders can be accepted. A $25.00 fee will be charged for checks returned because of insufficient funds. C Refund request must be made in written form by November 30, 2013, and sent to the WAFLT Registration address. WAFLT service charge for refunds is $20.00. Membership dues are non-refundable. Refunds for meals and/or workshop tickets are not possible after October 18, 2013. C If you have any special needs under ADA or special menu needs, please advise on an attached sheet to this form. ASL needs must be requested in writing by October 1, 2013. C If you are unable to attend the Conference, but wish to join WAFLT for 2013, you may do so online at waflt.org or by checking the appropriate box in Membership Dues section on the following page and including your check. WAFLT does not sell or share our membership list with anyone!

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Register Online at waflt.org Pay by credit card – OR – Print, mail, and pay by check

Mail-in WAFLT Membership / Conference Registration Membership Dues

“ Regular Member – 3 Years – $65.00 “ Regular Member – 1 Year – $25.00 “ Lifetime Member – $500.00

Conference Registration Fee (Includes

“ “ “ “ “

admission to all sessions except Optional Ticketed Events (below)

“ Retired – 3 Years – $50.00 “ Retired – 1 Year – $20.00 “ Student Member – $20.00

Regular Member – $45.00 Retired or Student Member – $30.00 Non-member – $75.00 Saturday Only Member – $25.00 Saturday Only Non-Member – $50.00

Please note: On-site Registration (Friday and/or Saturday) $10 extra

“ Thursday Workshop – $45.00 (includes registration, breaks, and lunch) Common Core Standards Through World Languages

Optional Ticketed Events Pre-registration recommended

$

$

“ Friday Workshops – $20.00 Indicate your top three choices by code (i.e., FW-1, FW-2, etc.) in order of preference: First _______ Second ________ Third ________

$

” A.M. Saturday Technology Session – $10.00 Indicate your top two choices by code (i.e., T-1, T-2, etc.) in order of preference: First _______ Second ________

$

” P.M. Saturday Technology Session – $10.00 Indicate your top two choices by code (i.e., T-4, T-5, etc.) in order of preference: First _______ Second ________

Meals

$

Friday Luncheon Saturday Luncheon

$16.00 $16.00

$

Number - _____ x $16.00 = _______ Number - _____ x $16.00 = _______ $

Endowment Contribution

General Endowment Contribution Professional Development Scholarship (Honoring Dr. Roma Hoff, Dr. Connie Knop, and

$ $

Dr. Irène Kraemer) $

Student Study Scholarship (Honoring O. Lynn Bolton) Please make check payable to WAFLT (School purchase orders cannot be accepted)

Total Amount

Return completed form by October 18, 2013 with check to:

WAFLT P.O. Box 1493 Appleton, WI 54912 For Office Use Only Date Received

Check Number

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S

P

Amount

$


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WI NNELL Representative Jessica Bradley Highland View Elementary School 5900 S. 51st Street Greendale, WI 53129 (608) 423-2750, ext. 2102 jessica.bradley1@gmail.com

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Central States NNELL Representative Nicci Saari Eastwood Middle School 4401 E.62nd Street Indianapolis, IN 46220 (317) 254-5588 Ext. 109 nsaari@msdwt.k12.in.us

NNELL Celebrated its 25th Anniversary! he National Network for Early Language Learning provides leadership in support of successful early language learning and teaching in grades pre-K-8.

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The professional Learning Language journal is a great resource for ideas and connections to the early world language teaching field. The NNELL Regional Conferences, National Conventions, Workshops, Institutes, and Webinars all provide targeted professional development where you live! NNELL advocates for early language learning of all languages. Learn more about how you can support NNELL’s advocacy efforts in our Advocacy section. Membership in NNELL provides you with a voice at the national level to support early language learning. FLESFEST 2013 Conference Notes Having just celebrated its 25th year, FLESFEST was originally established by language teachers who wanted to share best practices, lesson ideas, and unique challenges through networking with colleagues. FLESFEST is a one-day professional conference for World Language instructors K-16 on Saturday, March 2nd at UW-Waukesha.

The theme for 2013 was Active Minds, Active Bodies, Active Language: Communicating Through Purposeful Play. Planning units with a focus on integrating play to communicate is highly motivating and rich in possibilities for meaningful communication including connections, comparisons, and communities. Our keynote speaker, Helena Curtain, who is not only an incredible world-renown world language curriculum consultant, was also an integral part of establishing the first ever FLESFEST in Wisconsin in 1988-1989. Keynote Helena engaged conference participants by kicking off the day with learning through play. Like the world language instruction rockstar that she is, Helena began her session with an enduring understanding, focus question, and can-do statements about her presentation. She provided inspirational quotes about play and imagination and their relevance to learning. My favorite was: “What do most Nobel Laureates, innovative entrepreneurs, artists and performers, well-adjusted children, happy couples and families, and the most successfully adapted mammals have in common? They play enthusiastically throughout their lives.” –Stuart Brown, Institute of Play.

Helena addressed the types of play: Physical, Social, Pretend, and Constructive. She used these to highlight specific examples of play that enhance a meaningful experience in a world language classroom, and connected these scenarios to the 5 Cs. Her inspirational session was the perfect way to kick-off our conference. Planning for Purposeful Play: From Inception to Assessment Jessica Bradley and Erin Koplitz, from the Greendale School District, presented about using play during class throughout an entire unit, and especially in assessment. The focus was including play and meaningful experiences in assessment, and then using those assessments as a guideline to include play in activities throughout the unit. The session was a great way for teachers to plan for play as a springboard for communication. Making the Text Come Alive: How to Make Stories Lift Off the Page Lisa Bane and Susan Wolter, from Shorewood Intermediate School and Milwaukee Spanish Immersion School respectively, presented a motivating session on literature in our classrooms and how to make the text come alive in playful activities that involve communication in our classrooms. TPRS was highlighted through poetry


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The VOICE of WAFLT

and short stories, like Ferdinand the Bull. The session proved that our experiences within a story commit language to the heart and mind. Movement for Motivation and Language They Will Remember Collaboration with innovation sparked this session with Eileen Hesseling, Gina Pagel, La Sripanawongsa- Piyanut, and Jody Schneider and their activities that included movement. A highlight of the session for me was the movement activities that were authentic from each language’s culture. It was an incredible session with so many excellent ideas. Using Technology as a Platform for Play and Communication From hi-tech to the lowest of lo-tech, she knows it all! Anita Alkhas understands teachers and world language and offered so many great ideas on how to use technology as a springboard for playful communication. To see specific examples of the sessions above, please visit wi-nell.org for session notes! Wisconsin NELL Address to NNELL and WAFLT Members K-5, K-8, and K-12 World Language is optimal for world language programming in our Wisconsin public schools. I’ve been teaching in the Greendale School District now for four years, and our elementary schools’ testing scores have been going up each year. Many factors could go into the improvements in scoring for our students, but it can’t be ignored that research shows K-5 World Language improves test scores, and ours have steadily gone up since the introduction of our program four years ago. NNELL supports elementary programs and has so much information to support our mission!

Join NNELL Join NNELL at www.nnell.org. You can pay via credit card or even by check. We hope to see you network with us here in Wisconsin. You can always visit our Wisconsin NELL website as well for more information at www.wi-nell.org! Jessica Bradley

NNELL Membership Regular Membership: $30 All memberships are for the academic year September-August • Two Issues of Learning Languages. • Three Issues of E-NNELL Notes • Access to Members Only area of website (www.nnell.org) – media, advocacy, resources • Program Building Publications • NNELL Publications • Attendance at annual board meeting at ACTFL conference. • Annual Summer Institute held at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa every July


The VOICE of WAFLT

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Wisconsin Association of Chinese Language Teachers President Sarah Bailey UW-Marathon County 518 S. 7th Avenue Wausau, WI 54401 (715) 298-8118 bubsbailey@yahoo.com.hk

WACLT President-Elect Andrew Olson UW-Milwaukee, Dept. of Linguistics 3243 N Downer Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53201 (414) 534-8789 asolson@uwm.edu

Past-President Paul Faust Hudson School District 644 Brakke Drive Hudson, WI 54016 (612) 638-7799 paulfaust@hotmail.com

Treasurer Chen Dong Kettle Moraine High School 349 N. Oak Crest Drive Wales, WI 53183 (262) 968-6200 ext. 4153 chenchen41@gmail.com

013 marks the Year of the Snake. The Snake embodies the ‘water’ element and symbolizes a year for reflection and progression. As we reflect on the past year and look ahead, the ‘water’ element of the intelligent snake aptly embodies WACLT’s mission to promote the flow of enhanced communication and learning amongst our students and teachers.

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We reflect on the success of the annual Wisconsin Chinese Speech Contest held at UW-Milwaukee on February, 23, 2013. Non-heritage and heritage speakers ranging from kindergarten to college level came together to showcase their presentational language skills. We had a record-high 150 participants who took part in this event. This was a positive reflection of the growing strength of Chinese programs in the state, and credit must be given to the hard work by Wisconsin Chinese teachers for their efforts to advocate, promote, and expand solid Chinese language programs in their community. The entertainment and organization of the Speech Contest made this event fun

Secretary Remya Sarma-Traynor UW-Stevens Point Foreign Language Dept. 1804 4th Avenue, CCC 490 Stevens Point, WI 54481 (715) 346-3665 rsarmatr@uwsp.edu

and memorable for all involved, and special thanks must go to Professor Chen Yea-Fen and Andrew Olsen from UW-Milwaukee, Haiyun Lu from the University School, Dong Chen from Sun Prairie School, Paul Faust, and Aaron Bray for their support and help in making the event such a success. Chinese teachers around the state continue to work hard to promote and build their language programs. In April, Wisconsin International School (WIS) organized a trip to China for both students and parents. Students visited historical sites like the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, and the Temple of Heaven. They also had the opportunity to experience other aspects of Chinese culture by learning Chinese painting, Chinese calligraphy, making authentic crafts, and experiencing Chinese cooking. The highlight of their stay was meeting with pen pals from their sister school with whom they have been communicating over the past two years. While WIS visited China to meet students from their sister school, students at the University School of Milwaukee warmly welcomed students

from their sister school in Harbin, China. The visiting students stayed in Milwaukee from May 20-28 at host family homes and spent two days shadowing American students at school to experience academic life. The trip was extremely successful; students and teachers from both schools forged a stronger relationship and gained a great deal from the exchange. Looking ahead, WACLT will be organizing an Assessment Workshop run by Donna Clementi for Chinese teachers on November 16 at UW-Milwaukee. This workshop has been made possible by the sponsorship from the Chinese Language Teachers Association (CLTA) and the Confucius Institute at UW-Platteville. We express our sincere thanks to these two organizations for their staunch support of WACLT, and look forward to learning more from Donna. Those who are interested in attending and haven’t registered should contact me at: sarah.bailey@uwc.edu. May the Year of the Snake continue to flow smoothly for you all! Sarah Bailey


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American Association of Teachers of French – Wisconsin Chapter President Justin Frieman Adlai E. Stevenson High School jfrieman@d125.org

Secretary-Treasurer Brian Wopat Holmen High School wopbri@holmen.k12.wi.us

President-Elect SuAnn Schroeder Marshfield High School schroeder@marshfield.k12.wi.us

Past President Michèle La Pean-Usher Milton High School lapeanusherm@mail.milton.k12.wi.us

Grand Concours Jennie Bolen Logan Middle School grandconcourswi@gmail.com

AATF Web site: www.frenchteachers.org Sign up to be on the AATF-Wisconsin list serve at: AATFWisconsin-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Visit: www.theworldspeaksfrench.org

Chers tous et toutes, s we start another academic year, I want to thank all of you for the work that you did last year. We had an excellent Concours Oral, with our state competition being hosted by Mari Peterson at Lincoln High School in Wisconsin Rapids. Though our overall number of student participants was smaller than last year, we saw a noticeable growth in elementary school level participants. We also saw a slight rise in the number of participants in the Grand Concours.

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With many French programs still under attack, these are two easy ways to make your program more visible. I cannot stress enough the importance of visibility and promotion. We need to remind people that French is not a luxury, but a means for success. I would like to thank Nataša Bašiæ, E. Nicole Meyer, and Ritt Deitz for presenting at the American Association of Teachers of French Annual Convention in Providence, Rhode Island. Also in Providence, Andrea Behn from Parker High School in Janesville had the amazing

opportunity to take part in the Future Leaders Fellowship Program preceding the convention. Andrea will be speaking about her experiences as part of the fellowship at our annual business meeting. Also at our annual business meeting, we will be holding our elections for President-Elect, Secretary-TreasurerWebmaster, National French Exam State Coordinator, and Concours Oral State Coordinator. I encourage you all to contact me if you are interested in one of these positions. Following my second term as Concours Oral State Coordinator, I will not be running for a third term. I will remain involved with AATF-WI as the past-president; however, as my students are in Illinois, I will be getting more involved with the Chicago/ Northern Illinois chapter and their speaking contest. Our chapter has the oldest and strongest French-speaking competition in the country. I know that a lot of you feel as strongly as I do about this competition. If it weren’t for the Concours Oral, I probably would

not be a French teacher today. I beg you to think about taking on this worthwhile position, or any of our other chapter board positions. I encourage you to take part in the National French Exam next spring. It not only provides feedback for your students, but strengthens your program as well. I also would like to invite you to join two groups supporting French on Facebook: French in Wisconsin and AATF-Wisconsin. Also subscribe to follow France Synergies, at http://francesynergies.com. Veuillez agréer, Madame, Monsieur, l'expression de mes sentiments les meilleurs, Justin Friem an


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American Association of Teachers of German – Wisconsin President Mark Wagner Nicolet High School, Glendale mark_wagner@nicolet.k12.wi.us Vice President Tobias Barske UW-Stevens Point tbarske@uswp.edu

Past President Bobbette Leu Timmerman Assumption High School, Wisconsin Rapids btimmermann@assumptioncatholicschools.org

Treasurer Charles J. James UW-Madison cjjames@wisc.edu

Secretary Sue Marshall Phillips High School smarshall@phillips.k12.wi.us

Herzliche Grüße an alle Deutschlehrer/Innen in Wisconsin! Heast as nit----wia die Zeit vergeht Gestern nu' ham d'Leut ganz anders g'redt Die Jungen san alt wordn und die Altn san g'storb Duliei, Jodleiridldudieiouri.... Und gestern is' heit word'n und heit is' båld morg'n' his Hubert von Goisern song (Heast as nit) has been running through my head recently. My students invariably laugh when I play it in class because of the yodeling. But over time, they get used to it – sich anfreunden actually expresses the idea better. The song makes them (and me) happy. Allow me to use it as a way to organize my thoughts for this, my last offering as WI-AATG President for The Voice of WAFLT.

T

Gestern nu' ham d'Leut ganz anders g'redt – Although I learned my German in Niedersachsen, after seven exchanges with my GAPP partner school the Gymnasium Leopoldinum in Passau, I have come to appreciate the Bavarian language and traditions. In a world whose culture is becoming increasingly Americanized and commercialized, I appreciate it, that a region and tradition work together to ground people. Die Jungen san alt wordn – This new academic year will be the first one in

the last 45, which will not see Sy Kreilein in his normal place, teaching students at Marquette University High School. Speaking for myself and his colleagues at WI-AATG, I would like to express my admiration of and gratitude for the manifold ways Sy has shaped our profession. Our relationship goes back 25 years; Sy served as my cooperating teacher and it has been an honor to call him a colleague. What have I gleaned from this relationship? What have I learned from him during this time? Here is a top five list: • Teach Culture. Any of Sy's thousands of alum will tell you that on Fridays MUHS German students sing. The hiking and drinking songs the kids internalized are backdoor opportunities to ground students in the German culture. The many exchange trips he organized to his GAPP partner school in Ingolstadt did the same. Together with his students he investigated the similarities and differences in the German and American cultures.

• Keep Growing. Sy kept it up for so long because he kept learning as he taught. In the spring of 1989 he became the only person to finish a doctorate in German at UW-Madison while teaching German full-time. He continues to research and lecture on music and history in conjunction with his wife Joan's organization, Ensemble Musical Offering. I sense his retirement at MUHS will open up new doors in other areas for him. • Challenge Kids. Sy has the ability to call kids to be the very best versions of themselves. He recognized their potential and created opportunities for them to fulfill it. For decades his students took home more than their share of prizes at the DSSV awards ceremony. • Have fun. I remember Sy telling me as a student teacher not to take things too seriously. He had fun in class every day, telling jokes and stories, playing vocab basketball games, bantering with his students. I remember watching his


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class brainstorm for captions to fit a picture of a WC with the word “besetzt” on it. “Von wem?” was the question, and I can't imagine anyone having more fun practicing aspects of the statal passive. • Give Back. Sy has given of his time and talents to enrich the profession. He has trained numerous student teachers. He has given sessions at WAFLT and served as the President of WI-AATG. He has judged regional and State German Pronunciation Contests for years. He has also worked closely with the DSSV and with Goethe House. Sy knew that one solution to being the sole German teacher at his school was to become a member of the various German communities which exist in our state.

Und gestern is' heit word'n und heit is' båld morg'n' – This marks the last of my Voice of WAFLT articles. I have appreciated the opportunity to get more involved in the Wisconsin Chapter of the AATG. We have been well-led by presidents such as Bobbette Timmermann and John Pustejovsky and I am grateful for the assistance they provided during my tenure. These are challenging times to teach German in the state, but I am convinced that German programs do indeed add value to the schools which invest in them, and that as long as we keep doing good things for kids, German will thrive. And WI-AATG can help us do that. I look forward to handing the presidency over to the

very capable Tobias Barske of UW-Stevens Point and seeing you all at the WAFLT Fall Conference in November and other WI-AATG events. Heast as nit----wia die Zeit vergeht? www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfHIRtAU uMM Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Mark W agner


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Wisconsin Association of Teachers of Japanese President Atsuko Suga Borgmann UW-Milwaukee P.O. Box 413 Milwaukee, WI 53201 (414) 229-5650 suggatsu@uwm.edu

President-Elect Richard Kania Franklin High School 8222 S. 51st Street Franklin, WI 53129 Richard.Kania@franklin.k12.wi.us (414) 423-4640, ext. 2116

Activities Director Open

Web Page

President ex-officio Kasumi Kato UW-Whitewater 800 W. Main Street Whitewater, WI 53190 Phone: (262) 472-1241 katok@uww.edu

Treasurer Chie Kakigi Menasha High School 420 7th Street Menasha, WI 54952 Phone: (920) 968-1800 kakigic@uwosh.edu

Open

Konnichiwa! t seems fall has already come to Wisconsin! I hope each of you had a fun summer filled with refreshing and energizing activities.

ties with colleges and high schools, interest in statewide essay contests, speech contests, and a Japan Bowl. Please bring your ideas for future plans.

WAFLT Fall Conference

Events Held

Please mark your calendars for the annual WAFLT conference taking place October 31 to November 2, 2013 at the Radisson Paper Valley Hotel in Appleton, Wisconsin.

WiATJ is proud to have dedicated teachers and students. From speech contests to cultural events, teachers in WiATJ are actively holding special events at their institutions.

The theme of this year’s conference is “Languages: Literacy for Life – Fostering the critical skills necessary for making connections today in order to communicate in a global future.” We expect to have many presentations regarding Japanese pedagogy and we look forward to sharing ideas on educating our students.

• The Midwest Japanese Speech Contest sponsored by the Japanese Consulate of Chicago was held on March 16th. This speech contest covers all Midwest States, including Wisconsin. Students from UW-Madison won the following prizes:

I

Please also note that the business meeting has moved to Saturday morning (Nov. 2nd) to encourage participation from many different parts of Wisconsin. Meeting Topics: In the business meeting, I plan to discuss Wisconsinwide future events that will strengthen

– 3rd Category (HS with 3+ years; College/Adults with <1 yr of study) N 3rd Prize: Xinghui Yu, UW-Madison N Japan Airlines Award: Ashley Hale, UW-Milwaukee

– 4th Category (College/Adults with >1 yr of study) N 1st Prize: Xingyu Hu, UW-Madison N 4th Prize: Peter Meyer, UW-Madison N JASC Award: Melanie Yoeurp, UW-Madison N Bonjinsha Award: Carlton Fisher, UW-Madison N Bonjinsha Award: Timothy MacKenzie, UW-Milwaukee – Special Prize N Peter Grzywacz, UW-Milwaukee • UW-Oshkosh held a Taiko (Japanese drum) workshop on April 12 as part of their Japan Week. • UW-Oshkosh students (23 of them!) enjoyed their visit to Japan from May 14-24, 2013, through the kakehashi project with the support of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. • The UW-Milwaukee Japanese Program held its second Spring Festival in May. Students gave speeches in Japanese and showed short movies they created with English subtitles.


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Future Activities â&#x20AC;˘ A mock Japan Bowl is scheduled for Saturday, November 9, at UW-Milwaukee. Details pending. If your high school is interested in participating, please let us know. Open Positions The Webpage Editor and Activities Director positions are still open. Please consider this opportunity and let any officer know if you are interested or if you would like to nominate someone.

If you or your institution has any news, holds any events, or receives any awards or comments, please share it with us so we can include in future newsletters. We would love to hear from you. In closing, Wisconsin is one of the leading states in Japanese education and it is very important that we continue to be visible in the area of Wisconsin language education. Your participation in WAFLT will make a difference. If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t become a member of WiATJ yet, please do so by

going to the AATJ website today and signing up. (www.aatj.org/membership/index.html) In addition, please become a WAFLT member so WiATJ retains voting rights. We always welcome any ideas you have to help improve WiATJ and to meet your needs. Please let us know if you have any ideas to contribute. The door is always open. Atsuko Suga Borgm ann

Wisconsin Association For Language Teachers & Discover Languages Wisconsin Present the 2013 Discover Languages

Student Video & Postcard Contests Contest Theme:

Languages: Literacy for Life! For All Students Enrolled in World Language Classes in Wisconsin Elementary (PK-5) ~ Middle School (6-8) ~ High School (9-12) ~ Post-Secondary (Undergraduate) As you learn more about our world, bring the world to Wisconsin. Show us how much languages mean to you and how important they are in your life! Submission Deadline October 12, 2013 Visit waflt.org for contest details to begin!

Help Wisconsin Discover Languages and Discover the World!


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Wisconsin Latin Teachers Association President Allan Lubben Mequon Homestead HS Steffen & Lake Shore MS awlubben@gmail.com

Past President Daniel Tess Brookfield Central HS Wisconsin Hills MS tessdaniel@gmail.com

Secretary Jennifer Austino Brookfield East HS JenniferFotsch@aol.com

Treasurer William W. Kean 110 S. Henry St. #204 Madison, WI 53703

Salvçte Magistrae et Magistrî! LTA is excited to offer a 3-hour workshop at WAFLT’s Fall Conference November. UWGB’s Professor Greg Aldrete will be offering several foci from his areas of expertise, including reconstruction of linen armor, gestures in Roman oratory, and legionary training.

W

Dr. Aldrete received his Ph.D. in Ancient History at the University of Michigan and his undergraduate degree at Princeton University. In addition to his teaching duties he coordinates the UWGB Linothorax Project, in which he works with students to test and reconstruct linen body armor. In 2009, Dr. Aldrete received the Excellence in Teaching at the College Level Award from the American Philological Association, and in 2012 he received “Wisconsin

Primary source pottery depiction

Professor of the Year” from the Carnegie Foundation and Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. He has been the recipient of several fellowships supporting research, travel, and publishing in his scholarly endeavors. You can see him in various television appearances commenting on ancient Greco-Roman culture. His most recent books include Daily Life in the Roman City: Rome, Pompeii, and Ostia (2009) and, with Alicia Aldrete, The Long Shadow of Antiquity: What Have the Greeks and Romans Done For Us? (2012). His forthcoming major publication is Unraveling the Linothorax Mystery: Reconstructing and Testing Ancient Linen Armor. Don’t miss this

Professor Greg Aldrete

incredible opportunity to augment your Ciero course or cultural content in your curriculum! This year we will have several retirements and incoming teachers to celebrate, so make sure to put the WLTA business meeting on your calendar and come meet some new colleagues as we commend our outgoing emeritî. October 22, 2013, will be our annual Latin Day, this year to be held at Marquette University instead of Madison. Speaker information and times will be sent to you via email shortly, so stay posted for further information! Daniel Tess

Modern reconstruction of flexible, light-weight armor


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American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese President Fred Cruz Brookfield Academy (262) 783-3200 cruz@brookfieldacademy.org

Secretary Gladys Wisnefski Oshkosh West High School Oshkosh School District gwizz@new.rr.com

Vice President Diego Ojeda Evansville School District (608) 490-0247 ojedad@evansville.k12.wi

Treasurer Katie Ginsbach PhD Candidate-Modern Peninsular Literature University of Wisconsin katiesg@yahoo.com

NSE Coordinator Elizabeth Montavon Horning Middle School Waukesha School District (262) 970-3356 martinez_montavon@msn.com

Oral Completion Coordinator Richard Hallberg/Lisa Bane Marquette University High (414) 933-7220 hallberg@muhs.edu

Webmaster Sara Ruiz West Bend High School (262) 388-3023 sruiz@west-bend.k12.wi.us

Sociedad Honoraria Hispánica State Director-Holly Morse University School of Milwaukee (414) 540-3453 hmorse@usmk12.org

Queridos Colegas, n May 18, 2013, we held our AATSP-WI board meeting at Brookfield Academy. At this meeting, it was announced that Diego Ojeda, our Vice President, would be stepping down from his position as he will be moving out of state to accept a new teaching position. Though we are sad to see Diego leave us, we wish him all the best, and thank him for all the work he has done for our association. This now leaves us with no one to fill the post of Vice President. Please forward any nominees who would be interested in replacing Diego as Vice President. In the interim, it was discussed, and agreed upon, that I would continue to carry on as President of AATSP-WI.

O

We also say goodbye to Elizabeth Montavon, and thank her for giving us the best that NSE-Wisconsin Chapter can give us. We would also like to thank Holly Morse for all the hard work she did for SHS. Good luck on everything. I would like to welcome Sara Ruiz as our new SHS coordinator, and Erin O’Connor, our new NSE coordinator.

The annual National AATSP conference (www.aatsp.org) was held in San Antonio, Texas, July 9-11, 2013. I am pleased to announce that I attended the conference and the AATSP-Wisconsin chapter was wellrepresented. We are doing great things for our chapter and our membership is stronger than ever. San Antonio received us with open arms and some of the information obtained at this conference will be presented at our AATSP-WI business meeting held during the WAFLT Fall Conference in Appleton from October 31 to November 2. We would like to see you at this meeting. I would personally like to thank Brookfield Academy, Dan Davis, my colleagues at BA, Marian Larkin and Wayne Sobye, for giving me the opportunity to be one of the candidates for AATSP Teacher of the year, and for giving me the encouragement to nominate AATSP-WI as a candidate for AATSP Chapter of the year.

In the near future we would like to offer our members essay contests for Middle and High School students and a Spanish day for our Spanish teachers. This latter event might be held at UW-Madison. In our plans, we would like to have a few social meetings for teachers and supporters of Spanish language. We also plan to promote workshops for Concurso Oral, NSE, and SHS. Your participation is very important to us, and we would like you to continue communicating with us through Facebook or our web page, www.aatsp.wi.com. Somos muchos, pero necesitamos dar a conocer nuestras voces. “El pueblo unido, jamás será vencido.” A todos en general, de parte de AATSP-WI, les decimos: Siempre adelante, para continuar siendo LOS MEJORES. Fred A. Cruz


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WAFLT Awards, Scholarships, and Grants WAFLT Distinguished Foreign Language Educator Award: WAFLT's highest recognition, may be conferred annually on an individual of the language teaching profession who has demonstrated long-term achievement and service to WAFLT and to the profession locally, statewide, regionally, and/or nationally. Nomination Deadline: March 15 Anthony J. Gradisnik Award: May be conferred on an individual or group especially from outside the World Language teaching profession who shares Mr. Gradisnik's enthusiasm and advocacy for language education in such areas as international education, early language learning, and creative initiatives in language education. Nomination Deadline: March 15 Frank M. Grittner New Teacher Award: May be conferred annually on an individual new to the language teaching profession with one to three years experience who has demonstrated excellence in teaching and leadership in the promotion of language learning and international understanding; has given service to school, community, and state organizations; and has shown commitment to regional and national organizations. Nomination Deadline: March 15 WAFLT Excellence in Language Study Award: May be conferred on students who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in their school's language programs. Students currently enrolled in the most advanced World Language course offered at their school; elementary, middle school, high school, and post-secondary students are eligible. Nomination Deadline: March 15 WAFLT Future Foreign Language Teacher Award: May be conferred annually on students in teacher-training programs who have shown exceptional promise and potential to become outstanding World Language educators. Students currently enrolled in a teacher-training program are eligible. Nomination Deadline: April 1 WAFLT Professional Service Award: May be presented annually to recent retirees who have served both the profession and their students in providing quality World Language education. Recent retirees with a minimum of ten years’ experience as World Language educators and who have been members of WAFLT a minimum of five years within the past ten years are eligible. Nomination Deadline: May 15

WAFLT Recognition of Merit: May be presented annually to individuals who have demonstrated excellence in teaching or who have made significant contributions to the language teaching profession. Nomination Deadline: February 15 WAFLT Student Travel Scholarship: Designed to help Wisconsin pre-collegiate World Language students to participate in language and cultural immersion programs, this scholarship was established in 1999 to honor O. Lynn Bolton, a Spanish teacher in the West Allis-West Milwaukee school district. Nomination Deadline: December 1 WAFLT Scholarship for Professional Development: Designed to help World Language educators in Wisconsin improve their classroom teaching skills, this scholarship was established in 1995 to honor Professor Roma Hoff as she retired from the Department of Foreign Languages at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. The fund was expanded to honor Professor Constance Knop who retired from the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1996, and again in 2005 to honor the memory of Professor Irène Kraemer who served in many capacities at Carthage College. Nomination Deadline: April 15 WAFLT Scholarship for Tomorrow’s Teachers: Designed to offer financial assistance to attend the WAFLT Fall Conference for up to 20 college-level students preparing to become language teachers. Deadline: September 25 WAFLT Special Projects Grants: Designed to support research efforts, exchange initiatives, special programs, and projects that clearly demonstrate an ability to benefit a broad constituency of World Language educators and students in Wisconsin. Deadlines: April 15 and November 15 WAFLT Central States Extension Workshop Grant: Designed to offer financial support for two WAFLT members to attend the Central States Extension Workshop each spring. Recipients of the grant are expected to work together to present a WAFLT Extension Workshop at the Fall Conference in Appleton. Deadline: December 15 Donna Clementi Award for Excellence in World Language Programs: Recognizes one school and/or district that promotes language learning through quality programs.

For complete details and forms, please visit our Website, waflt.org Questions? Concerning awards, please email: awards@waflt.org. Concerning scholarships and grants, please email: grants@waflt.org


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Presentation Proposal: 2014 WAFLT Conference Radisson Paper Valley Hotel, Appleton, Wisconsin November 6-8, 2014 Making Language Matter: Essential Learning, Effective Teaching Online submission for session proposals will be available after December 1, 2013. Please go to the WAFLT website – waflt.org – to submit your proposal. Steps to submit your proposal online: C From the conference page on the WAFLT website, click on the “Submit proposal” link. Log in or follow the link to create a login if you have never done so. C Verify that your account information is current and contains an email address you have access to all year. C Register as an exhibitor and submit your proposal as an exhibitor session if you will be promoting a product or program during the session. C Fill in all parts of the online form for a successful proposal submission. C Enter the name, position, and school/company/ organization) for all session presenters as they should be printed in the conference program.

Conference Tip

C Verify that your session has been submitted by clicking on “My proposals.” Please note: C You can not exceed the word limits of 40 words for the abstract for printing and 100 words for the description for review by the Program Committee. Extra spaces and special formatting could prevent you from successfully completing your submission. C If using a school email address, verify with your school district that email from waflt.org is not blocked. C Presenters of accepted proposals must be current members of WAFLT. Renew your membership if necessary! Email notification of status will be sent to the submitter of the proposal in May. Contact program@waflt.org if you have any questions submitting online!

A good conference proposal is: C C C C C

C

Written in the third person with complete sentences 100 words for first submission to clarify for proofreading committee 40 words for publication in the Conference Program Proofread by more than one person Submitted with a well-chosen title, focus of presentation, procedure to be followed, and the benefit to participants Submitted online at waflt.org on or before March 15, 2014

Deadline for Proposal Submissions: March 15, 2014


2013 Fall Conference Program & The VOICE of WAFLT

PRSRT STND US POSTAGE PAID PERMIT 226 NEENAH WI

Linda Havas & Cathy Stresing, Conference Co-Chairs Carrie Bergum, Editor www.WAFLT.org WAFLT Membership Service PO Box 1493 Appleton, WI 54912

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

2013 WAFLT Fall Conference Registration Materials Please pass the pre-conference information in this publication along to a World Language Teacher! Inform ation & Address Change Help elim inate costly duplicate m ailings. Mark appropriately, detach and return to: W AFLT Mem bership Services, PO Box 1493, Appleton, W I 54912 Please Please Please Please

delete the address on the m ailing label correct the address on the m ailing label add the nam e/address shown to the W AFLT m ailing list. send W AFLT m em bership inform ation to the address shown below.

W rite address addition/corrections here: Nam e: Address:

2013 Fall Voice  

Highlights include... The Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness System, It's a SMART Focus, CIME: Help Others GAin an Experience of a Lifetime, A...

2013 Fall Voice  

Highlights include... The Wisconsin Educator Effectiveness System, It's a SMART Focus, CIME: Help Others GAin an Experience of a Lifetime, A...

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