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W H A T’S O N

Y O U R F R E E PA R E N T I N G M A G A Z I N E F O R T H E G E E L O N G R E G I O N


PAGE 2


WELCOME - PAGE 3

WELCO M E

Flies, sticky ice-cream fingers, “I want”, sunburn, “I’m bored”, crowds . . . don’t you just love summer holidays? Actually, I do! Not having to rush kids to school, no homework (although the teenager does have holiday homework), no lunch boxes to prepare. What bliss. The coastal towns become alive with the buzz of holiday makers and there is a vibrant feel to the area. How lucky are we to live in an area that people pay to come and visit? Even if you are working, popping down to the various beaches or wonderful parks after work allows you to feel like you are on holiday. With our lighter and warmer evenings, we can enjoy a relaxing end to a day at work. January school holidays also have a wide range of entertainment on offer, from school holiday programs at various centres throughout the region through to the Festival of Sails, the Australia Day Family Fun Day, Tranquility Fair and the Rip to River, to name a few. Have a look at our What’s On section for some great ideas on what to do over the holidays. This edition also provides you with some help on coping when your child starts school, along with some tips on mums returning to work. Browse the photos of children from Point Lonsdale Primary School working hard on creating awareness of our environment and other photos of the recent youth singers contest. Finally, all of us at Kids’ Voice wish you a very happy and fulfilling 2014.

F R O M T H E T E A M Kids Voice

KV TEAM

BUSINESS MANAGER Michele Mitten EDITORIAL The A Team SALES & MARKETING Carly Boyce

GRAPHICS & LAYOUT ARTIST Elise Blach STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Alan Barber COVER MODEL Noah De Bruijn

PO Box 54, Ocean Grove Victoria, 3226 Phone: 03 5255 3233 Fax: 03 5255 3255 FIND US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/Kids Voice Geelong www.kidsvoice.com.au

No part of this magazine, including the advertisements, may be reproduced without permission of the editor. The opinions expressed within Kids’ Voice magazine are not necessarily the views of the publisher, but those of individual writers.


PAGE 4

- CONTENTS

CONTENTS 6 8

6

10

9

11

13

16

17 20 21

13

22

27

Beach Health & Safety Barwon Heads Kindergarten Working Parents Queenscliffe Historical Museum Importance of Post Natal Exercise Happenings: All Stars Dance Technology: The Great Outdoors Sport: Holiday Health & Happiness

24

Geelong Summer Music Camp 2014

27

Crafts & Cooking

31

26

Attitude: Boredom Be Gone!

22

28

16

Eileen’s Birth Story

Reviews What’s On

...AND MU CH MO RE


OH BABY SOFT SUMMER SKIN - PAGE 5

OH BABY BABY SOFT

SUMMER

CO UR T NE Y BU CH AN AN JO UR NA LIS T AN D BL OG GE R AT BE AU TI FY I.C OM

SKIN

Baby’s skin – untouched by the sun, smooth and plump. A lifetime of good skin starts from birth.

NATURAL

The skin is our largest organ – yet this is where many people slather on the most chemicals!

MINI MOO BUBBLE

The moment you ingest bad foods your saliva starts breaking it down. This is continued in the stomach where your gastric acids continue to process your food.

WASH,

$17.50

However, when you put creams laden with preservatives (parabens are among the unhealthiest) and petrochemicals onto the skin, a high percentage (it is unclear exactly, but many studies say at least 60 per cent) absorbs straight into your blood stream more or less unfiltered.

(500ML)

More studies are being done and while the results can be worrying (hormone disruption and carcinogenic to name a couple of side effects) they are also empowering.

L’OCCITAN E

Knowledge is power and the more we know the better we can act. Research is only the click of a mouse button away these days.

SHEA MOM &

BABY CREAM,

The Environmental Working Group (www.ewg.org) has brilliant information such as listings of the safest sunscreens. The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics (www.safecosmetics.org) is another website with comprehensive information to start you on your journey to using safer products.

$29 (50ML TUBE)

There is also an abundance of health and beauty blogs on the Internet with fantastic tips to achieve healthy and natural beauty for women in general (I love Sarah Wilson’s lifestyle blog - www. sarahwilson.com.au). When you’re a new or busy mum, you don’t necessarily have the time to research new products (after the food shopping, washing, cooking and more, who does?). Thankfully, many brands are showing greater awareness for skin and overall health and are crafting safer products accordingly. Here, I bring you a few fabulous options that are all natural and far safer alternatives to your mineral oil-based baby products (mineral oil is a petroleum by-product). These products aren’t just better for your bubs health – they’re uber cute, easy to find and fuss-free.

BAM BOO BAB Y WIP ES,

$2. 99

(PA CK OF 20) OR

$6 .50

(PA CK OF 80)

BAB Y BEE

GET TIN G

ST ART ED

KIT ,

$24 .95 YES TO BAB Y

CAR ROT S

SOO THI NG

DIA PER CRE AM,

$12 .95 (80 ML) STO CKIS TS: Burt’s Bees available at David Jones, Harrisons Pharmacies, Kleins Perfumery, Terry White Chemists and selected retail outlets (www.burts bees. com), Wotnot available at www.ecodirect.com.au , select health stores and pharmacies nationwide (www .wotnot. com.au), Moogoo available at pharmacy and health stores nationally (www.moogoo.com.au), Gaia availa ble at Coles supermarkets, Thomas Dux, Priceline, My Chem ist, Chemist Warehouse, Terry White Chemist, and independent pharmacies, gift stores, health shops, and baby/ maternity stores (www.gaiaskinnaturals.com), Yes to Baby Carrots available at Priceline and selected pharmacies nationally or call 1800 791 381 (www.yestocarrots.com), L’OCCITANE call 02 8912 3000 for stockists (au.loccitane.com ).


PAGE 6

- NEWBORNS

E IL E E N ’S B IR T H S T O R Y Eileen works as a nurse. She grew up in rural Victoria, as the third child in a family of four children. As a young adult Eileen travelled widely, and lived and worked in many places in Australia and around the world. Eileen was 27 years old and studying first year nursing in Geelong, when she experienced her first pregnancy. At 17 weeks gestation she started to bleed, and had abdominal pain, so she drove to Warrnambool where her Obstetrician was based. She was diagnosed with Appendicitis, and went to theatre for an Appendectomy. As she drifted off to sleep after the anaesthetic, she remembers hearing it discussed that there was a risk of losing the baby associated with the surgery. Eileen was relieved when she woke up that all appeared to be well. Eileen was looked after in her pregnancy by a Shared Care arrangement, where she saw an Obstetrician in Warrnambool and a GP in Geelong. Eileen found that when she went to the GP she would pick up coughs and colds from sitting in the waiting room, so she didn’t repeat this shared care arrangement with subsequent pregnancies. Eileen breezed through the rest of the pregnancy until she reached 35 weeks gestation. At this time she returned home from being out, to find that her place had been broken into. On the same day she also had unexpected overnight visitors, and the next morning Eileen’s waters broke! Eileen was not organised for hospital and had no bags packed, and it was a shock to have to go to hospital around 35 weeks. Eileen then drove to Warrnambool to be checked out at the hospital. No labour pains commenced following the rupture of membranes, so by Sunday, about four days after the ROM, Eileen had an induction of labour. After one and a half hours of labour, Eileen’s first baby, Cara, was born. Eileen had required no pain relief, did not have stitches, and generally everything went very well. Cara was small, and weighed 5lb 8oz (2.49 kgs). By the time Cara was born she was 36 weeks gestation, which is around one month early, so she was admitted to the Special Care Nursery. She required a naso-gastric tube for feeding, but besides that Cara was well, and was only under SCN care for a few days. Cara fed well at the breast, gained appropriate weight, slept well and was a ‘model’ baby. When she had her 2 month immunisations the GP thought that he heard a murmur (a noise in the heart associated with poor blood flow through the heart), and although offered, Eileen didn’t think that a referral to a paediatrician was necessary because she had just seen a paediatrician a few days earlier, where Cara had been given a clean bill of health. At around 4 months, after Cara had her next immunisations, she looked

‘grey’ and developed projectile vomiting. She was also showing signs of cardiac failure, such as head bobbing, tracheal tug, and a rapid respiratory rate. Eileen took Cara to the Warrnambool hospital, and a Chest X-ray revealed that Cara’s heart was quite enlarged, and that Cara was in cardiac failure. Cara was immediately admitted to Warrnambool Base Hospital, and the next day Eileen and Cara were airlifted by Air Ambulance to the Royal Children’s Hospital. Eileen had no idea at the time what the cause of the cardiac problems were, as the heart condition could not be diagnosed until further tests were performed, so this was a very stressful time. Eileen stayed in the parent accommodation at the RCH. She was so stressed that her milk supply decreased and Cara was supplemented with formula as well as breast milk. Cara’s first Christmas was spent at the RCH. The plan was to perform surgery once the cardiac surgeon returned home from an overseas trip, but after three weeks Cara was not responding to medication, so surgery was performed on the 29th of December 1999. To add to the stress of the situation, there were provisions being made at the hospital for emergency procedures if all the medical machines and ventilators failed at midnight on the 31st of December 1999 as a result of the anticipated ‘Millennium Bug’! Parents and staff also underwent emergency training, which fortunately was not required. Cara’s surgery involved the repair of a Ventricular Septal Defect (a passage between the right and left heart ventricles), and the repair of a mitral valve (between the left atrium and ventricle). The surgery lasted for 6 long hours. Cara was taken off the ventilator on the 31st of December, which was a relief to Eileen as it meant that if the ventilators failed at midnight as a result of the ‘Millennium Bug’ Cara could breathe without requiring assistance. Cara spent over six weeks in hospital. After discharge home it was found that her repaired mitral valve was still not functioning properly, so on the 23rd of February 2000 she was back in the RCH for another three weeks to have the mitral valve replaced. By the time Cara was six months old she had spent over half of her young life in hospital. Eileen continued to express milk for Cara until after her second bout of surgery, and then Cara went on to formula. Cara has continued to require numerous hospital visits over the years (she is now 14 years old), and is now awaiting another mitral valve replacement. Eileen found out that she was pregnant with her second child when Cara was 9 months of age. Eileen had a ‘sixth sense’ and knew that she was pregnant even before she had performed a pregnancy test. Eileen was nauseous between weeks 6-12 of her pregnancy, but then this settled with no other issues. Eileen was offered specialised scans used to detect cardiac problems in the foetus, but decided to have only the routine ultrasound scans in pregnancy. By this stage Cara was still on medication but was thriving. She was a bit slower with her milestones (she didn’t walk until she was 15 months of age), but generally Cara was well, considering the rocky journey she had experienced. Gemma, Eileen’s second daughter, was also born at the Warrnambool Base Hospital. Gemma was born one week before her due date. At this time Eileen’s grandmother, who was in her 90th year, was a patient in Timboon Hospital. Eileen went to visit her dying grandmother on the morning that Gemma was born and following the visit, rang her partner Ray to ask him to come down from Geelong. Incredibly Eileen had a ‘sixth sense’ that Ray needed to come down to Warrnambool because she had ‘a feeling’ that she was going to have the baby that day, and sure enough she did go into spontaneous labour in the late afternoon. Ray left after work and made it to Warrnambool with 10 minutes to spare. With Gemma’s birth, Eileen experienced a 45 minute labour. Gemma was admitted to the SCN for a night for observation because of the quick, precipitate delivery, but fortunately everything was well. Gemma weighed

in at 6lb 10 oz (just over 3kgs) and both Eileen and Gemma were discharged from hospital after four days. Gemma breast fed well, and this continued until Gemma was 14 months of age. With amazing determination, Eileen completed her nursing studies and began her Graduate Nursing year and an Honours degree the same year that Cara commenced school and Gemma started Kindergarten. The girls had attended family day care two days per week prior to starting Kindergarten to enable Eileen to undertake nursing placements and study. Nine years later Eileen added to her family with the birth of Michael. She was 38 years old at this stage. Eileen was offered an amniocentesis because of her age, but declined as the initial scan indicated a low risk of Down’s syndrome. With her third pregnancy Eileen chose to be cared for by the Midwifery Group Practice Midwives (MGP) at Geelong Hospital. Eileen found the MGP midwives to be good. She was more tired in this pregnancy than with the previous two, because she was working mixed shifts including nights, she was a bit older, and was also kept busy with her two daughters. Michael was born at 39 weeks. She again had a ‘feeling’ in the morning that she was going to give birth that day, despite no obvious indicators. In fact, Eileen had a regular volunteer job to perform at the local primary school and did this in the morning instead of the afternoon because she felt that she was going to need to be free in the afternoon to have a baby! Her waters broke at 1pm, and there was meconium in the liquor. When Eileen went to the hospital to be checked out, she was placed on the CTG machine for monitoring, and was therefore confined to bed. Eileen didn’t enjoy this at all and insisted that the monitor be stopped so she could move around. At 5pm the midwives wanted to induce labour in view of the meconium liquor (which is a sign of the baby being stressed in-utero), but Eileen once again had a sense that all would be well, and she told the midwives that a baby would be born by 7pm so syntocinon would not be necessary. Reluctantly the midwives agreed to leave things for a few hours, and sure enough labour did commence. Michael was born at 6.30pm after a 50 minute labour. Once again Eileen had not required pain relief or stitchesa trifecta of quick but manageable labours- great effort! Michael was by far the biggest of Eileen’s babies, weighing 8lbs (3.6kgs). Despite the meconium liquor Michael was well at birth, and did not require admission to the SCN. They were both discharged after 20 hours in hospital, and were home in time that afternoon to collect the girls from school. With all three labours Eileen did not have a birth plan, as she had heard so many people say that their plan just didn’t equal the reality. She also had active labours for all three, walking around and spending a lot of time in the shower in labour, which she felt helped make birthing easier. Eileen’s babies were delivered while she was in a kneeling position. Eileen breast fed Michael for 13 months until he was weaned. Since Michael’s arrival three years ago, Eileen has had two trips around Australia with the family and their caravan! Ray and Eileen also had a ‘surprise’ wedding on the day of Michael’s christening. Thanks Eileen for sharing your birthing story and good luck to Cara with her future surgery! - AS TOLD TO JENNIFER CARR


THE TRANSITION BACK TO SCHOOL - PAGE 7

BACK TO SCHOOL Starting the school year requires an adjustment for both kids and parents. For parents of children starting school for the first time, the transition can be an emotional one. NORMALISE FEELINGS

It is normal for parents of prep children to experience mixed emotions; excitement, pride, anxiety, guilt, a sense of loss. Parents may benefit from having a coffee with other prep parents after drop off and by planning some activities for themselves to adjust to being without their child. It can be helpful to develop a trusting relationship with the teacher but be mindful of the boundaries and respect their role. If you are feeling anxious because of your own school experience, remind yourself that your child’s may be different. BEING FAMILIAR WITH HOW SCHOOL WORKS

Explain the routine for the school day in advance, such as mealtimes and when your child will be dropped off and collected. Let your child know exactly where you will meet them at the end of the day and try not to be late! Children may feel more confident if they have met the teacher before starting school and had an opportunity to walk around the school grounds. To improve social interaction skills, schedule play dates over summer, and consider group activities such as music groups or library story-times, so that your child can practice listening, waiting their turn to speak and putting up their hand.

LE TT IN G GO OF YO UR PR EP

GETTING READY FOR SCHOOL

If the summer holidays have meant late nights, sleep ins and lots of lounging around, it can be helpful to adjust sleep and mealtime routines a few weeks before starting school. Aim for smaller increments of time in adjusting bedtimes, such as 15 minutes over several weeks, and practice eating breakfast, snacks, and lunch at ‘school times’ in the week or so prior to the start of term. It can also be helpful for children to practice getting dressed for school by themselves and for parents to plan some activities for earlier in the day to get children used to leaving the house at school time. When school starts, allow plenty of time for getting ready to avoid feelings of panic. INDEPENDENCE AND CONTROL

Children may benefit from some control in planning for school, such as picking the colour of their pencil-case or nominating a preferred lunch. It might seem obvious but it can be helpful to explain what to eat when, perhaps even separating snacks and lunch into separate containers. Nurture their independence by encouraging them to organise some of their school materials, such as putting their books in their bag, and by teaching them how to tie their shoelaces or write their name. Velcro shoes might also be an option if tying shoelaces has not yet been mastered. The transition into the classroom will be easier if children are less reliant on the teacher for these things. DEALING WITH FATIGUE

The first few weeks of school are exhausting for prep children so allow for grumpiness and fatigue.

EA SI NG TH E TR AN SI TI ON BA CK TO SC HO OL AN D

It might be helpful to have earlier dinners and bedtimes, to schedule more ‘down time’, and to postpone extracurricular activities until your child has settled in. Children might be shocked to learn that they have to attend every day for a whole year, so it might pay to explain this in advance. SMOOTHER SEPARATION

Most children will feel apprehensive being separated from parents, which is a sign of healthy attachment. It is better for parents not to prolong the separation process even if their child begins to cry. Many prep children do cry when starting school but quickly adjust to being without their parents, and teachers are well-versed in dealing with tears. Parents should model a sense of confidence and relative calm to children, walk them to the right classroom, give them a hug and some words of encouragement, then leave. Don’t sneak out, it’s better that your child knows that you have left. And remember, it’s only through discomfort that we grow as human beings. DIFFICULT SEPARATIONS

Some children experience more severe separation anxiety that does not remit as the school term progresses. Talk to the teacher if you have concerns. If they also identify an issue it may be worth seeing your GP to get a referral to a psychologist. DR EMILY HILL

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST


PAGE 8

- ATTITUDE

ATTITUDE

BO

I’M

RE

D!!

BOREDOM BE GONE! The summer holidays are about halfway through and that brin gs up the question, what are you going to do for the rest of them? Sure, by now you’ve gone to the beach one too many times with frie nds on a hot day and gotten sun burnt, gotten a job if you’re old eno ugh to pass the time and just bas ically done everything you possib ly could to enjoy yourself with friends and family.

But what can you do after you’ve done everything? You’ve gon e out with your friends, seen all the new movies that take your fancy, played all your video games and rea d all your books. So what do you do now? Nothing? Do you just let the boredom seep in as you try to fight it by doing menial things tha t keep you occupied for a few min utes like playing with candles, snappi ng all the pencils in your house in half, colour in an entire A4 sheet of paper orange and stick it to your wall, wave to people as the y drive by your house… No, you don’t like those options. Well there really isn’t much to do, after the movies and everyth ing

else you’ve been doing, eve n the local entertainment venues lose their novelty after going the re 4-5 times a month, so you can either sit at home and do nothing or get creative.

Gather your friends togeth er and create a video of you all dan cing or acting, paint a picture or dra w, learn an instrument if you have to. If only there were more things to do, or more places that advertise d more to let us know that there is som ething to do, like rock climbing, abs eiling or jet skiing, even places tha t teach self-defence like karate, mix ed martial arts or boxing. All these things to do, yet… there’s nowhere for you to do them that you know of, unless of cou rse you go and look it up on the inte rnet, or if you aren’t into sports, settle down in a dark corner in you r room and learn how to play Yu-Gi -Oh or Pokémon, personally my pre ference would be Yu-Gi-Oh but all the same it’s something do when you ’re bored and out of things to do. SH AN NO N DE NN IN G

- LO CA L TE EN AG ER


NATURE - PAGE 9

KEEPING YOU AND

THE BEACH SAFE AND

HEALTHY THIS SUMMER Summer provides us with plenty of time to explore our beaches, enjoy the sunshine, run wild and take part in water activities. It is also a time to remember that other people are also enjoying the beach. So how do we share this experience without impacting on others, ourselves and the wildlife that share their home with us? Here are four simple tips to keep you safe, whilst at the same time making sure we leave the beach clean and healthy for the plants and animals.

1. Letters and numbers show us the way - to the beach:

Our dunes are homes to many wild animals that live here all year round. These animals share their homes with you so it is important that you access the beach using the pathways to protect the plants that provide food and shelter for these animals. Remember no dogs or people in the dunes.

2. Swim safe - Each year we experience a number of youth

jumping off the bridge, jetties and moored boats within our estuary. The estuary is tidal, meaning that the water level will drop quickly to water depths of less than 1 metre. Hitting the sandy bed of the estuary can cause the same spinal injuries as those that hit a hard structure. Enter the water responsibly to protect yourself, never jump from structures and always swim between the flags when out along the open coast.

3. “Take Only Photos, Leave Only Footprints” – We find

empty shells along the beach that were once homes for small animals that live in the sea. Empty shells provide shelter to smaller animals that need a place to hide from bigger animals that want to eat them. Look around our environment, leave things where they are and take a photo that you can keep forever.

4. Beaks and Bait Don’t Mix – The Barwon Estuary is a

great fishing spot. Make sure you fish responsibly, taking all your rubbish including your fishing line and tackle with your or placing it in the bins provided along the estuary. Fishing line and tackle causes serious injury to our marine birds and seals.

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE. MADDIE GLYNN MANAGER COMMUNITY LIAISON & EDUCATION BARWON COAST Ph 0400 931 893 Email : maddie@barwoncoast.com.au


PAGE 10 - SCHOOLS

STARTING SCHOOL

FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL

DO YOU HAVE A CHILD STARTING SCHOOL

THIS YEAR? This significant time comes with a mix of different feelings from everyone involved, including excitement and nervousness. Your child’s experiences in their first year of school are very important and the continuing support you give your child as they start school is vital. The January school holidays are the lead up to the first day and this period is marked with fun, sun and a carefree sense of freedom and spontaneity as everyone relaxes and enjoys themselves. This time is also the perfect time to help your child to make the transition to starting school. The Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD) suggest some practical ways that you can assist your child with their school transition: • Ask your child what they think about starting school. Talking to your child about their feelings and thoughts about school can help them to understand what school is all about and what they can expect on their first day. Be positive about starting school and enjoy your child’s excitement. Adopt a low-key approach to the big day by having casual conversations with your child about this next step in their life and sharing positive memories of your own school experience with your child. • Take your child to the local library and read books about starting school. Reading and looking at books can help them to visualise expectations about school and to put these ideas into a routine. Using pictures to aid discussion about school will support your child’s understanding of the situation. • Participate in the information sessions the school organises for you and your child. Many primary schools have their prep orientation days prior to Christmas. If your child is nervous or anxious about starting school it may be appropriate to visit more times than the allocated orientation days. Talking to your child’s school about additional opportunities to visit the school is a good idea. Visit the school with your child. Your child is likely to feel more settled if they have an idea of where things

are within the school. Show them where the drink taps, toilets, playgrounds and their classrooms are located. • Communicate with your child’s prep teacher. Building a strong relationship with your child’s teacher is vital. Arrange a time with their prep teacher to discuss your child’s interests, experiences and strengths. Teachers have a wealth of knowledge and experience and are a vital tool in helping with transition. • Network with other parents and children attending the same school. There may be some children starting at school who attended the same kindergarten as your child, or whom you know through friends or family. A meet and greet may be helpful for your child, and yourself, to get to know some of the other children and parents in your child’s class. • Practice makes perfect. Let your child practice dressing for school, using their lunch box and drink bottle and packing their school bag in readiness for their first day at school. • Establish a routine. It is important to establish a consistent routine for your child and any siblings at home. A good routine means an appropriate bed time so that your child is well rested for each day. Enforce routine well before the first day so your child has time to settle into the routine. If you need to arrange before and/or after-school care for your child, ensure that this is arranged and confirmed prior to your child’s first day. Show your child where the Outside School Hours care facilities are and talk to them about how they will get there and what will happen. When all the preparation is finished, there are a number of things you can do to help your child have a successful and stress free first day at school: • Help your child to pack their school bag with a snack, drink, lunch and a hat. Include a change of clothes and a spare pair of underwear in a plastic bag and let your child know these clothes are there in case of any accidents. • When dressing for school look for easy fasteners and encourage your child to dress themselves, so they can

manage things like taking jumpers on and off. Label all belongings and find out where lost property is held at school. • Put sunscreen on your child in the morning if it is needed and make sure they know that their hat is in their school bag. • Leave home on time allowing time to say goodbye. At first, you may stay a while to ensure your child feels secure, but once they have settled in, a short and reassuring goodbye encourages independence. • Show your child where you will meet them at the end of the school day • Check what time school finishes and arrive in plenty of time to collect your child • At the end of the day talk to your child about what happened at school. If you would like some more assistance with assessing your child’s readiness to start school, the health professionals in the Child Health and Development Team at Bellarine Community Health are also available to help. If you have concerns with fussy eating or mealtime behaviours, the Paediatric Dietitian will be able to assist, before your child starts school. There are also some very useful dietary resources for the whole family at the new website, www.eatforhealth.gov.au. With five centres around the Bellarine Peninsula, Bellarine Community Health (www.bch.org.au) provides health services to families across the region. The Child Health and Development Team offers a family-centred service focusing on the well being of children aged 0-12 years. The team includes speech therapy, occupational therapy, podiatry, dietetics, physiotherapy and dentistry. They can be contacted through BCH Service Access – Telephone: 5258 0812 or Email: serviceaccessofficer@bch.org.au. EMMA CLARK

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

BELLARINE COMMUNITY HEALTH LTD.


SCHOOLS - PAGE 11

EARLY LEARNING

BARWON HEADS KINDERGARTEN

It has been a fun and productive year for the Barwon Heads Kindergarten during 2013. At the end of 2013 grade 5 children from Barwon Heads Primary School made several visits to the Kindergarten to help integrate the children into prep in 2014. We had 48 children enrolled in prep for 2014 at the local primary school. It is fantastic to see so many children transitioning from kinder to prep within Barwon Heads. The Barwon Heads Kindergarten teachers have focussed on teaching the children all about recycling, re-using and sustainable practices again in 2013, showing the children many

different ways they can help look after their environment and implement these practices into their everyday lives. This has included recycling of food scraps, which are then used on the worm farm to help produce worm juice. Many families from the Kindergarten have taken advantage of the worm farm, taking the juice home for their own gardens. The children were involved in growing strawberries, snow peas and many other vegetables in the Kindergarten yard, learning many things about the growth of plants. To follow on from this the children have also been involved in cooking and eating their produce. It has been a fantastic year for the Kindergarten with regards to fundraising, with a very passionate group of parents working extremely hard to raise much needed funds for the Kindergarten. All the money raised has meant in 2013 the children have had the opportunity to go on several excursions, incursions and to be involved in lots of fun activities. Highlights of the year included the Wild Action (zoo to you) animal visit to the Kindergarten. The children were able to hold and feel lots of native Australian animals. They also learnt lots of interesting facts about these animals, including a 4 year old crocodile called Salty and very cute joey called Mac. We have also enjoyed some great literacy incursions. The Flying Bookwork where the children got to participate I some well know stories and The Drama Toolbox that took us on a wonderful space adventure, visiting the planets. The Kindergarten would like to thank the wonderful community of Barwon Heads for their generous fundraising contributions

throughout the year, it shows the community spirit is very much alive in our great town. 2014 is an exciting time for the Barwon Heads Kindergarten and wider community with building expected to commence on the new Barwon Heads ELC, which is to be built in the village park. This year Barwon Heads Kindergarten is again at full capacity with 52 children enrolled in the 4 year old program and 41 children enrolled in the 3 year old program, hence it is vital that the new Kindergarten is up and running in 2015. Unfortunately this year a number of local children were unable to secure places at Barwon Heads Kindergarten due to increasingly large number of enrolments, we look forward to a future of being able to accommodate everyone! -

BEC WHITEHEAD


PAGE 12 - SCHOOLS

PRIMARY SCHOOL

POINT LONSDALE PRIMARY SCHOOL

ng and planning to help Over the past semester we have been worki when we got put into 3 the dying environment. We started in term the environment. save help to task a various groups and were set n posters, All through term three we helped plan and desig environment and the rtise adve to was plan The s. book or brochures we inserted that s movie made how to save it. In term four we have address The nt. onme envir the save help onto our class 3/4 blog to of the blog is http://mrsvassilou.edublogs.org locally by painting This term we have begun to think globally, act It is purely about ds. groun l an environmental mural in our schoo It is a map of the for. care and live we that our local environment information including local area and has some other little pieces of beach, back front park, Hooded Plovers, the lighthouse, skate l and the local schoo our , store reeze beach, Moonah trees, Seab slogans down g writin for s, board black ed includ shops. We also nt. and messages about our local environme d to paint with Two local artists, Jane and Jen, have volunteere artists of Point n know well very are ts the students. These paren nscliffe. The mural Quee Of gh Borou The and f nsclif Quee Lonsdale, Waste Wise Centre but was thought of when we visited the Barwon ettes of drawings silhou drew We r. we have added our own flavou mural is on a The l. detai the in paint us d helpe and the artists to help express best blue concrete base. We have tried our very green hats on our put have We nt. the problems of the environme every way tried have and ence differ a make to (creative thinking) eded in succe have possible to share our message. Hopefully we helping the environment.

Y! THI NK GLO BAL LY! ACT LOC ALL JOSI E HORN E. WRIT TEN BY ROBB IE TAYL OR AND

LON NY KID S DOIN G THE IR BIT FOR THE ENV IRON MEN T


WORKING PARENTS - PAGE 13

WORKING PARENTS THE IMPO RTAN CE OF

MAIN TAIN ING A WORK /LIF E

BALA NCE AS A BUSI NESS OWN ER matter. If this is ringing true with you, it is time to step back and take stock of your situation. I am not saying to devote less time to your fledgling business, I am saying to sit down and acknowledge the things that you could be doing to bring that Yang back into balance.

The Chinese have long believed in the Yin and the Yang. Yin and yang are opposite in nature, but they are part of nature, they rely on each other, and they can’t exist without each other. The balance of yin and yang is important. If yin is stronger, yang will be weaker, and vice versa. This is my mantra when it comes to the way I run my business, although it wasn’t always the case. Most people who start their own business do so for one of three main reasons. They want to have more time, more money and more flexibility, all of these things to have a better work/life balance. Six months in, 80 hr. weeks are the norm and the families excitement in all of your lofty promises of a better life are melting quicker than an ice-cube in the Sahara. Your business, lets call this your Yin, is very strong which in turn has weakened your Yang, which represents your home/social life and relationships. What you focus on is what you get to the exclusion of everything else. Whether your business has taken off or you are struggling to pay bills, if you don’t start recognising that your Yang needs some attention, you entire life will be out of balance. For many, they don’t recognise a problem with their relationships until it hits them in smack bang in the face. You know, the “I am leaving you” kind of smack. Two of the biggest things people fight about are money and attention. Too little or too much, it doesn’t really

The first thing I would suggest is sitting down with those most important in your life and thank them. Thank them for understanding your long hours. Thank them for picking up the slack in the family operation and most of all, thank them for allowing you to create a better life for them. While we are talking about your family/friend relationships, how has your social life been? Are you making some time to spend with your loved ones? If your answer is no because you are ‘too busy’, your Yang will never regain its strength. I have always said, it is no point being wealthy and successful if there is no one you care about around to enjoy it with! How is your health and wellbeing? Are you spending any time looking after yourself? When is the last time you exercised or enjoyed a walk with the family outdoors? If your health has been neglected, this is just another aspect of your Yang that has it in such a weak position. Your life is all Yin. I believe that to be at your best, you need to spend some time, even if it is disproportionate time, on all aspects of your life. When I look back only a few short years ago, I was all Yin and no Yang. My life was my business and shortly, things started to fall out of balance. I had a two year son and was married and my friends were all still in ‘employee mentality’. I spent every available minute I had working on my business from my ‘Girl Cave’ and can honestly say I missed the warning signs. I was disconnected from the two most important people in my life, my son and my husband. They had their own thing going on, and then there was me and my relationship was with my business.

It was hard to hear at first and like most business owners; I was overly protective of people questioning my intentions. A defining moment came when my son at about 2 ½ said “Mumma loves business more than me” Ouch, think that didn’t cut to the bone? It was that minute that I knew, things had to change. When something is important to you, you don’t need motivation to make it happen. I didn’t work any less on my business; I just made everything else that was missing more of a priority. I found the time. I don’t know where, but I did. I learnt communication and organizational skills I never knew existed! I was present, I was available and I had an off switch. I gave myself boundaries and time limits that I worked until and even though it was hard, I knew it had to happen and happen immediately. When I look back, I can’t believe what it was like. Three and a half years later and I live my Ultimate Life. I work in my businesses (I now run four businesses) two days a week and on my business another two days. I choose not to work Fridays and every weekend is family time either going away on mini-breaks or just chilling together. Sure, I run some workshops and my Ultimate 48 Hour Author Retreats on four weekends a year however I choose to do that. I look after my mind and body, catch up with friends regularly and make every moment count travelling the world 3 times a year with my entire family including my second child Mika who is 2 ½. Being successful in business is amazing and I love seeing so many small business owners so passionate about making it work. Just as important however is having the same levels of passion on the rest of your life, your Yang. Natasa Denman is the next generation business mentor and product generator specialist. The founder of Ultimate 48 Hour Author, a book writing mentorship program, Natasa is the author of four books herself – The 7 Ultimate Secrets to Weight Loss, Ninja Couch Marketing, You Can Live The Life Of Your Dreams and her soon to be released latest, The Ultimate 48 Hour Author. FOR MORE INFORMATION V ISIT W W W .U L T IM AT E48HO U R AU T HO R .C O M .AU

OR EMAIL

BO O K @U L T IM AT E48HO U R AU T HO R .C O M .AU


PAGE 14 - HOW DO I...?

H OW D O I ...?

KEEP MY KIDS SA FE OVER SUMMER

The heat waves are coming . We get out early in the day to enjoy the sun shine and avoid the heat. The first thing parent s think of reaching for on a long hot day is the sunscreen, and rightly so; Australia has the highest rate of skin cancer in the world. A broad spectrum and water resistant sunscreen applied 2-3 hourly, a wide-brimmed hat, wrap-a round sunglasses and light, long protective clo thing when playing in the summer sun are skin protection strategies that are, as Australians, ing rained in our being, or should be! The earlier our children are exposed to the sun, the gre ater the risk of developing skin cancer late r in life. But, the sun isn’t the only thre at to our children over the summer months. It is a frightening statistic and one that should shock all parents into ensurin g water safety is a high priority; the number one cause of death in under 5’s is drowning. A large proportion of these occur in back yard pools. Have your family members attended ‘learn to swim’ classes? Do you have per manent fencing around your pool with a chi ld safety latch on your gate? Do you reinforc e rules in and around the pool area? Par amount to water safety is adult supervision. The truth is that children can drown in just 5cm of water. Fun in the sun and water req uires us as parents to pay close attentio n to keeping our kids hydrated. Hot weather alone contributes to the loss of body fluids thro ugh sweating. Breastfeeding mums can fee d more regularly

and increase their intake of fluids also. A bottle fed child can be offered a cool bottle of boiled water as an extra drink thro ughout the day and our children should be offered fluids more frequently. While water is best, a variety of drinks will make it easier to maintain hydration. Travelling in a car on mild to hot days can increase the risk of dehydr ation for our kids. We underestimate how qui ckly a car can heat up even on the mildest of day s. Best leave car travel to the coolest parts of the day, use the air conditioner or have window s open. Never leave your children alone in a car . 1574 children were rescued from cars in Victori a in 2012-2013. Victorian legislation now ma kes leaving a child unattended in a car a crim inal offence, with penalties ranging from fine s of up to $1,652 to three months in prison. Hot weather usually brings with it the potential for other dangers. Discourag e children from eating food that has been left out in the heat any longer than 2 hours. App ly child friendly insect repellent and stay aw ay from stagnant water to prevent insect bite s. The most valuable asset any parent can have to ensure they can be of any help to their children given any of these scenarios in the heat, is having attended first aid trai ning. CONTRIBUTION FROM ST JOHN OF GOD GEELONG HOSPITAL WR ITTEN BY EMMA HAY, NURSE & MOTHER


PAGE 15


PAGE 16 - QUEENSCLIFF HISTORICAL MUSEUM

QUEENSCLIFFE

HISTORICAL MUSEUM Your family might be mentioned in reports of sporting matches or accidents or school celebrations. Perhaps your grandfather or grandmother was rescued from a shipwreck which was written up in the local newspaper. Perhaps your great grandfather was the Mayor, or a teacher at a school or had a shop in the main street. Perhaps your grandmother was a teacher or a nurse or a musician or lived to be very old! Anyone starting a family history project should start by practising on their own story. Look at photographs of you and your family. Can you list everyone in order of their ages? Where do you fit in the list? Have you seen your birth certificate? What does it tell you about when and where you were born? Have you any photos of where you lived when you were very small? Are there any trees in the photos? Small trees may tell you how long ago the photo was taken because a small tree when you were say three years old might be quite a tall tree now that you are nine or ten years old. After you have practised on yourself the next step is to come into the Museum and see if there are any other photos of your family on the computer. The Museum staff will show you how to use the computer program for births, deaths and marriages. And of course you can also use your own computers to ‘google’ a search for information. It’s great fun. Newspapers can tell you a lot about history and their records are easy to find on a computer.

It’s a bit like being a spy doing a family history. There are all sorts of clues for you to follow up. Do the people in your photographs look like people in really old movies or people in war movies or people who look like we do today? That will tell the story of which generation of your family you are looking at. Do you understand that word ‘generation’? You are one generation. Your parents are the generation before you. Your grandparents are the generation before them. Great grandparents are the generation before grandparents. So you have two parents, four grand parents and eight great grandparents. Can you work that out? The Museum staff will help you sort out who is who. In the Museum there are school records. Do you know that school records show the birth date of pupils, how old children are when they start at that school, their father’s name and where he worked and if they had been to another school in another town? All this information helps you complete the story of your family. JOCELYN GRANT - QUEENSCLIFF HISTORICAL MUSEUM


POST NATAL EXERCISE - PAGE 17

T H E IM PO R T A N C E OF

POST NAT A L E X E R C I S E BENEFITS OF POST NATAL EXERCISE

Exercising after giving birth has many benefits, some of these benefits include; - Improves muscle tone - Helps to relieve stresses that occur to the body while looking after a baby (i.e. back and joint pain) - Increases energy levels, vital for a new mum experiencing lack of sleep - Improves sleeping patterns - Increases muscle recovery after the stresses of pregnancy (pelvic floor and core) - Decreases stress/ anxiety levels - Increases bone density and improves blood circulation - Maintain a healthy weight - Improves self confidence IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING WITH A PRE AND POST NATAL SPECIALIST

Time after time I see women who are so eager to get their pre baby body back that they find a hardcore trainer at the local gym and start personal training straight after their 6 week check. The problem with this is that the majority of the time these trainers have done a quick 8 week personal training course that doesn’t cover pre and post natal exercise. These trainers tend to focus on the ‘outside’ and prescribe high impact, high weight exercises which are completely inappropriate and potentially dangerous. A trainer that has completed additional training in the area od pre and post natal exercise will recognise the importance of initially focussing on the ‘inside’ and teaching their client the correct way to train these muscles to ensure that their recovery is complete and successful.

TRAINING THE

‘INSIDE’ During pregnancy there are massive changes that occur to your body and a few areas that are placed under enormous strain. These areas require special attention during pregnancy and after giving birth. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLES:

The pelvic floor muscles are the muscles that create a ‘sling’ to help support our bladder, bowel and uterus. We need it to maintain continence, core stability and sexual function. These muscles are placed under so much strain during pregnancy and birth that they weaken and require special attention in order to re strengthen. Start strengthening these muscles as soon as possible after giving birth. Aim to be able to do 6 x 6 second holds by the time you have your 6 week post natal check, then aim to exercise these muscles 3 times a day after that. CORE:

Our core is made up of 3 layers of muscles, the rectus abdominus (outer layer), the internal obliques (second deepest layer) and the transverse abdominus (inner most layer). The transverse abdominus muscles work in conjunction with the pelvic floor muscles to support the spine and are vital in post natal recovery. These

muscles will take longer to recover if you have had a caesarean delivery, suffer from back pain or have abdominal separation. THINGS TO AVOID (PARTICULARLY IN THE FIRST 12 WEEKS AFTER GIVING BIRTH) - - - - - - -

High impact exercise Lifting things heavier than your baby Straining on the toilet Heavy weights at the gym Abdominal curls Holding your breath Lunges and wide squats

Full Circle Health and Exercise in conjunction with Rock and Stroll Fitness run a number of post natal specific exercise classes, mums can even bring their babies along to exercise together. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL FULL CIRCLE HEALTH & EXERCISE:

5224 1442


PAGE 18 - THE LETTERBOX

THE

LETTERBOX Glastonbury Community Services (Glastonbury), one of Geelong’s most highly regarded community service organisations, is launching a new playground, Imagination Station at Northside, at the Salvation Army Northside Community Centre on Thursday 28 November, 2013. The facility is located in Corio the heart of the highly disadvantaged Northern suburbs of Geelong at a centre that is the gateway for disadvantaged families who would not otherwise seek support from community agencies. Approximately 500 people seek support at the Centre each week. Imagination Station at Northside has enhanced the Geelong community’s welfare hub facility by providing a safe, welcoming, informal and wheelchair / pram accessible outdoor play area for vulnerable children and their families. Until now, there was no sheltered, secure playground within 3kms of the centre. This space will provide further motivation to come to the centre and thereby increase the likelihood of needs assessments, immediate support and further support opportunities by way of referral for hard to reach service users.

Glastonbury delivers a play based parent and child enrichment program to 30 families and 40 children each year to promote optimal and healthy development at the Centre for young mothers aged 15-22 and their children. The Salvation Army recently committed to Glastonbury using its venue for our service delivery well into the future. The CEO of Glastonbury, Mr Sandy Morrison, has expressed his gratitude to the Percy Baxter Charitable Trust, as well as to the community organisations, local businesses, and volunteers involved with the development of this playground. “In keeping with Glastonbury’s values, the implementation of this project was a true demonstration of community collaboration. It was funded by the Percy Baxter Charitable Trust, managed by Perpetual, project managed by Glastonbury, and supported by several other organisations and individuals. Not only staff from our two organisations, but many parents, locals and small businesses pooled their resources, ideas and labour to produce this wonderful space”. Mr Morrison said.


EDUCATION - PAGE 19

E D U C A T IO N

IT ’ IN K R O W S ’ A M M MU

TIPS FOR MUMS LOOKING TO RETURN TO WORK

The notion of returning to work after raising babies / children can be a daunting one. The idea of juggling a career and parenting is intimidating for anyone! It’s sometimes a time where many women struggle with lack of self confidence, and overwhelming feelings of guilt, at the thought of leaving their children. It’s important for women to be reminded that this can be an exciting time to have a think about what they want, and reclaim back a different identity, in addition to their role as a mother. There are a number of factors that need to be considered, when deciding to return to work. •

Consider why it is that you are planning to return to work. It could be around income / finances, career progression, or obtaining work / life (sanity!) balance.

Think about what you enjoy doing, and what you are good at. This is a time when many women completely switch career paths or even set up their own businesses.

Consider the types of environments that best suit you. If you really miss adult company, then a job which allows you to work from home isn’t probably for you.

• Have open and honest conversations with your partner / family. You will need to have the support

of people around you to make it work, and share the load. • Consider the costs of child care / after school care, etc., and make sure that you have services available to you. •

Have a great resume. Invest in having your resume prepared by an expert who can assist you in highlighting your skills and attributes. You may have been involved in volunteering with kindergartens / school activities, assisted family / friends with small businesses, sold items on-line, used social media, all of which can be positively reflected in your resume.

Use social media. Promote that you are looking for work on your own social media sites. Your friends and family may become aware of employment opportunities for you.

• Consider a LinkedIn profile. • If you are anxious about the thought of a job interview, invest in a coaching session, or have a friend assist you by role playing mock interviews. • If you are nervous about your computer skills, do a quick refresher course to up-date your skills, and increase your confidence. • Talk to other working Mums. They will be able to share their experiences on what worked, and what didn’t, for them.

REMEMBER... IT’S ALL ABOUT FINDI NG THE BALANCE THAT WORKS FOR YOU - AND YOUR FAMILY. GO OD LUCK! JEMMA JAMES OF HICKORY HR SOLU TIONS WWW.HICKORYHR. COM.AU

MOTHER OF JASP ER (AGE 4) AND LOLA (AGE 2)


PAGE 20 - HAPPENINGS

ALL STARS DANCE O F YE AR D EN E” IC T EN PR AP S ER T ‘M AS S HE D CO N CE RT AT T HE PO T AT O

PHOTO BY JODIE HUTCHINSON

PHOTO BY HUNTER MICALLEF

PHOTO BY JODIE HUTCHINSON

Masters Apprentices was a sold out event! They had an overwhelming response to the involved dancers and actors. It was the first show for All Stars Dance, which featured very original material, as Suzanna Bowen wrote, produced and directed the entire show.

PHOTO BY HUNTER MICALLEF

PHOTO BY JODIE HUTCHINSON

PHOTO BY JODIE HUTCHINSON


TECHNOLOGY - PAGE 21

THE G R E A T O U T DO O RS

W O N DE R FUL W OR LD OF W E B

TE CH NO LO GY

I spent my childhood living on a two thousand acre farm, where there was always an adventure waiting to happen. There was nothing like spending hours being pulled behind the ride-on-mower on a sheet of corrugated iron. Perhaps not the safest activity, but certainly fun! My own children are a little more closely guarded, and not always by choice. We are confined to our modest allotment of just over 700m2, and have the added bonus of being at the end of a quiet court. One of my kids needs no encouragement to head outside with his basketball or football but the other two need a little persuasion. Here are a few tools that might help to make the most of this summer, and get the family outdoors. BECOME A WEATHERMAN Remember when the weatherman was as trustworthy as used car salesmen (no offence intended for my husband and his colleagues). With all of the satellite imagery, radars and historical data, we are now able to access some of the most accurate weather forecasts. This includes the percentage chance of rain and even the prediction of down to the hour that the rain will arrive. Every Victorian knows that we can have all four seasons in the one day (and sometimes the one hour) so checking the weather forecast can help you plan and decide what you want to do and when to do it. This might include keeping the indoor activities for those rainy days or in the heat of the day. And heading to the beach or park or boating when

the conditions are perfect – if only the weather website also had mosquito radars! My preferred weather site is www. weatherzone.com.au but for the more serious meteorologist, head to www.bom.com.au . Great Gadgets THERE ARE SOME GREAT THINGS TO HELP GET KIDS OUTDOORS THIS

SUMMER. HERE I HAVE LISTED JUST

A FEW: Walkie Talkies are fun and a great way for siblings to interact without being in close proximity to one another. The good old sprinkler. After years of water restrictions, it was no surprise that my kids didn’t even know what a sprinkler was. There are still some rules on use of sprinklers, but there is nothing more exciting than running through a sprinkler on a hot night. Along the same lines, is a slippery dip. We used to have just an old tarpaulin from the workshop with a splash of dish washing detergent, but now you can buy slides that come complete with sprinklers or are even inflatable with a ladder. Remote controlled vehicles are always fun and especially when racing against friends. For the serious enthusiast, there are competitions around with the all-important ladder for results. For those who really can’t part with their electronics, there are some great Apps that you may find useful. • MotionX GPS - This GPS tracks your location when you are riding, hiking, sailing or geocaching.

• • • •

What Knot To Do – An easy to use app that includes a glossary so not only you know what knot to use, but you will also appear to know what you are talking about. Surf Report – just like Swell Net, these apps will get you hangin’ ten in no time. Army Survival – Now this is not for the light hearted. Complete with everything you need to know to become just like Bear Grilles, including how to light a fire and building an open desert shelter. First Aid – The First Aid app gives you expert instructions via illustration, videos and text. Of course, always seek medical advice.

TOOL BOX Still stuck on ideas for getting your family outside this summer? There are some fantastic websites that can be used for inspiration. The Visit Victoria website has a section called ‘Outdoor Activities’ that can even be narrowed down to your specific region. Time Out has 101 things to do on their bucket list of outdoor activities, and also refer to some great suggestions on Kids Spot. CAPTURE THE FUN Many stores now offer water proof cameras which are perfect for all those outdoor activities. And there is always video recorders, such as the GoPro, to relive the experience all year round. S HEL L EY GR O S S D IR EC T O R AT W O N D ER F U L W EBS IT ES W W W .W O N D ER F U L W EBS IT ES .C O M .AU


PAGE 22 - SPORTS

HOLIDAY HEALTH & HAPPINESS

Being out of routine due to a range of varying commitments can mean hectic times for most families over the Summer break: there’s endless BBQ’s to attend, kids to run around and entertain, plus the all-important family get-togethers to organise and attend… However, these crazy weeks don’t have to see the family’s health and fitness - especially exercise “parked” until it’s time for school to go back… A few fun ideas can help keep you all in shape and feeling fit and fabulous for the entire summer! The best way to feel fit and healthy through this period is to maintain some amount of physical activity. And be realistic - you don’t need to undertake exercise at the same level or frequency as your non-holiday regime…. Simon Coverdale, Health and Fitness Manager at Leisurelink Aquatic and Recreation Centre says, “Instead of the exercise class you won’t get to due to your holiday time-table, schedule an early morning walk or take the kids bike riding. When you host social gettogethers at home, organise your day around games of backyard cricket, soccer, football or even Bocce! Along with the benefits of the exercise, the smiles and delight on the faces of all involved in the games will mean the world!”

Another great location to gather socially with friends and family is at the beach or at a local swimming pool. Nothing beats beach volley ball or cricket, body surfing, swimming races or throwing a Frisbee around amongst kids of all ages. Looking for further ideas? The following may just help to keep fitness in focus until school goes back: • Bring out the kids’ favourite ball games or water sport equipment and dive in to the fun with them •

Make a commitment to the kids that you’ll plan some kind of outdoor or active pursuit once or twice a week regardless of the weather. Ice-skating or roller skating, indoor rock climbing or activities at indoor pools are all great ideas.

• Re-introduce yourself to bike riding and get out on some amazing cycle trails with the kids. • Simply being outside in the sun and fresh air - enjoy outdoor gardening time or start a new garden project with the family. • Walk - it’s free, it’s easy and just about everyone can participate! Failing the above, a membership at a City of Greater Geelong Swim Sport & Leisure Centre can keep every

SPO

RT

member of the family fit and entertained week in, week out, 52 weeks of the year. Swim Sport & Leisure centres have indoor swimming pools to suit all ages and abilities plus fun and invigorating group exercise classes. Crèche facilities are also available. A Swim Sport & Leisure network membership means that you can share in the benefits of all that’s on offer at Leisurelink, Waterworld, Splashdown and Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre, plus you can access Kardinia Aquatic Centre and Lara Pool to swim and cool off over summer. Simon suggests a Swim Sport & Leisure Family Membership could be a great family investment these holidays. Visit a centre for more information or go to www.ssl. geelongaustralia.com.au

SWIM SPORT & KIDS’ VOICE HAS 20 AT IM PASSES VALUED LEISURE FAMILY SW EP E AWAY TO HELP KE $17.50 EACH TO GIV ED SS AND FUN FOCUSS YOUR FAMILY FITNE s . To win Like the Kid THESE HOLIDAYS… nk thi u yo y wh us l and tel Voice Facebook page . ily pass you should win a fam


SPORTS - PAGE 23

SPOR

T

READ THE PLAY

YOUTH PROGRAM COMES TO OCEAN GROVE SLSC

people on how to look after a mate.” A youth program aimed at raising The Read the Play program which awareness and addressing the g youn of g has been running for the last eight bein wellhealth and at k years, is involved in football and people was introduced last wee ng Savi Life netball clubs across the wider the Ocean Grove Surf Geelong region, after it was Club. recognised that there was a need een betw One in four young people within the Geelong local community the ages of 15 – 24 will experience to increase youth health awareness a mental health problem in any in relation to drugs, alcohol and 12-month period. 75% of mental mental health. The program is illnesses first occur in people aged delivered at the club by mental 15 to 24, yet . . . only one in four health workers or professionals young people with mental health within the field, in conjunction with problems receive professional help. the club’s Player Wellbeing Officer. The ‘Read the Play’ program which The format of the program is has also been delivered at the interactive and designed to engage Ocean Grove Football and Netball young people through a series of Clubs, teaches young people how to team games. The specific aims of the recognise the signs and symptoms project, for the young participants, for mental health, drugs and alcohol. were to increase knowledge about Three sessions with the assistance mental health, increase knowledge of a trained health professional to about local support services, help deliver a games evening, were increase confidence in ability to held at the Ocean Grove SLSC on respond to people with mental health Thursday December 19. Read the problems, increase confidence to Play Manager, Emma Mooney, said assist people to access appropriate it was great Ocean Grove SLSC support, improve attitudes towards had got on board after success of mental health problems and improve the program at the Ocean Grove attitudes towards seeking help. The Football and Netball Clubs. “We Program has been very successful were approached by the Ocean and is recognised as a major mental Grove Surf Life Saving Club basically health initiative in the Geelong asking us to give it a go,” Mooney Region supported by the Geelong said. “The biggest thing we are trying Football and Netball Leagues. to do is to de-stigmatise and teach

READ THE PLAY AMBASSEDORS TEGAN CALDWELL AND NATHAN VARDY


PAGE 24 - MUSIC & ARTS

MU S I C A R TS &

GEELONG SUMMER MUSIC CAMP 2014 6 DAYS OF GREAT MUSIC AND HOLIDAY FUN FROM JAN 12 - 17 TH Get on the GSMC web site and check out the photos from last year’s camp….you can get your application form online and it’s not too late to join the camp for this January www.gsmc.org.au The Geelong Summer Music Camp attracts keen musicians from all around Victoria each year. Singers and instrumentalists rehearse and perform in a range of junior and advanced ensembles and enjoy a host of fun electives ……film music composing and school of rock are just two of the great variety of electives offered. Young ‘musos’ from the age of 9 to 21 years are guaranteed a great time. GSMC is a day camp that gives around 280 students and music teachers the chance to make great music, have some fun and hang out with friends. The public concert is a fantastic showcase held at Costa Hall featuring all of the ensembles and a massed finale item with every participating camper on stage. This year’s musical theme will see each of the groups playing some Australian music as well as a range of other repertoire also chosen to inspire and motivate the performers. Public Concert: Friday 17th January, 7.00pm at Costa Hall - Deakin University Waterfront Campus Enquiries about the camp call Michael Wilding (03) 5229 5430 MOB. 0411 432 155


MUSIC & ARTS - PAGE 25

M USI C AR TS &

VOICES SEA

BY THE

On Sunday 8 December, ‘Voices By The Sea’ talent quest for the under 21’s was held at the Barwon Heads Hotel Bistro. It was organised and directed by Jill Meehan, local music teacher and facilitator, to bring a local stage to talented local children. Jill asked the children if anyone could come up with a name for the quest, and 12 year old Teemu Braiser did just that and named it ‘Voices By The Sea’ and the rest is history! The 8 December was their inaugural event and first prize winners were Ocean Grove girls Sue De Bruijn and Sydney Coad, who performed as a duo called ‘SOS’. Second prize winner was ‘Guy Perkins’ from Clifton Springs and third prize went to Teemu’s brother, ‘Matias Brasier’. There were ten acts in total at this event. Jill would love to spread the word about this event as this will be held twice a year and is designed to boost children’s self-confidence, performance skills and stage craft. For more information contact Jill Meehan on 0431 606 476 or at jillfolksinger@hotmail.com REVIEW BY JILL MEEHAN


PAGE 26 - LITTLE WREN COOKERY SCHOOL

LITTLE

FELONG I L A R O F HILD UP C R U O Y T SE Y! OOD TODA

&

A T T IT U D E E IV IT S O P

TO F

entertain pre-school and primary school aged children by providing a weekly cooking program enabling them to learn the joy of cooking through self-discovery, enhancing their knowledge about where food comes from and making healthy nutritional choices. The classes will teach children new invaluable life skills in a fun environment, enriching their self-confidence along the way. In addition to learning the joy of cooking, Little Wren’s mission is to help children understand the importance of a healthy balanced diet. Over 8 000 people in Geelong have diabetes and the number of people classified as obese within Greater Geelong amounted to over 24 000. Understanding the importance of good nutrition and healthy eating is vital in order to begin to combat Australia’s obesity epidemic, which has overtaken smoking as the leading cause of premature death and illness in Australia. Little Wren Cookery School can step in and teach children about wholesome, healthy cooking with the skills that will last a lifetime. Is your child a fussy eater? Does your child love being creative? Are you looking for a fun new class that will keep your child entertained and sneak in some education too? Are you looking for your child to learn some great kitchen skills and recipes using organic, local and seasonal produce? Little Wren Cookery School was created because one of my toddlers was a fussy eater and I discovered he loved to help me in the kitchen and would nearly always try whatever was being prepared. After talking to other parents and doing some research I found Geelong was in need of these fun classes for the youngest generation. The cookery school provides a service to educate and

WREN

According to VicHealth fewer than 10% of adults in Victoria eat the recommended minimum daily intake for vegetables and fewer than 50% meet the recommended minimum daily intake for fruit. In order to encourage our children to start to eat a more healthy diet, it is imperative we get them into the kitchen and show them what the right and wrong foods are and also how delicious they can be. It is important to educate children early about the cornerstones

COOKE

RY

SCHOO

L

of a healthy diet and set them up for a lifelong positive attitude to food - particularly vital now with diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and allergies on the rise. The aim of the service is also to educate children about where their food comes from and sustainable practices. A qualified teacher, passionate cook (and assistant)will provide the cooking lesson for a small class (maximum 10 children) so that each child will have individual attention and learn the invaluable skills of cooking in a fun and entertaining environment. At the same time they will also be learning about health, nutrition and kitchen safety and hygiene. Each session will differ depending on the recipe of the day. For instance if something needs to be baked, the children will help clean up and then play cookinginspired games whilst baking is occurring. Some recipes may be eaten on the day, others may be taken home to share. All the nutritious recipes will be given to the children to take home or be available on the website. During school holidays we hope to expand with special classes available, with specialised chefs, e.g. local baker to teach bread making, art of sushi making etc. JENN ANDERSON LITTLE WREN COOKERY SCHOOL


COOKING & CRAFTS - PAGE 27

CRAFTS

& C O O K IN G PAP E R PINWHEELS

P I N W H E E L S A R E A C LA SSIC SUM M ER C R A FT A C T IVIT Y . T HEY A R E E A S Y TO M A K E A N D Y OUR Y OUN GST ER C A N B E QUIT E C R E A TI V E W I TH THEIR A R T IST IC DESIGN ON T HE PA PER .

METHOD

• Start out by cutting two identical squares from paper or card. • You can leave the squares plain or color and draw some patterns or designs.

M A T E R IA L S

• Cut out both paper squares. • Glue the undecorated sides of the squares together. Remember to apply glue not just along the edges, but on the entire back area of the squares.

PAP ER OR CAR D ST OCK

• Cut along the 4 diagonal dotted lines.

SCI SS ORS

• Gather the four corners towards the centre without creasing the paper. You may glue the ends in place or just hold them together with your hand as you do the next step

GLU E ST ICK SPL IT PIN

• ADULTS: Insert a split pin at the centre. If you did not glue the ends of the paper in Step 6, the split pin should hold all four ends together. Wiggle the pin around to make the hole a bit larger.

BEA D (OP TIO NAL ) CRA YON S OR TEX TA S

• As an option, you may put a bead or small button between the back of the paper and where the push pin is opened out. This helps the pinwheel rotate better.

(OP TIO NAL )

• Finally, try blowing at the edges of the pinwheel to make it spin. Loosen the pin a bit if the blades do not rotate well.

OIL 2 CUP (12 5M L) RIC E BRA N

C UPCA K E S

2 CUP (15 0G) HON EY 200 G ST RAW BER RIE S WA TER 1 TA BLE SPO ON BOI LIN G COC ON UT 2 CUP (50 G) DES ICC AT ED

METHOD

L 12 CUP S (24 0G) WH OLE MEA AIS ING (W HOL EW HEA T) SEL F-R

• Preheat oven to 170°C (335°F) fan-forced. • Beat together eggs and oil until fluffy. Mix in honey until dissolved. • Blend strawberries and boiling water until smooth, then add to mixture.

FLO UR

MAKES

12

• Add coconut and flour, and then mix in milk until combined.

• Bake for 20 minutes. • Leave the cupcakes in the tin for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool. • To prepare icing, blend together ricotta, honey, oil, coconut and orange juice in a food processor until smooth. • Spoon icing over the cupcakes. Slice strawberries into quarters and place one quarter on top of each cupcake.

3 CUP (80 ML ) MIL K

From Healthy Home Cooking For Kids by Emily Rose Brott Reprinted by Permission of Random House Australia RRP $19.95 by Ebury Press. Available from booksellers and online retailers from 2 December 2013

4 CU P (6 0G ) RI CO T T A

2 T AB LE S PO ON

S HO N EY

1 T EA S PO ON RI CE BR AN OI L

2 CU P (5 0G ) DE S IC CA T ED 2 T EA S PO ON S

CO CO N UT

OR AN G E J UI CE

3 S T RA W BE RR

IE S , S LI CE D IN T O Q UA RT ER S

ICING

• Line a cupcake tin with patty cases and fill until full with mixture.

IN G R E D IE N T S

STRAWBERRY

2 EGG S


PAGE 28 - REVIEWS

G I B B LE WO RT T HE G OBLIN: THE

STORIES F OR BOY S - S TORI E S F OR GI RLS

S UM M E R HO LIDAY COLLECTION

Va r i o u s Au th o r s - R a n d o m h o u s e

Victor Ke lle her amd S tep h e n Mi c h a e l Kin g - Ra ndomhouse Goblin in the Bush: Gibblewort is a nasty little Irish goblin. One day he gets sick of the rain and damp of his homeland and decides to go to Australia instead. At first, he’s delighted with his new home, which is as sunny and dry as any goblin could hope for. But when he gets to know the local flora and fauna, he gets more than he bargains for and makes a hasty retreat back to Ireland where he feels safe and secure. The other goblins aren’t pleased to see him back and when gets really nasty, threaten to send him back to Oz. Goblin on the Reef: Gibblewort the Irish goblin is as nasty as ever. When his goblin friends get tired of his wicked ways, they teach him a lesson by packing him off to a damp part of Australia. The place he ends up in couldn’t be damper – the Great Barrier Reef! Delight in the adventures of Gibblewort and the creatures he meets there.

R A I N BO W LO O M

S hamro c k Cr a ft

Stories for Boys features stories that boys will be falling over themselves to read and re-read. Stories for Boys is a selection of wonderful stories written by Australian authors especially for the young male of the species. Dinosaurs, rockets, pirates and grumpy grandpas will capture boys’ imaginations and tickle their funny bones. Stories for Girls features stories that girls will be jumping with joy to read and re-read. Stories for Girls is a selection of wonderful stories written by Australian authors especially for girls in the 6- to 8-year-old age group.

LUL U BELL A N D THE CIRCUS PUP

Be l i n d a Mu r r e l l Ra n d o m h o u s e Performing dogs and trick riders on beautiful ponies - Lulu Bell can’t wait to see this circus show! There’s a circus setting up near Lulu’s house. How exciting! But as Lulu and her family walk past, they see a young girl crying. Stella tells them that Spangles the performing dog is missing. Lulu is determined to help Stella find the clever pup. Can Stella teach Lulu a circus trick in return? When the show starts, the Bell family might get a big surprise!

Rainbow Loom® is the original kit for making stretchy and super fun rubber band jewellery. The aim is to have fun creating bracelets, necklaces, rings, key tags and much more. Simply stretch the rubber bands over and around the loom to create a variety of different patterns and effects. It’s the perfect activity for kids looking to create lasting crafts. Recommended for 8 years to adult. Younger kids are recommended to use the kit with adult supervision (not for children 3 years or younger).

D UN GE R

Joy Cowley - Gecko Press A new pre-teen novel from the beloved New Zealand writer Joy Cowley. William and Melissa have been roped into helping their old hippie grandparents fix up their holiday home in the middle of the Sounds. They’ll have no electricity, no cellphone reception, and only each other for company. As far as they’re concerned, this is not a holiday.

BIERTVICS ES IT S

LLY

E

IA SPEC

UR O Y FOR SS! E N BUSI

Contact Shaun on 5255 3925 OR 0411 416 384 to discuss your requirements! www.bitsit.com.au

We provide a managed IT support p lan for: · IT Mainte nance

& Audits · Project Pla nning & Su pport · New Purc hases & Up grades · Network M onitoring · Data Back up · Broadban d, E-mail & Website Se · Anti-Virus tup , Malware & Spyware M onitoring


REVIEWS - PAGE 29

RA I N Y BRA I N , SUN N Y BRA I N

B E L M O N T HILL

Elaine Fox - Randomhouse

R e m y Lacr oix - Randomhous e In the vein of Sweet Valley High and Gossip Girl comes this hot new teen series. Piper Houston always gets what she wants. Popular, rich and gorgeous, she is the it girl of Belmont Hill. Boys want to date her, girls want to be her. And in her final year of high school, she and her friends will rule the school. But when her father’s new wife and her teenage daughter Alex move into the Houston mansion, Piper’s perfect world is thrown into chaos. Everything Alex does drives Piper crazy. The car she drives, the music she listens to, the boys that like her. When both girls are given an amazing opportunity to get involved with the magazine event of the year, watch the claws come out and the fireworks explode over Belmont Hill.

Are you optimistic or pessimistic? Glass halffull or half-empty? Do you look on the bright side or turn towards the dark? These are easy questions for most of us to answer, because our personality types are hard-wired into our brains. As pioneering psychologist and neuroscientist Elaine Fox has discovered, our outlook on life reflects our primal inclination to seek pleasure or avoid danger—inclinations that, in many people, are healthily balanced. But when our ‘fear brain’ or ‘pleasure brain’ is too strong, the results can be disastrous, as those of us suffering from debilitating shyness, addiction, depression, or anxiety know all too well. Luckily, anyone suffering from these afflictions has reason to hope. Stunning breakthroughs in neuroscience show that our brains are more malleable than we ever imagined. In Rainy Brain, Sunny Brain, Fox describes a range of techniques— from traditional cognitive behavioural therapy to innovative cognitive bias retraining exercises—that can actually alter our brains’ circuitry, strengthening specific thought processes by exercising the neural systems that control them. The implications are enormous: lifelong pessimists can train themselves to think positively and find happiness, while pleasure-seekers inclined toward risky or destructive behavior can take control of their lives. Drawing on her own cutting-edge research, Fox shows how we can retrain our brains to brighten our lives and learn to flourish. With keen insights into how genes, life experiences and cognitive processes interleave together to make us who we are, Rainy Brain, Sunny Brain revolutionises our basic concept of individuality. We learn that we can influence our own personalities, and that our lives are only as ‘sunny’ or as ‘rainy’ as we allow them to be.

MO VI E RE VI EW S B OOK T H IE F

Based on the beloved international bestselling book, The Book Thief tells the story of an extraordinary, spirited young girl sent to live with a foster family in WWII Germany. Intrigued by the only book she brought with her, she begins collecting books as she finds them. With the help of her new parents and a secret guest under the stairs, she learns to read and creates a magical world that inspires them all.

T U O B A S TELL U ! S T N E V E YOUR IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING HAPPENING IN YOUR AREA DROP US A LINE news@kidsvoice.com.au

SP ON SO RE D BY GEELONG

FREE BIRDS In this hilarious, adventurous buddy comedy for audiences of all ages, directed by Jimmy Hayward, two turkeys from opposite sides of the tracks must put aside their differences and team up to travel back in time to change the course of history - and get turkey off the Thanksgiving menu for good.


PAGE 30 - BITE SIZE NEWS

AUSTRALIA DAY

CHILDREN’S FREE FUN & ENTERTAINMENT DAY

Park with over 30 FREE Celebrate Australia Day at Rippleside lies and children to enjoy. fami for lays disp ity activities and commun brought to you by the Geelong For over 50 years this event has been ort of community groups and Australia Day Committee with the supp volunteers. ludes at 4.00 pm with the flagThe event starts at 11.00 am and conc at 1.00 pm. y mon cere raising and opening address sement rides, pony and train The FREE activities will include: amu animal nursery and much more. ting, rides, jumping castles, face pain p Shearing , Police vehicles, Community displays will include: Shee ities, CFA vehicles, Geelong Girl Guide and Scout Display and Activ MG Car Club vehicles, just and lay Disp p Military Re-enactment Grou to name a few. for families, there is To make the day more friendly and easy site. the on ided prov adequate free parking also encouraged to bring a Visitors to the Rippleside Park site are onsite at reasonable rates. or’s vend food be picnic lunch or there will

ic V C A Y T A T N E M T IN O P P A NEW

The City of Greater Geelong’s Youth Portfolio Councillor Jan Farrell has been elected Co-Chair of the Youth Affairs Council of Victoria (YACVic).

Cr Farrell said she ‘lives and breathes’ the vision of the Youth Affairs Council. “YACVic is a very special organisation that truly values the input of young people. The Board consists of 5 young and 5 not-so-young members, all elected by the YACVic membership. That commitment to young people is reflected in the leadership model of the CoChairs, with James Campbell representing young people alongside me.” The Youth Affairs Council of Victoria Inc. (YACVic) is the peak body and leading policy advocate on young people’s issues in Victoria. Their vision is for a Victorian community in which all young people are valued as active participants, have their rights recognised and are treated fairly and with respect. “I’ve advocated for the rights of young people for many years across a whole range of issues. I am thrilled to take up the position of YACVic Co-Chair and I see this appointment as a validation of my contribution to the youth sector in Victoria over many years. I strongly believe that young people should be consulted in the decisions that affect them, and be encouraged to be active participants in community life. It’s imperative that our young people are resilient and that we as a community note and celebrate their achievements. They have a right to be treated fairly and with respect”, said Cr Farrell. “My new role on the board of YACVic will enhance my local work as Geelong Council’s Education and Youth Portfolio holder, allowing me to represent the interests of all young Victorians.” Councillor Farrell is also an active participant in the Smart Justice for Young People initiative and is the Treasurer at Youthlaw, a Melbourne-based Community Legal Centre that acts for young people.

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WHAT’S ON - PAGE 31

4 JANUARY

34th Rip To River. Run along the hard sand beach from Pt Lonsdale Lighthouse to Ocean Grove beach as well as a 5Km Beach run, a 10Km beach walk and a 1.4Km Ripper Nipper kids run . 8am 12pm. Ocean Grove Surf Beach, Esplanade, Ocean Grove

4 JANUARY

Ocean Grove Tranquility Fair. 10am to 4pm. Ocean Grove Park, Presidents Avenue Ocean Grove. Entertainment and over 100 stalls, rides and activities. Free

4 & 5 JANUARY

Autopro Classic Car Show & Family Day, Drysdale Recreation Reserve. A fun day for all the family. With hundreds of car and motorbikes on show, a jumping castle, face painting and more including live music, food and refreshments.

7 - 9 JANUARY

Blues Boot Camp, Potato Shed, Peninsula Drive, Drysdale. A fun and challenging workshop, ending in a public performance. Place strictly limited. 9am - 5pm.

11 JANUARY

Portarlington Mussel Festival, Newcombe Street, Portarlington. A local festival showcasing talented locals, including musicians, dance, choral groups etc Local mussels, food and wine. 9.30am - 5pm. Gold coin entry

12 JANUARY

Community Boating Day - Boat Safety, When You’re Upside Down It’s Too Late. Ocean Grove Boat Ramp, Guthridge Street, Ocean Grove. The event aims to create awareness and educate the community, both boat operators and beach users on safe and responsible boating practices. 9am - 2pm.

13 - 24 JANUARY

National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St, Geelong. Summer School Holiday Fun - Guided activities from 10am to 2pm. Join the Museum’s Summer School Holidays drop-in craft activities on offer at no extra charge each Monday to Friday. The first week (13-17 January) will focus on Waves and Water themed activities such as making your own mobile. The second week (20-24 January) will be Perception Deception themed activities such as making old time toys and optical illusions.

13 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. Located at the old Tourist Information Centre in Stead Park, the fOrT is a youth centre in the northern suburbs of Geelong. A free activity-based program,

provides a safe space for young people to relax, socialise and interact with other young people in the community. The fOrT has a great line up of free activities for the school holidays. Ages 12-25 only. Limited places exist for the excursions so please contact Jane Ruge Fort Manager on 0457 790 085 to enquire and book. The Fort, Corner of Princes Hwy and St Georges Rd, Corio. 9.30am2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 11am-2pm - Food for the fOrt. 2.30pm-4.30pm - Art Workshop

14 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. 9.30am-2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 6pm-8.30pm - Comedy Movie Night

14 JANUARY

Minecraft Inventions and Challenges Holiday Workshop, Geelong. Belmont High School, Rotherham St, Belmont. Ages: 5 10 Years.

15 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. Located at the old Tourist Information Centre 9.30am2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 1pm-3pm - Girls session.

15 JANUARY

Lara School Holiday Activities. Got nothing to do these holidays? Are you between 12-25 years old and live, go to school or play in Lara? Come along to Lara Youth Agency’s School Holiday Activities. All activities include some adult supervision, transport and lunch, but you must book! 6pm-8pm, Lara Library, Minecraft Night

16 JANUARY

Lara School Holiday Activities. 11am-2pm, Rosewall Community Centre, Skate Ramps

16 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. Located at the old Tourist Information Centre 9.30am2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 1pm-3pm - Music jam. 5pm-8pm - Mixed Disco

17 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. 9.30am-2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 10am-12.30pm - Beach Bus #1 (Bookings required). 2pm4.30pm - Beach Bus #2 (Bookings required)

17 JANUARY

Lara School Holiday Activities. ut 10am-11am, Labuan Square, Silent Disco

18 JANUARY

The Harvest ‘n’ Graze Family Festival is back for their second event at the glorious Bellarine Estate Saturday 10am-6pm

T E L L U S W HA T’S O N I N Y O U R A RE A

headlined by legendary Australian performer Ross Wilson. The coastal setting of luxurious vineyards, refreshing sea breezes and vitalizing aura set the scene for another Harvest ‘n’ Graze Festival. We have created a family friendly festival based around the incredible produce we have on offer right here in Victoria. All stallholders are handpicked and share our Harvest ‘n’ Graze philosophy of ‘local, seasonal, family, sustainable’. Bellarine Estate, Portarlington.

20 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. 9.30am-2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 4.30pm6.30pm - Food for the fOrt

18 & 19 JANUARY

Day Out With Thomas. Bellarine Railway. Details and ticket sales for both events are available online at www.bellarinerailway.com. au or by calling 5258 2069

21 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. Located at the old Tourist Information Centre 9.30am2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 3pm-5pm - Art Workshop. 6pm-8.30pm - Scary Movie Night

21 JANUARY

Lara School Holiday Activities. 3pm-5pm, Corio Library, Game On!

22 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. 9.30am-2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 10am-12.30pm - Beach Bus #1 (Bookings required). 2pm4.30pm - Beach Bus #2 (Bookings required)

22 JANUARY

Lara School Holiday Activities. 6pm-8pm, Lara Library, Game on!

23 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. 9.30am-2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 11am2.30pm - Pool and Table Tennis Competition

23 JANUARY

Lara School Holiday Activities. 11am-2pm, Rosewall Community Centre, Skate Ramps. 2.30pm5pm, Lara Library, ArtHouse

24 JANUARY

fOrT School Holiday Program. 9.30am-2.30pm - Digital Futures (Bookings required). 12.30pm-3pm - Drop In

24 JANUARY

School Holiday Fun, Barwon Heads Community Hall, Barwon Heads. Keen for your child to try a new local program in 2014, but are a little un-sure of what type of activity? Your child can try a range of 45 minute classes under the one roof from 9.30am. Over 2 hours of active fun for one fee of $12 per participant, $8 per sibling. 2 - 16 year olds. Program list includes yoga and yoga dance, martial arts, music, indoor sports or junior gym circuit. Bookings essential: stacey@bellarinekids. com.au

24 - 27 JANUARY

Festival of Sails. The Festival of Sails annually attracts around 300 yachts and 4,500 sailing competitors to Melbourne and Geelong over the Australia Day holiday period. Shoreside activities include live music acts, art and craft market stalls, children’s entertainment and more. Fireworks on Australia Day at approximately 9:20pm. Waterfront Geelong

26 JANUARY

Australia Day Children’s FREE Fun and Entertainment Day, Rippleside Park, Bell Parade, Drumcondra. Celebrate Australia Day at Rippleside Park with over 30 FREE activities for families and children to enjoy. 11am - 4pm. No charge

26 JANUARY - Suicide

Awareness Walk, Johnstone Park, Gheringhap St. To raise awareness of Suicide and to get people to talk about problems. We need people to understand that this is happening and that it can be prevented. 9am - 11:30am

- E M A I L E D I T O R@ K I DS V OI C E.C OM.AU



Kids Voice January 2014