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M OTHER’S DAY C O O KI N G & CRAFTS M IRA CLE O F M E DI T A T I O N

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W HY K IDS SHOUL D GRO W TH E I R O W N FO O D

DENTAL EMERGENCIES

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CH I L D RE N W I TH A SP E RGE R’S

Y O U R F R E E PA R E N T I N G M A G A Z I N E F O R T H E G E E L O N G R E G I O N


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- MAY 2014


MAY 2014 - PAGE 3

WELCO M E

Can you believe it’s May already? It seems that we have rushed through term one and even the Easter school holidays were a blur, however I hope that you enjoyed the break. Now we – or rather, hopefully our partners and children – are working towards spoiling us for Mothers’ Day. While some mums expect huge presents (each to their own), most of us are happy with a homemade card or a gift personally chosen by our child. It’s the little gestures that mean so much . . . the extra hugs and kisses, some flowers picked from the garden (if you are lucky enough to have flowers – we have a great combination of weeds and bushes), maybe a cup of lukewarm tea. . . . all of these are far more valuable than an expensive present purchased without thought. This month Waurn Ponds Shopping Centre opens the first stage of their new development, with a grand opening day full of fun activities, and I believe Coles will be having a brand new baby/younger kids section. We also have the RSPCA Million Paws Walk, which is a wonderful initiative and a great day out for your family and pets. Then soon enough it will be school holidays again and term 2 will be over. Where does the time fly to? F ROM T H E T EA M Kids Voice

KV TEAM

BUSINESS MANAGER Michele Mitten EDITORIAL The A Team SALES & MARKETING Carly Boyce

GRAPHICS & LAYOUT ARTIST Elise Blach STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Alan Barber COVER MODEL Sarah-Alice Swan

PO Box 54, Ocean Grove Victoria, 3226 Phone: 03 5255 3233 Fax: 03 5255 3255 FIND US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/Kids Voice Geelong www.kidsvoice.com.au

No part of this magazine, including the advertisements, may be reproduced without permission of the editor. The opinions expressed within Kids’ Voice magazine are not necessarily the views of the publisher, but those of individual writers.


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- MAY 2014

CONTENTS 10

6

26

24

27

7

30

6

Birth Story: Meg, Liam & William

7

Why our kids should be growing their own food

10

Belmont Community Kindergarten

18

Supported Playgroups

19

Education: Stop the blame game

21

Children with Asperger’s

24

Music & Arts: Daemora

25

Music & Arts: Christian College Music Tour

26

Stepping Stones Open Day

27

Crafts & Cooking

28

Reviews

30

What’s On

...AND MU CH MO RE


MAY 2014 - PAGE 5

THE MIRACLE OF MEDITATION RELIEVING STRESS AND ANXIETY IN MUMS-TO-BE Author of the new book, Meditation for Motherhood, Yogi Brahmasamhara (Brahm) is the Meditation Master at the Meditation Sanctuaries in Sydney. He is Australian born but, from the age of 20, he spent five years studying meditation with an Indian yogi and then three years in a Japanese monastery with a very wise old man, Suni Kaisan, a Zen Meditation Master and monk. Brahm has now practised and taught Zen for almost 40 years. ‘The first ‘clue’ that authentic Zen meditation may be of profound value to women at all stages of the motherhood journey, came when a young pregnant student told me ‘that her baby had stopped moving for three days after she had enjoyed a long meditation’. Naturally anxious, she saw her specialist who said that they were both fine and the baby was ‘just meditating too’. The second was another student who had recently given birth after practising meditation throughout her pregnancy. She told me that she was so peaceful and calm that she ‘had actually fallen asleep between contractions’. In then contacting many other new mothers who had practised meditation at the Sanctuary during their pregnancy. it slowly dawned on me that meditation may be significant in other aspects of the pregnancy/ birthing process such as increasing the possibility of overcoming difficulties in falling pregnant (including IVF) as well as a vastly increased possibility of a completely natural delivery. For example, in my admittedly tiny sample of about 35 meditating new mothers, only 13 percent had intervention of one kind or another at birth – quite meaningless to me until my subsequent research showed that more than 90 per cent of women in Australia do not experience a totally natural childbirth. In fact, 37 percent of births today are by caesarean (an astonishing 74 percent increase in 20 years) whereas only two of the meditating mothers delivered in that way, both for medical reasons. Further research worldwide showed that healthcare experts and scientists are now using meditation to reduce stress in IVF (a subsequent 60% increase in success rates) and that a significant number of the world’s 40% of

‘inexplicably infertile’ couples who meditate are becoming mums and dads after all! Another very important issue drummed its way through in talking to many more mums (particularly non-meditators). A deeply recurring theme was that almost all had experienced anxiety, confusion and even deep distress over conflicting ‘expert’ opinions - not on the scientific understanding of foetal development or the medical side of baby’s basic health but, incredibly, the key natural aspects of the early nurturing of the little one; crying, comforting, feeding and sleeping! I found that the utter naturalness of nurturing a newborn has seemingly gone ‘off the rails’. Mothers are being conditioned to heed the oftenridiculous expectations and false advice saturating modern society. They are beginning to forget the agesold practice of listening first to their own innate wisdom and also to the clear messages every baby conveys from the second of birth. As one mother said to me, ‘don’t they know that deep down, we know!’ The key message in the book then became ‘the greatest wisdom on caring for your little one is inherent in both you and the baby, passed into your very genes through countless generations before you’. In Meditation for Motherhood’, I say that authentic Zen meditation is ‘not a miracle that gives you a golden pass to the perfect pregnancy, perfect delivery and perfect way of positively influencing your baby’s experiences’. But it is the most natural and beautiful practice available to drill right in to that innate wisdom. Meditation is now proven worldwide to help women become calm, poised, deeply focused, peaceful of being, awake and wiser in all the motherhood situations they may face. In practical terms, it is the wisest and most successful way to permanently de-stress through learning how to let go tension, right breathing, damp down the mind worry and apprehension and deeply focusing on ‘just this’. Above all, meditation becomes a complete, confidencebuilding support resource from conception to bonding.

So that mothers-to-be can reap optimum benefits from practising meditation, in the book I have selected some of the loveliest authentic practices. They are presented as a developing programme for the various motherhood stages from pre-pregnancy, through the trimesters, delivery itself to bonding with the precious one. To get a little taste of the wonderment of meditation, you might like to try this simple meditation exercise in letting go tension. Even this one practice, done daily, can have great benefit on your wellbeing quite quickly! LETTING GO TENSION

- Lie down on your back, arms away from the body, ankles a little apart and hands facing down. - Stiffen your whole body (including your face muscles) and hold comfortably for 15 seconds. - Take a minute or so to then, very slowly, release the tension in the whole body. - all at the same time. THEN

We take the ‘relaxation’ deeper, letting go more tension in little body areas, one at a time. Focus on each area in the following order. -

Start with the muscles around your eyes (very important), then face, scalp, neck, arms (one at a time), hands, fingers – right to the tips – slowly down the body, chest, stomach, lower body, back, buttocks, thighs, calves, feet and toes. Focus on each part – be aware of just that part and keep letting go - one little bit at a time – then move on. Do this until you think that this time you are really relaxed.

THEN

– Be like an iceblock in the sun. Visualise your whole body ‘just melting’ - Try and keeping your awareness in your body and how it is feeling. - Just allow yourself to relish the enjoyment of the experience of being tension free. Complete very slowly so you ‘don’t spill the calm’.


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- MAY 2014

This months’ birth story has been shared by Meg, who, with her husband Liam, has a two year old son named William.

MEG, LIAM AND

Meg is from Ballarat, but has moved all around Australia over the past few years due to her husband’s job as a member of the RAAF. Liam and Meg coincidentally met on a plane when Meg was moving to Darwin. They sat next to each other on the plane and started conversing, and have been doing so ever since!

Currently Meg and Liam are living in Geelong, and Meg works at Geelong Hospital as a Registered Midwife. She trained as a midwife in Newcastle, when Liam was stationed at Newcastle RAAF base. Meg had a very healthy pregnancy the first time around, except for constant nausea that lasted the whole pregnancy.

WILLIAM

Meg booked in to have her baby at the John Hunter Hospital in Newcastle. She decided to have her pregnancy managed through the MGP (Group Practice Midwives), and was allocated her own midwife called Anne. This system is similar to the MGP arrangement that is available through Barwon Health in Geelong. Meg found the MGP system to be ‘excellent’, as it was great to see the same person the whole way through the pregnancy. She was seen by her midwife every four weeks throughout the pregnancy as she was well, healthy and free of complications. Meg did not formulate a birth plan as she wanted to ‘go with the flow’. She also did not participate in the ante-natal classes provided at the hospital, as being a midwife she felt that they were not necessary. She did however book into Calmbirth Classes (which are also available in Geelong). Liam and Meg were taught relaxation techniques through Calmbirth, and as they are both very intense people, they found this very helpful. They went to a weekend session to learn Calmbirth at around 34 weeks gestation. There were no other issues regarding Meg’s pregnancy and she was able to work up until 38 1/2 weeks gestation. True to form for a midwife, Meg’s pregnancy lasted beyond the due date and the textbook pregnancy did

not eventuate! At around 41 weeks gestation Meg’s membranes ruptured at 5 am in the morning which woke Meg up. The liquor was clear which meant that there was no indication that the baby was in distress, so Meg, Liam and Meg’s mum decided to try and get some more sleep. Within an hour contractions commenced, so they all had breakfast and watched a movie as a distraction. By around 1pm the family ventured into the hospital as Meg was suffering from very painful backache with the contractions. Meg was assessed as being 4cms dilated. For pain relief she tried sitting in the shower, having a bath, using the gas and water injections. The baby’s position was ‘posterior’ which means that the pressure on the back during labour is more severe, and the baby’s head doesn’t flex into the pelvis as well, so the labour tends to be longer and more unpredictable. After a few hours Meg was assessed as being 9 cms dilated. Progression to being fully dilated was very slow, so Meg was transferred from the ‘Birth Centre’ to Delivery Suite for an epidural and Syntocinon drip. After the insertion of an epidural anaesthetic, Meg’s blood pressure dropped which caused the baby to drop it’s heart rate, so Meg was transferred to theatre for a trail of forceps delivery, as by this stage the cervix was fortunately fully dilated. When the baby is posterior the forceps are used to rotate the baby to the correct position (Keillands Rotation Forceps). Meg remembers that the baby rotated without the use of too much force, and the delivery of baby William was quite ‘easy’. He was born in good condition and weighed about 3.7 kgs. Meg was disappointed that intervention had been required for delivery, but was relieved to have escaped the need for a Caesarean Section, and she was happy to have given birth to a lovely, healthy boy! Meg is still breast feeding William, who is now two years old. She is pregnant with baby number two, and has booked to have her baby through the Geelong Hospital MGP midwfe program. Meg is approaching her second labour ‘with an open mind that things could be completely different’, and her hope is that baby number two will not be in a posterior position during labour! All she really wants is a healthy outcome for her baby, and Meg would ‘experience a bad labour any day rather than having a horrible pregnancy’! Thanks to Meg for sharing her story and good luck with pregnancy number two!

TOLD TO JEN CARR


MAY 2014 - PAGE 7

WHY OUR KIDS SHOULD BE

We should be eating what our grandmother’s ate. That’s the advice being shared by many articles and studies with regards to nutrition and meal plans. And if I look at my Nan, I couldn’t agree more. Nan turns one hundred this year. She’s mobile on her own two feet, she has beautiful skin and perfect teeth, all of which are her own. Gentlemen twenty to thirty years her junior think she’s a bit of all right. Nan enjoys a glass of wine, loves butter and eats everything. And the trick is, it’s all in moderation and it’s all natural. Nan grew up on a farm that had a wonderful vegetable patch which she helped tend. She finished school when she was twelve, but armed with the knowledge she gained from being out in the veggie patch she could win Masterchef and take first prize the at Chelsea Flower Show. While our grandmother’s were being taught important survival skills, they were also eating real food. And the great news is we can too. And, it’s something we can pass on to our kids to give them the nutritional benefits that real food delivers. Going organic is great, and while it’s wonderful for our waistline, it can be harsh on the hip pocket. But, we can all have access to organic fruit and veggies … when we grow our own. I’ve dabbled in food growing for years and I can tell you, when you grow your own, you appreciate the time it takes for a plant to form its fruit or vegetable. You watch in wonder as the tiny seedling adds leaves, then a flower. You marvel at the bees spreading their pollen and you wait in anticipation as the flower slowly starts to turn into a pod that, in turn, magically grows into something you can eat. When you grow your own, you see that imperfect is unique, not unwanted. A lopsided pumpkin tastes as sweet and

GROWING THEIR OWN FOOD

delicious as a perfectly formed specimen. It becomes the centrpiece of your Instagram photo, and the number of likes you get for your post on facebook rivals what Michelin starred chefs receive. And while this is fun for us, it’s off the Richter of the fun scale for kids. They are enchanted by the daily changes that the veggie patch provides. They pat and poke and squeeze with delight at the new things they see. Kids learn that it takes time for food to grow. They understand fruit and veggies need to be nurtured and cared for, and that they don’t just come in a carton or a crinkly plastic bag. We all feel a sense of pride when we’ve made something, especially our kids. For them, to pick a tomato or a zucchini and know that they’ve played a part in its formation is as rewarding as making it to level ten in the latest phone game. To present a carrot that’s been tended to every day by them is as exciting as receiving a gold star on the Chores Chart. When children figure out that they can play an important role in growing their own fruit and vegetables, they feel a sense of responsibility and achievement. They want to help and be involved. Watering, weeding and sorting out pesky snails is satisfying, and its fun! And it gets even better. Studies show that children who are involved in growing their own fruit and vegetables are more likely to give them a try. When they understand how the food grows and where it comes from, they are more interested in it, and that’s a big win for parents. The backyard veggie patch is back. It’s a step forward to being sustainable and doing something good for our family. The veggie patch is making a renaissance. It’s the new ensuite – every home should have one. And I bet if Nan’s Mum could see that, she’d be all for this reinstated institution.

BY BIAN C A C . R O S S

W W W .HER BER T PEABO D Y .C O M


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- MAY 2014

CONV EN TI O NS So most people would have heard of comic-con, an event for comics, cartoons and games where people dress up as their favorite character and go have a good time buying the merchandise, meeting voice actors, the actors and the creators of the comics, cartoons or games. There are however lesser known events like comic-con such as: ARMAGEDDON - Held once a year Armageddon is a two-day convention showing at the Melbourne show grounds on October 19th and 20th with famous guests such as Kevin Eastman co-creator of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Wayne Nichols best known for illustrating Marvel comic Giant Sized Incredible Hulk, Dark Horse Comics

Star Wars: The Force Unleashed and Radical Comics Ryder On The Storm and Abattoir. Terry Brooks author of the Shannara series that covers over twenty books of Epic Fantasy giving real depth into the Post Apocalyptic world he created. William Slayers voice actor of protagonist Rigby on Regular Show he also has had roles in video games such as Mass Effect 3, Captain America: Super Solider and The Darkness 2. David Hewlett also known as Dr. Meredith Rodney McKay in Stargate: Atlantis. SUPERNOVA - Also held once a year

Supernova is open from the 11th of April to the 13th… (So last month ☺) with people such as Lucy Lawless: Xena, Alexander Ludwig from The

Dark is Rising and The Hunger Games, Crystal Reed: Allison Argent in Teen Wolf, Freema Agyeman: Martha Jones in Doctor Who, James Callis: Baltar in Battlestar Galactica also starring in Arrow and The Three Musketeers, Lindsay Wagner the original Bionic Woman, Mark Hadlow: Dori in the Hobbit trilogy and many many many others including voice actors from Adventure time, Pokemon, Futurama and Yu-Gi-Oh. Cover Artists and Comic Authors and Illustrators. On a sad note for Supernova which left me particularly down was that Eoin Macken: Gwaine from Merlin had cancelled on Supernova, he was supposed to go to the Melbourne showing but had to cancel due to a wedding and work commitments. Jessie Cave: Lavender Brown from Harry Potter also cancelled as well as Manu

Bennett: Deathstroke in Arrow and Azog in The Hobbit. Tamora Pierce, Gethin Anthony from Game of Thrones and Rachel Skarsten from Lost Girl and Transporter: The series and Birds of Prey. Of course you couldn’t have an Anime/ Comic/Game convention without the one thing that makes it worth going… Dressing up as a character you know, it just brings out all the childish joy you have when you get to dress up and mess around for an entire day with out anyone thinking it’s inappropriate or weird, whether you’re dressing up as Dimatello from TMNT, Kyoya from Beyblade Metal Masters or Erza Scarlet from Fairy Tail it’s a good day to just mess around and have fun. SHANNON DENNING


MAY 2014 - PAGE 9

EDWARD POINT WILDLIFE RESERVE

A REAL WORLD ADVENTURE One thing that makes Edwards Point Wildlife Reserve really special is that it’s the last remaining piece of coastal bushland on the Bellarine Peninsula. Nestled between St Leonards and Queenscliff on the foreshores of Swan Bay its a perfect spot for kids to escape from the world of computer screens and get involved in some real world adventures. And if online quests and challenges are what kids are looking for, then there are some real gems of the natural kind to be found here. Stage one starts at the car park at the end of Bluff Road and sees our adventurers tackle the easier Charlies Hole walk. On this walk you will enter a forest that has recently been returned to the area by re-seeding over the past couple of years. Crossing over into the lowlands you will glimpse far off destinations across the water and start to see the local inhabitants. Crakes and Moorhens lurk in the thick vegetation as Kites and Eagles soar overhead. Giant Macropods like Kangaroos feed on the open grasslands as shy native Swamp Rats and Bush Rats scurry under your feet. Find the Curlews and Snipe on the muddy wetlands and listen for the croaks and growls of the Toadlets and marsh inhabitants. Stage two is harder, but its challenges are more rewarding for your efforts. Starting at the car

park at the end of Beach Rd, players embark on the Two Bays Walk with its dense forests and ever changing bay sections filled with marine creatures. This walk takes you through sections of gnarled forests with thick undergrowth filled with scurrying creatures some of which do not have any legs. Again Giant Macropods can be seen feeding on the abundant grasslands and salty water fringes. Cross the timber bridge if you are brave and then decide if you wish to cut your quest short and return along the beach . If you track further south you will be rewarded by achieving the ultimate goal of climbing the viewing tower. Returning along the beach you may be lucky to encounter the friendly Banjo sharks as they patrol the shallows. A school of Salmon or Flathead may reveal themselves as you return to your starting point. A day at Edwards point has something for every member of the family. You will be exposed to the environment and will need to make real life decisions but in the end the gems of experiencing nature close up will be bigger, brighter and longer lasting than those in the virtual world.


PAGE 10 - MAY 2014

KINDERGARTEN

BELMONT COMMUNITY KINDERGARTEN

Belmont Community Kindergarten has been providing quality education and care for the children and families of Geelong for over 70 years. At our kindergarten we have two large, well-appointed kinder rooms and an expansive outdoor space that includes playground and sporting equipment, a sand pit, dry creek bed, fruit trees and a vegetable patch. Our kindergarten has a National Quality Standard rating of ‘Exceeding’, which is a testament of the exceptional education and care program our teachers, committee, parent community and the Geelong Kindergarten Association provide to the children who attend Belmont Community Kindergarten. At our kindergarten we provide a quality program, incorporating the National Quality Framework and the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework into curriculum planning. Through ongoing reflective practice, observations and feedback from parents, our flexible and inclusive program evolves to meet the needs of individuals, the community and families. We offer an open-ended, play-based program, as we believe play is the optimum way children learn in early childhood. A playbased program allows children to direct their own learning in a way that is meaningful and therefore relevant to each individual child. At Belmont Community,

children will have opportunities and time to make sense of their world through discovery, inquiry and experimentation in a relaxed environment. The staff at the centre facilitate and scaffold children’s learning and support them to reach their highest potential. At our kindergarten we have a real focus on environment and sustainability; we encourage children to develop an understanding of the world around them and the impact they have on the natural world. Our educators offer many opportunities for the children to learn about ways to help the environment. This ranges from our worm farm, where children can feed the worms their food scraps, encouraging ‘nude food’ with minimal plastic packaging and promoting the reuse of paper, cardboard and plastic products. We are also very excited about the installation of solar panels and water tanks this year. The children are also involved in the selection, planting and watering of the vegetables for our vegie patch. This focus on environment and sustainability helps children understand the importance of caring for the world they live in and develops respect for others and nature. To enhance our program and contribute to the children’s learning, we invite several visitors to our centre. These include the librarian, the Responsible Pet Program educator, the Drama Toolbox, Reptile Encounters, Sportz Buzz, Bravehearts, Vicroads and our local primary school’s reading group. We also schedule excursions to our local primary schools and to the Geelong Hospital to broaden the children’s learning about the local community and the world around them. We also like to support the local community by hosting charity events such as Hot Chocolate Day this month to raise money for the Geelong Hospital. Parents and families can contribute to the program in a variety of ways such as being on the Management Committee, helping in the kindergarten through our parent roster, sharing special skills and talents to enhance the program, offering feedback, helping at working bees, gardening and assisting with preparation

of experiences. All parents are encouraged to contribute to the program and all participation is highly valued by our educators and the children. We invite any interested families to contact the centre on 5243 4807 to arrange a visit to our wonderful kindergarten. At Belmont Community Kindergarten, we believe that the purpose of kinder is not just to prepare children for school but to prepare them for life. MY FAVOURITE THING ABOUT KINDER IS…

“I like drawing, painting and having our snack outside” – Lily “(Playing with) dinosaurs” – Banjo “Painting, bunny rabbits (Easter craft activity) and racing cars” – Matthew “We can hunt for dinosaur teeth and hide them in our pockets” – Erin


MAY 2014 - PAGE 11

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR A DENTAL EMERGENCY THOUSANDS OF DENTAL EMERGENCIES, FROM INJURIES TO A PAINFUL, ABSCESSED TOOTH TAKE PLACE EVERY DAY. WOULD YOU KNOW

WHAT TO DO IF YOUR CHILD BROKE A TOOTH OR HAD A TOOTH KNOCKED OUT WHILE

PLAYING OUTDOORS? KNOWING WHAT TO DO CAN LESSEN THE PAIN AND SAVE A

TOOTH THAT MIGHT OTHERWISE BE LOST.

KNOCKED-OUT (AVULSED) TOOTH:

OBJECTS CAUGHT BETWEEN TEETH:

Try to find the tooth! This may not be as easy as you think if the injury took place on a playground, basketball court or while skateboarding, so try to stay calm. Hold the tooth by the crown and rinse the root in water if the tooth is dirty. Don’t scrub it or remove any attached tissue fragments. If it’s possible, gently insert and hold the tooth in its socket while you head to the dentist. If that’s not possible, put the tooth in a cup of milk and bring it to the dentist. Time is critical for successful reimplantation, so try to get to your dentist immediately.

Try to gently remove the object with dental floss. Never use a sharp instrument to remove any object that is stuck between your teeth. If you can’t dislodge the object with floss, contact your dentist.

TONGUE OR LIP BITES OR WOUNDS: Clean the area gently with a clean cloth and apply cold compresses to reduce any swelling. If the bleeding can’t be controlled, go to a hospital emergency room or clinic. You may able to reduce bleeding from the tongue by pulling it forward and using gauze to put pressure on the wound.

Keep your dental office phone number and an emergency number where the dentist can be reached after hours with other emergency numbers, such as your family doctor, and fire and police departments. Some families post these numbers on the refrigerator or inside a kitchen cabinet door near the phone. Call the dentist immediately for instructions on how to handle a dental emergency. The Child Health and Development Team at Bellarine Community Health, is comprised of allied health professionals providing services for all children aged 0-12 years. These services are free to children listed as dependents on a health care card or pension card. For appointments and enquiries, phone 5258 0812.


PAGE 12 - MAY 2014

PRIMARY SCHOOL

WHICH SCHOOL??

HOW DO I GO ABOUT CHOOSING

NOW YOU WISH TO APPROACH THE SCHOOL AND

them about your concerns/needs after they have read the report.

Schools vary enormously in the quality and quantity of the gifted programs they offer. The Bright Futures Policy Document from the Education Department of Victoria advises parents to contact local schools to ascertain their gifted policy and whether it is a charter priority. The recent Parliamentary Inquiry advised that collaborative partnerships between schools and students’ families are essential, and should provide a strong foundation on which tailored provisions can be made to meet the needs of a gifted student. Parents interested in Secondary Accelerated Learning Programs need to appreciate that testing is conducted in the March/April of the year prior to entry. Some questions to ask the school.

Be aware of the importance of building a very positive partnership between you and the school. Even though you may be frustrated try not to cause the teacher (school) to feel that you are criticizing their teaching or them personally. You are there as an advocate for your child and you need the co-operation of the school to ensure this happens. Use phrases such as “How can we work together to...”

• At the meetings take minutes. The school will too but you may not get a copy.

Be aware that the school administration (principal) must be involved in any planning for your child even if only initially or you will be faced with having to repeat yourself year after year. Change does not happen without the approval and subsequent co operation of the school administration.

• Most schools will be delighted to have a CHIP but may not know how to go about catering for them.

• What is the philosophy/mission statement of the school?

• Be prepared to negotiate – give and take-small steps at a time.

• The content of the curriculum offered.

Make the school a partner in the process by showing them that by providing/catering for your child they will be helping other CHIP children in the school and there will be a few

• Do they have a policy on gifted children? If yes, ask for a copy.

Be reasonable in what you ask the school to do. Try to determine how willing the school is to go beyond programs that already exist. The school has to justify any curriculum change which incurs financial adjustment. They must be satisfied that they can rationalise change and get school council/education department approval and/or funding.

• What forms of enrichment/extension are used with high-ability children?

WHEN YOUR CHILD HAS BEEN

A SCHOOL FOR MY CHILD?

• Does the school have specialist programs such as music, computers etc. • Does the school allow children to progress at their own rate? How does the school do this? • Does the school have interest club e.g., chess? • How does the school perceive the role of the parent in the child’s education?

• Are there forms of acceleration at the school? Eg. Grade, subject? • Is there a specialist teacher who works with gifted children? • Are gifted children given the opportunity to interact with intellectual peers? • Does the school enter academic competitions as well as sporting?

WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW TO DO THIS?

FORMALLY ASSESSED.

• When your child has been assessed formally or you have some evidence that your child has needs that are not being addressed do have some objective material with you for example psychometric test results. • Make copies for the teacher and principal to read and ask if you could make an appointment to speak with

• That night send a copy of your minutes to the principal with the words “I understand from our meeting today that ----------------------will be trialled /initiated”. MAKE A DATE FOR A FOLLOW UP

MEETING TO REVIEW PROGRESS/ACTION.

• Ask if they would like to speak with the tester or organisation regarding the assessment. •

When looking for a suitable teacher for CHIP steer clear of teachers (and schools) who tell you that “all our students are gifted’ or I’ve never seen a gifted child”. Karen Rogers in “Re-forming gifted education” advises parents to look for a teacher who has a.:

• High degree of intelligence and intellectual honesty. • Expertise in a specific academic area • Recognition of the importance of intellectual development • Strong belief in individual differences and individualization • Genuine interest in, and liking for, gifted learners • Highly developed teaching skill and knowledge • Self-directed in their own learning, with a love for new advanced knowledge • Level headed and emotionally stable. SANDRA LEA-WOOD PHD

MANAGER CHIP CENTRE GEELONG SLEAWOOD@BIGPOND.MET.AU

WWW.CHIPGEELONG.INGEELONG.COM.AU


MAY 2014 - PAGE 13

MOTHERING WITH

MENTAL ILLNESS

YOU ARE NOT ALONE... The most important thing I want to say to parents struggling with mental illness: You are not alone. Not even a little bit. There are lots of us, whether we talk about it or not. We fall everywhere on the spectrum from occasional blues to debilitating illness. And, yes, there is a stigma about mental illness. A stigma that shouldn’t exist. It shouldn’t exist because people with mental illness did nothing wrong. It shouldn’t exist because people with mental illness should be encouraged to seek help. The stigma is even worse when it comes to parenting. As someone with mental health struggles, I’ve often thought: Do I have what it takes to parent? If someone knows my diagnosis, will they question my ability to parent? DO I HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO PARENT?

Yes. I love my children. I would do anything for them, which includes keeping myself as healthy as I possibly can. It’s not always a straightforward path. For me the decision to medicate was fraught with anxiety about the babies I was carrying or breastfeeding. Anxiety that was just icing on my already very anxious life.

I spent many hours researching the effects of anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medications on a developing pregnancy. I spent even more hours thinking and meditating on what the right decision was for me and for my babes. I know I’m not the only one who has devoted many hours and days and weeks to this struggle. And you’re not the only one either. I’m a mother. I’m an agoraphobic. I suffer from panic disorder. The fear of going certain places, of getting stuck in traffic, of being far away from a bathroom, has impacted my life in many, many ways. I’ve gotten depressed about it. I’ve worried that I’ll never be able to take my children to the zoo. I’ve stopped traveling three hours away to visit my in-laws. I’ve sought out therapy. I’ve sought out medication. None of this, none of these challenges have stopped me from loving my kids and nurturing them. I take it a day at a time, a struggle at a time. If I’m not up to taking my son to the zoo, it becomes something special he can do with his grandparents. If I need to take anti-anxiety medications to get on a plane, that’s okay. I made the choice to medicate. I made the choice to seek treatment, so that my children don’t grow up

with a mother paralyzed by fear. So that my children know that it’s okay to seek help. It’s more than okay. It’s vital. MY LIFE AS A MOTHER IS FULL OF JOYS. THE JOYS MAKE THE STRUGGLES SO VERY WORTH IT.

Acknowledging your struggles is important. Acknowledging your triumphs is even more important. And when I overcome a fear, I celebrate, and my husband celebrates with me. So, other mums out there. You are not alone. You may not know another mother who is struggling as you are. Except now you know me. I’m there with you. YOU ARE NOT ALONE.

Olivia Hinebaugh is a stay-at-home-mom to a three-year-old boy and baby girl. She is an aspiring novelist and steals time whenever both kids are sleeping to clack away at the keys. She tweets about mothering and writing @OliveJuiceLots


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MAY 2014 - PAGE 15

YOUTH PARTICIPATION

FUELS MEANINGFUL CHANGE

Glastonbury Community Services Voice of the Child Project Worker, Dina Dasic, spoke to Courtney Buchanan about why children should be seen and heard, especially in terms of the services provided to them in our community.

“We want to be seen as something positive because we are kids with hope and aspirations, we just have difficult circumstances so we need a bit of extra help to get there.” Voice of the Child Project Worker, Dina Dasic, recounts what the marginalised and vulnerable young people she works with say to her – they want to change perceptions about children and young people in out-of-home care in Geelong. Marginalised and vulnerable youth refers to children and young people who have experienced abuse, bullying, poverty, have a disability, and other kinds of hardship or trauma. Many of these young people live in out-of-home care, which is an umbrella term for children and young people in foster care or residential care units (staffed 24/7 by community service workers). While some children are placed into wonderful foster families who embrace them as part of their own family, that’s simply not the reality for all young people. “It’s hard, because you do have to find an actual match for a foster family and what they want in terms of age group,” says Dina. Although it’s not supposed to be perceived as such, residential care units are often last resort accommodation for children and young people who have broken down too many placements with foster families, or who can’t be matched with a family at that point in time. What needs to be addressed is the root cause of the problems, which results in these young people to break down their placements in the first place. “A lot of these kids are very upset with the system because they feel like whenever they say what they want, they’re never given what they want. But no one asks them in the first place. “Adults because they are adults are not always right, and we need to listen to children in their own right,” says Dina. In a society dictated by adult experience and decision-making, children and young people are being consulted by community service and welfare organisations in the hope to action real and meaningful change. Voice of the Child is a program initiated and run by Glastonbury Community Services with a collaborative approach involving other welfare organisations servicing young people in our region. Some of the organisations involved include McKillop, Diversitat, Bethany, Barwon Youth and the Department of Human Services (DHS). The program is the implementation of an action plan, which was formed after community service organisations were involved in a conversation series called Hear Me. Glastonbury’s General Manager of Service Development and Innovation, Dr Sarah Leach, initiated Hear Me as a research project to see what was happening in community services terms of supporting children and young people’s participation and engagement. Whilst Hear Me was aimed at adults working with and for children, two young people were involved in the conversation series. Both told their story about what happened to them and how not having a voice severely impacted their life’s outcomes, and how – had they been listened to – things could have been better for them. One of the young women who spoke told how she was sexually abused in her family and as a result was removed from home. She loved school, was a straight-A student, and had no problems other than what had happened to her at home. As a foster home couldn’t be found with the speed necessary, she was placed in a residential care unit. “She kept telling her workers ‘I don’t want to go there. This is not going to be good for me. Put me anywhere else but don’t put me there.’ But no one listened and they put her there,” says Dina. The other young people in the unit where she was placed were taking drugs, stealing, and not attending school. After a period of time the peer pressure wore her down and she ended up taking drugs, stealing and dropped out school. “Now, as a result of the abuse she put on her body during that time… she is experiencing huge health problems and she’s only 22,” says Dina. Despite her health concerns, this young woman has returned to the system that failed her so badly in order to make a change and prevent other young people from not being listened to. Hear Me ran for about 12 months and involved both local and high profile advocates for children, including Victoria’s Child Safety Commissioner, Bernie Geary OAM, and Child Protection Advisor at Save The Children Australia, Fiona Williams. What was identified as missing was children and young people having a say in the services they access. With the production of their action plan for Voice of the Child, Dr Sarah Leach applied for funding so the program could go ahead. Give Where You Live (GWYL), which is a Geelong Community Chest, funds the majority of the Voice of the Child project through a two year innovation grant. In addition, Glastonbury has committed substantial funding over the two years, with funding assistance from Bendigo Bank through Geelong Connected Communities. Voice of the Child consists of two main groups – the Youth Advisory Group (YAG), and an inter-agency reference group. The inter-agency reference group was already

formed through Hear Me and consists of organisations and practitioners servicing young people. They come up with questions and ideas to consult with the young people in the YAG, which is made up of 10 marginalised and vulnerable youth accessing services provided by organisations such as those in the inter-agency reference group. Members of the YAG are aged 13 – 17, and all happen to be in foster care or residential care. Project Worker Dina Dasic acts as a link between the two groups and helps guide the young people in the YAG to have meaningful participation in the cause. “Something that we’re trying to focus on is the fact that it’s a two-way conversation and we must give feedback to the young people,” says Dina. This means the inter-agency reference group acknowledges what needs to be done in the eyes of the young people, and depending on their capacity to do so, they should meet halfway, all the way, or if it can’t be fulfilled – explain the reasons why. “The young people are very smart and clued-on, they say ‘sometimes what we want, can’t be given to us. But we weren’t being asked from the start’,” says Dina. After just one meeting, the YAG already have so many ideas and goals to work towards. In their second meeting, the YAG will be reviewing grants for GWYL. Up until now, all the GWYL grant rounds have consisted of panels of adults. However, a lot of the grants go towards organisations directly working with young people. “This is a direct example of how these young people are having their voices heard. They will be reviewing grants specific to children and young people,” says Dina. GWYL will come back to the young people and tell them whether the grants have been accepted or not, and the reasons why. Another thing to come out of Voice of the Child is the acknowledgement that websites of community service providers should be more child-friendly. “What we’ll be doing as part of the YAG is looking at some of the websites and reviewing them for potential changes,” says Dina. Voice of the Child is still in its early stages and many of the actions will start taking place in the near future. However, since Hear Me, some things have already been implemented. “One of the things that came out of Hear Me was there should be a young person on interview panels for workers being recruited to work with young people. We have implemented that in Glastonbury and it’s something we’re encouraging other organisations to do,” says Dina. There was, of course, a young person on the interview panel when Dina applied for the job as Voice of the Child Project Worker. While other candidates had more specific experience, the young person on the interview panel felt Dina was the most relatable for young people and hence she was chosen for the job. There have been some blockages to having these young people’s voices heard so far. All young people in out-of-home care are on Child Protection Orders through DHS. The fact they are on a Child Protection Order means that they can’t be identified as a young person on a Child Protection Order under any circumstances. Whilst acknowledging there is a good reason why it is this way, Dina believes there could be a better classification system to allow some young people to be recognised publicly in cases where they are very low risk. While some certainly need to be ‘hidden’ from families with a history of violence, others actually have visits with their families and are no longer in the care of their family for other reasons. Although the YAG are already having a positive impact on our community, they can’t be identified or recognised for this publicly in any way. “I can’t take photos of the YAG and have them posted with an article, they can’t be recognised for reviewing the grants in the GWYL newsletter, I can’t take them anywhere to present with me. It’s one of the things we really need to work towards changing,” says Dina. Although some members of the group have expressed they would love to attend presentations involving them and their cause, legally it’s just not possible. “It’s not the same impact me standing there and delivering what they’ve said compared with them standing there and delivering what they feel… Although this is the integral part of their life and experience as a young person, they’re not allowed to speak about it until they’re 18,” says Dina. At any one point in time Geelong there are 55 – 65 children and young people who need to be placed with suitable foster families in Geelong. In addition to running Voice of the Child, Glastonbury are in the midst of a campaign to find homes for many of them right now. A positive foster care experience, where young people feel part of a family, and not just like they are there to pass the time until they turn 18, can seriously alter the outcomes for marginalised and vulnerable youth. Outside the Voice of the Child program, Dina urges everyone to have a part in changing the perception that adults always know best. “Start listening, but more importantly, start hearing. Anyone can be a part of this in some capacity.” If you would like to become a foster carer, please contact Glastonbury Community Services on 03 5222 6911.

COURTNEY BUCHANAN


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MAY 2014 - PAGE 17


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CITY OF GREATER GEELONG

SUPPORTED PLAYGROUPS

15 sessions of supported playgroups operate throughout the City of Greater Geelong each week. Playgroups are low cost and fun for adults and children alike. Adults stay with the children, giving them the opportunity to meet with other people going through similar experiences and helps ease the isolation that can come with staying at home caring for young children.

their ideas and making their own decisions.

Babies, toddlers and preschool children who come along to playgroup can make new friends, have new experiences, gain self confidence and independence and develop physically as well as socially and emotionally.

This session operates from a kindergarten room at the centre and is set up with an exciting range of activities for the children to experiment with. Families also have access to a fully enclosed yard complete with large sandpit, cubby house and paved paths taking you on an adventure around the gardens.

Play is essential for children to reach their full potential. When children play they develop language, relationships, use their imagination, explore, experiment, learn and practise new skills and express ideas and emotions. Children gain satisfaction from doing things their own way, using

This month we focus on the two supported playgroups in Whittington: “COME & PLAY PLAYGROUP” Monday10.00am- 11.30 am Early Learning Centre @ Apollo, Apollo Place, Whittington.

“PLAY & LEARN PLAYGROUP” Tuesday10.00am-11.30am War Memorial Kindergarten,Townsend Rd, Whittington.

This session is also fortunate to have full use of an unused kindergarten room and a beautiful yard. Children can spend the entire morning outside exploring the garden, having tea parties in the sandpit or riding around the large yard. Both sessions allow time for stimulating activities inside and out, morning tea time, and finish with an interactive story and music session. New families are welcome at each session.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SUPPORTED

PLAYGROUPS PLEASE CONTACT SUE ELLIS AT THE CITY OF GREATER GEELONG BY PHONE

52724781 OR EMAIL

SELLIS@GEELONGCITY.VIC.GOV.AU


MAY 2014 - PAGE 19

STOP THE BLAME GAME E D U C A T IO N

5 TOOLS TO STOP RUNNING ON AUTO PILOT

If you could create your life any way you desire, what would you choose? Often times when we hear a question like this, we imagine a bigger house, a nicer car, more vacations… tangible things. Nothing wrong with that! And, what about the “feeling” of your life? What would you like to have more of? Would you like more joy? More ease? More fun and laughter? What is it for you? What if, creating the life you desire is possible? Not matter what. No matter who your parents are. No matter how educated you are. Whether you live in luxury or poverty, what if you could begin to create your life exactly as you would like it to be? We often have our list of excuses. “If my partner would be more supportive then I would be happier.” Or, “If I could finish my college education, then I could have money.” Whatever it is, we often place our power in the hands of someone else. What if YOU are the source for your life? What if it’s not true, that someone else must do or change something? What if you are far more capable than you’ve been willing to acknowledge? When we are living our lives on autopilot, something else is in control. Perhaps the people we blame for past events. Perhaps the blame we place on ourselves. Whatever it may be, when we are blaming, we are functioning on autopilot. And when we are functioning on autopilot, we are not creating our lives.

reasoning is that kids are expensive and whatever you make, they take. Guess what? You will end up not having lots of money while your kids are home. You’re point of view says it’s so. You’re reality will prove it’s so. Would you like to change this? Change your point of view! Here’s how. For every point of view that you have say, Interesting point of view, I have that point of view.” As you do, you begin to let go of the points of view that limit you. This opens possibilities you haven’t even considered. 2. Is this mine? Ninety-eight percent of the thoughts, feelings and emotions you experience aren’t yours. You pick up on the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others and buy them as yours. Here’s an example. You’re at the park with your kids. You have this overwhelming sense of tiredness. Your mind says, “Being a parent is exhausting!” In that moment, ask a question. Ask, “Is this mine?” or “Where did this come from?” If you have a sense of lightness when you ask, it’s not yours! You can simply say, “Return to sender.” 3. Questions Change EVERYTHING! The next time you come up against an obstacle, ask a question!

Would you like to stop the blame game and create your life? Here are 5 tools to begin:

Here’s an example. You get a bonus at work. You are so excited until you get home and find a bill you weren’t expecting that’s more than your bonus. Excitement gone. Ask a question! “What else is possible?” Or, “How does it get any better than this?” Questions open the door to infinite possibilities!

1. Interesting point of view Did you know that your point of view creates your reality? It truly does! Let’s say you have the point of view that you can only have lots of money when your kids are grown and have left the house. Your

4. Choose every 10 seconds Imagine that you had 10 seconds to live the rest of your life. What would you choose? That lifetime’s over. Again, imagine you had 10 seconds to live the rest of your life. What would you choose? Keep

choosing every 10 seconds. This stops autopilot and puts you in the now! Choose. Choose again. Choose again! 5. Do something every day that nurtures you Choosing to include you in your life creates dynamic change. What can you do today that would be fun for you? What would nurture you? Getting out of autopilot and creating your life is possible. The creation of your future starts now! Dr. Dain Heer travels all over the world facilitating advanced classes, workshops and seminars on Access Consciousness® and a healing process called The Energetic Synthesis of Being. He has written multiple books including Being you Changing the World. In his unique approach, he offers tools that empower people to move beyond their current limitations and into the life they truly desire. Dain is conducting workshops in Sydney & Melbourne in April on these themes - for details visit www.beingyouclass.com


PAGE 20 - MAY 2014

K E E W H T U O Y L NATIONA

TH E VA RI OU S EV EN TS NG YI JO EN E AR ON GI RE G ON KI DS FR OM TH E GE EL E NA TI ON AL YO UT H W EE K AT BR LE CE TO N W TO EIR TH HA PP EN IN G IN

THE TRAVELLING SILENT DISCO WAURN PONDS SKATE PARK


MAY 2014 - PAGE 21

C H IL D R E N W I T H A S P E RGE R’S “Can’t you read?” she screams. My eyes close for the three seconds it takes to prepare for whatever is to come next, and to consider how I might deal with it. I look across the playground and spy the target; 40 metres away an elderly woman, the kind who still wears a hat and tweed coat, is walking with her fluffy miniature puppy. I’m racking my brain now. What is she doing wrong? She is not trespassing, not littering, not jay walking…. “I SAID” the voice bellows, “Can’t you read?” The elderly woman stops and looks over at us. “The sign clearly says ‘No Dogs Permitted Off The Lead’ You should be in jail!” The woman looks horrified for a brief moment, then registers that the booming authoritarian voice belongs to my angelic doll-eyed, then 4 year old daughter. I attempt to give the woman a ‘kids say the darndest things’ smile, and she seems to accept this. I guess at what she is thinking, or will be talking about with her neighbour back at home though, “How rude” or “How peculiar that a child should be so concerned about my little dog” or perhaps “How would a child that age even know how to read that sign?”, and of course, “What sort of mother has she?” There will be plenty of tongue clicking. My own thought is stock standard: If only I could smile, say ‘Asperger’s’ and all would be understood. Children with Asperger’s can be ‘little policeman’ and are sticklers for rules. Rules that actually exist and their own rules they create in their minds to make sense of this alien world they have been dropped into. In retrospect, I should have known my daughter wasn’t typical years before The Diagnosis. She is two years old, a healthy toddler visiting a doctor for the first time, for a cold just a little more serious than others. “Now I’m just going to use my shiny bobbler to check how you are ticking” he explained in the experienced way doctors have of placating little ones who may not comply with examination. My girl sets him straight, “It’s a stethoscope, Dr Wilson. You are using it to measure my heartbeat”. We laughed, no humouring her! I recounted this scenario to friends and family. “Where do they pick these things up?” Children with Asperger’s are literal. They have difficulty with language and communication, so they make it simple. Using one word for one object, that makes sense to them. Many adore technical, melodic or new words that they can practice on their tongues for a few days after learning it. ‘Stethoscope’ meets all this criteria. Not long after the doctor visit, she is begging us on a daily basis, “Can we go to the monkey playground?” This is not an unreasonable request and we will happily take her, if only we knew where she was talking about. Do you mean the zoo? No. The beach park? No. The park near Nan’s house? No. We can’t

figure it out and its driving us spare. Weeks go by and one day from the back seat of the car she’s shouting, causing me to break suddenly “There! There! The monkey play ground!” Aha! An indoor play centre we went to one time to celebrate a cousin’s birthday, when she was 11 months old and still in her stroller. It is a plain brick building, lots of posters on the windows, and on one A4 size ‘Yes! We Are Open’ sign on the door is a tiny picture of a monkey. Children with Asperger’s have an elephant’s memory, and an incredible eye for the details most of us miss, or deem irrelevant to recall. There is so much information being retained in their brain, is it any wonder they forget the daily social chit chat of our lives – the stuff they think is irrelevant? Who can remember to flush the toilet, say ‘hello’ to Grandad or comment on the weather when there are details like the monkey on a welcome sign to occupy the mind? Age 3 and she begins swimming lessons. A typical outing, except for us, the 15 minute drive to the pool will, in time, take me to the brink of frustration and back again. “Mum, how is grey made?” I know the answer to this one, “By mixing black and white”. Small pause. “How is black and white made?” I’m stumped. Next question. “How are wrenches made? “Umm…in a factory”. Lame I know, but its Monday morning and I’m on the way to a toddler swim class. “Well, then, what does ‘most’ mean? Ahhh… let’s see, it means….I’m struggling, but manage to come up with, “Not the least!” I’m so satisfied by this answer but she looks at me like I’m the fool that I am. She asks me these four exact same questions, in the exact same way, listening to my exact same response every Monday morning on the way to swimming for the next 3 years. Boys with Asperger’s are often referred to as ‘little professors’, while girls with Asperger’s are cast as ‘little philosophers’. I know from the one philosophy class I took at Uni, that this field of study involves a lot of questions being posed and very little in the way of definitive answers. Children with Asperger’s never ‘just let it go’. Ever. They also thrive on routine and repetition. She starts school at the local primary school, and begins dance lessons. She has The Diagnosis by this time, so we surmise that dance class is a fantastic way to provide her with a structured activity with strict rules and pseudo-socialisation with peers – plenty of opportunity for parallel play, lining up in rows, often according to age or size, and everybody following the teacher up the front. One day a friend comes to play after school. I give them an idea for a game – make up a dance and put on a concert for us. They do, and it’s brilliant. “Well done!” I clap, “bravo!” My girls chagrin is palpable, “Well I was really good. Ella wasn’t. She doesn’t do dance lessons, so she can’t do it properly”. Ella, naturally, goes home in tears and that’s the last we see of her.

Children with Asperger’s have difficulty forming and maintaining appropriate peer social relationships. Will there ever be a time when I can smile to Ella, simply say ‘Asperger’s’ and have her understand? Not long after her 6th birthday, sitting around the dinner table. “It seems apparent Mum. Mary is dead”. Yes, I explain to her how sad we are that our good friend has died, especially given that we didn’t know she was sick. “Well, the service is at St Marys. You can pick me up early from school. Dad can take the station wagon; he will be coming from work. Meet him out the front at 2:30. Ester can mind the baby; she is too young for a funeral. A drink at the Elephant and Castle afterwards will be appropriate”. Children with Asperger’s have difficulty identifying and labelling their emotions. My girl compensates for this difficulty by being a ‘problem solver’. If I were in any major accident, life crisis or minor inconvenience, I want her by my side. I never expect she will put her arms around me and share tears for Mary. The way she processes information often results in an over-reaction to the slightest sensory bugbear – a 30 minute tantrum because her pony tail is too loose – and an under-reaction to real catastrophe. This is a positive trait when everyone else is falling to pieces and she can guide us out with practicality. Today, I have just returned from the frenzy that is the Myer Stock-take Sale. The shoe department at 4 o’clock looks like a tsunami has hit, and has my girl declaring ‘This will never do!”, as she sets about sorting, ordering and matching all the picked over, tried on, rejected size 5 and 11 footwear that Myer can’t pay us to take home. The sales assistant looking on seems pleased at her efficiency – at least she won’t have to do it-, and we laugh about how she will get a job here one day. Typical girl just loves shoes. Except that she’s not typical and she doesn’t love shoes at all, she just can’t stand the disarray, it gives her a headache. On completion of the task, the shoes are certainly lined up neatly, but why are the Sandlers, Wittners and Diana Ferraris all mixed in together? “I’ve put them in order from those that will make the softest sound to the loudest sound when walking on a timber floor”. Her tone implies only an idiot would sort them any other way. Children with Asperger’s often learn by pattern, or by patterns that may only make sense to them. I smile at the over wrought sales assistant who is now faced with a massive tidy- up mission. I decide to test the waters. “Aspergers” I smile nervously. She smiles back! She knows! She gets it! Perhaps she knows something about it; she might even have a nephew, or a neighbour. I immediately see I don’t have to begin my usual rote monologue while talking to a blank stare, “Aspergers, it’s a neurological disorder on the autism spectrum that causes difficulties with social language…..” Today all is understood. - CAROLYN ROBERTSON


PAGE 22 - MAY 2014


MAY 2014 - PAGE 23

BEATING THE MOODY

BLUES WITH FOODS You may know that what you eat influences your body i.e. skin, energy levels and weight but food also influences your mood as food is a fuel for the body and mind. The brain is a complex organ and many nutrients affect your mood. A Geelong Osteoporosis Study (2010) by Associate Professor Felice Jacka, NHMRC Research Fellow, Deakin University, showed a diet low in fibre and nutrients had a negative effect on the immune system and a diet high in saturated fat and refined sugars had a negative effect on the brain. WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Eat a varied diet ensuring you get a range of nutrients, including fibre. A varied diet includes fruit, vegetables, wholegrain bread/cereal/rice/ pasta, low fat milk/yoghurt/cheese and lean meat/ chicken/fish/nuts/eggs/legumes. ENSURE REGULAR MEALS:

Eat at least three meals per day. How can your body and brain work if it’s hungry and not getting any fuel? EAT BREAKFAST:

Food in the morning refuels the body and brain to help concentration, memory and energy levels. OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS MAY HELP DEPRESSION:

Rich food sources include tuna (fresh and some canned), salmon, sardines, walnuts, linseeds, chia seeds, canola oil and canola margarine. Nuts and tinned fish are easy snack foods. FOOD IS FUN AND SOCIAL:

Enjoy eating with friends or family a few days a week. It’s a great excuse to catch-up. INCLUDE CARBOHYDRATE-RICH FOODS AT

EACH MEAL AS EASY FUEL FOR THE BRAIN:

They help memory and aid sleep. Enjoy wholegrain breads and cereals, whole fruits, reduced fat milk and yoghurt, baked beans, potatoes, rice or pasta. Try cereal at breakfast, a sandwich or wholegrain dry biscuits at lunch and potato, rice or pasta at dinner followed by a dessert of fruit and yoghurt or custard and a glass of reduced fat milk before bed. Other factors that help mood include adequate sleep, adequate fluid, daily physical activity, avoiding cigarettes and, if consuming alcohol, only in moderate amounts. If you think your mood is being affected by what you are eating and you want to talk, contact an Accredited Practising Dietitian. If you are 12-25 years old, you can find one at headspace Geelong – Drysdale site Peninsula Drive, Drysdale, Ph.52515088.

The Child Health and Development Team at Bellarine Community Health, is comprised of allied health professionals providing services for all children aged 0-12 years. These services are free to children listed as dependents on a health care card or pension card. For appointments and enquiries, phone 5258 0812.


PAGE 24 - MAY 2014

MU S I C A R TS &

MEET DAEMORA F I V E R OC KIN’ YEAR

11

BOYS F ROM

B ELLAR IN E SECONDARY COLLEGE HOW OLD WERE YOU WHEN YOU STARTED PLAYING/SINGING? Connor: 10 Josiah: 13 Anthony: 11 Jayden: 12 Jeremy: I’m not sure.. WHAT INSTRUMENT/S DO YOU PLAY? Connor: Vocals, Guitar, Keys, Drums, Banjo and I can play Twinkle winkle Little Star on Violin! Josiah: Guitar, Jews Harp & Marimba Anthony: Guitar Jayden: Bass, Trumpet Jeremy: Drums HOW HAS YOUR SCHOOL BACKED YOU UP WITH YOUR MUSIC? Connor: Bellarine Secondary College has a great music Program, very supportive along the way and it has teacher who actually care Jayden: It is an area where we can meet like minded musicians. YouthFest is great every year too IS MUSIC WHAT YOU WANT YOUR CAREER TO BE, OR DO YOU HAVE OTHER PLANS? Connor: I want to be a Musician or Filmmaker Josiah: I’d like to be a Photojournalist, Photographer, Writer and/or Musician and have more more dreams.. Anthony: I want to be a Rockstar! Jayden: If we as a band could achieve any success then id be here with the band, no questions, but I wouldn’t want to be a professional without a band like this Jeremy: I want to be a professional Drummer/Session Drummer & a rockstar & own my own music store. WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE LIVE MUSIC SCENE IN GEELONG? Connor: Amazing. So cool but I mean, I lead two music lives.. one in the metal scene with this band and the other in the folk/rock/acoustic scene with the other, so I’ll have a different opinion than these people. Josiah: Dead for metal. There is good rock and other stuff though. Jayden: I’m not personally huge fan of the thriving

acoustic scene we have which is great and filled with many talented musicians such as Connor, but I feel that metal bands like ourselves have been left out in the cold, not welcome at hardcore punk gigs or the acoustic ones. The hardcore scene is also very strong here in Geelong, but they have a habit of excluding bands such as ourselves. A continuation of the everlasting rivalry between metal and punk. Josiah: But we’re here to change that... WHAT PROBLEMS ARE THERE WITH BEING AN UNDERAGE MUSO? Josiah: No respect. No gigs for Metals. No venues for metal. Connor: Literally, no respect. That is a huge one. You get a few exceptions, and I’m lucky since I play things other than metal to associate with more than metal bands (Jeremy would agree with me there) but man, there are some musicians out there who think they are the be all and end all, with no respect for us young ones. Anthony: No gigs Jayden: There are so many, any venue that holds gigs for metal bands are all over 18s venues which makes it really hard to get our music out there. Another problem obviously being that we have problems moving lots of heavy gear without licenses. And as everyone as already mentioned, a lack of respect for underage musicians makes it hard to get noticed in a scene that already doesn’t favor your kind of music WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCES? Josiah: Ben Harper, Tom Morello, Dweezil Zappa, John butler, Kerry king, John petruccI, Tony Iomi and many, many more. Jayden: I feel the band takes mostly after the first movement of thrash metal in the early 80s, definitely lyrically but musically is always a matter of opinion. I this our sound as a band though comes from all our widely different musical influences. Connor: I think we have a unique sound for a metal band haha. I have an Indie Rock background too,

so I do what I can to make things a little different here and there. Jayden: So bands like Metallia, Megadeth, Slayer and Anthrax. Josiah: I come from a more alternative/roots/ progressive background so that’s what I bring to the band on top of thrash WHAT ARE SOME OF THE VENUES THAT YOU HAVE PERFORMED AT? Jayden: I guess, as we said before it’s hard for an underage band, and a metal band no less to get a gig. Luckily though, the Barwon Heads Pub holds a great underage open mic that we’ve played at and the school as provided us with several opportunities to play. HOW IT STARTED: Jayden: it started with me and ant, playing metallica and iron maiden covers and stuff. And we wanted to do an open mic but we had no singer, so i kind of pulled connor into it. Then we didnt have a drummer but connor knew jeremy and then josiah filled the last spot for the 5 piece that would give us the sound we were looking for to play our music that unfortunately isnt shared as a passion by many of our peers HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE NAME ‘DAEMORA’? Connor: The name comes from the Latin word “Demon” = daemon.. and Hally (Jayden) added the “ra” instead of “n” It’s not the first name we had though, originally we were the ‘Anthony’s Garage Band Experience’, and we were ‘Perdition, Systematic Insanity’, ‘Pearl Harbour’ and ‘League of Steel’. The name ‘Daemora; only really stuck because Facebook only lets you change the URL of a page a certain number of times... Our dream as a band i think is to really kick start a whole new wave of metal. To create a scene where metal isn’t a novelty or a non-existent niche but where a metal band can be considered equally as mainstream as an indie band.


MAY 2014 - PAGE 25

M USI C AR TS &

SENIOR STRINGS PERFORMING AT BEIJING UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE

THE SENIOR WIND SYMPHONY PERFORMING IN FRONT OF A HUGE PAGODA ON THE AMAZING GREAT WALL OF CHINA

CAITLYN OAKLEY YEAR 10 AND LYDIA MACKIE YEAR 10 MEMBERS OF OUR WIND SYMPHONY MEETING CHINESE UNIVERSITY CHOIR MEMBERS AFTER AN EXCHANGE OF GIFTS AND A VERY SPECIAL CONCERT

TESS GOLDEN YEAR 11 & MADI NORWOOD YEAR 11 SOAKING UP THE FESTIVAL ATMOSPHERE WHILE SIGHTSEEING AT THE BIRD CAGE.

SENIOR CHOIR PERFORMING AT DISNEYLAND HONG KONG


PAGE 26 - MAY 2014

STEPPING STONES

OPEN DAY

On Saturday 11th April , Stepping Stones educators came together to showcase their amazing centre to the Ocean Grove Community. From 11am-1pm the centre was open for interested families to come and a look around if they are needing care for their children. Families enjoyed a music session fro HeyDeHo, face painting, a sausage sizzle & children enjoyed some fun on the Jumping Castle.

The day was a great success and since that weekend we have had an influx of new enrolements that has helped us to build numbers at our centre. We still welcome anyone who is looking for care to give us a call and inquire about care for your child. We as educators love our centre & welcome anyone who is needing care to come and look through our beautiful child care centre.


MAY 2014 - PAGE 27

CRAFTS

& C O O K IN G

EGG & BACON

CUPS FOR MUM METHOD 1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees and lightly grease muffin tin.

2. Using a cookie cutter, cut two 5cm circles out of each slice of bread. Place a bread circle in the bottom of each muffin cup.

1 S L IC E OF BA CO N PE R CU P

3. Cut each strip of bacon in half and form an X in the bottom of

1 EG G PE R CU P

your muffin tin.

1 S L IC E OF BR EA D PE R CU P

4. Crack an egg into the cup on top of the bacon X. You can add

RE G UA L R S IZ ED M UF FI N T IN

other flavours here as well such as chives, cheese, sun-dried tomatoes or herbs.

OP T IO N AL :

5. Bake for about 35 minutes or until the eggs are cooked to

CH IV ES , CH EE S E, S UN - D RI ED T OM AT OE S , HE RB S , ET C.

your preference and the bacon is crispy on the top.

IN G R E D IE N T S

*PLEASE BE CAREFUL WHEN USING SHARP OR HOT OBJECTS. ACCORDING TO kidsafevic.com.au “THE HOME IS THE MOST COMMON LOCATION FOR CHILDHOOD INJURY. THEREFORE IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT WE MAKE OUR HOMES AS SAFE AS POSSIBLE.”

MOTHER’S DAY CARDS Materials Required:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Blank Cards Felt Heart Shapes Flower Buttons Corrugated Rolls - Natural CraftSmart PVA Glue Scissors

Instructions: 1. Separate the contents of the kit evenly. 2. Start by cutting a square shape using the corrugated roll provided. Whilst we did a square, you can experiment with any shape you wish. 3. Glue this onto the front of your card. 4. Now, glue on a felt heart shape. 5. Further embellish by gluing on some flower buttons. 6. As a finishing touch, write a special message inside for your Mum, Grandma or close friend. Happy Mother’s Day! *We recommend using CraftSmart PVA Glue for this project. *Products used in this project are available at Craft Direct. www.craftdirect.com.au Tel: 1300 354 240


PAGE 28 - MAY 2014

M E D I TA TI ON F OR M OTH E RHOOD Yo g i B r a h m a s a m h a r a - R o c k p o o l Publishing

F LAVO U RS O F M E LB OURNE

Jan ette George and E th a n J e n k i n s - S m u d g e P u b l i s h i n g Voted best culinary travel cookbook in Australia, by The Gourmand World Cookbook Awards, this fully updated second edition covers Melbourne’s nooks and crannies – upstairs, downstairs and through the complex laneway system – to provide a compilation of the best eateries in the city. The book features all new stunning full colour photography, a history of how the city came to be, delicious recipes from local chefs, street art, maps, restaurants and bars – all coming together to showcase the flavours of the most liveable city in the world, Melbourne. This book makes the perfect gift or coffee table centrepiece and will keep you engrossed for hours.

GOAT SIMULATOR

Zen meditation for conception, pregnancy and birth. A practical book teaching Zen Meditation for mothers-to-be. Stress can affect the mind and body, and in pregnancy, stress can place a huge toll on a woman, all of which can have a detrimental effect on mother and baby too. This is a book to teach a mother-to-be gentle ways to handle or banish stress as early as possible in the pregnancy. A calm mother has a positive effect on the baby. Step by step appropriate exercises to help let go of tension; learn relaxation techniques; right breathing calmness and quieting the mind.

Not rated - PC

Goat Simulator is a unique game, where you can play as a goat, (or there are other unusual ‘goat’ options that you can choose from). There are various things that you can do; whether it be jump on a trampoline doing front flips, summoning a UFO so you can go to space or crash a party. There are many simulator games from firefighting simulator, to robot vacuum simulator, but not yet have any of them been as brilliant, or as individual as this one. It is an interesting sandbox (play space) where you don’t feel it’s too hard that you need to check guides on how to find everything. As you play you will find something and realise how it works, and you can use it to summon something awesome. It really flows well and with perfect difficulty. (i.e. not too easy, not to frustrating) Goat Sim has very easy to learn controls so it’s not difficult to learn them. It doesn’t have a tutorial, so the only way you learn the controls is when the game is loading. People with some experience at computer games will probably find these controls easy to guess, but others may find it a bit confusing. Exploring and playing with this world is what this game is about, so I don’t want to spoil too much. There are many secret and hidden items and places, which can be great fun if found - keep looking and you will be able to get lots of fun out of this game. Although it can get boring fast, with every update this game will get better. If you like goats, fun, and pointlessness you will love this game, but if you are organized and exact you will not enjoy it as much. I love this game and really think it earns its $10 value by providing me with hours of fun by just being a goat! “This game has fully trained and prepared me and I feel that I am now ready for my new life of pursuing a career as a full time goat”-Malugre (Steam Recommendations) You can contact me at sushiphantom@gmail.com or play with me on Steam at Sushiphantom. Frag out for now! Callum Bedson

BIERTVICS ES IT S

LLY

E

IA SPEC

UR O Y FOR SS! E N BUSI

Contact Shaun on 5255 3925 OR 0411 416 384 to discuss your requirements! www.bitsit.com.au

We provide a managed IT support p lan for: · IT Mainte nance

& Audits · Project Pla nning & Su pport · New Purc hases & Up grades · Network M onitoring · Data Back up · Broadban d, E-mail & Website Se · Anti-Virus tup , Malware & Spyware M onitoring


MAY 2014 - PAGE 29

IN T O THE HE AR T OF T HE

MO VI E RE VI EW S

HIM ALAYAS

FO R REA L

When Jono Lineen’s brother died in tragic circumstances, he gave up a comfortable life, moved to the Himalayas and over eight years immersed himself in the cultures of the world’s highest mountains. The experience culminates in his book Into the Heart of the Himalayas, a fascinating memoir that traces his solo trekking odyssey from Pakistan to Nepal across thousands of kilometres of mountain terrain. No-one has ever before attempted to walk the length of the Western Himalayas alone, but Jono’s intentions were more psychological than physical. It was about integrating the Himalayan culture he had grown to love, assimilating the wisdom of the place and coming to terms with his loss. Jono’s openness with everyone he meets on the trail—from Pakistani military officers to Tibetan lamas and naked Hindu Saddhus—lies at the heart of one of the most complete portraits of the Himalayas ever written. Jono Lineen—a lone, disarming man—crosses borders, religions, castes, languages and philosophical boundaries to find the way to embrace his future.

If your a fan of Lulu Belle book series than you’ll love this! The artist of Lulu Belle, Serena Geddes, has kindly drawn a one off poster for KV readers! If you would like to win this large original of Lulu Belle at Ocean Grove beach, Like Kids Voice on Facebook and tell us why you love Lulu Belle!

GEELONG

HEA V EN IS

Jono Li n e e n Ra ndomh o u s e

WIN!!

SP ON SO RE D BY

Starring Greg Kinnear as Todd Burpo and co-starring Kelly Reilly as Sonja Burpo, this movie is based on the book of the same name, Heaven Is For Real. It brings to the screen the true story of a small-town father who must find the courage and conviction to share his son’s extraordinary, life-changing experience with the world. Colton (played by Connor Corum) claims to have visited Heaven during a near death experience and recounts the details of his amazing journey with childlike innocence. He speaks matter-of-factly about things that happened before his birth... things he couldn’t possibly know. Todd and his family are then challenged to examine the meaning from this remarkable event.

BE L L E

Belle is inspired by the true story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the illegitimate mixed race daughter of Royal Navy Admiral, Sir John Lindsay. Raised by her aristocratic great-uncle Lord Mansfield and his wife, Belle’s lineage affords her certain privileges, yet the colour of her skin prevents her from the traditions of noble social standing. While her cousin Elizabeth chases suitors for marriage, Belle is left on the sidelines wondering if she will ever find love. After meeting an idealistic young vicar’s son bent on changing society, he and Belle help shape Lord Mansfield’s role as Lord Chief Justice to end slavery in England.

T U O B A S TELL U ! S T N E V E YOUR IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING HAPPENING IN YOUR AREA DROP US A LINE news@kidsvoice.com.au


PAGE 30 - MAY 2014

AUSTRALIA’S FAVOURITE CANINE EVENT The RSPCA Million Paws Walk Returns to Geelong on Sunday 18 May 2014! The RSPCA invites you and your pooch to join in the walk to be held at the Eastern Gardens Circuit (near the adventure playground), Eastern Gardens, at 10.00am on Sunday 18 May. It is set to be a fantastic day for the family and your pet including pet advice, pet care displays, pet dog competitions, demonstrations, BBQ, food and refreshments, and prizes. Geelong Million Paws Walk coordinator Ebony McCarthy says “It’s a special social day out for our four legged friend’s whilst bringing the Geelong Community together”. The picturesque 2km walk will be around the Eastern Gardens Circuit and anybody can enter this unique event, so grab your lead, attach your pooch and come along. For further information, please visit millionpawswalk.com.au

RECONCILIATION IN JOHNSTONE PARK ‘Reconciliation: Let’s Walk The Talk’ is the theme for this community event organised by the Wathaurong Aboriginal Co-operative and The Geelong One Fire Reconciliation Group. The day raises awareness about reconciliation through FREE fun activities for families and everyone . Join in making and painting boomerangs, face painting, the Storyteller game, dancing, basket weaving, yarn with Elders, free BBQ, damper and more. Head along to share and learn about the achievements and contributions of local Aboriginal culture and history. There will be an opportunity to take part in the Constitutional Recognition discussion, Local musicians: Mick & Ollie from The Louds, Craig Norman, Renee van-Parren. Come along from 10am to 3pm and reflect on what recognition means, plus visit Geelong Gallery for local schools’ art work from 24 May - 9 June. For more information contact: geelongonefire.org.au or www.reconciliationvic.org.au

NATIONAL CELTIC FESTIVAL - PORTARLINGTON Could there be any better way to spend a winter long weekend? A group of friends. World class entertainment. Wonderful atmosphere. Warm, cosy venues. It’s all at this year’s National Celtic Festival. Held across the long weekend, June 6-9, at Portarlington, this festival has grown in the 12 years since it first put down roots in the small Victorian coastal town. It is now proudly the largest and most diverse celebration of Celtic music and culture in the southern hemisphere. Our concerts, gigs, sessions and displays, markets are able to be enjoyed by everyone, from the very young to the young-at-heart. The festival includes quality children’s entertainment; a workshop program just for kids; and all the fun of the family-friendly Ceili dance party. Free and Ticketed areas. Tickets @ www.nationalcelticfestival.com

TRAD E Hairdressers

Health

DIRE CTORY

IT Solutions

List your business in the Kids’ Voice trade directory.

ads@kidsvoice.com au

Parties

Toy library


MAY 2014 - PAGE 31

1 MAY

Annie The Musical. GPAC, 50 Little Malop Street, Geelong.

perhaps because of it, step families can provide a rich and diverse environment in which parents and children can belong to and develop in. Parenting in a Step Family program offers participants a forum to reflect on their own step family and parenting in light of a Step family developmental process and model and to increase their understanding of theirs and others in their step families’ experiences. 7 - 9pm. Gold Coin Donation

2 - 4 MAY

6 MAY

Open Day Aireys Inlet P - 12 College, (Lorne Campus), Grove Road, Lorne. 6.45pm : Welcome in ILS Centre; 7pm : School Tours; 7.30pm: Information Session in ILS Centre. Tel 5289 1585

2 -10 MAY

A Festival of Music in Geelong’s Churches. Music at the Basilica would like to welcome you to their annual music festival. This year the music festival has “Canticles” as its theme and there are seven concerts and three workshops. www.musicatthebasilica.org.au

3 MAY

National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St. Art activity: Art We Can Wear; interactive tour: Future Wool. Crafty Kids: Pre-School Art Classes. Got a preschooler who enjoys messy play? At a loose end on a Saturday morning? Come on down to the National Wool Museum for our art classes for kids up to 5 years old. Our friendly and fun Saturday morning art and craft classes are led by our qualified art teacher and we’ll even clear up after you! Bookings are not required, however, class size is limited to 12 children. You are welcome to attend every class or pick-and-choose sessions to participate in. Children will need to be accompanied by their parent / guardian for the duration of the art class. 10 - 11am. Cost $5.50 includes materials, tuition and entry to the museum

3 MAY

The 13-Storey Treehouse, GPAC, 50 Little Malop St. The 13-Storey Treehouse has been turned into an equally brilliant show for the theatre.

4 MAY

Bounce for a Cure, YMCA Newtown, 25 Riversdale Rd, Newtown. Each year about 1,600 cases of brain cancer are diagnosed in Australia and about 1,200 people die from the disease each year. Due to the very little research funding provided, no significant improvement has been made in survival rates in almost three decades. Last year local Basketball identity, Ron Dawson, was diagnosed with Brain Cancer. Ron has dedicated many years to supporting basketball and we are asking the Basketball community to get behind Ron in supporting “Bouncea-thon” to raise money for “Cure Brain Cancer” a Brain Cancer research charity. 11 - 3pm. Costs $20 per participant.

5 MAY

Open Day - Geelong High School, Ryrie Street, East Geelong. 7pm: Information Session – CA Love Hall. Tel 5225 4100

5 MAY

Open Day - Surf Coast Secondary College, Meeting at Torquay College site, Grossman’s Road, Torquay. 7pm: Information Session – Multi Media Presentation Room, Secondary Complex. Tel 5261 6633

5 MAY

Parenting in a Stepfamily, Ariston House, 245-249 Pakington Street, Newtown. A four-week program that has a positive look at the joys and difficulties of being in a Stepfamily. The program investigates the importance of identifying and respecting each individual’s place and developing realistic expectations of all concerned. Step Families are complex sometimes they can blend and sometimes they curdle. Despite its complexity and

Open Day - Belmont High School, Rotherham Street, Belmont. 6 – 7pm: School Tours; 7pm – Information Session – School Gym; 7.45 – 8.30pm : School Tours. Tel 5343 5355

7 MAY

Open Day - Northern Bay P - 12 College, Hendy Street - Corio, Peacock Avenue – Norlane, Tallis Street – Norlane and Wexford Court – Corio. Open sessions 9.30 – 11am – 6-8 Learning Communities of our Junior Campuses. Tel 1300 348 535

7 MAY

Bringing up Great Kids Parenting Program, Ariston House, 245 Pakington St, Newtown. A parenting program devised by the Australian Childhood Foundation, which aims to promote positive, respectful parent/child relationships. This program enables parents to ‘walk in the child’s shoes’ and provides practical help in understanding children’s emotional development, assists parents to develop attentive communication skills with their children and enjoy parenting as a two-way learning journey. Parents are encouraged to reflect upon and understand the meaning of their children’s behaviour, while gaining insights into the triggers that cause strong emotional responses from parents. The insights gained enable parents to develop the ability to contain these reactions and respond more thoughtfully to children’s behaviour. 7 - 9pm. Costs involved

9 MAY

Story times with the Itty Bitty Book Van, Geelong Gallery, 55 Little Malop Street. Experience the magic of books with these special story time sessions for the whole family to enjoy. Suitable for children aged 0-9 years. 6.30 - 7pm Free

9 MAY

Open4 Rooftop Cinema - Civic Carpark, cnr Little Malop & Gheringhap Streets, Geelong. Open4 presents a night of film, food and refreshments. 6 - 10pm. Free www.open4.org.au

9 - 10 MAY

Mouth to Mountain. http://www. geelongaustralia.com.au/mtom

10 MAY

National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St. Art activity: Fire and Water Fun; interactive tour: Mouth to Mountain. Crafty Kids: Pre-School Art Classes. Got a preschooler who enjoys messy play? At a loose end on a Saturday morning? Come on down to the National Wool Museum for our art classes for kids up to 5 years old. Our friendly and fun Saturday morning art and craft classes are led by our qualified art teacher and we’ll even clear up after you! Bookings are not required, however, class size is limited to 12 children. You are welcome to attend every class or pick-and-choose sessions to participate in. Children will need to be accompanied by their parent / guardian for the duration of the art class. 10 - 11am. Cost $5.50 includes materials, tuition and entry to the museum

T E L L U S W HA T’S O N I N Y O U R A RE A

11 MAY

Mothers Day Classic, Eastern Beach Reserve, Waterfront Geelong. There will be a new course on offer for 2014, so you will be able to run or walk the 4km and 8km in new surrounds, still taking in the fabulous foreshore and all it has to offer. With spot prizes for competitors, entertainment and activities at the expo area, there is definitely something for everyone whether you are running, walking cheering or volunteering. As well as your race plate we encourage everybody to fill out a a tribute card to wear on the day. These cards will forever be a memory of a loved one, words of encouragement to someone currently undergoing treatment or for yourself to remind you why you are here. Tribute messages can also be added to our new online tribute wall. 6.30am – 12noon. www.mothersdayclassic.com.au/ event/vic/geelong

13 MAY

Open Day - Lara Secondary College, Alkara Avenue, Lara. 6 – 6.30pm : Information Session – Middle Years Centre; 6.30 – 7:45pm : College Tours. Tel 5282 8988

15 MAY

Grandparenting 1st time around. Ariston House, 245-249 Pakington Street, Newtown. Are you about to become or have just become a Grandparent for the first time? Would you like to know what has changed since you were a parent? The Grandparenting for the 1st time program looks at what has changed in caring for infants since your own child was a baby, reminders about safety and explores the role of Grandparenting. 9.30 - 11.30am Gold Coin Donation

17 MAY

National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St. Art activity: Birds and Bugs; interactive tour: The Wool Harvest (noises). Crafty Kids: Pre-School Art Classes. Got a preschooler who enjoys messy play? At a loose end on a Saturday morning? Come on down to the National Wool Museum for our art classes for kids up to 5 years old. Our friendly and fun Saturday morning art and craft classes are led by our qualified art teacher and we’ll even clear up after you! Bookings are not required, however, class size is limited to 12 children. You are welcome to attend every class or pick-and-choose sessions to participate in. Children will need to be accompanied by their parent / guardian for the duration of the art class. 10 - 11am. Cost $5.50 includes materials, tuition and entry to the museum

18 MAY

RSPCA Million Paws Walk. Eastern Park BBQ Rotunda and Eastern Park Circuit, Eastern Park. Million Paws Walk is a fun day for any animal lover. 9am - 12.30pm. Costs involved

20 MAY

Let’s talk - addressing childhood anxiety and building resilience in children (aged 4-12yrs). Geelong West Town Hall, 153 Pakington Street, Geelong West. 11.15am - 2.30pm. Free

24 MAY

National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St. Art activity: Exploring Colour; interactive tour: Museum Colour Hunt. Crafty Kids: Pre-School Art Classes. Got a preschooler who enjoys messy play? At a loose end on a Saturday morning? Come on down to the National Wool Museum for our art classes for kids up to 5 years old. Our friendly and fun Saturday morning art and craft classes are led by our qualified art teacher and we’ll even clear up after you! Bookings are not required, however, class size is limited to 12 children. You are welcome to attend every class or pick-and-choose sessions to participate in. Children will need to be accompanied by their parent / guardian for the duration of the art class. 10 - 11am. Cost $5.50 includes materials, tuition and entry to the museum

25 - 31 MAY

Australian Indigenous Surfing Titles 2014, Bells Beach. The week long event will showcase the top 32 Indigenous open male surfers from around Australia.

26 MAY

Strengthening Families, CWI Geelong, 207 Moorabool Street. Empowering carers and strengthening families. The Strengthening Families program will assist you in developing the knowledge, skills, and confidence to respond to the needs of a loved one. The program will develop key skills in optimism, resilience, assertiveness and well-being that will help overcome the challenges associated with supporting someone with a disability. Delivered by Independence Australia’s fully qualified trainers and psychologists, the Strengthening Families program will consist of four workshops that are run over a two week period. 10.30am 2.30pm. Free

30 MAY

Rotary Star Search, McAuley Hall, Sacred Heart College, Aphrasia Street, Newtown. 7.30pm. www.starsearch.net.au

31 MAY

National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St. Art activity: Simple Sewing; interactive tour: Fleece to Fabric. Crafty Kids: PreSchool Art Classes. Got a preschooler who enjoys messy play? At a loose end on a Saturday morning? Come on down to the National Wool Museum for our art classes for kids up to 5 years old. Our friendly and fun Saturday morning art and craft classes are led by our qualified art teacher and we’ll even clear up after you! Bookings are not required, however, class size is limited to 12 children. You are welcome to attend every class or pick-and-choose sessions to participate in. Children will need to be accompanied by their parent / guardian for the duration of the art class. 10 - 11am. Cost $5.50 includes materials, tuition and entry to the museum

- E M A I L E D I T O R@ K I DS V OI C E.C OM.AU


Kids Voice May 2014  

Free parenting magazine covering 0 - 18 years. Geelong, Bellarine, Surf Coast and Lara,

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