Issuu on Google+

FR

DECEMBER

TRA VE LLI N G WI T H K IDS

-

TEEN TALK

S TA N DI N G T ALL F OR A GIRAFFE

-

-

EE

2 013

COPING W I TH H O L I DA Y STRE SS

CV’S FOR K IDS

-

P H O TO GRA P H Y

101

Y O U R F R E E PA R E N T I N G M A G A Z I N E F O R T H E G E E L O N G R E G I O N


PAGE 2


WELCOME - PAGE 3

As we slide into December, full of Christmas and holiday excitement, it is easy to forget how stressful the past month or two may have been for some. End of year concerts, tests or exams and orientation days can build up immense stress not only for the child involved but also for their parents and siblings. How easily that stress is forgotten with the excitement of school holidays looming, Christmas and overindulgence both with foods and presents.

WELCO M E

Spare a thought for those less fortunate than ourselves and question whether your child really needs that extra present, or could that present be better served by donating it to the Wishing Tree appeal at Kmart, dropping it off at a homeless shelter or at the local hospital. That one small present could be the answer to another family’s prayers. That small present could be the only present their child receives this year. Involve your child in the donation of the present, possibly right through from choosing something, wrapping it and delivering it. It will encourage them to be thoughtful and to think of the less fortunate out there. Finally, how could we forget, this issue is our one year anniversary! We hope you have enjoyed this journey with us and we always welcome your requests, ideas and feedback. Merry Christmas to you all and have a safe holiday break. Ruby-Jane Roberts, Age 6, East Geelong

KV TEAM

BUSINESS MANAGER Michele Mitten EDITORIAL The A Team SALES & MARKETING Carly Boyce

GRAPHICS & LAYOUT ARTIST Elise Blach STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Alan Barber COVER MODEL Linc McCall

F R O M T H E T E A M Kids Voice

PO Box 54, Ocean Grove Victoria, 3226 Phone: 03 5255 3233 Fax: 03 5255 3255 FIND US ON FACEBOOK facebook.com/Kids Voice Geelong www.kidsvoice.com.au

No part of this magazine, including the advertisements, may be reproduced without permission of the editor. The opinions expressed within Kids’ Voice magazine are not necessarily the views of the publisher, but those of individual writers.


PAGE 4

- CONTENTS

CONTENTS 6

6

11

7

8

9

11

15

17

18

20

17

22

8

Food Reactions in Children Holiday Stress Stand Tall for a Giraffe Top 20 Toys for Christmas Zarra’s Exhibition The Letterbox: Letters to Santa Happenings: QMF Nippers get ready for Summer

27

Crafts & Cooking

25

31

27

Teen Talk

22

28

25

Raphael Centre’s 10th Birthday

Art, Design & Technology Extravaganza

Reviews What’s On

...AND MU CH MO RE


HOW DO I...? - PAGE 5

HO W D O I ...?

TRAVEL WITH KID S

Travelling with your kids this school holidays? Here are a few tips to help make the holiday a peaceful one, rather than a war zone, and are as a guide for both younge r and older children. Book ahead. Remember the days when you could go out into the world and worry about accommodation when you got there? That was BC – Before Children. It’s much easier to be more planned and have acc ommodation ready and waiting for you, when you have children. Do your research. Most hot els provide cots and bedding. Some accommodat ion providers also provide strollers and most car hire companies provide car seats. Why tak e bulky items with you when for a little more cos t items are provided for you?

apps and games. Allow old er kids to pack their own backpack. What they pack, they must carry, however younger kid s should also be encouraged to have a bac kpack with their own entertainment. Do check this backpack though, as you will find that they stu ff as much as they can into it. On car trips, hav e toys and games that can be handed out eve ry couple of hours. Bring snacks. On the plane, meals might not always be given to you at the right time for your child and in the car you ma y not be in a position to stop when they’re hungry . Having snacks available for use at any tim e is a wonderful solution.

Cameras and travel journa ls. Even toddlers will enjoy the child-friendly kiddy cameras. It Take your time. Enjoy the encourages them to have process. No matter a look around and what your mode of transpo to take photos of items of inte rt, let the younger rest to them. ones explore and look aro Younger kids can draw pic und them. Encourage tures of where they older kids to notice people have been and older kids can and sights. If you gather brochures build in time for stopping, loo or postcards and write abo king, toilet breaks ut interesting places and tantrums you will be mo they’ve been to and differe re likely to keep nt foods they’ve tried. calm. Antibacterial wipes. This nee ds it’s own Pack an organised bag. Ha category as these wipes are ve a bag with zips useful for washing and loads of pockets so tha hands, cleaning toilets sea t you can access ts, wiping tables and items easily. Band-aids, ant a load of other things. iseptic wipes, sting treatment and mosqu ito repellant, pens, ASK your teenage children Texta’s, paper, snacks. The what they would like list goes on! For the to do. Combine sightseeing with youngsters, pack for individ a reward – day ual nappy changes off at the beach, swim at the – have a nappy and wipes pool, room service! in a plastic bag. Accept that they are techno Easy to take with you to the phobes and allow changing room or them time for technology (bu plane bathrooms. t also time away from it). Technology works wonders for the Bring new toys and books. journey and it can be put aw When we go on ay once you are at holidays, I always find a new your destination. toy and book that the kids don’t have. It keeps them occupied for ages. Even my teenage kids receive a new FIN AL LY , MO ST IMP book or comic! However, the OR TA NT . most compact form of entertainment is a device loaded with HA VE FU N AN D BE HA PP Y!


PAGE 6

- NEWBORNS

HA PP Y BI RT HD AY RA PH AE L CE N T RE GE EL ON G !

This year the Geelong Raphael Centre celebrates ten years of helping local families affected by anxiety or depression following the birth of their baby. Ten years ago, the need for a local service was identified by the St John of God Geelong Hospital when the closest available support was in Heidelberg. Back then it was thought that depression was more likely to affect women after their baby was born (and commonly known as PND). Through research we now know that depression and anxiety can affect both men and women, and can commence during the pregnancy or after the birth. Perinatal Mental Illness is a term now more commonly used by health professionals to talk about a range of mental health conditions occurring around this life stage, which is a time when there is increased risk of mental illness.

Geelong Raphael Centre Manager, Suzanne Higgins said “We acknowledge that for one in every seven women (and their families) this journey to parenthood may be side-tracked by negative moods, exhaustion, loss of confidence and depression or anxiety. Men may also be affected with as many as 1 in every 12 experiencing significant distress but this rate doubles if their partner is also unwell. The Raphael Centre is able to help these families with counselling including some self-management strategies or, when this isn’t sufficient, to encourage further medical assessment and treatment.” “New mums and dads may feel worried, overwhelmed, or guilty that they are not coping as well as they expect and therefore do not seek help. Raphael Centres provide a welcoming, supportive environment where parents can find the understanding they need at this difficult time – it is important parents ask for professional help when they are struggling emotionally and it doesn’t resolve

quickly. This precious time in family life is ideally a time with more positive experiences than negative for the wellbeing of all members. ” Suzanne added. Raphael Centre services are available to all families regardless of where the baby is born (or planned to be born) and is offered without cost as part of St John of God Health Care’s commitment to Social Outreach and Advocacy. People can self-refer for help or may be referred by a health professional. Building on their experience and expertise, the St John of God Raphael Centre has now expanded to offer counselling and other therapies to new parents in Colac and Winchelsea as well as the Geelong region. A new Raphael Centre website providing further information about anxiety, depression and other mental health issues during the early years has just been launched at www.sjog.org.au/raphael with essential information and contact details for all eight St John of God Raphael Centres across Australia.

ST JOHN OF GOD RAPHAEL CENTRE GEELONG

is located at 11 Fenwick St. Phone 5221 7333 or email raphael.centre-geelong@sjog.org.au for more information.

Y D IE S B A B A N E H W N E R D IL H C WHAT TO TELL A baby dying before or just after birth is one of the saddest things parents can face. The arrival of a new baby is always a highly anticipated event and for couples who have older children, the death of their much longed for little sibling can be incredibly upsetting. Each year in Australia, about 147,000 couples experience a miscarriage, 1,750 babies are stillborn and about 850 babies die in the first 28 days after birth. For parents with older children, the death of a baby is possibly the first encounter with death they have had. Even if they are very young and do not fully understand, they will be aware of their parents’ distress. Children are unique and will show their grief differently, just like adults. Sometimes parents may struggle to provide care for their living children – finding they need breaks to grieve, while others find reassurance in their existing role as parents. There is no right or wrong way and parents should seek the support they need. Many find that including their baby in regular conversations and rituals helps children to understand the baby is part of the family. W HA T S HOULD PA R E NTS DO ?

• Talk about the baby’s death simply and honestly. Cry, if necessary. Reassure children with lots of cuddles and encouragement to help them express their thoughts. •

Involve older children regardless of their age. Let them visit the hospital to see the baby. They might want to hold and cuddle their baby brother or sister which is

healthy and normal and should be encouraged.

W HAT T O AVO ID ?

Involve them with funeral preparations, where appropriate, and any other rituals or remembrance services. For example, ask them to write letters or draw pictures for the baby who has died.

• Use books, puppets and/or drawings or to help children understand death and grief. • Assume out of character behaviour is a reflection of their grief. Provide reassurance and physical contact. W H A T T O SA Y ?

• Give simple and age-appropriate explanations. • Be honest, and let them know they can ask any questions. • Tell them they are not going to die, like the baby did. • Use words such as dead and death and use explanations such as ‘their body no longer works’. • Let them know that being sad and crying is okay, and that it is not their fault. • Initiate the topic and don’t always wait for them to bring it up. • Explore other emotions such as anger and fear. • Repeat the facts many times and tell the story in different ways, as children will

need many opportunities to try and make sense of things.

• Don’t tell them the baby went to sleep, as this may make them fearful of sleep. • Only offer religious explanations as appropriate for your family. • Be wary of words such as ‘spirit’ or ‘soul’ as these will need explanation. N EED M O R E IN F O R M AT IO N ?

Sands is a national not-for-profit organisation that offers support when a baby dies before, during or soon after birth. 1300 0 sands (1300 072 637) www.sands.org.au https://www.facebook.com/Sands.australia


TEENS - PAGE 7

Discrimination against hom osexuals and be worried about you is a huge problem around ever finding the world. out eventually to the point of get People often look upon the ting m in disgust anxiety. at their choice of partner des pite the fact that it doesn’t concern Stereotyping is another pro them, blem that however there are quite a the Stand Out group works aga few groups inst. around that try to stop discrim Generally people put gays ination. into littl e One of them is the Stand Ou groups that society has ma t Group. de up like your gay guy friend is going Stand Out is a group of peo to love ple who sho pping and have a wardrobe work against discrimination full of in Bellarine fluffy pink boa ’s, wear make-up and Secondary School as well as other want to paint your toe nails schools around the area. Alt as you hough the bot h talk about who the hottes group is small and run by stu t guy dents is in school or that really cut they try their absolute best e boy to stop who works at the coffee sho degrading comments from p down slipping out the street or his boyfriend is a around the school yard to muscle make it a bound sport enthusiast wh better, more accepting pla o like s ce for gays. to wear leather and owns a Ha rley The main issues they work Davidson. against are gay slurs in people’s speech like ‘that’s People thinking that they can gay’ or stupid insults to you change r friends you r sexuality is wrong, you are like ‘you’re a fag’. The gen who eral opinion you are and you can’t change of gays and bullying of peo tha t ple who nor can anyone else and any have worked up the courag one wh o e to tell thinks that they can change people that they are gay, tak the way es a lot of someone is, is sorely mistak courage because so many en. You people are can ’t help your sexuality. It is not against even the idea of gay a s. sickness to get rid of. It’s som eth ing People bullying gays is a hum you are born with not som ongous ething you problem - one of the bigges dec ide. t; it has the worst effect on people’s opinion The Stand Out group is wo of themselves and most ofte rking n leads aga inst all of these issues and to depression and/or anxiety is . Say for making progress. It is still instance that you tell your hard for best friend people to tell others that the that you think loving someon y are e of the gay , in future though they hop same gender is wrong and e that your best they can make it as easy as friend is secretly gay and had tell ing been someone that you’re straigh planning on telling you. Th t. The ey may think group itself is not all homosexual, 50% that you will abandon them, hate them of them are straight. and probably bully them for something they can’t control. Your bes t friend would then have to hide wh - SH AN NO N DE NN IN o they are G

K L A T N E E T


PAGE 8

- HEALTH

F O O D RE ACTI ONS I N C H I L D R E N - A RE THEY A LL A LLERGY? The vast majority of food allergic reactions in children in Australia are caused by cow’s milk, egg, peanut, tree nut, wheat, soy, sesame, fish and shellfish, but any food may cause an allergic reaction. Allergies to cow’s milk, egg, soy and wheat commonly resolve in childhood, but those to nut, sesame and fish usually continue to adulthood.

Non-IgE mediated food allergies show a delayed inflammatory response to the ingested food protein, usually in the skin or gastrointestinal tract. These symptoms can occur up to 24 hours after ingestion of the food protein and diagnostic tests are usually negative. Symptoms include delayed eczema; delayed vomiting and diarrhoea; loose, frequent bowel actions; blood or mucus in stools; irritability in infants.

How often do you hear of people who are “allergic” to this or that food? It seems to be increasingly common. However, are all adverse food reactions due to allergy? The answer is no.

On the other hand, and importantly, food intolerance is not immune-mediated and does not cause anaphylaxis. There is no reliable skin or blood test to diagnose food intolerance, and a dietitian-guided elimination diet is usually used as the diagnostic test. Food intolerances can be metabolic in origin, such as in lactose or fructose malabsorption, or pharmacological in origin, such as in chemical sensitivity. Symptoms, often mimicking those of food allergy, include those of the skin, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, such as headaches and, occasionally, behavioural issues in children.

a food allergen but has never ingested or experienced a reaction to the food itself. People with positive allergy tests do not have clinical allergy and suspected allergy should always be confirmed by a clinical immunology/ allergy specialist.

Common misconceptions about allergy testing include: • A positive test result is diagnostic of a food allergy • A negative test result excludes food allergy • The skin prick weal size correlates with the severity and or duration of an allergy. Your general practitioner and dietitian both play vital roles in the identification and treatment of adverse food reactions. General practitioners can arrange for diagnostic testing while dietitians have a vital role in the management of food reactions, which includes: • monitoring of growth in children • nutritional adequacy of diets in all patients • educating patients and caregivers in how to avoid allergens • education in elimination diets for identification of food intolerance • management of food intolerance.

Community understanding of the different types of adverse food reactions is essential for the health and wellbeing “Adverse food reaction” is the term given to any reaction of all children, but particularly for those with true food to a food that is reproducible. Such reactions can be allergies. When the word “allergy” is used loosely, the broadly classified as either immune mediated (primarily When parents notice adverse food reactions in children, community can become complacent in its response food allergy) or non-immune mediated (primarily food it is essential that the cause of the reaction is determined to adverse food reactions with the resultant possibility intolerance). and diagnosis of food allergy and risk of anaphylaxis that those children with true food allergies may be at True food allergies may be classified according to whether should always be medically confirmed. Occasionally, other increased risk of life threatening anaphylaxis. Conversely, they are IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated or mixed IgE and tests will need to be conducted to diagnose conditions children with food intolerance may be restricting their diets non-IgE mediated. such as coeliac disease. unnecessarily, possibly compromising their growth and IgE mediated food allergies usually have rapid onset development. An accurate diagnosis is important, so that the child’s - M IC HEL L E D AY symptoms i.e. less than 30 minutes in children and less diet is not unnecessarily restricted at a time of both rapid than 2 hours in adults. Diagnostic tests (skin prick tests or growth, and development of taste preferences and food The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and serum specific IgE blood tests) are usually positive. behaviours. Inappropriate diets in young children may Allergy (ASCIA) http://www.allergy.org.au/ has a wide Signs of mild or moderate allergic reactions include compromise nutritional status and precipitate feeding range of resources to assist patients and consumers swelling of lips, face, eyes; hives or welts; tingling mouth; disorders. with all issues related to allergy. abdominal pain, vomiting; eczema or rashes. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on a combination of The Child Health and Development Team at Bellarine Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction which is defined the patient’s history of reaction to ingested food, tests Community Health, is comprised of allied health by any one of the following signs: difficult/noisy breathing, to identify sensitisation to an allergen (skin prick or professionals, including dietitian, providing services swelling of tongue, swelling/tightness in throat, difficulty blood tests) and medically supervised oral food allergen for all children aged 0-12 years. These services are talking and/or hoarse voice; wheeze or persistent cough; challenges, as required. These latter are particularly free to children listed as dependents on a health care persistent dizziness or collapse; pale and floppy (young important to confirm diagnosis in the situation where a card or pension card. For appointments and enquiries, children). It is important to note that mild or moderate child has a positive skin prick or blood test response to phone 5258 0812. reactions will not always precede anaphylaxis.


HEALTH - PAGE 9

HOLIDAY

RE SS DE AL IN G W IT H ST Y PE RI OD OV ER T HE HO LI DA

? S S E R T S

Most of us experience stress during the Christmas period but there are things that we can do to keep these feelings at a manageable level. REALISTIC EXPECTATIONS

Christmas can be a busy time so it’s important to have realistic expectations about what you want to achieve. Writing up a plan can be helpful but make sure that it is achievable. Consider whether there are corners that can be cut or tasks that can be delegated. When dealing with difficult family members or relatives it may also pay to expect less from the interaction to minimise feelings of disappointment. EMOTIONS ARE CONTAGIOUS

Stress can have a ripple-on effect in families. If parents are stressed it is likely that children will be irritable or disobedient. It can be helpful for parents to model a sense of relative calm to children and for families to engage in stress-reducing activities together, such as exercise or listening to music. Children may also benefit from some involvement in Christmas plans or preparations to give them a sense of control. For instance, they may wish to decorate cards or plan an activity for Christmas Day. COPING WITH CHANGED ROUTINES AND TIME PRESSURES

Most of us are creatures of habit and as routines get out of whack and time pressures increase stress levels can also rise. Maintain some structure where you can, such as with sleep, exercise and diet routines, but also aim to be flexible. If schedules are particularly tight it is OK to say ‘no’ to some things.

KEEP SELF-MEDICATING IN CHECK

As sleep routines and diets change, and people are faced with difficult relatives, it can be tempting to medicate feelings of fatigue or stress with substances like caffeine and alcohol. Remember that caffeine is a stimulant so it can exacerbate stress and alcohol can also worsen anxiety and depressive symptoms. The most effective way to manage stress is

?

with relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, exercise, and by thinking about situations more flexibly or optimistically. ANNIVERSARIES

For people who have lost loved ones during the year or families that have separated, Christmas can represent a painful anniversary. It may be helpful to remember a deceased relative in a personally meaningful way, such as through ceremonies, traditions or a visit to the cemetery. For separated families, an opportunity may be provided to start new traditions. Children can benefit from some involvement in establishing new traditions to provide them with a sense of control in the situation. MAINTAIN PERSPECTIVE

Remind yourself of the personal meaning that Christmas holds for you. Consider how important the things you are stressing about are in the grand scheme of things. Think of the things that you are most grateful for in life. As a family you may wish to reflect upon the things that you are most proud of achieving in the year or the things that have turned out well. Perhaps consider a charitable act, such as writing a Christmas card for an elderly neighbor or making a donation to a charity. DR EM I LY H I LL

C LI N I C A L P S Y C H OLOGI S T

W W W .C H R I S M A C K EY .C OM .A U


PAGE 10


NATURE - PAGE 11

STAND TALL

FOR A GIRAFFE AT WERRIBEE OPEN RANGE ZOO

Humans have seven bones in their neck…How many do you think a giraffe has? This summer, come to Werribee Open Range Zoo to find out! Throughout the school holidays from 21 December until 27 January, kids can enjoy a range of free giraffe activities and learn more about these gentle giants on Safari, with the free summer program, Stand Tall for Giraffe. Entry to the Zoo is free for kids under 16 during the School Holidays! Help piece together a giraffe skeleton and see just how complex and incredible this creature is. From the head to the hooves, this giant jigsaw has so many amazing pieces, you won’t know where start! Get up close to the sky-high herd on Safari and see exactly why the word ‘giraffe’ means gentle one. Can you catch a glimpse of Ajali’s blue tongue? And how tall are you compared to Jelani? Test your skills! Attempt your own graceful walk in the African Village on stilts and imagine how it feels to be the tallest animal on the planet. This summer you can also support the Zoo in their mission to preserve wildlife habitat in Africa through the Beads for Wildlife campaign. Zoos Victoria sell beautiful hand-crafted beadwork created by women in the Melako Community Conservancy in Northern Kenya. Beadwork creates a sustainable alternative livelihood for families, reducing the reliance on livestock and their impact on natural resources and wildlife.

So Stand Tall for Giraffe at Werribee Open Range Zoo this summer. There are plenty of adventures for all ages and all heights! DATE: 21 December to 27 January TIME: Activities 10am – 2pm

COST: Free for kids under 16 / General admission for adults $26.80

BEHIND THE SCENES GIRAFFE ENCOUNTER*: Go behind the scenes with a Tall Order experience, with prices from $65 - $80 Bookings required. INFORMATION: zoo.org.au/werribee

WIN

WIN A FAMILY PASS TO THE WERRIBEE ZOO

SIMPLY LIKE AND SHARE OUR FACEBOOK PAGE - facebook.com/kidsvoicegeelong AND TELL US WHY YOU’D LIKE TO WIN.

*FAMILY PASS IS CLASSED AS 2 ADULTS AND 2 CHILDREN


PAGE 12 - SCHOOLS

EARLY LEARNING

EVERY CHILD’S AN ARTIST AT ONE WORLD

The value of developing and encouraging creativity in early learning programs is of vital importance, not only in their early years but in every child’s entire education. Exploring with imagination and discovering different materials such as paint, clay, papers and beads – creating, develops a sense of wonder. The enjoyment of art education is only one beneficial aspect for children. Skills developed in art education often transfer to other areas of life and school work. This is the foundation of all learning. According to Early Childhood Australia in their September 2010 Talking Point, “Arts education is important for all children. Arts education is one of the first mediums children use to express themselves and communicate. It is also considered important for teaching social justice, exploring diverse identities and uniting communities. According to Maxine Greene (2001), the arts are considered a tool to open minds and break down barriers, allowing children to imagine the realities of the world other than their own familiar culture.” Art creates opportunities for children to learn about language and literacy by creating images they’ve seen in books or the world around them and the discussions these can create. Young children also learn about numeracy by working with simple collage materials and beads. This introduces numbers, positive and negative space, classification, and sequencing and pattern recognition. Art is not only about emotion, colour and aesthetics, but also about rhythm, patterns

and problem solving. Through art children have the opportunity to use their cognitive and problem-solving skills and enhance their concentration. They have to think through how they are going to make their imagined creations real. These problem-solving skills enable them to think creatively in other situations. Once finishing the project this gives children a sense of accomplishment. One World has embraced this philosophy by developing a wonderful dedicated artistic space. Glenn is their Artist in Residence. His role is to develop projects and guide the children safely in their creations. Creatures from the children’s paintings have been enlarged and copied onto the walls creating a fun magical effect. A large sculptural tree is a “work in progress.” Large tables are set up with a variety of material for the children to discover and develop their own ideas. One World’s influence for these “holistic art projects” is taken from such programs as Reggio Emilia. The curriculum is based on the approach that is often termed as “emergent curriculum,” in which the educators develop general goals and predict children’s responses to activities and projects. It is evident that all the children’s

educators are enthusiastic in the development of the “Every Child’s an Artist” project. The enormous, collaborative, sculptural paintings developed by ‘Kitty’ are located in the foyer. There’s always something happening which creates a colourful, joyful vibe. The arts program offers many benefits to the development of young children. Children are free to express themselves in an “open ended” space where the process of discovery is more important than the end result. Young children resonate in their world through their senses, the colours, the form and the experimentation. The benefits of exposure and meaningful involvement in the arts in its broadest context leads to a strong sense of self and feelings of connectedness and community. - ONE WORLD FOR CHILDREN


SCHOOLS - PAGE 13

P R I M A R Y W H AT ’S HAPPENI NG I N WHITTING TION FLAMEFEST

Thank you to all students and families who came along to participate in Flamefest last Friday. With a wide range of activities on offer, everyone who attended enjoyed the event. Congratulations to all of the Whittington students who contributed to presentations on the night. These included the Art Show, Mrs Levy’s class performing their drumming circle item, Holly’s singing in Whittington’s Got Talent, the School Band and the Active After School Dance group. A big thank you to all students, staff and families for once again making Flamefest a great community event.

M IL O T 20 CR IC K ET What a perfect day for cricket! On Wednesday, 18 of our students represented our school at the Milo T20 cricket competition at Kardinia Park. Up against the giants like Leopold and Highton, our job was always going to be tough but our teams got off to a great start with the boys winning their first 2 games, only going down to Highton by a few runs in their third game. This put them into third place (out of 8 teams) narrowly missing a place in the grand final. The girls got off to a slower start but came back in their last two games with some phenomenal play to take out second place overall and secure themselves a spot in the grand final. Unfortunately, they came up against some very tough opposition but fought out the game till the very end. Runners up, a very impressive effort from our girls. Well done to all children involved, not only on your great work on the field but the sportsmanship and teamwork we saw throughout the day. It was a pleasure to take out such a great group of children. You certainly did Whittington Primary School proud. Thanks to Mrs Shirley (supercoach of the day) for her work with the girls. Also thanks to Mr Speed for helping out with some umpiring duties.

Well done everyone. - KERRIE SANDERS

CU IT GE EL ON G S HO W BI S ES DE CO RA TI NG & TR UF FL

The wonderful students from Mrs Devereaux’s class recently did some cooking, making truffles and decorating biscuits. All of the students really enjoyed the cooking activities and their creations were entered in the Geelong Show for judging. A special congratulations to Jack, Jayden and Riley. The three boys all placed in the competition in their age group and received a certificate and small prize.

On Wednesday, November 6, most of the seniors went to Milo T20 cricket at Kardinia Park. The girls first played Leopold. We lost. Second game against Highton, we won. Last game we won so the girls got in the GRAND FINAL. Then we got back to school and had a rest. By Nikita It was so fun. On November 6 it was the T20 cricket. We had two teams, the girls and the BOYS. The BOYS won 2 out of 3 games and so did the girls, but luckily the girls got into the Grand Final, but lost. These were the boys scores: Game 1-154 to 86 runs-win, Game 2-152 to 77 runs-win, Game 3-137 to 159 runs-lose. Everyone had a fantastic day and I hit a double six on the last bat of the day.

BY LACHLAN

Here are some of the student’s comments about the cooking activity: J AYDA - “We rolled the truffles with our hands. We put on the coconut. We had fun making them”. I SAAC - “I made truffles. I made cookies, SpongeBob, Spiderman and footy. My favourite was the cookies”. THERESA - “I made some biscuits for the Geelong Show. I made some truffles for the Geelong Show. We got to make a biscuits and after we had finished, we got to eat a truffle”.


PAGE 14


TOP 20 TOYS - PAGE 15

20

TO P

1

FURBY BOOM - HASBRO

TO YS FO R CH RI ST MA S

2

FLUTTERBYE FAIRY - FUNTASTIC

5

NERF REBELLE HEARTBREAKER BOW - HASBRO

6

FRIENDS DOLPHIN CRUISER - LEGO

9

MINECRAFT FIGURES BANTER TOYS

3

PEPPA PIG -BIG BALLOON

4

TRASH WHEELIES JUNKYARD - MOOSE

7

GLITZY GLOBES STARTER KIT - MOOSE

8

AIR HOGS SHARP SHOOTER MEGA BLAST

FOREVER CLOVER CARDS

12

15

ADVENTURE TIME PLUSH - BANTER TOYS

16

19

LEGO STARWARS X-WING - LEGO

20

10

OCTONAUTS PLAYSET - MATTEL

11

13

FUR REAL DAISY - HASBRO

14

SYLVANIAN FAMILY TREEHOUSE - MODERN BRANDS

17

BARBIE RV CAMPER - MATTEL

18

MONSTER HIGH FRIDAY 13TH DOLL - MATTEL

CO MP I L ED BY

- FOREVER CLOVER

AS SEEN IN

DOC MCSTUFFIN - HEADSTART

LEGO OPERA HOUSE - LEGO

FUR REAL CUDDLES MONKEY - HASBRO


PAGE 16 - THIS MONTH’S CHARITY

W O M B A T ’S WI SH It’s early Saturday morning and the sun is shining at Camp Burnside in Anglesea. The cars arrive and out of each emerges a young child or teenager with the same hesitant look on their face as they say goodbye to their sole parent or foster carer and join the other children inside for a weekend away. These children can’t say goodbye to both of their parents, as one or both have passed away. Each year, approximately 100 children in the Geelong area experience the death of a parent. Maybe dad had a heart attack or mum committed suicide. Perhaps dad overdosed on drugs or both mum and dad were killed in a car accident. These are some of the stark realities that children face in what is an extremely difficult time for them and their family and this can potentially result in long-term emotional health problems. Our aim at Wombat’s Wish is to provide the support that parentally bereaved children, young people and their families need. To find a way to live with loss and grief, to move forward and take the next steps on their journey. Wombat’s Wish is based on a very successful and highly regarded Winston’s Wish program in the UK and we endeavour to demonstrate the value of such a service in the Geelong area. The service is a therapeutic one, provided by a team of professional facilitators in conjunction with trained volunteers. The key component of what we do is our bi-yearly camps, which sees 20-30 kids in attendance. From preps to those in high school, these camps give the children a chance to express their emotions through

T H IS MO NT H’S

C H A R IT Y

practical and creative activities which encourage teamwork and build self-esteem and confidence. For this camp, I was the ‘buddy’ of an 8 year old boy who I was pre-warned could be a handful. Despite his overwhelming desire to go on the high ropes course or head off bush exploring, he was well behaved and participated in all the activities with the other children. He shared both the good and bad memories of what he had of his father and expressed his feelings of confusion and hurt. Getting these kids to open up and discuss in a positive environment with their peers is extremely important and the range of activities throughout the weekend are geared towards that. Creative art classes, an ‘Ask the Doctor’ session and a moving candlelight ceremony remembering the ones they lost are some of the ways they conveyed their thoughts and emotions. We break up the more serious times with fun activities such as the flying fox or a visit from ‘Roaming Reptiles’. You couldn’t wipe the smile off my buddy’s face after he held a baby crocodile and it was pleasing to see the innocence of a child was still alive and well despite being dealt such a rough hand at an early age. I’m proud to be part of a charity that makes a difference within the community, but like many, we rely on donations to keep afloat. If you would like more information- how to contact, get involved or make a donation to our cause, please visit our website www. wombatswish.org - MATT LANCASTER


ZARRA’S EXHIBITION - PAGE 17

Z AR RA’S EX HI BI T I ON

Zarra is a happy and competent 23 year old young adult with Down Syndrome or as she likes to say ‘Up Syndrome’. She is a quiet and reserved young lady according to her mother (apparently she is quite chatty when she gets the chance!) She has an ‘ability’ to enjoy a lot of activities like cooking, bowling, swimming, dancing with e.motion 21 dance group and art. Zarra is a full time participant at Karingal, a service providing activities for people with a disability. She does a cooking activity twice a week where she gets to

cook her lunch, the best bit of that is eating it! She bowls in a bowling league once a week and never misses a game. She also swims with a squad two nights a week. Monday night is her favourite because she has dancing with e.motion 21. She has never missed a dance class either! Zarra does art on Fridays at Karingallery in Geelong. She really enjoys working on her art projects and puts a lot of effort into them. She has produced several artists books, prints and paintings and has work on display in the group exhibitions held at

Karingallery each year. Zarra takes great pride in everything that she does and loves showing off her work to other people. Recently she finished making a sculpture of a tree and catdog. These sculptures were entered into the State Trustees Art Exhibition entitled Connected, which is an exhibition celebrating artists with a disability or experience of mental illness. Her entry was one of 170 chosen to exhibit out of over 600 entries. She is very proud of her achievements, especially the sculpture for this exhibition.


PAGE 18 - THE LETTERBOX

LETTERBOX

E A R L Y L E A R N IN G

CENTRE WHAT S A N T A IS G O IN G

SUNGLASSES AN D A BIG TRUCK. I’M GOING TO LE AVE OUT CARROT S FOR THE REINDE ER AND A BISCUIT FOR SANTA (age 5)

A BARBIE DOLL. SHE WILL HAVE GREY HAIR, BIG EARRIN GS AND A PURPLE DRESS. SANTA WON’T BE COMING DOWN OUR CHIM NEY. HE WILL JU ST WALK THROUGH THE DOOR.

A NEW BIKE, IT WILL BE BLUE AND I CAN DO WHEELIES LIKE MY DAD. IT’S GOING TO GO VERY FAST. I WILL LEAVE OUT BEER FOR SANTA AND REINDEER FOOD FOR THE REINDEER.

- SAM WOOLLEY (age 5)

TOYS THAT MAK E MUSIC. I’M GOIN G TO DECORATE MY T REE WITH CANDY CANES, GLASS BALLS AN D THERE WILL BE A BIG GLOWING STAR ON THE TOP.

- SOPHIE SHEEDY

- MIA PEARSON (a

ge 4)

PEPPER PIG AND A ROBOT THAT CAN WALK AND DANCE. FOR CHRISTMAS LUNCH I’M GOING TO HAVE “CHRISTMAS FOOD” AND I’M GOING TO LEAVE OUT SOME PLAYDOUGH FOR SANTA.

- AALIYAH LAMP (age 4)

(age 4)

N I W

E SS TO TH A P Y IL M A A F N U S T R A L IA A F O M U E MUS Y DEMOCRAC

racy Win a family pass (worth $35) to the Museum of Australian Democ since has and May in opened m museu The t. at Eureka in Ballara museum received over 10,000 visitors. Built on the site of Eureka, the ts artefac historic es combin that offers a highly sensory experience urges and t presen the into past the g bringin s, with high-tech display M.A.D.E visitors to consider the concept of equality in its many forms. Year’s New and as Christm is open daily from 10am to 5pm (closed Day) and is located on corner of Eureka St & Stawell St South.

WELCOME...

OL IV E EL IZ A EV IE NO RM AN

Born 16th October - Second chi

PHOTOGRAPHY

- MASON MORRIS

T O B R IN G T H E M T H IS Y E A R .. .

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: EL

THE

W E A S K E D K ID S O F W IL S O N S R D

ld for Geoffrey & Wendy


EDUCATION - PAGE 19

ED UC AT IO N

C V ’S F O R K ID S

EMPLOYMENT - A GREAT PATH FOR SCHOOL LEAVERS!

Many school leavers will be considering employment, as opposed to further study or training, as their preference for next year. Employment brings with it an income, freedom, and the opportunity to learn new skills. There are many exciting employment opportunities available to school leavers that can ultimately lead to rewarding careers. It’s time to start looking!

• Don’t discount Christmas casual opportunities. Many companies offer top performing staff ongoing employment in the New Year. • Ensure that your resume is presented professionally, is up to date, and free of spelling errors.

AND NEW WAYS TO SEARCH FOR JOB

• Speak to potential referees. Let them know that you are going to be applying for positions, and obtain their approval to pass on their details to recruiters.

OPPORTUNITIES:

Search the internet. There are many websites dedicated to job searching. Consider registering your details, so that you can receive alerts as soon as suitable roles become available.

• Read newspapers. Most newspapers feature employment opportunities. •

Use social media. Promote that you are looking for work on your social media sites. Your friends and family may become aware of employment opportunities for you.

• Consider a LinkedIn profile. This will allow you to network with people, and also follow companies on-line. • Register with recruitment agencies. Employers often contact agencies directly when looking to hire staff. •

Monitor Community Job Boards. These social media sites allow both employers to post job opportunities, and people looking for work to register their details.

WANTED

IMPORTANT THINGS TO CONSIDER:

THERE ARE A NUMBER OF TRADITIONAL

HELP

• Search for employment opportunities posted on the websites of companies that you would be interested in working for.

Highlight any part-time work, work experience or volunteering that you have been involved in, along with extra curricula activities that you have participated in, whilst at school.

Recruiters often check the social media sites of candidates. Ensure that any social media sites that you are active on are free of any inappropriate photos or offensive language. Also check that any privacy settings are set correctly.

Make sure that you have an appropriate email address. If necessary, set-up a new email account that you can use for applying for jobs, and monitor your emails regularly.

ENQUIRE WITHIN

• Make yourself available. Treat interviews as a priority. Don’t expect employers to work around your social activities. • Conduct some research. It is important to find out information about the company that you have applied for, before meeting with them at interview. •

Be enthusiastic and willing to learn! Many employers offer further training opportunities, and you may be able to obtain formal qualifications through combining work and study.

• Consider your voice-mail message on your phone. The message should be professional, and remember to check your phone regularly.

GO O D L U C K !

• Attend career expos and speak with people in the field.

J EM M A J AM ES O F HIC K O R Y HR S O L U T IO N S

• Have an interview outfit ready. Companies often invite candidates in for interview with little notice.

W W W .HIC K O R Y HR .C O M .AU


PAGE 20 - HAPPENINGS

L EN T A T A T G N U O Y R U O G IN T A R EB EL C

QUEENSCLIFF

MUSIC

FESTIVAL

CO SM IC TR AS H

AL YS HA JA NE

ICH I NI

G U Y PE RK IN S

FORM ER YOUN GST ERS OF GEEL ONG

TH E MU RLO CS

QM F HIG HL IG HT

A ME LB OU RN E SK A OR CH ES TR


TECHNOLOGY - PAGE 21

PHO TO G R A PHY

101

WON DER FUL W OR LD OF WE B

TE CH NO LO GY

As another Christmas approaches, another hundred photos to be taken. The odd one might make it to your Facebook page or Twitter feed, but what about the others? Of course there is the option of printing out every photo but that can be expensive. And if you have set yourself high bench marks like me and write on the back of photos, it can also be very time consuming. C A ME R A C HOI C E

All parents will be aware that our young ones don’t stay young for long. So we want to capture the milestones along the way and what better way to embed them in our memory than with a photo. My most exciting recent purchase was a funky new camera (Canon EOS 700D). It has a tonne of functions, and takes a really great photo. In fact most camera’s do. If you feel that you are not getting the most out of your camera, you might think about doing a quick course to learn more about what your camera can offer. POS E , PLA C E A ND P RI N T

The first step is to sort through your photos to identify the keepers. Renowned local photographer Brendan Waites suggests to download your photos onto your computer and to place them into an A, B or C folder. The A’s are the ones that you will possibly print for your album or frames. B might contain those that are still quite good, but not worth printing. And C’s are those shots that you would rather not show anyone, but are still worth keeping, just in case. This was great advice after I managed to take over 1300 photos during our latest family

holiday. Certainly a slide-show to bore the most interested family members, but not when I had culled it down to about 120 photos. P H O T O SH O P P I N G

I am lucky, as I have Adobe Photoshop which is fantastic for touching up photos. I often have fun with removing unwanted objects from photos or adjusting colours and lighting. You may not have Photoshop, but there are some other great photo editing programs at a fraction of the price including Corel PhotoImpact, GIMP and Magic Effect Photo Editor. The only thing I would recommend is to keep the original version of your photo and edit a copy. That way if you make a change that you are not happy with, you can always revert back to the original. This also goes for using the editing choices on Instagram. It might be funky to use the ‘Earlybird’ or ‘1977’ setting now, but perhaps down the track you might want the untouched version. C O L L A G E CR E A T I O N

There are some great choices of free software for creating a collage of your images. Fotor is a free online collage maker which has a great range of templates. Or if you are feeling creative, you can even create your own design from scratch. Photovisi is another one, or perhaps try the Photo Collage by Kai Xia app for smart phones and tablets. O N L I N E ST O RA G E O P T I O N S

By far the most popular online storage website is Flickr. The great thing about Flickr is that it is very easy to use and is great for sharing photos across other social networks such as

Facebook and Twitter. It also has resizing options but keeps the original size as well. Flickr, like Pinterest and Photobucket, is a sharing platform, so be aware that once photos are placed on this media, they are available to a very wide audience. If you are looking for a more private storage option there is always the camera’s memory card. These can usually hold around 1,000 photos but are not always reliable. I would suggest transferring the photos onto an external hard drive for safe keeping. Don’t forget about all those shots taken with your smart phone or tablet. For Apple products, iCloud Photo Sharing allows you to easily share photos and videos with the people you want to see them. These people can then comment and access the shared stream from any iPhone, iPad, Ipod touch, Mac or PC. Wonderful!

SO, GET HAPPY SNAPPI NG THI S C HR I STMAS. THE

PHOTOS WI L L L AST L ONGER THAN THE PR ESENTS. S HEL L EY GR O S S D IR EC T O R AT W O N D ER F U L W EBS IT ES W W W .W O N D ER F U L W EBS IT ES .C O M .AU


PAGE 22 - SPORTS

NIPPERS GETTING READY TO

HIT THE BEACH THIS SUMMER

With the summer season fast approaching, registrations for the 2013/2014 summer Nippers program at lifesaving clubs across the state are now open and places are filling fast. Over 9000 young Victorians learned essential water safety skills through Life Saving Victoria Nippers programs last year. Across Australia, there were over 58,000 Nipper members (5-13 years) last season, making up nearly 40 per cent of lifesaving membership throughout the country. This shows just how significant the junior movement is within lifesaving. Along the Surf Coast and Bellarine region there are 12 lifesaving clubs which offer Nippers. The Nippers program, for children aged five to thirteen, promotes water safety skills and confidence in a safe beach environment. Nippers participate in fun and interactive activities tailored for different age groups covering surf safety, first aid, sun safety, communication and physical skills including surf swimming, board paddling and beach sprinting, providing pathways for participation in both lifesaving and surf sports. LSV Manager Membership and Leadership Development Kate McLachlan said the Nippers program

promotes an active and healthy lifestyle, while making friends and having fun. “The program encourages kids to join an outdoor social network over summer, making new friends and gaining confidence, while learning essential surf and water safety skills,” she said. “It teaches valuable life skills and knowledge for use on and off the beach. Our primary aim is to have as many young children confident around water.” The Nippers program also creates many opportunities for the whole family to get involved, as age managers, coaches, officials, or by providing water safety. “It is a great way for the whole family to spend time together at the beach,” said Mrs McLachlan. “To make sure that Nipper programs can run successfully it is important that parents put their hands up and offer assistance. “Age Managers courses are available, which educate parents and volunteers on how to instruct Nipper activities on the beach and in the water.” Nippers also have the option of participating in junior lifesaving sports carnivals, which allows young members to put everything they learn at Nippers into practice. It provides an opportunity for young members to gain

SPO

RT

further understanding of conditions and safety in and around water, as well as building their social skills, confidence and competitive spirit. Offering team and individual competitions for children aged between eight and 13, events include beach sprints, beach flags, surf and pool swimming races, wading, rescue and ironman and ironwoman races. Mrs McLachlan said it also keeps young swimmers fit and active and helps nurture a lifelong passion for water sport and recreation. “The carnivals provide a fantastic reward for our nippers after a summer of Surf Education and training sessions,” she said. “They are a great way to keep our members enthusiastic about lifesaving and help to really develop the young lifesavers that will be patrolling our beaches in the future.”

gram, about the Nippers pro For more information . ers pp /ni ictoria.com.au visit www.lifesavingv t ou club and enquire ab To contact your local low be m, please see the their Nippers progra tes. tails and program da de ct nta table with co

CLUB:

DATE:

CONTACT:

APOLLO BAY SLSC

27-12-13 TO 06-01-14

FIONA DE PALMA: 0417 377 214 fiona.d@pinpointdesign.com.au MEG MILLER: 0412 811 931 firstthrreads@mac.com

BANCOORA SLSC

15-12-13 TO 02-03-14

TIM WATSON / STEVE RICHARDSON: 0407 232 884 tim@mbprefab.com.au

BARWON HEADS

04-01-14 TO 19-01-14

PATRICK STOCK: 0433 199 596 patrick.stock@shell.com

FAIRHAVEN SLSC

27-12-13 TO 10-01-14

KIRSTIN CHARLESWORTH: 0409 644 435 kirsten.charlesworth@bigpond.com

JAN JUC SLSC

27-12-13 TO 19-01-14

LISA HAPP: 0411 341 324 juniors@janjucsurfclub.com.au

KENNETT RIVER SLSC

30-12-13 TO 24-01-14

GEOFF TRESIDDER: 0425 712 886 tresfam@optusnet.com.au

LORNE SLSC

02-11-13 TO 09-03-14

JENNIFER BROWN: 0413 607 357 nippers@lornesurfclub.com.au

OCEAN GROVE SLSC

27-12-13 TO 10-01-14

SCOTT McNAUGHTON: 0403 354 628 nipper@oceangroveslsc.asn.au

POINT LONSDALE

30-12-13 TO 11-01-14

JUSTINE KIELY-SCOTT: 0417 059 105 vpyld@pointlonsdaleslsc.asn.au

TORQUAY SLSC

27-12-13 TO 12-01-14

TROY HARRIS: 0411 028 375 troy.tslsc@gmail.com

WYE RIVER SLSC

27-12-13 TO 10-01-14

SHARYN BRIGHAM: 0408 687 212 sharynbrigham@hotmail.com

/13TH BEACH SLSC

SLSC


SPORTS - PAGE 23

SPOR

T

PLAYING IT SAFE THIS SUMMER

Families are being urged to play it safe by the water as Water Safety Week, December 2-9, marks the beginning of Summer. Sadly, the following statistics from the Royal Lifesaving Society National Drowning Report remind us how critical it is to be vigilant when supervising our kids undertaking water play or swimming, whether in pools, at the beach, by the river or at home: • 1 in 5 of all drowning deaths are children aged under 18 years of age • 56 children drowned last year • 91% of children aged 0-4 fell or wandered into the water • 43% of children aged 10-14 drowned in rivers • Males are 4 times more likely to drown than females • Drowning rate dramatically increases as teenagers become young adults Australian children are almost guaranteed to be involved in some kind of water activity over the summer holiday period, so it’s essential that they have the skills to stay safe in and around the water.

Local indoor public pools are great places for the whole family to swim and participate in water activity and programs all year round in preparation for the warmer months. The Royal Life Saving Swim and Survive Program is delivered across the City of Greater Geelong Swim Sport & Leisure network including Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre, Leisurelink, Splashdown and Waterworld.

Across Water Safety Week, around 6,000 Swim Sport & Leisure Learn to Swim students will brush up on their water safety knowledge, practice both survival and rescue techniques and many will experience falling into the pool fully clothed. The Swim Sport & Leisure network will share key water safety messages with the wider community and have information on hand for parents and carers visiting’ centres over this time.

Skills and knowledge learnt in the Swim and Survive program provides Learn to Swim kids with strong foundations in swimming, survival and basic rescue skills. The program titles, Wonder, Courage and Active reflect the hopes and aspirations of children and families as they embark on a lifetime of fun and safety in the water:

Please visit www.ssl.geelongaustralia.com.au or any Swim Sport & Leisure centre- Bellarine Aquatic and Sports Centre, Leisurelink, Splashdown and Waterworld - during Water Safety Week, December 2-9 for further information or to enrol in a Learn to Swim program.

WONDER: water familiarisation for parents and their children aged 6 to 36 months. COURAGE: a program to build water confidence in preschool children 3-5 years. ACTIVE: swimming and water safety program for school kids 5-14 years.

FOR FURTHER READING AND INFORMATION:

We suggest you visit the following websites: www.swimandsurvive.com.au www.watersafety.vic.gov.au


PAGE 24 - MUSIC & ARTS

MU S I C A R TS &

LET’S DANCE

AT OCEAN GROVE PRIMARY SCHOOL

The toes were tapping and the tutus came out in term three at Ocean Grove Primary School, when the school concert was based around the history and culture of dance. It was exciting for students to research the origins of their particular grade’s dance and to learn the dance steps. Every year a different aspect of performing arts is a focus for this event. “Many students have never heard of the Charleston, the Twist or even the Tango,” said Ms.McCudden, the performing arts teacher at the school. Students explored the culture and national costumes of the dances and spent nine weeks learning dance routines. Senior students researched and then narrated the historical information on each dance and were then filmed, explaining each dance on a screen at the concert. The concert was held at Costa Hall in Geelong and an audience of over 1,200 people watched over 25 concert items which included Tap, Celtic, Bollywood, French Can Can, Line dancing, African, Hawaiian, Conga, Ballroom and Disco. The grade sixes finished the concert with contemporary dances such as Modern Jazz, Hip Hop and Gangnam style dance. This whole school event is a much anticipated event on Ocean Grove Primary School yearly calendar. It was a great success.


MUSIC & ARTS - PAGE 25

M USI C AR TS &

ART, DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY

EXTRAVAGANZA

AT CHRISTIAN COLLEGE The annual Art, Design and Technology Extravaganza was held in November and artwork was on display by students from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Guest artist Mark Trinham officially opened the event and both a fashion parade of students’ textile work and a presentation of the media short films were shown during the Extravaganza. The Villa Paloma is the art campus for Christian College and was also the setting for the students’ artwork. There was artwork, robotics, fashion and textiles through to sculptures, multi-media and woodwork on display.


PAGE 26


COOKING & CRAFTS - PAGE 27

CRAFTS

& C O O K IN G SANTA XMAS C AR D METHOD 1. Fold a sheet of green construction paper in half to make a card. 2. Cut a Santa hat shape from red paper and glue onto the front of the card.

M A T E R IA L S

3. Glue 2 google eyes under the hat. SH EET OF GR EEN CAR D / PAP ER RED CAR D / PAP ER SC ISS OR S WH ITE , RED , PIN K

2

& BL ACK PAI NT

GO OG LE EYE S

&

GL UE

4. Brush child’s hand with white paint and press onto the paper to make Santa’s beard. Wash hands. 5. Use fingers to add details of the white trim of the hat, Santa’s cheeks, nose, and mouth. Allow to dry. 6. If desired, glue a white pom pom at the top of the hat. 7. Write a message inside and send your Santa Christmas card to someone special.

W A TE RME L ON C HRI S T M A S TRE E S

ME TH O D 1. Cut slices into triangles 2. Cut base into shape of pot (for little hands to grip on to) 3. Cut small V’s up side of tree to form branches

IN G R ED IE N T S

6

SL IC ES OF SE ED LE SS W AT ER ME LO N


PAGE 28 - REVIEWS

T HE GIRL IN THE

N A N N Y P I GGI N S GUI D E TO

Loretta Hi l l - Ra n d o m h o u s e

RA Spratt - Randomhouse

Y E LLOW VEST

CON Q UE RI N G CHRI S TM A S Watch out Santa, Nanny Piggins is coming to town this Christmas! This is not a survival guide to Christmas. This is a guide to conquering the Yuletide season! That’s right, it is time to take a stand – don’t suffer through another year of brussels sprouts, gift-wrapped socks and slobbery kisses from great aunts who forget to put their teeth in. Take control of your Christmas and put the happy back in your holiday, using the handy hints, games and inspiring stories within this book.

‘We can’t choose who we fall in love with. It could be our best friend ... or our worst enemy.’ Emily Woods counts cracks for a living. Concrete cracks. So when her long-term boyfriend dumps her, she decides it’s time for a change of scenery. Her best friend, Will, suggests joining his construction team in Queensland. Working next door to the Great Barrier Reef seems like just the sort of adventure she needs to reboot her life…until she realises that Will is not the person she thought he was. Charlotte Templeton is frustrated with the lack of respect FIFO workers have for her seaside resort. But picking a fight with their tyrannical project manager, Mark Crawford, seems to lead to more complications than resolutions. The man is too pompous, too rude, and too damned good looking. As both women strive to protect their dreams and achieve their goals, they discover that secrets will come out, loyalty often hurts, and sometimes the perfect man is the wrong one.

B AT T L EF IELD 4

MA1 5 + P C , X B O X & P S 3 Battlefield 4 is a fast paced first person shooter that knows how to immerse you in the action. This instalment of the Battlefield series has combined the best bits of the last games, improved them, and made a massive combined effort to make one of the best games.

S MASHA B ALLZ - FUNTAS T I C

When you play Campaign mode, you play as Recker, leader of Tombstone squad. You have to lead your squad through various missions. By pressing q (default) you highlight your enemies and order your squad mates to engage them in a firefight, although I found them pretty useless and did all of it myself. The storyline was really good although it does feel like you are being led in a certain path and don’t have much freedom of where to go.

WIN

To win LIKE and SHARE our Facebook page. facebook.com/ KidsVoiceGeelong and tell us why you’d like to win.

Get Smash’en!! The SmashaBallz are ready for action! Smash ‘em, kick ‘em or chuck ‘em to hear them make gross and funny sounds then watch them shake! The more you smash them, the crazier they’ll become! There are stacks of Smasha-Ballz to collect Ninjaaah , Gooba and Marzian plus Brainz, Mandroid and Phara-oohh!!! Each one has its own unique sounds and ghoulish grins! And some even glow in the dark!

But the Battlefield series is known for its thrilling multiplayer and Battlefield 4 has definitely lived up to expectations. With countless amounts of unlocks and many guns to master, Battlefield 4 is definitely one of the best shooters out there. Whether you stroll and patrol the streets or take down enemies from above with a helicopter, you can still feel like you have a good chance of outshooting, outrunning, or hiding from your enemies. There is also a wide array of vehicles too. Battlefield 4 is a great action-packed FPS (First Person Shooter) game and is a definite buy for anyone who likes this style of game and has some money to spare. You can contact me at sushiphantom@gmail.com or play with me on steam at Sushiphantom. Frag out for now!

T H E O C TON A U TS G UP - A MISSION VE HICLE

Reel in the angler fish with the hook and net Arm grabber attaches to Gup-A Crank the propeller to make it go Wobbles up and down as it rides on land and works on water too Suitable for ages 3 years and over. Join in the fun and collect all the Octonauts toy range. Available at Tates Toyworld and Toyworld Express Market Square.

IT S

LLY

E

IA SPEC

WIN

To win LIKE and SHARE our Facebook page. facebook.com/ KidsVoiceGeelong and tell us why you’d like to win.

Meet the Octonauts, a team of undersea adventurers who are always ready to dive into action! Led by Captain Barnacles, the fearless Kwazi and medic Peso, their mission: to explore new underwater worlds, rescue amazing sea creatures and protect the ocean.

BIERTVICS ES

WIN

To win LIKE and SHARE our Facebook page. facebook.com/ KidsVoiceGeelong and tell us why you’d like to win.

From the author of the bestselling The Girl in Steel-Capped Boots and The Girl in the Hard Hat, comes another scintillating romantic comedy, this time set on the beautiful Queensland coast. The perfect summer read for adults!

UR O Y FOR SS! E N BUSI

Contact Shaun on 5255 3925 OR 0411 416 384 to discuss your requirements! www.bitsit.com.au

Z O O M ER F U N TA S T I C

The most interactive, life-like robotic dog has arrived…. Zoomer! Through voice recognition, Zoomer is able to listen and learn new tricks. Zoomer mimics features of a real life dog: tail wagging, sitting, rolling, and can even be trained to pee! Zoomer is cute, silly and interactive; and he makes the perfect family pet that never needs to be taken for a walk!

We provide a managed IT support p lan for: · IT Mainte nance

& Audits · Project Pla nning & Su pport · New Purc hases & Up grades · Network M onitoring · Data Back up · Broadban d, E-mail & Website Se · Anti-Virus tup , Malware & Spyware M onitoring


REVIEWS - PAGE 29

A LPH A BE T CI TY M E LBOURN E

AU ST R ALIA’S

G R E AT E S T PEOPL E AN D T HE IR

Linsay Kni g h t Randomho u s e

Can you name Australia’s longestserving prime minister? Which Australian sportsman is the only cricketer to have received a knighthood from the Queen? What important scientific discovery is Howard Florey famous for?

WIN

100 PE OP LE

Masayuki Sebe - Gecko Press 100 People is the follow-up to the popular ‘look-and-find’ books Dinosaurs Galore and 100 Things, by Japanese author/ illustrator Masayuki Sebe. In the ‘Where’s Wally’ style of activity books, 100 People is lavishly designed with great detail and dozens of small stories to discover within the illustrations. These amusing details will keep children (and parents!) entertained even after they’ve answered the questions on each spread - they can count to 100 or find all the little stories and jokes happening between the characters. 100 People is a delightful picture book that can be reread and enjoyed time and time again!

MO VI E RE VI EW S FR OZE N

- DI S NE Y

IN CINE MAS : 2 6 TH D E CE MBE R 2 0 1 3

Elsa and Anna are not only princesses, they are also sisters and best friends. Elsa has a dark power that threatens to harm the people she loves the most and the only way she can protect her family – and her kingdom, Arendelle – is by freezing out anyone who tries to get close, including Anna. Anna, a fearless optimist, teams up with extreme mountain man Kristoff and his sidekick reindeer Sven on an epic journey to find Elsa, the Snow Queen, and put an end to her icy spell. Featuring the voices of Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel, “Frozen” is the coolest comedy-adventure ever to hit the big screen. Encountering mystical trolls, a funny snowman named Olaf, Everest-like extremes and magic at every turn, Anna and Kristoff battle the elements in a race to save the kingdom from destruction.

T U O B A S TELL U ! S T N E V E YOUR IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING HAPPENING IN YOUR AREA DROP US A LINE news@kidsvoice.com.au

WIN

To win LIKE and SHARE our Facebook page. facebook. com/KidsVoiceGeelong and tell us why you’d like to win.

To win LIKE and SHARE our Facebook page. facebook. com/KidsVoiceGeelong and tell us why you’d like to win.

WIN

In Australia’s Greatest People and their Achievements, you will learn the answers to these questions and discover many more stories about great Australians who have helped shaped our nation. Australia is a young country, but in the short time since our recorded history began we have achieved remarkable wealth and prosperity across many areas of life. From business to science, politics to sport , science to the arts, and entertainment to social justice, we are a country of achievers. Many of the people in this book came from humble beginnings, but worked hard to achieve their dreams. These stories will show you that with hope and dedication, almost anything is possible. Be inspired! Filled with information, interesting fact pages, breakout boxes and loads of illustrations, this is a fun and inspiring book for people of all ages, and especially children aged 12+, to dip into. Great Christmas present.

In the new children’s picture book, Alphabet City Melbourne, artist Maree Coote has photographed shapes and letter forms around key Melbourne sights, creating a unique alphabetised picture book to help parents teach their kids the letters of the alphabet. “The city is alive with letter-forms, I see them everywhere I look,” says Maree, “This new book helps little kids become more observant in their surroundings, more graphically literate, and of course to have fun while learning the alphabet!” Alphabet City is a fun, educational, and lovingly local hardcover book suitable for Infants to 5 yrs.

To win LIKE and SHARE our Facebook page. facebook. com/KidsVoiceGeelong and tell us why you’d like to win.

ACHIE V E MENTS

Maree Coote - Gecko Press

SP ON SO RE D BY GEELONG

THE HO BBIT:

T HE D E SO L AT IO N O F SMAU G

IN CINEMAS: 26TH DECEMBER 2013 The latest Hobbit movie is an epic fantasy adventure film co-written, produced and directed by Peter Jackson and is the second installment of J. R. R. Tolkien’s 1937 novel The Hobbit. The storyline continues the events of An Unexpected Journey, in which the hobbit Bilbo Baggins travels with the wizard Gandalf and a company of thirteen dwarves to the Kingdom of Erebor, from Smaug. Bilbo Baggins is in possession of a mysterious and magical ring.


PAGE 30 - CHRISTMAS LIGHTS

PUT A

SPARK

B A C K IN

CHRISTMAS

has been decorating his house in We spoke with Jon Mamonski, who asked him a few questions: Ocean Grove for many years and For the past ten dec ora ting you r hou se? How lon g hav e you bee n in Wyatt Street se hou our ght rt and bou years. We moved from Feiglin Cou the neighbours who have gotten into and discovered a wonderful set of Christmas lights spirit. dad and granddad were ‘sparkies’ Wha t mad e you sta rt? My inspiration n (electricians) and they’ve bee my nged over time? Yes, from humble Has your collection grown or cha topsy though because design is like beginnings, it’s blossomed. Not e in your house front and what you hav important like taking advantage of , hter brig lot a lays disp e mad s have your front yard. LED Christmas light safer and cheaper to run as well. you r ligh t you r str eet rea cte d to How hav e the peo ple in

place to e spread that Wyatt Street is the disp lay s? Word seems to hav come cars in ilies so from 1 December, a lot of fam see Christmas displays streaming past.

ts? The ut doin g the Chr istm as ligh Wha t is the bes t thin g abo local our gs brin it that

istmas display is main reason for creating the Chr ly is of kids enjoying the lights. That real lots with ther toge street community a little also re’s The r. yea h eac w sho the the motivation to keep improving ps een a few neighbours and that kee friendly Christmas lights rivalry betw us on our toes. 1 December to add ? Turning the lights on Any thin g els e you ’d like week later, a only is Carols in the Park reminds me that the Ocean Grove er. emb Dec 8 pm e for 7.30 so put a big date note on the fridg

We also spoke to a Geelong West resident and offered them the same questions: How long have you been decorating your house? I have been decorating my

A loca reside l Geelong nt has a Fac se keep y ebook pag t up e that ou up will to dat Decem e Christ ber on hom throughou t mas li ghts a es that hav The sit e nd de e was c oratio only s yet it a ns. et The sit lready has up in Nove mber, over 3 e nam 000 e is Lights Tracke Geelong C likes! r a n d can hristmas at ww b christ w.facebook e found maslig .com/ htsofg eelong

house for 10 years now.

What made you start? Let’s just say I am

Christmas obsessed. Well, my grandfather always used to display stuff inside and have all moving Christmas figures. Before he died he was going to display his outdoor lights for the first time (a big display) He had always had small amount of lights, but never got around to it. So it is in memory of him. Not just that but ever since I was young I loved the Christmas lights!

Has your collection grown or changed

over time? Our collection has grown remarkably over the ten years. For the first five years we had a solid little display but now it’s huge! From Santa and his sleigh on the roof to animated reindeers down the drive. We used to just display fairy lights and traditional Christmas lights. Now we have solar lights, hand crafted objects, a five metre tall Christmas tree and much more. Each year the theme changes and a new plan and design is created. How have the people in your street

reacted to your light displays? We have a lot of younger people in the street. The neighbours across the road have younger kids who love the display! They come over every night and ask when the lights are coming on. They have even started displaying some themselves! We also have a lot of elderly people in the street and they said it brings them lots of happiness at this time of the year. What is the best thing about doing the Christmas lights? The best thing

for me personally is the time I spend with friends and family setting it up. But mainly for me is the enjoyment and excitement you get from everyone who comes and has a look. It wouldn’t be Christmas without the lights.

One of the most excitin g things about the build up to Christmas is taking a drive around to look at the Ch ristmas light displays people put up at their homes. Luckily, in the Geelong region, you will find lights in most suburbs including outdoor Christmas trees and de corations to fairy lights and large Christ mas inflatables. Children will enjoy the grand scale that some of these homes offer, along with the single shy Santa sliding down the roof. Many homes take this opportu nity to collect money for charity, so have a few coins spare when you make your rounds. At the time of the Kids’ Voice going to print, it was too early to provid e you with a definitive list of where to visit, ho wever the following streets do have their de corations up already. Plantation Road and Be nambra Street in Corio, Eagle Parade in Norlane, Pinder Court in St Albans Park, Candover Street in Geelong West, Hereford Drive in Belmont, Anthony Street in Newc omb, Bellarine Highway in Leopold an d Point Richard Road in Portarlington.

TRADE D IRE CTORY Business Oportunities

Hairdressers

Parties

Cleaning

IT Solutions

Toy library

List your business in the Kids’ Voice trade directory.

Email: ads@kidsvoice.com au


WHAT’S ON - PAGE 31

DAILY DECEMBER - 29 JANUARY National Wool Museum, 26 Moorabool St, Geelong. Perception Deception explores your brain’s ability to take sensory signals and paint a mental picture of your environment. It is mainly targeted at visitors aged 10 years and above, but can be enjoyed by people of all ages. Perception Deception’s 28 exhibits consist of 60 hands-on and multimedia experiences, each using perceptual tests and illusions to reveal how our brains edit, prioritise and even add information about the things and people around us. The exhibits cover themes of visual, audio, audio-language, tactile and social perception. 30 NOVEMBER - 1 DECEMBER

Geelong Revival Motoring Festival 2013 - The festival brings Classic Sprints back to the Geelong Waterfront. Join tens of thousands of classic and veteran motoring fans for:. Entry is FREE! www.geelongrevival.com.au Geelong Waterfront, Ritchie Boulevarde, Eastern Beach. 1 DECEMBER - Family Movie - Cloudy

with a chance of Meatballs: Barwon Heads Community Hall from 11:00 - 13:00. BYO bean bags or a rug. BYO snacks: please, NO PEANUT products!

2 DECEMBER - Cartoon Creations: Artist,

Central Geelong, Lt Malop St, between Moorabool and Yarra Sts. Fabulous artist, Earle, will create a cartoon of you for free. You will be able to take home this unique art piece. Join in the fun.

3 DECEMBER - Red the Clown: Central

Geelong, Lt Malop St, between Moorabool and Yarra Sts. Ever wanted to learn the art of juggling? Red the Clown will teach you how. No bookings required, just turn up on site and Red will have the necessary items to have you juggling in no time. Workshops are subject to suitable weather conditions. 2 - 4pm 4 DECEMBER - Odyssey Geelong Year 11 and 12 Media Studies Film Festival, Village Cinema, Geelong. ‘Odyssey Geelong Year 11 and 12 Media Studies Film Festival’ is in its first year of operation in 2013, and aims to establish a strong and much loved youth film festival, making a significant contribution to our regions social capital through its annual celebration of young people’s amazing talents. ‘Odyssey’ was open to those schools whose curriculum includes Year 11 or 12 Media Studies, and 11 Secondary Schools responded entering 16 short films. Odyssey gives a unique opportunity for young people to show their film, created during current studies, that would not otherwise been seen by the community. Odyssey supports a positive image of young people in our community. For more information www. odysseyfilmfestival.com 5 DECEMBER - Geelong Street

Orienteering. Geelong Street Orienteering is a fun activity for all the family. Whether you are a serious runner or just want an activity to get fit and share with friends, this is for you. Participants attend checkpoints either running or walking, in any order, and return in a set time. No prior experience is required and instruction provided to newcomers. And its free on your first night! Come and try. 7-8pm. www. facebook.com/pages/Geelong-StreetOrienteering/260434017314582

5 DECEMBER - Krazy Koala - puppet and

music show, Central Geelong, Lt Malop St, between Moorabool and Yarra Sts. 2 - 5pm. Krazy Koala and his furry friends present a delightful puppet performance for all ages.

6 DECEMBER - Odyssey Geelong Year 11 and 12 Media Studies Film Festival, Surfworld, Torquay. ‘Odyssey Geelong Year 11 and 12 Media Studies Film Festival’ is in its first year of operation in 2013, and aims to establish a strong and much loved youth film festival, making a significant contribution to our regions social capital through its annual celebration of young people’s amazing talents. ‘Odyssey’ was open to those schools whose curriculum includes Year

11 or 12 Media Studies, and 11 Secondary Schools responded entering 16 short films. Odyssey gives a unique opportunity for young people to show their film, created during current studies, that would not otherwise been seen by the community. Odyssey supports a positive image of young people in our community. For more information www.odysseyfilmfestival.com 6 DECEMBER - Diversitat Wholefoods Food of the World Festival. Food Of the World Festival outside Wholefoods at 2 Baylie Place, Geelong offers food, live music, dance, film and much more. Entry is free, with food options from $5-$25. Bookings are necessary. Contact Diversitat Wholefoods on 5221 5421 to secure your place. 6:30 - 9:30pm 6 DECEMBER - Outdoor Cinema and Twilight Market (Christmas). A fantastic Christmas community event for everyone in the family. Held at the Historic Pirra Homestead on Windermere Road, Lara on 6th December starting at 5.30pm, entrance includes the movie on a 10 meter cinema screen showing the Christmas family favorite ELF staring Will Ferrell in full HD, 30 boutique market stalls and gourmet food choices and loads of pre show entertainment for the little Elfs. Tickets are only $6 each and are available through the Facebook page Pirra twilight market or from Daisy Dry Cleaning, Lara Sporting Club or Lara Bendigo Bank. Pirra Homestead, Windermere Road, Lara 5:30 - 10:30pm 7 DECEMBER - Christmas Festival: Myers

Reserve, Bell Post Hill. Enjoy markets including food stalls, rides and a jumping castle at this Christmas event. There will be a BBQ operating throughout the event. Santa will arrive on a fire truck and will hand out lollies for 30 minutes to children. 3 - 8pm

7 DECEMBER - Denis Walter Carols

By The Bay. Eastern Beach Reserve, Waterfront Geelong. Free event. 7:30 9:30pm. A Christmas concert welcoming the festive season. You are invited to welcome the festive season to Geelong at the annual Denis Walter Carols by the Bay. Sing along to Christmas hymns being performed by some of our region’s talented artists as well as some notable Australian performers. Watch out for a special appearance from annual favourite, Humprey B Bear and of course everybody’s favourite - Santa! Hosted by Denis Walter, Carols by the Bay will leave you feeling festive with the spirit of Christmas.

7 DECEMBER - Dream to Fly - Geelong’s Kids Place Circus combined with National Institute of Circus Arts present one show only at The Arena, North Geelong, 2.304.30pm. Tickets $20. Phone 0405776256 or email sandra@kidsplace.com.au. 7 DECEMBER - Lighting of the Christmas

Tree, Point Lonsdale. Annual community celebration of Christmas, including the lighting of the Christmas Tree in Point Lonsdale. Entertainment will be provided by the Queenscliff Lighthouse Theatre Group. Glow candles and Santa hats will also be available for purchase. From 6pm

7 DECEMBER - Preschool Art Classes on Saturdays. National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St, Geelong. Got a preschooler who enjoys messy play? At a loose end on a Saturday morning? The National Wool Museum is offering an alternative - art classes for kids up to five years of age. Come and join in our friendly and fun Saturday morning art and craft classes with our qualified art teacher - we’ll even clear up after you! Bookings not required, however, class size is limited to 12 children. 8 DECEMBER - Ocean Grove Carols In The Park. The single largest community event in Ocean Grove each Christmas. Ocean Grove Park, Presidents Ave from 7:30pm 8 DECEMBER - 94.7 the Pulse 25th Anniversary Birthday Street Party. Market Street South (near main entrance to 94.7 the Pulse). Celebrating 25 years of broadcasting. This would involve live

T E L L U S W HA T’S O N I N Y O U R A RE A

bands playing throughout the afternoon in a marquee setup across the side road. The bands will also be broadcast live on-air. 12 - 4pm 8 DECEMBER - Geelong Harley Owners Group Toy Run. Richie Boulevard, Eastern Beach, Geelong. The 21st Annual Geelong Toy Run will for the first time be starting from Richie Boulevard, Eastern Beach. Toys and nonperishable foods for those less fortunate will be collected at the starting point, along the route via Portarlington and at the finish at Queenscliff. Organised by the Geelong Harley Owners Group, all bikes are welcome. 10am 8 DECEMBER 2013 - Botanic Cafe Summer Market: 1 Fyans street, 10.00am to 2.00 pm. Botanic Cafe Summer Market showcasing local talent. Clothes, Cupcakes, Furniture, Kids Clothes, Chocolates and heaps more. Interested stall holders please contact Maree. Please contact Maree Gannon on 03 5232 2858 for more information. 8 DECEMBER - Family Market Event. 515 Bellarine Hwy Moolap from 10am 2pm. FREE Family Market Event, FREE Parking, FREE showbag for the first 100 kids! FREE Balloons! 60+ Stalls. Hot Food, Popcorn, Fairy Floss & Mini Dutch Pancakes! Jumping Castles! New stall holders welcome! Please contact Jennifer Worley on 0428 085 208 for more information. 12 DECEMBER - Krazy Koala - puppet

and music show, Central Geelong, Lt Malop St, between Moorabool and Yarra Sts. 2 - 5pm. Krazy Koala and his furry friends present a delightful puppet performance for all ages. Come and hear Nic on the didgeridoo and engage with his friends.

13 DECEMBER - Friday Night Skate, Barwon Valley Activity Centre, 1 Barwon Heads Rd Belmont. This session offers indoor skating, roller blading and skateboarding. Running for over 20 years, 7 - 10pm. $5 to get in and drinks are sold for $1. Skateboards, Scooters and Rollerblades welcome. This event is not suitable for Bikes/BMX. 14 DECEMBER - Preschool Art Classes on Saturdays. National Wool Museum, 26-32 Moorabool St, Geelong. Got a preschooler who enjoys messy play? At a loose end on a Saturday morning? The National Wool Museum is offering an alternative - art classes for kids up to five years of age. Come and join in our friendly and fun Saturday morning art and craft classes with our qualified art teacher - we’ll even clear up after you! Bookings not required, however, class size is limited to 12 children. 14 DECEMBER - Christmas in Drysdale, Drysdale Green, Drysdale. Come along to this free Christmas event and bring your family. Kids will meet Santa and get a gift! Choirs will be singing... Get into the festive spirit. 3 - 7:30pm 15 DECEMBER - Christmas Carols

at Osborne House, Osborne House, Swinburne Street, North Geelong. Twilight Family Christmas Carols overlooking Corio Bay at North Geelong on the South lawn at Osborne House with the Geelong Memorial Brass Band and guest artists. Please bring your own rug and or chair plus warm clothes as the evening breeze can be cool on the Waterfront. 6:30 - 8:30pm

17 DECEMBER - Cartoon Creations - artist, Central Geelong, Lt Malop St, between Moorabool and Yarra Sts. Fabulous artist, Earle, will create a cartoon of you for free. You will be able to take home this unique art piece. Join in the fun. 17 DECEMBER - Minecraft School Holiday Course: Belmont High School, Rotherham St. Start Time: 9am - End Time: 5pm. This popular course allows students to learn problem solving and 3D modelling skills using Minecraft! During this workshop students will learn to work within the 3D world of Minecraft taking part in a range of architectural and engineering challenges. Students

are encouraged to bounce ideas off one another having their imagination pushed to the limit through exciting goals and challenges! Students are required to bring their own laptop computers. Please contact Kristin on 1800 115 562 for more information. 22 DECEMBER - Carols In The Park -

Highton, Highton Recreation Reserve, Barrabool Road, Highton. A festive Christmas carols event held at the Highton Recreation Reserve. Come along and enjoy the atmosphere and sing along too! 7 - 8:30pm

22 DECEMBER - Corio Norlane Community

Carols by Candlelight, Corio Community Park, Corio. The event will be a shared community carols evening with choirs from local primary schools and supported by Karen Burmese choir. The evening will commence at 6pm with a free BBQ, ice cream and soft drinks and entertainment for the children including Santa. The carols will begin at 8pm and conclude by 9:30pm. The Carols, which are sponsored by the churches of Corio and Norlane, will have a broad appeal to the wider community.

23 DECEMBER - Krazy Koala - puppet and music show, Central Geelong, Lt Malop St, between Moorabool and Yarra Sts. 2 - 5pm. Krazy Koala and his furry friends present a delightful puppet performance for all ages. Come and hear Nic on the didgeridoo and engage with his friends. 23 DECEMBER - Cartoon Creations - artist,

Central Geelong, Lt Malop St, between Moorabool and Yarra Sts. Fabulous artist, Earle, will create a cartoon of you for free. You will be able to take home this unique art piece. Join in the fun.

23 DECEMBER - Kingston Estate Christmas Party, Lake Reserve / Holburn Rise Reserve, Oakdene Blvd, Kingston Estate, Ocean Grove. The Kingston Estate Christmas Party is on again. Residents and their families are invited to celebrate with their neighbours. The event consists of Santa, the Mik Maks and a movie in the park. 7 - 10:30pm 24 DECEMBER - Geelong Carols by Candlelight, Johnstone Park, Gheringhap Street Geelong. The Geelong Carols by Candlelight is a great evening for the whole family, staged in the natural amphitheatre of the historic Johnstone Park. A traditional carols programme with some of Geelong’s best artists and choirs, plus our concert band and lots of carol singing! 8 - 10pm 31 DECEMBER - The Pier Festival Geelong: Funny Characters, Twilight Market & Waterfront Fireworks. We love our festivals and Geelong is turning on a lovely one on Tuesday 31 December, 2013. It is a free and promising event to welcome in the New Year. They are offering children’s rides, jumping castles and entertainment. There will be a food court with gourmet food on Steampacket Gardens, and a lovely the Twilight Market. Children’s entertainment will be provided by The Mik Maks, along with The Voice’s Imogen Brough. To add some whimsy to the event, Tubby the Robot will be wandering about with her baby robot in tow. There are also balloon artists, animal petting farm and children’s rides. In the Youth Activities Area at the skate park there will be live music for the 1217 year olds. At 9:15pm, the boardwalk will come alive with fireworks from Corio Bay, continuing on into the evening and followed by midnight fireworks also.

- E M A I L E D I T O R@ K I DS V OI C E.C OM.AU



Kids' Voice December 2013