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Long-T ime

Mo r e no Va l l e y Resident

S u zy L a n gh o r ne

Welcomes the

Future. . . ÂŚ F.A.C.E.


Welcome to Valley Life Today Magazine!

"A l w a y s i n m o t i o n i s t h e f u t u r e .”

Yo d a , S t a r W a r s E p i s o d e V: T h e E m p i r e S t r i ke s B a c k

Valley Life Today Magazine A Publication of F.A.C.E. Media Managing Editor

The Future is Now

Linnie Frank Bailey

The future will not wait for us.

Design + Art Director Technological advances push us toward tomorrow at an accelerated pace. Just look at the devices we carry around with us. A few decades ago, could we have predicted the rampant use of smart phones and related mobile devices that not only make calls but also allow us to watch movies, take pictures, track our location, listen to music, read books and so much more! And then there is social media that lets us stay in contact with everyone we ve ever met. Without a doubt our resources and contacts have increased dramatically.

Hector Chavez Publicatio n Consultants Phyllis Bailey Rosalyn Carter Writers

However, we also have seen recent economic challenges that have us rethinking longaccepted ideas about work, housing and transportation.

Linnie Frank Bailey

We w o n d e r, w h a t w i l l t h e f u t u r e b r i n g?

Paola Wong-Ringer

With this issue of Valley Life Today we look to the future of Moreno Valley and discuss possibilities with city residents and leaders. We started by asking what we might expect in the years 2030, 2050, and 2100. These are years in which a child born today will be 18, 38, and 88 years old respectively. We wonder what s being done today to prepare for the future and what is going to be required to provide a quality lifestyle for residents from young adulthood to old age? We can, of course, only paint a picture of what might occur. We do not know what the future holds. But those we talked to stressed that we must start NOW to build the bridges that will make this area one of the most dynamic in the country. The future seldom unfolds the way we think it will. However, with this issue we look at projected trends and offer some possible scenarios. Whenever you see FUTURE know that it is our conjecture ‒ but who knows? Here at Valley Life Today we dare to dream. So, take a glimpse of what could be. Are you ready?

Linnie Frank Bailey Linnie Frank Bailey Managing Editor Valley Life Today Magazine

Claudette Jack

Photographers Marc Anthony Raphael Samuel Hector Chavez Andre Greer Publisher F.A.C.E. ‒ Family and Community Empowerment 14950 Riverside Drive, Riverside, CA 92518 951-697-8803 For more information or an advertising packet: info@vlifetoday.com Visit our website: vLifeToday.com

Valley Lif e Tod a y Maga z in e Published by :

F.A.C. E .


Yea r of 20i2 6. RI CHARD STEWA RT

-MAYO R

9. SUZY LANGH ORNE

-ELDER

12. SOLYM AR SOLA NEGRO N

-AMBA SSADO R

-DEVEL OPER

15. IDDO BENZE EVI 20. JAMIL DADA

-AMBA SSADO R -EDUCATOR

23. JULIE SINGLE TARY

-BISHO P

27. LACY SYKES , JR.

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“A socie t y g r o w s g r e a t when men pla nt t r e e s w h o s e shade t h e y k n o w t h e y shall n e v e r s i t i n . � -G r e e k p r o v e r b

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M AYOR R I C H A R D ST E WA R T:

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“ N O W W E C AN AC T U A L LY P L AN”

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Richard Stewart has seen first-hand the explosive growth of the City of Moreno Valley in the past few decades. Retiring in 1997 as a lieutenant colonel at March Air Force Base, he recalls an abundance of vacant fields when he bought a home near the base in 1985. There was nothing from the base hospital to where Moreno Valley High is today, he says. Crop dusters sprayed the area regularly, and Highway 395, which is now the 215, was a four-lane highway.

N ame: R i ch a rd A. S t e w a r t , M a y o r of th e C i t y o f M o r e n o Va l l e y

A lawyer and the city s current mayor, Stewart has served on the Moreno Valley City Council for 21 years. Back when he first started

Li ttl e Kn o wn FAQ : Ste wa rt s p a re n t s w e r e p r o f e ssi o n a l i c e s k a t e r s w h o wor k e d i n t h e m o vi e i n d u s tr y al o n gs i de No r w e g i a n f i gur e s k a t e r a n d f i l m s t a r Sonja H e n i e . T h ey l i ve d near 20 t h C e n t u r y F o x Stud i o s , w h e n t h e y w e r e in Hen i e s mo v i e s . T h e y also t o u re d a c ro ss t h e count ry wi t h t h e S on j a Hen i e I c e S h o w. S t e w a r t s mothe r ( s t i l l a l i ve ) i s of Me x i c a n de s c en t .

on the council, there was little computer use and no cell phones, he says. The area was mostly known for the Riverside International Raceway (which was demolished to make way for the Moreno Valley mall) and March Air Force Base, which was realigned from an active duty base in 1996. Moren o Valley was incorporated as a city in 1984 and is now the s e c o n d l a r g e s t i n R i v e r s i d e C o u n t y. I t h a s s o a r e d i n p o p u l a t i o n from around 19,000 in 1970 to more than 190,000 today. Much of its growth has come from people migrating to the area in search

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“Planning is bringing the he future into t at you present so th ing can do someth ” about it now.

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of affordable housing.


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A s t h e c i t y g r e w, M o r e n o V a l l e y

don t want jobs; they don t want

leaders were hard-pressed to keep

growth; they don t want change!

up with the demand for services

What they don t realize is that we re

while managing its growth. Stewart

competing with other communities

stresses leaders were forced to be

in Southern California as well as

more reactive than proactive. He

with other states.

California is

states, Now we can actually plan

known as having a horrible climate

and that is our goal today -- to

for business. We have to counter

create a strategic action blueprint

this if we want to bring jobs into

for the coming decades.

our city. Otherwise residents will have long commutes to other job-

Stewart admits that city leaders

producing areas.

have not been without their fair share of critics as they offer plans

In the decades to come, Stewart

for the future. He understands

believes families will continue to

w h y,

Once ideas and diagrams

migrate Inland in search of jobs

are actually submitted it is easier

and better lifestyles. He believes

for people to criticize,

he says.

the city must position itself to take

H o w e v e r, i t b e c o m e s a p r o b l e m

advantage of growth industries

when everything is shot-down and

such as health care saying,

solutions are not offered. We then

demand for medical professionals

ask, What is the alternative plan?

will continue to grow and the City s

Where is the proposal or pro-active

own Moreno Valley College Applied

plan for our future? We can t just

Health Care program will provide

sit back and do nothing to prepare!

access to health care training. In

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According to Stewart, jobs are the 25

population can support more

most important issue for Moreno

than the two hospitals currently

Valley today and tomorrow. He says

in the area.

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city residents of the future, just like those of today, must be able to earn income and provide for their

In 2030 we want to be a leader among u

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families. He cites statistics that show

in the world by creating a medical

that most family fights, especially

community where people can live and

those that lead to divorce, are over

work. We will be a center of medical

money. He also believes many of the

excellence. Students from Moreno

social problems we see among youth

Valley College and the upcoming

have to do with low employment

UCR Medical School will find jobs in

options for both themselves and

the health and wellness centers of

their parents.

Moreno Valley, states Stewart.

On this issue he again takes aim at

Logistics will also be an industry

critics of city planning stating, They

leader for Moreno Valley in the

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Richard Stewart reports, “The City of Moreno Va l l e y w i l l n o l o n g e r h a v e just a caretaker government. We w i l l have a gover nm ent that i s acti ve ly planning f or the future!”

» The

City reviews two significant projects for the Rancho Belago area: a health & wellness ‘city within a city’ and the Wo r l d L o g i s t i c s C e n t e r ( t h e largest distribution center in the world.)

2030

» FUTURE

The Moreno Va l l e y I n t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t expands to add more flights to P aci fi c R im count r ies.

» FUTURE

The Moreno Val l ey C i vi c Plaza adds t he S tew art Family I ce Rink.

2050

»FUTURE

Driverless vehicles take over all city transportation functions, including trash pick-up, deliveries, and bus service .

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the most advanced medical centers 52

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» Mayor

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Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

» FUTURE

The March International Spaceport expands its space tourism routes.

2100

» FUTURE

The Riverside Internati ona l Pod Raceway opens at the site of the former Moreno Valley m all.

» FUTURE

The City of M o r e n o Va l l e y e s t a b l i s h e s a tourist resort on the moon.

7


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coming decades. Already plans are being considered

When asked about the possibility of a commercial

for a large state-of-the-art distribution center on

airport at the site of the former base, Stewart says

the city s east end. Called, the World Logistics

it is hard to see it now given the current economic

Center , the project is a proposed master plan for

climate and the problems facing Ontario Airport.

the future development of up to 41.6 million square

However, one thing is sure, he says, The City of

feet for logistics warehouse facilities.

Moreno Valley will no longer have just a caretaker

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government. We will have a government that is Stewart also envisions a City of Moreno Valley Civic

actively planning for the future!

Plaza near the center of the City. One of the things

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we hear from citizens is the need for a downtown

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area. We hope to have a civic plaza in a park-like

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setting in mid-city and perhaps satellite police stations throughout the area. soid

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Valley Life Today ÂŚ Discover the Greatness ÂŚ April 2012


SUZY

LANG

HORN

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2012

E:

AG I N G GRACEFULLY WITH 252Studios

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» S uzy

Langho r ne says, “ I t is i mportant to st ay act ive as you age. It can make all the di fference i n your qualit y of l i fe.”

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TAI CHI 252Studio 252Studios

» The

boomer generation (those born from 1946 through 1964) is t ur ning 65 at the rate of one every eight seconds. Th at m eans m or e than 10,000 people each day – or almost 4 million per year – a r e appr oaching Medi care el igibilit y.

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2030

» FUTURE

M o r e n o Va l l e y h a s s e v e r a l S e n i o r Te c h Centers to train and support seniors in the use of robotics and vi rtual r ealit ies.

» F UT URE

The ‘off icial’ US reti rement a ge is 75.

Name: Suzy Langhorne (Cover Model) Little Known FAQ: An avid gardener, Suzy has made her back yard a Monarch Butterfly Way Station. According to the federal Administration on Aging, by 2030, the nation s population of those 65 and older will have doubled from what it was in 2000. That adds up to one out of every five Americans ̶ 72.1 million people. Wellness, including preventing

a is “There h: fountain of yout it is your mind , your tale nts, the you creativity your to bring the and life live s of peop le you love. When you lear n to tap this sour ce, you will trul y have defe ated age. ” –Sop hia Lore n

injury and disease, is becoming a

2050

» FUTURE

Replacement hips, knees and organs contain bio-chips and provide superior strength and agi l i ty.

» FUTURE

Most Moreno Va l l e y c h i l d r e n h a v e living grandparents and great-grandp ar ent s.

significant issue as the number of adults age 50 and older continues to swell in Moreno Valley and the surrounding area. Long-time Moreno Valley resident Suzy Langhorne says keeping active is the secret to successful aging. She and husband Norm are the model for elders of the future. Both retired from the h e a l t h c a r e i n d u s t r y, N o r m a n d S u z y

2100

» F UT URE

Senior s ( def ined as those 80 and older ) ar e assisted by robots equipped w i th arti fi ci al int elligence.

» FUTURE

As we age, our thoughts and experiences will be stored and cataloged, providing life-long access to our memori es.

are devoted to physical fitness. Norm is at the gym regularly and Suzy is a Tai Chi instructor.

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

9


According to Suzy, Tai Chi is a graceful martial

Tai Chi is practiced by people of all ages. Classes

art that has been practiced in China for centuries.

can be found throughout the Moreno Valley and

It is considered a moving meditation, perfect for

Riverside area ‒ including those offered by the

reducing stress and increasing strength. Tai Chi

Riverside Community College District s Young at

can slow the heart rate, improve digestion and

Heart program. There is also a group that meets

circulation and relax the mind and body -- just

Saturday mornings at White Park in Riverside. For

what we need for today s fast-paced world!

a full list and schedule of area Tai Chi classes visit the website, dotaichi.com.

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Suzy discounts those who say Tai Chi is not an

The Inland area will continue to be attractive for

aerobic exercise saying, Studies show that it is.

seniors because of mild weather and affordable

When people perform Tai Chi for one hour they

housing. As cities prepare to accommodate their

expend about the same amount of energy as

aging population, those residents should take

walking 3 to 4 miles at a steady pace. However,

steps to remain healthy in their retirement years.

the most well-established medical benefits of Tai Chi come from increased strength and balance in older adults.

It is important to stay active as you age, says Suzy.

It can make all the difference in your

quality of life. In one study, seniors who practiced Tai Chi for 15 weeks reduced their risk of falling by 47 percent. They gained confidence in their balance, thus minimizing their fear of falling. Other studies show Tai Chi helps people with arthritis by strengthening the muscles around the joints and increasing range of motion and flexibility.

10

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012


we look that as e p o h my mber “It is ll reme i w e w ve future that ha to the s e s s e n no ll busi of More the sma n o i t a e found rs.� been th ny yea a m r o f Valley ive Execut , a n e Valdep mber Oscar ley Cha l a V o n r More Directo merce of Com


SOLYMAR SOLA NEGRON:

“EDUCATIONAL ACCESS IS A GLOBAL ISSUE” Beyond Moreno Valley... beyond California ... beyond America ... are people, mostly children, who suffer because of the color of their skin, their religion, their poverty or simply because they were unlucky enough to be born in a place destroyed by war. While we see poverty and suffering in our own cities and towns, we thankfully have been spared the relentless devastation of other parts of the world.

Nam e : S o l ym a r S o l a The question we must ask now, and in future years, is Are we to turn our heads

Little Kn o w n FA Q :

away from the suffering that goes on beyond our borders when our destiny

The Algarabia Literary Project/ Proyecto de Creación Literaria is an academic and cultural enrichment program that provides quality-educational experiences for Dominican and Haitian youth and their families to enhance l i te ra c y a n d a n a l y t i c a l s k i l l s i n r ea di n g, wri t i n g , p op u l a r d isc o u rs e a n d h i s t or y.

is increasingly linked to other peoples of the world?

To o b t a i n mo re i n f o r m a ti on or to donate, visit their website at proyectoalgarabia. wor d p re s s . c o m .

Elementary to help foster cultural identity and encourage them to stay in

Rapid advances in technology and communications bond us to those we might otherwise ignore. The global ramifications of poverty and illiteracy affect us all. Solymar Solá Negrón understands the implications of inadequate educational access. It is what led her to join a mentoring group while still a sophomore at North High School in Riverside. She worked with sixth graders at Highland school. This activism continued at UC Santa Cruz, where Negrón helped start an outreach and retention program for students struggling to graduate.

It was a joint effort among black, brown, Asian and native American students, says Negrón, who served as the program s coordinator and subsequently became interested in alternative education and support issues, both in the U.S. and globally. After graduating from the Feminist Studies and Community Studies departments at UCSC, Negrón headed to Mexico City where she worked with a Women s Neighborhood Group involved with fighting poverty, illiteracy and domestic violence. She describes the real world training she received there saying, When I came to Mexico, I was introduced to a different world and perspective ‒ one that no history book, lecture or campus organization could provide for me.

12

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012


“How wonderfu l is that it nobody n eed wait a s in b e f o r e s gle moment tarting improve the worl t o d.” Anne Fra nk

After spending a couple of years in Mexico,

took her to community meetings and

Negrón started working with Haitian

rallies when she was small.

school children on the plantations of the Dominican Republic. She and (historian

Her dad, local political organizer

and poet) Fabian Villegas co-founded the

Francisco Solá , says, Solymar has a mind

Algarabia Middle School Project for the

of her own. Sometimes, I worry and wish

students who face discrimination and lack

she would stay closer to home, but I

of access to education. (see sidebar)

understand the importance of the work she is doing and I am proud of her.

There are over 450 plantation communities in the Dominican Republic with a limited

Negrón and Villegas are promoting the

number of teachers ‒ in some cases only

Algarabia project locally and raising

two teachers for 200 students, states

funds for the program. Negrón says much

Negrón. Of those who do get schooling,

of the support has come from families

most students only make it to eighth grade

in the Moreno Valley and Riverside area

because high school is too costly. And,

who contribute $20 to $50 in support of

even if they make it to high school, their

students a world away.

dark skin relegates them to life working on a plantation so education is of no use. This is a reality few in the U.S. are aware of.

» Solymar

Solá Negrón leads the Algarabia Literary Project/ Proyecto de Creación Literaria, an academic and cultural enrichment program that provides quality-educational experiences for Dominican and H ai ti an yout h.

»A

spoken wor d t heat er and performance presentation to give voice to the Dominican and Haitian youth draws a standing-room only audi ence.

2030

» FUTURE

The majority of the world’s students have digital access to course materi al .

» FUTURE

Students in farming communities worldwide become agricultural-technology experts.

2050

This work is extremely important to me because it brings hope to a people who have faced decades of continuous

Negrón, who is of Puerto Rican descent,

oppression. It s just an expansion of

inherited her activism from her parents

the work I started with Riverside area

who, she remembers,

2012

students years ago. Solymar

Solá

Education is global. Instructors can be located anywhere in the world. Most teachers appear vi a hol ogram .

» FUTURE All students speak at l east tw o languages.

Negrón

reminds us that it is not just our future that should concern us. We are part of a global community that will only become more interconnected

» FUTURE

in

the

years ahead.

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

2100

» F UT URE

Cr ops ar e r aised in specialized environments, i ncl udi ng the deep sea and space.

» FUTURE

All planting and harvesting is done by robots.

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(TODAY S CULTURE)

LA CULTURA DE HOY

Blending into the Future... By Paola Wong-Ringer

I

was sitting in a crowded restaurant a few days ago and as I

began to look around the room, to gather my current surroundings, the similarities of culture struck me. My multi-ethnic audience resembled each other in dress, mannerisms and demeanor. They blended well and while their physical appearance was not necessarily the same, there was a sense of shared awareness. I also notice a curious similarity with my Spanish students who are learning English. They will vary in age ‒ from children

to seniors, yet the passion, interest, and commitment to a new language is what binds them. Their affinity to the subject, and willingness to learn a new way of communicating, unites them. The concept of harmony and blending can and should be comforting as it allows us the luxury of confidence and vision into a prosperous, inclusive future. According to The American Society on Aging, rising intermarriages are creating a growing multi-racial community and are reducing the socioeconomic differences between races. This information seems to suggest that the social boundaries can potentially become less distinct. A development towards oneness? We are blending. Furthermore, Americans who previously were required to choose one race are being permitted to honor a more complex heritage by choosing two or more. Asians and Latinos are currently the groups most likely to report multiracial ancestry. If trends continue to 2050, it is predicted that a quarter of Asians and nearly half of Hispanics could point to recent mixed ancestry. Ultimately, what could our future possibilities entail? On the subject of diversity, reality points out a fading of color lines and a continuous falling of cultural barriers. Is this good for society? Could it be possible that skin color could have less of a role? Worth pondering over. Paola Wong-Ringer teaches Latino culture and language to individuals, organizations, and businesses. She can be reached at TheLatinEducator@gmail.com

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Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012


I DDO B E NZE E VI : 2

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Local businessman and land owner Iddo Benzeevi is known for his grand vision for the i so

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City of Moreno Valley. He sees the area not as it is, but as it can be. When asked his Name: Id d o B e n z e e v i , Pr esi de n t a n d C . E. O. H i gh l a n d Fair v i e w Pr op e rt i e s .

thoughts on how to prepare the City for the future, he laid out his steps for success.

Little Kn o w n FAQ : B en z e e v i i s we l l v e r sed i n H e b re w an d Sc ri p t u re an d spe a k s o ft e n of th e i m p o rtan ce o f fa i t h .

be a vision, says Benzeevi, citing Proverbs 29:18: Where there is no vision the people

These steps can be applied to an individual, an organization, or a city. 1.

Have a Vision.

Vision is important -- for individuals as well as businesses and organizations, there must perish. He continues, Everyone needs a destination. Where are you headed? Which path will you take? And most importantly, is it worth it? A truly great vision can t be

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You must have a plan! Execution is critical -- how do we get it done? What are the S2

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required steps? There are plenty of great ideas out there that never come to fruition. The greater the vision, the

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Accept Change.

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greater the results; however, great visions also require strategies and priorities.

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We must have empathy for those who are slow to accept change. Some people are more accepting than others. Change is hard. There are those who resist technology despite the positive change it can bring to their lives. Others don t want business and industry in their city. They are shell-shocked by the changes coming as

“Make no little plans; they have no magic to stir men’s blood and probably will themselves rea liz ed. Mak e big plans; aim high in hope and work, a that remembering

not

be

noble, logical diagram once recorded will not die.” Burnham H. Daniel (American architect and urban planner 1846-1912)

the world gets more technical and workers demand jobs where they live. Change is a part of life and if we don t accept it we get left behind. Other cities in the Inland area see the hand-writing on the wall and understand the importance of bringing state-of-the-art industries to their towns. The City of Moreno Valley is poised to be in the forefront for industries where future jobs will be ‒such as healthcare and logistics. 4.

Think Like a Winner.

Everybody likes the opportunity that America provides but not everyone commits the efforts to take part in it. We have the best schools and colleges in the world yet our culture does not value education as it should. We need to emphasize the value of education instead of being upset when others get educated and succeed in America. Take advantage of the opportunities; even to win in a lottery one must buy a ticket! Education is the best ticket.

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

“WHERE THERE IS NO VISION THE PEOPLE PERISH”

S2

Make a Plan.

t du

2.

52

just personal, but must improve the lives of all involved.

15


5.

Embrace the Future.

For almost 200 years we were part of the Industrial age where you didn t need education to have a decent paying 52 S2 ut id o s

job and a middle-class life. That started changing 15 to 20 years ago. With an industrial-based society wealth was

2 25 tS du oi

People must be retrained into new technologies. For instance, robotics in manufacturing has

52 S2 ut id so

52 S2 ut id o s

and our most valuable asset is an educated workforce.

52 2 S2 25 ut tS id du o i s so

to 20 years we have moved into the information age where wealth comes from adding value to ideas,

52 S2 ut id so

52 S2 ut id so 52 S2 ut id o s

created by adding value to natural resources ‒ oil, gas, steam, agriculture, etc. However, within the past 15

replaced manual labor and has brought costs down. Today, few companies produce an entire s

product in one location. One building may house the design and marketing team; another place, or multiple places may make the parts, and yet another location may assemble the item; and then it becomes a matter of distributing the product to stores or shipping it directly to customers. Logistics is the new manufacturing.

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Valley Life Today ÂŚ Discover the Greatness ÂŚ April 2012


How many iPhones does Apple itself make? The answer is zero! The phone (its parts) is made throughout the world. In the future, even the concept of retail stores will change -- they will be more like exhibit halls where you can go to view or try on a product. They won t keep an inventory but will ship the item from the distribution center. So the shopping mall of the future will be an exhibition hall. Moreno Valley is perfectly situated to take advantage of these changes in how we

2012

»Businessman

Iddo Benzeevi, “Within the past 15 to 20 years we have moved i nto t he inf or m at ion age where wealth comes from addi ng value t o ideas; our most valuable asset is an educated wor kf or ce. ”

distribute products. The emerging Asian market has created what is called the Golden Triangle for the movement of goods. This includes the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, Orange County, and the Inland area. There is still land in the Inland area to build the needed logistics centers. Here in the City of Moreno Valley we want to build the largest such facility in the country ‒ the World Logistics Center. This will be a huge project which will bring jobs and increased revenue to the city. It s okay to think big. This is what you would call a grand vision! Proposed World Logistics Center

2030

» FUTURE

Most Moreno Va l l e y r e s i d e n t s d r i v e plug-in electric or hybrid cars. Charging locations are more pl ent if ul t han gas stati ons.

» FUTURE

Human-manned cal l centers, nat ionally and gl obal l y, are a t hing of t he past. Customers interact with “virtual employees” equipped with artificial i ntel l i gence .

2050

» FUTURE

A i r Tr a v e l i s faster and it is possible to reach anywhere in the world in less than 2 hours by pl ane.

» FUTURE

Many people grow their own fruits and vegetables on rooftop gardens.

2100

» FUTURE

The oil-age is o v e r, e n e r g y r e s o u r c e s come from space and are mi ned from ot her planet s.

» FUTURE

Distribution Centers send items to space colonies on the moon and Mars.

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

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A. B. C. D. E

.

F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M.

Las Vegas Launch Center (North Travel) Los Angeles Launch Center (West Travel) San Diego Launch Center (South Travel)

A

Palm Springs Launch Center (East Travel) March Air Museum – Home to the living

H Moreno Valley Mall

quarters of the International Space Station in use in the year 2012. March International Spaceport.

Town Gate

The City of Moreno Valley Civic Center. The Riverside County International Pod Raceway

B

Moreno Valley College – Health Sciences Moreno Valley College – Transportation Moreno Valley College – Robotics Moreno Valley College – Environmental Sciences Moreno Valley Interactive Sports Center Map Legend:

Red Lines – Moreno Valley Air Rail Line. Green Line – Moreno Valley Health and Wellness Corridor (along Nason Street) Blue Line – Moreno Valley Logistics and Distribution Corridor (along Theodore Street) [2012 Landmarks] • March Air Reser ve Base • Cross Word Church • Moreno Valley College • Skecher s

• • • •

Kaiser Permanente Moreno Valley Mall Rancho Belago Moreno Valley City Hall


Moreno Valley 2100* K

D

L Moreno Valley Auto Mall

Moreno Valley City Hall

G

Moreno Valley Unified School District

Cross Word Church

J Riverside County Regional Medical Center

E

Kaiser Permanente

F

I March Air Reserve Base

Moreno Valley College

M 252Studios 252Studios 252Studios 252Studios 252Studios 252Studios

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• Town Gate • River side County Regional Medical Center • Moreno Valley Unified School District • Moreno Valley Auto Mall

*These are only the projections of the Valley Life Today Editorial board.

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C

Skechers

Rancho Belago


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JA M I L DA DA:

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“THE END OF THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT” 252Studios

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Mr. Moreno Valley

Jamil Dada, jets across Southern California.

Name: Jam i l D a da

Jamil Dada predicts a future full of fundamental changes in how

Little Known FAQ: H i s f i r s t f o r ay into t h e I n l a n d b u s i n e ss wor l d c a m e a s a g i f t s h op owne r i n P a l m S p r i n g s .

we live, work and learn. It s already started, he says, citing the R.E.M. s It s the End of the World as We Know It. He insists that ours will not be a world where we work for the same company or live in the same house for 30 or more years. The economic turmoil in recent years already has people reconsidering their home as an investment and their job as long-term.

“It’s the E n d of the Worl d as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)”

Dada s career paints a vivid picture of the business and community leader of the future. His interests vary and he serves on numerous boards and commissions.

He is a vice president

of Investment Services at Provident Bank and known nationally

- A song by the rock ba n d R.E.M., 198 7

for his work with the Workforce Investment Board, where he has served as chair on national, state and county levels. He leads the governor s Workforce Investment Board and recently worked with U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis to secure federal funding for local employment training and resources.

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Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012


A frequent visitor to White House and congressional offices, Dada a l s o a d v o c a t e s o n b e h a l f o f t h e m i l i t a r y, p a r t i c u l a r l y t h e l o c a l M a r c h Air Reserve Base. He is chair of the March Field Air Museum, which houses more than 70 historic aircraft and other displays relating to the base s history. A USC graduate, Dada arrived in Riverside County in 1986 and lived in Moreno Valley for 14 years. Currently a Riverside resident, he considers Moreno Valley his adopted city. He has been nicknamed Mr. Moreno Valley

because of his frequent participation in city

events and tireless promotion of city activities. He says both Riverside and Moreno Valley need to work together as a region. Dada says area leaders need to prepare for the new normal taking place worldwide. Here s his take on what is needed to get the area ready for the future: Education T h e r e i s a h i g h s c h o o l d r o p o u t b o r n e v e r y h o u r i n R i v e r s i d e C o u n t y. The lifetime cost of a dropout is $200K. We must fix the dropout problem if we are to have any hope for our future. Moreno Valley is the second largest city in the region with the highest number of children. We need more community-supported gathering places for them ... more learning centers, such as libraries. Workforce Career and technical education is just as important as academic preparation for the workforce of the future. Students should start preparing for future employment before leaving high school. C u r r e n t l y, o n l y 1 4 p e r c e n t o f s t u d e n t s a r e i n c o n t a c t w i t h b u s i n e s s e s ,

2012

» Jamil

Dada says, “Moreno Va l l e y i s o u r s o c i a l laboratory for the future. The di versi t y we have now represents how t he count r y will look in the coming decades. Cit y leader s m ust capitalize on this diversity and lead the nation in creating a city where all groups live and work in harmony.”

» Va r i o u s

companies are developing both vertical and horizontal launch vehicles for space exploration and touri sm.

2030

» FUTURE

M o r e n o Va l l e y completes an urbanized, walkable town center with condos, apartments, rooftop gardens, str eet - level shops and cultural activities for all age groups.

» FUTURE

Books, CDs, and DVDs are obsolete relics. Most media is digital and delivered from online sources. Libraries are community gathering centers for t he exchange of ideas and group computing.

2050

» FUTURE

Space tourism, now avai l able t o t he m iddle class, is a multibillion dollar i ndustry.

» FUTURE

In homes, there are no fixed spaces such as living rooms or bedrooms. There are movable walls that can be r econf igur ed at will to meet the changing needs of the occupant s.

yet these relationships must be fostered to provide career pathways and apprenticeship programs.

2100

» FUTURE All buildings have

thei r ow n power supply and w ater generat ion syst em .

» FUTURE

Robots perform most manual labor and physical tasks humans no longer want to do and are 30% of the American w orkforce.

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

21


Housing

land use. Eleven to 13 percent of land for job p r o d u c t i o n i s a g o o d r a t i o . M o r e n o Va l l e y s i s o n l y

Thirty-two percent of area workers commute. Residents are sacrificing their families for their

3 percent. We must look at wiser use of land and industries we can support.

house. They are working multiple jobs and traveling great distances to work. This creates

Moreno Valley lacks a downtown and needs a

situations where many kids are without adult

civic center. This will become even more crucial

supervision in the afternoon and early evening.

in the future as we become a destination place

This dynamic must change for the City of

for workers and visitors.

Moreno Valley, which has many young families and a surplus of affordable housing.

Moreno Valley is our social laboratory for the future. The diversity we have now represents how

Thirty years from now, home ownership as we

the country will look in the coming decades. City

k n o w i t n o w m a y g o a w a y. A l r e a d y, i n t h e g r e a t

leaders must capitalize on this diversity and lead

cities of Europe, many people rent spaces above

the nation in creating a city where all groups live

stores and businesses so that they can be close

and work in harmony.

to work and cultural activities. The villages of the future ‒ even in Moreno Valley ‒ will reflect

Though the world we live in is rapidly changing,

these work-live options.

as are our notions about how we live in it, the future offers even greater opportunities for those who are prepared for it. Dada says he is honored

Moreno Valley Government

and privileged to join five percent of the world s

Moreno Valley needs to be a more business-

the world.

friendly city and we are starting to see this. A decent ratio for jobs in a city has to do with 252Studios

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© Hanna-Barbera

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22 252Studios 252Studios 252Studios 252Studios

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population in living in the greatest country in


T H E IM P O R TA N C E OF E A R LY IN T E R V E N T IO N ON THE FUTURE O F M O R E N O VA L L E Y

Julie Singletary: Why We Must Intervene Now! Julie Singletary is the principal of the preschools in the Val Verde Unified School District. The main office is at El Potrero Preschool in Moreno Valley with additional classes on four elementary campuses in Perris and the unincorporated area of Mead Valley. Here she answers questions about the program she oversees.

Why do you think education is critical for our area s future? The future of every city begins with its residents and the level of education that they possess. Moreno Valley has experienced tremendous growth over the last 25 years, however according to Census statistics, a large percentage (over 50 percent) of the current population possesses only a high school diploma. In January, the city sponsored the East End Community Forum at the Conference Center, where Dr. John Husing, economic guru of the Inland Empire, was a guest presenter. In his presentation, he made correlations between the residents level of education and the economic well-being of the city. He stated that for Moreno Valley to attract higher paying jobs, and for more of the residents to move into the middle class, educational levels would need to increase. We must start with early education!

Valley Life Today ÂŚ Discover the Greatness ÂŚ April 2012

23


How many schools participate and how many students are enrolled? There are five schools involved with a total of 720 students. Two years ago, the superintendent, Dr. Alan Jensen, made

Who can attend and what is the focus of the preschool program? The program is income-based and 4-year-olds

it possible for the preschool program to move into and use the entire El Potrero Elementary campus. It was truly a blessing to have a complete

have priority, however, 3-year-olds are included on a space-available basis. Families are certified as eligible for enrollment according to California Department of Education, Child Development Division s income guidelines. The main focus of the program is kindergarten readiness. There are three hours of instruction designed to enable a successful and smooth transition to kindergarten. In addition, parents have the opportunity to be involved in their child s education. The children are taught the following: •

Reading readiness, which includes letter and sound recognition

elementary school consisting of 27 classrooms, a library,

Name recognition

a computer lab and an administration building solely

Basic counting and number recognition

dedicated to preschool children. At this location, we

Listening, including retelling a story

serve 410 regular and special education students. The

Prediction of what might happen

program also offers a school psychologist and two

Writing their first and last name and numbers 0-30

speech and language specialists.

Social skills for learning how to work well and play with peers

Self-independence

And, how to follow directions.

In comparison to students who have not attended the program, how would you rate their performance academically? The children are ready to learn to read and their social skills are more advanced. The students are also able to follow directions and get along well with others, which is a skill that they will need for the rest of their educational experience and in the workplace. At present, every year we transition between 400 and 500 kindergarten students into the district s elementary sites and then we start enrollment efforts all over again for the next year.

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Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012


What is the most rewarding experience for you as Principal of the program? What I have found to be most rewarding is to provide a child with their first educational experience; to see their excitement when they have mastered a skill, and lastly, to know that they are ready to successfully transition to kindergarten.

What would you say to parents reluctant to enroll their children at such an early age? Come and visit our program! They will be surprised to see what children at this age level are capable of achieving. Parents who have entrusted their children to the program are very pleased about their child s education growth.

Ten years from now, what would you like to see happen? I would like to see more funding, so that ALL 3- and 4-year-olds are able to attend the early learning program!

2012

» Educator

J u l i e S i n g l e t a r y, “I would like to see more funding so that ALL three and four yea r olds ar e able to attend the pr ogr am . ”

» Va l

Ve r d e U n i f i e d S c h o o l District named Advanced Placement (AP) District o f t h e Ye a r f o r b e i n g t h e nation’s leader among medium-sized school districts in expanding access to AP courses and maintaining or improving AP E xam perform ance.

2030

» FUTURE

All course work and textbooks ar e in digit al format.

» FUTURE Starting in middle school , stud ent s ar e put on career tracks and supported by local businesses and agenci es.

2050

» FUTURE

All instruction is online and interactive. Learning and career centers, for all ages, have repl aced schools.

» FUTURE

Grades and grade levels are obsolete. Mastery of skills is more i mportant.

2100

» FUTURE Education begins

while the child is in the womb and continues for a l i feti me.

» FUTURE

Individualized learning and virtual reality define the educational envi ronment .

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

25


The Val Verde Unified School District is one of t wo s cho ol dist r ic ts in Moreno Va l le y.

O n e w a y Va l Ve r d e c o n t r i b u t e s t o t h e “ F u t u r e o f M o r e n o Va l l e y ” i s t h r o u g h o f f e r i n g a p a r t - d a y e a r l y e d u c a t i o n a l program, or prescho ol, for 3- and 4-year-old children of l o w e r- i n c o m e f a m i l i e s . In addition to offering an early inter vention program, Va l Ve r d e’s s u p e r i n t e n d e n t , D r. A l a n J e n s e n , i n Ju n e 2 0 1 0 dedicated an entire elementar y site to use as a preschool p r o g r a m f o r e l i g i b l e s t u d e n t s r e s i d i n g w i t h i n t h e d i s t r i c t’s Mo r e n o Va l l e y b o u n d a r i e s . E l Pot re ro, 1 6 8 2 0 Vi a Pampl ona D r ive i n More no Va l l e y, is a f u l ly e quipp e d c ampus w it h 27 cl assro oms, computer l ab and an administ rat ive bui lding consist ing of a librar y, mu lt ipur p os e ro om, k itchen and music ro om. There are 410 prescho olers, including 50 sp ecial education pres cho olers, t hat attend t his site Monday t hroug h Fr iday. Up on le av ing E l Pot rero, t he y t ransit ion into one of t he four Val Verde element ar y s cho ols – R ainb ow Ridge, Mar y McLeod B ethune, Victoriano or L asselle – for kindergarten t hroug h f if t h g rades. Va l Verde’s pres cho ol prog ram a ls o of fers s er v ices at f ive e l e m e nt a r y s i t e s i n Pe r r i s a n d Me a d Va l l e y, i n c l u d i n g Tr iple Crow n, Va l Verde, Manuel R e a l, C olumbi a and Me ad Va l le y element ar y s cho ols. The preschool program is currently recruiting students for 2012-2013. For en rol lment in for mat ion, c a l l E l Pot re ro Preschool at 951-940-8530.

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Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012


BISHOP LACY SYKES:

“THE CHURCH AS A C O M M U N I T YG AT H E R I N G P L A C E ”

2012

» Bishop Lacy Sykes Jr. says,

“The early church in Europe consisted of community gathering centers where the church was an int egr al part of everyday life. This is w here w e’ re headed. ”

» Moreno Valley’s Cross Word Name: B i sh o p L a c y Sykes Jr.

Lacy Sykes Jr. sees church as a platform for people to

Li ttl e Kn o wn FAQ: I w a s b o rn in Ca mp Z a ma , Japa n . M y p a re n ts we r e b o t h i n t h e Ar my, me t a n d g o t mar r i e d i n Ja p a n.

location. Bishop Sykes is leader of Cross Word Christian

fulfill their God-given purpose. This goes beyond Sunday sermons and great singing. It also goes beyond a single Fellowship, a church with a large, diverse congregation that meets in the former chapel of the March Air Force Base. The chapel compound is a good size, but the church is packed each Sunday.

At 80 percent capacity you start to lose people, said Sykes, explaining the need to expand. Thus, there are plans for satellite churches across the valley to fill the immediate need for space. The church also has launched a major campaign to purchase 35 acres in the city s east end (Rancho Belago), near Redlands Avenue and Ironwood Boulevard.

» F UT URE

The Cr oss Wor d Cultural Center includes s c h o o l s , a f i t n e s s f a c i l i t y, restaurants, a movie theater, sen ior housing and youth acti vit y cent er s.

» FUTURE

Cross Word partners with the city’s health corridor to offer faith-based healing and w el l ness pro gr am s.

» F UT URE

Sykes said. This is where satellite campuses will help. Right now we are looking at locations in the Rancho Belago area, Corona and Redlands. We want to provide options to our main location on the base. Cross Word is a community-based church where a person s relationship to Christ is stressed more than religion. People have problems with Christians and organized religion because it doesn t relate to their everyday life. We have to address their life issues, so that they can find themselves in Christ, Sykes says. In addition, there must be vehicles to attract people to church so that they can be introduced to Christ. Our church is a place for healing ‒ a one-stop shop to meet the needs of those struggling with the challenges of today s world. Sykes says the church of the future should take lessons from the church of the past. The early church in Europe consisted of community gathering centers where the church was an integral part of everyday life. This is where we re

-- Anon

2030

2050

We have at minimum a two-year window before a new building can be put up.

“We don’t k n o w what the f u t u r e holds, but w e know Who h o l d s the future ! ”

church announces plans for satellite campuses and a large facility on the city’s east si de.

Chur ch is vir t ual and interactive. Members bring it into their homes w here they can t ake act ive roles in the service, from reading Scripture to singing i n the choi r.

» FUTURE

Contrary to the popular opinion of the preceding years, church attendance and t he num ber who believe in God has grown as man struggles with machines for dominance and rel evance.

2100

» FUTURE Religious leaders

denounced “designer” babies, in which every trait can be determined and embryos are grown in arti fi ci al w o m bs.

» FUTURE

Scientists can create robots that appear human and ar e sm ar t er and more agile than humans. B ut they struggle wit h how to create a “ soul. ”

headed, he said.

Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

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We have to look at programs to address all of the

In the future, there will still be the need to lead our

needs of our congregation and the surrounding

young people to Christ. We know that we must get

community. Church can not just be about Sunday

them involved before they are 18 or else we may lose

worship. Not now and especially not in the future,

them for life. By the time they are sophomores in college,

said the bishop.

There is no reason a church

kids disconnect from church until they are married with

campus can t include recreation, entertainment,

children. To reach them at young ages there must be

and cultural activities. This is a throwback to the

relevant teaching.

great cathedrals and towns of Europe where the church was the center of life.

We tell them this is not your mother s church and we teach life skills like how to interview, how to dress and

Multi-ethnic and multi-generational congregations

how to pass entrance exams. We are competing with all

are another trend. It has long been said that Sunday

that they have access to in today s world.

mornings are the most segregated times in America because people tend to worship within their own

While Moreno Valley is known for its abundance of young

ethnic groups. This is changing in ethnically-diverse

families, there is also a growing population of adults older

Moreno Valley and elsewhere.

than 50. Elders bring a broad life experience that can be integrated in a church s vision and a distinct set of issues

Cross Word has a special service for its Spanish-

that cannot be ignored.

speaking members and encourages Hispanics to be active in the church. Future churches will be multiethnic, Sykes insists.

The church of tomorrow can t just focus on youth, Sykes said. People are living longer. There is a need to promote the wisdom of the seniors in the church while

Technology also plays a role in the future. Many

also helping with their own life issues including health,

churches have websites that broadcast sermons, offer

housing and retirement concerns.

prayer chains and accept online donations. Some have made the leap into social media with Facebook

The church can not address the challenges of the future

pages and Twitter updates. Bible apps can be found

without help, the bishop says. We will need partnerships

on smart phones and other mobile devices.

between the faith communities, schools and the political establishment to meet the needs of residents. All are

I realize I am preaching to a tech-savvy generation,

needed, he stressed.

Sykes says. With technology, the message of Christ can be spread worldwide. Our young adults are on

Years ago, the true vision was the church as the hub

board with what we are doing here at Cross Word.

‒ putting faith at the center of everyday life. This is the

We are especially happy with the participation we

heritage we must pass to our children.

are getting from the 18- to 29-year-old age group.

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Valley Life Today ÂŚ Discover the Greatness ÂŚ April 2012


M E G A LO P O L I S : AN URBAN REGION CONSISTING OF SEVERAL LARGE CITIES THAT ADJOIN EACH OTHER. F

rench geographer Jean Gottmann (1915-1994) published a book, Megalopolis, in 1961 about a future metropolitan area that stretched more than 500 miles, from Boston to Washington D.C. The megacity was called BosWash. In the future, it is predicted the majority of the world s population will live in these mega cities, sharing commerce, communication and transportation systems. Cities within the megalopolis will each have specific areas of concentration. FUTURE The City of Moreno Valley is the regional logistics, space transport, and health care hub for a megalopolis that stretches from Los Angeles to San Diego and is called LosSan.

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Valley Life Today ÂŚ Discover the Greatness ÂŚ April 2012


PRAYER FOR A NEW DAY DEAR LORD, HERE WE ARE AGAIN, THANKING YOU IN ADVAN CE FOR YOUR BLESSING. WE SEEK YOUR GUIDAN CE AND YOUR WISDOM AS WE PREPARE TO ENTER THE NEW DAY. HEAVENLY FATHER, SHOW US WHAT WE NEED TO BRING FORTH FROM OUR PAST, AS WE PREPARE FOR OUR FUTURE. LET US ALWAYS REMEMBER WHAT OUR EYES HAVE SEEN, SO WE CAN BEAR WITNESS TO THE COMING GENERATIONS: WE WILL TELL THEM OF OUR FIGHT, TO PROVIDE GRACE FOR OUR CHILDREN, WE WILL TELL THEM OF OUR CULTURE, HOW YOU PAINTED US WITH A COLORFUL STROKE, WE WILL TELL THEM OF OUR LAUGHTER, HOW THE BAD TIMES WERE MADE GOOD, WE WILL TELL THEM OF OUR FAITH - IT HAS BROUGHT US TO WHERE WE ARE. LET US ALWAYS REMEMBER WHAT OUR HEARTS HAVE FELT, SO WHEN WE SPEAK OF YOU OUR SIN CERITY WILL BE SHOWN: WE WILL TELL THEM OF YOUR LOVE, WHI CH SURPASSES ALL WARMTH AND GOODNESS, WE WILL TELL THEM OF YOUR PEACE, WHI CH MAKES THE ROUGH PLACES SMOOTH, WE WILL TELL THEM OF YOUR JOY, WHI CH IS THE REASON FOR OUR LIVING, WE WILL TELL THEM OF YOUR PROMISE - - THAT WE WILL NEVER WALK ALONE. LET THEM SEEK US OUT, WHEN THE WORLD PROVIDES NO ANSWERS. WE WILL SHOW THEM THE WAY TO YOU, THEY CAN FOLLOW THE WELL-LIT PATH. TOGETHER WE WILL WALK, IN SUNLIGHT LADEN MEADOWS, AND, MEET YOU AT THE GATE, OF EVERLASTING LIFE. PLEASE DEAR GOD BE WITH US, HELP US GET THE STORY RIGHT, THANK YOU FATHER FOR THIS JOURNEY, THANK YOU MASTER FOR THIS LIGHT, AMEN. LB Valley Life Today ¦ Discover the Greatness ¦ April 2012

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Valley Life Today Magazine -- Issue 2