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DANIEL Major Project_03.indd 1

GRIFFIN_PORTFOLIO

02 11/06/2008 10:27:47 PM


DANIEL GRIFFIN PORTFOLIO 02

Major Project_03.indd 1

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DANIEL Major Project_03.indd 2

GRIFFIN_PORTFOLIO

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//_INTRODUCTION_ Thematic Organisation

//_EXCHANGE CULTURE_ {research thesis}

//_ON THE GROUND_ Jenin.West Bank. 2025

//_PLASTICITY_ Experimental Studio in Emergence Theory

//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ 303 Collins St. Melbourne.

CONTENTS

//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes

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//_THEMATIC STRUCTURE_ Introduction.

Throughout the studios that comprise my masters course there has been a series of common themes that find different, or sometimes similar articulations. These themes have been identified as part of a self critique. Together they begin to describe the idiosyncrasies of my design characteristics. This publication is thus arranged thematically, and in reverse chronological order. It covers a selection of projects that best describe my architectural beliefs.

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a

CONTEXT AND IDENTITY.

Much of my work relies heavily on architectural specificity. The designs respond to both physical context and cultural context. This forms the core of my architectural ethos, for a role of architecture is to facilitate the creation of a sense of place - to battle the banal. I am also concerned with the search for identity and its expression in architecture. In an era where the prevalence of physical connectivity is being diminished, the importance of generating a sense of belonging has never been stronger. As architects are only responsible for 5% of construction it is important that these pieces of urban fabric fully participate in the dialogue between our society and its environment.

b

PERMEABILITY.

The creation of permeability through my architecture is a recurring theme. Throughout each scheme there is an attempt to allow public access deep within the building or site. To open up the programs and create a sense of transparency. This sense of permeability is not just expressed in terms of circulation, but also through visual and emotional connection. The dialogue between public and private domains is played out at various scales within my architecture. The articulation of the boundary that separates these two realms will forever be a domain for architectural exploration.

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c

ERODING SOCIAL BOUNDARIES.

I understand architecture to play a very important role in the formation and support of social systems. This role shifts between societies and cultures, thus it is important to understand its implications. To make occupants and user groups aware of one another’s importance and place within the social structure/system is a consistent aim embedded within my architecture. I seek to break down social preconceptions and bring people together. The architecture facilitates interaction and prevent alienation.

d

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY.

Similar to the modernists, I have utopian ideals. However I am also aware of the limitations of architecture to instigate rapid social change. Architecture should respond to society, culture, technology and environment in an attempt to create a built environment that is appropriate to our ever-changing condition. It should evolve slowly. Unlike the modernists I don not believe in drastic moments of intervention, but lean toward a bottom up organic approach. Each of my projects has an agenda of social responsibility. I attempt to slowly and subtly manipulate social conditions to remedy documented deficiencies within social systems.

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e

DISCOURSE BEYOND ARCHITECTURE.

Throughout history architecture has been able to reflect on the civilization, society and culture of its time. I believe this still true, whether it be intentional or not. I am interested in the way in which architecture borrows from other fields of academia and interprets these ideas into an rhetorical architectural language. I think it is important to maintain a practice of research into theories within various fields of academic research. This is a practice that is evident in Semper’s theories on tectonics which is linked to the developments in Egyptology and the opening of Japans borders. Although this is a constant theme within my work, the degree to which I make it explicit may change depending on the content and the audience.

f

PARTICIPATING IN ARCHITECTURAL DISCOURSE.

With each project I seek to critically engage with current theoretical discource and practice such that my work can contribute to that discourse. Of late this seems to be mainly focused on digital design processes and their relevance to contemporary architectural practice. I believe that without this critical engagement there is little chance of developing progressive and innovative design practices.

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g

PROCESS NOT PRECONCEPTIONS.

My work is heavily reliant upon process driven methodologies. Throughout each project there is a systematic approach creating a framework to justify and articulate my design decisions. I am aware and self critical of these processes and constantly seek to evolve or disregard them. These processes have gone through exhaustive studies to test their potential and ultimately i have developed a series of processes that I can apply to any design problem, these processes enable specific design solutions to be developed quickly. It is important to develop robust conceptual design processes that justify design decisions as these will be the first points to come under scrutiny within practice.

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PRECEDENT.

Each project is grounded with precedent. This is usually done after some initial design exploration and research into the brief. Initially in the design process the precedent research it is orientated around understanding theoretical approaches to design problems, and only later does the precedent research begin to explore spatial, formal, tectonic or organisational principles. I believe that this is important to prevent formal mimicry and the resultant “hodge podge� of architectural elements copied and pasted together. I am also interested in historical precedents and understanding the drivers behind these works. Sometimes the distance of time has a sobering clarity.

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i

ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE DESIGN.

In today’s climate it would be grossly unethical and idiotic to neglect environmental design principles. Often these ideals are seen as poetically dry by architectural academia + design profession. But what point is a permeable facade if we can’t breathe the air? As a designer I find that ESD principles are the perfect element on which to graft more lofty architectural ideas. As society transforms to realise the legitimacy of ESD these environmentally responsible elements will become fundamental, and in some cases financially self sufficient. Therefore they are fertile ground for exploration and adaptation to architecture.

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//_EXCHANGE CULTURE {research thesis}

Jenin Refugee Camp

With reference to Mrs Abu-lug-hod ‘Similar to the change from the classical to gestalt psychology, urban ecology must move away from the classification of individual symptoms to an analysis of the processes of urban formation and development, the “causal chains and potential influences”. In considering these causal processes, she sees the need to emphasize the sociological phenomena and to integrate this with geographical, technological, and spatial theories of organization’ Susan Landay- ecology of Islamic cities

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// Area of Concern

// Camp

//Town Center

States of exclusion within cultural contexts exist at various scales. The repercussions of these circumstances can be identified on different levels. These Geopolitical negotiations have an impact on the architecture and urbanity. The Israeli - Palestinian conflict is just one such example within our contemporary world.

//_EXCHANGE CULTURE_ Introduction

The wider context of this political landscape has recently driven discourse on the architectural nature of this occupation from architects such as Eyal Wiezman and Rem Koolhass. This is not the discourse that this paper project seeks to address.

In this future context the official boarders between the camp and town will dissolve with only the physical manifestation of the boundary remaining. No longer a symbol of the Palestinian struggle for a return to the home land. Its identity will be defined by its condition as an overcrowded, poverty ridden enclave. Distinguished by its physical presence, which continues to reinforce this state of exclusion.

It is the repercussions on the urban fabric and the repetition of these states of exclusion at the local scale within the Palestinian Occupied Territories that is of interest. This project seeks to address the immediate impact of the integration of refugee camps into their surrounds following the formation of the Palestinian State. These enclaves currently sit as isolated bodies within their cultural and geographic contexts. Consequently this project is located in the near future, when the Palestinian Territories have formed into a sovereign state – or states, given the current political climate. The situation in township of Jenin, in the northern province of the West Bank, is that there is a disjunction between the Town Centre, and the Refugee Camp that lies on the outskirts. This is physically defined by the void in the urban fabric, an urban wasteland between the refugee camp and the new development extending from the town centre.

Main Commercial Streets

Jenin Township Ground Zero

Refugee Camp

PHYSICAL CONTEXT ...FOREIGN ELEMENTS AND VOID SPACE Major Project_03.indd 12

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//_EXCHANGE CULTURE_ Urban Analysis + Case Studies

With reference to Mrs. Abu-lug-hod ‘Similar to the change from the classical to gestalt psychology, urban ecology must move away from the classification of individual symptoms to an analysis of the processes of urban formation and development, the “causal chains and potential influences”. In considering these causal processes, she sees the need to emphasize the sociological phenomena and to integrate this with geographical, technological, and spatial theories of organization’ Susan Landay- ecology of Islamic cities Vector field analysis was conduct to identify if there were any trends in the orientation of dwellings. These drawings reinforce this notion of two disparate planning systems functioning alongside one another. The regular arrangement of vector lines into streams indicates the presence of relative alignment following a “soft” grid pattern. The vector patterns within the camp that respond to various site forces is evident. These are particularly defined moving in the direction of the town. (Bottom right). The vector fields within the camp also seem to bend in response to the topography.

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The primary access between the camp and the center is along the roads indicated. This suggests that the movement through the camp flows between bottom left toward these roads.

//circulation_camp +town center

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the retail area in incorporated within the redidential areas along these roads. these roads also provide the primary access to Jenins center.

//retail

Clockwise from top left. - Graveyard - Secondary School - UNRWA facilities - Rehabilitation Center - Hospital - Settlement

//institutions

There are 3 mosques located within the vecinity of the refugee camp. According to research. Mosques should be distributed evenly wihin residential areas. (Mortada.2003)

//mosque distribution

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//_EXCHANGE CULTURE_ Cultural Context + Emergence Theory

The social systems identified earlier in this paper are illustrated here. The residential matrix is identified by a triangulation of the courtyards, which display a behavioural pattern similar to that of cells. Although this does not provide useful information in terms of connections between “cells”, it does however identify the extent to which the residential fabric spreads. It also enables holes in the fabric to be identified indicating the presence of different programs. 03

Self Organising Systems Crowds in Enlgish Parks

Marrakesh Courtyards + Evolution

05

Diagram identify the potential family cells and their relationship to other cells was done by encircling the houses that immediately address the “hosh” - courtyard. The overlap of theses shaded parts indicates the possible existence of houses common to both courtyards and thus indicates that the occupants are common relatives. This illustrates the cohesiveness and strength and inter connectivity of the families within the network.

Kin Exclusive Family Networks Gender divided spatial arrangement

These cells and courtyard arrangements are most likely to the result of intermarriage between families. As the tradition of arranged marriages is still maintained, with the wife them moving into the husbands families compounds, it is possible to imagine these void spaces slowly being encircled as successive generations marry and form families.

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Analysis of voids generally indicates an increase in size moving away from the main roads - NW. It appears that there is a pattern between the voids and surrounding built form.

//void/courtyard _refugee camp 01

It is obvious that there is a greater prevolence of voids surrounded by built form - forming “hoshs� within the refugee camp than the wider context. This could be due to a higher density or a different approach to built form.

//void/courtyard _context

Triangulating the voids creates a matrix. Anthropological studies indicate that hoshs exist mainly within residential areas. Holes in the matrix indicate the existance of different programs.

//residential matrix

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The clusters include only those houses that are oriented toward the void. Overlaps indicate that the families may be connected.

//clusters _buidings facing void 04

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Ba Bb Aa+Bc

Ac+Da

B Bd+Ab

A

Ad+Ca D C

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Dim Dim l, InitialVectors, NumVectors VariabilityBetween = Rhino.GetReal("Define v

The siting of this facility is crucial in the camp into the ("Select town. The massing of my OriginPt = back Rhino.GetPoint origin ie proposal will thus arise from a mutation Radius = Rhino.GetReal("radius of point forc of the existing fabrics along the edge BaseLine = OriginPt conditions of the site into a symbiosis Units = Rhino.GetReal("Define units ie mm = of planning strategies reconciling the and informal. A study AttStrengthformal = Rhino.GetReal("strength of po of the camp has revealed the significance of the AttPt = Rhino.GetPoints (,,"Select attractor organizational systems in place there. maxPts = UBound(AttPt) The built form is a manifestation of the ReDim arrAttPoint(UBound(AttPt)) social organisational institutions based ReDim AttPoint(UBound(AttPt)) around kin exclusive networks, gender 'ReDim AttRadiusPt(UBound(AttPt)) ReDim AttPtCircle(UBound(AttPt)) defined space, traditions and security. Variability = Rhino.GetReal("Define variabil

RandomRotation = Rhino.GetReal("Define variaof facilitating the reconnection

//_EXCHANGE CULTURE_ Master planning Strategies

15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30: 31: 32: 33: 34: 35: 36: 37: 38: 39: 40: 41: 42: 43: 44: 45: 46: 47: 48: 49: 50: 51: 52: 53: 54: 55: 56: 57: 58: 59: 60: 61: 62: 63: 64: 65: 66: 67: 68: 69: 70: 71: 72: 73: 74: 75: 76: 77: 78: 79: 80: 81: 82: 83: 84: 85: 86: 87: 88: 89: 90: 91: 92:

ReDim ArrPlane(UBound(AttPt)) ReDim DistBaselineAttPt(UBound(AttPt))

I have incorporated these social systems for flexibility within the organizational InitialVectors = Rhino.GetObjects ("Select I NumVectors systems = UBound(InitialVectors) that may generate there, this forms part of the residential component ReDim arrVectorParticle(NumParticles) ReDim StartPt(NumParticles) of my major project, which will deal ReDim EndPt(NumParticles) ReDim Distance(NumParticles) with the dialogue established between ReDim DistBaseLine(NumParticles) the infrastructure component and ReDim VectorLine(NumParticles) the residential fabric. I am looking to ReDim arrStartPt(NumParticles) establish a fluidity through the boundary ReDim arrEndPt(NumParticles) which would become a surface of ReDim NewStartPt(NumParticles) ReDim NewEndPt(NumParticles) transmission. Executed in such a way as not to inhibit the integration of the ReDim NewarrStartPt(NumParticles) ReDim NewarrEndPt(NumParticles) camp with the surrounding township yet at the same time enabling its memory to ReDim RotatedVectorLine(NumParticles) remain. '___________________________________________ NumParticles = Rhino.GetReal("number vect within my master plan of allowing

For l = 0 To NumVectors For i = 0 To NumParticles

If i =0 Then VectorParticle = InitialVectors(l) Else VectorParticle = Rhino.FirstObject t End If PositiveNegative = Rnd()*2 If PositiveNegative <1 Then PN = -1 ElseIf PositiveNegative >1 Then PN = 1 End If VarBet = Rnd()* VariabilityBetween Variance = Rnd()* Variability * PN Var = CInt(Variance)

Form Fo orm orm m AN AND ND SP SPACEE ...MUTATING M TO CONTEXT CONT ONT ONTEXT NTE Major Project_03.indd 18

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Max. building foot prints

Existing industrial buildings to be relocated

Jenin old town center

UNRWA Headquarters

Proposed Site

Hospital and UNRWA Clinic

2004 UAE Reconstruction

Jenin Refugee Camp

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//_ON THE GROUND_ Jenin.West Bank. 2025 Major Project_03.indd 20

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commercial strip

town center ground zero

refugee camp

Urban Wastelands = Restich urban fabrics

a

//_ON THE GROUND_ Context and Identity

Israeli Boarder

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Area of concern - connecting urban densities

Return of Palestinian diaspora = growth

Understanding complex urban conditions

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hoshâ&#x20AC;? - Family Courtyard

The aim is to generate an architecture that celebrates + articulates a sense of place, giving spatial form + experience to cultural topologies. Connecting culture to place. The architecture extends from the context, responding to the specific conditions. Jenin Refugee Camp

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Three organisational systems interact to form a complex urban fabric. 01_ Self referencing system based on building alignment. 02_ Self organising courtyard and housing location based on Kin-exclusive family networks and gender. 03_ Pedestrian permeability resulting from informal settlement origin. Building alignment responding to desire lines and topography.

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02

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site

Jenin Refugee Camp

Rersidential Matrix

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hoshâ&#x20AC;? - Feminine Space

Common Ancestral Dwelling

Kin-exclusive Family Network

Site Plan: Edge condition is defined in relation to Diagram 04 with projection lines.

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‘Many are finally reaching the inevitable conclusion that serious research, analysis, evaluation and objective implementation of compatible and sustainable design elements, from both local and imported models are necessary to synthesize a new, complex-free, modern Egyptian architecture of which we can all be proud.’ ( El – Husseiny, 2004).

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B13

id

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nursing station

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Anthropological research illustrates the importance of gender structures on spatial relations. These relations evidently have a private/public spatial relationship.

B13

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//_ON THE GROUND_ Permeability

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This articulation of Public/ private domains is established in various scales across this scheme. From the relationship between patients, and relative/carer, in the family rooms to the 02 separation of break-out space from the bedroom space in the single patient room.

B13

B13

The relationship between these patient domains and the extended family common rooms has to be carefully controlled for security reasons. Thus the placement of staff bases and the articulation of their presence through ceiling details. 03

02

B13

The strategic location of these family rooms in relation to the public urban spaces of the site has been surgical, maximising connectivity. 04

Allowing public permeability through the site is crucial to activating it and allowing for ownership by the 05 community. These arcades and atriums connect with the surrounding context.

atri at ium i m

b own

hospital i entry r [below] ] 03

Feminine + Masculine spacee ...catering for the extended Major Project_03.indd 26

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o do ramp d

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//_THIRD FLOOR PLAN

d Major Project_03.indd 27

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One of the essential elements of this design is the integration of various user groups in order to stimulate a forum that will address the health risks resulting from lifestyle and circumstance. Examples of such users are: 01

Prosthetic department

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Cerebral palsy patients Psychologically victims

A challenging aspect of this brief is configuring the building such that social boundaries are broken down through exposer and thus familiarity, culminating with a sense of normality. This is essential if we are to get users to overcome stigmas and preconceptions. The aim is to facilitate education. The primary strategy to achieve this is trough circulation and connection. This is difficult because of programmatic needs for restricted access and circulation. The solution in this case is to create visual connections. 04

Encouraging wider public use of the site is also crucial. 05

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//_ON THE GROUND_ Eroding Social Boundaries

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Programmatic reorganisation ...mixing user groups Major Project_03.indd 28

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04

Circulation Diagram LVL 02/03

Circulation Diagram LVL 01

Circulation Diagram LVL 00

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01

Here I am making a case for the validity and understanding of Palestinian urbanism emerging out of a complex interaction of very ordered systems resulting in a seemingly chaotic fabric. This project defends the complexity of this fabric in relation to the very ordered forms of Israeli urban settlements.

02

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//_ON THE GROUND_ Social Responsibility

01

‘Urbanity became the Palestinian “weapon” of retaliation, threatening to undermine the “other” urbanity of the settlements that was being produced to maintain Israeli territorial control.’ Wiezman, 2004.

03 //_Soft Grid

04 //_Algebraic/Cumulative Systems

Additionally, the project looks at the intersection of Arab and Western architecture’s. 04 The project identifies similarities in philosophies across the cultures and celebrates the differences. The drivers are examine to create and appropriate language for a new Palestinian state without over emphasis on nostalgic architectural language. The aim is to generate an architecture that encapsulates a new sense of hope and identity.

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//_Orthogonal Construction Grid

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‘Where secular buildings strive for an Islamic identity, the result is a kitsch postmodern,’

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Mohammad El – Husseiny- In search of identity

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//_Resultant Hybrid System

Transforming social preconceptionss ...protest Major Project_03.indd 32

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However, ‘non west’ not only refers to and maintains the ideology of an exaggerated difference between the west and its others, but also disavows the differences within these others. It completely undermines the centuries long hybridizations between these geographical zones – their intertwined histories, their effects on the cultural imaginations of each other – as if a ‘pure west’ and a pure east’ can exist.

Mohammad El – Husseiny- In search of identity

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e

//_ON THE GROUND_ Discourse Beyond Architecture

01a

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Architectureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to make comments on the society, culture and science of its time is one of its most fascinating characteristics. A study of the influences and developments of civilization at the time of architectural creation reveals the level of understanding and engagement of its architecture, and visa versa. 01 Sempers understanding of tectonics was heavily influenced by the developments in egyptology and the engagement by japan in International exhibitions. In this case the influences that have positioned my architecture in relation to historical developments is the connection between medieval Middle Eastern and contemporary mathematics.

03

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Additionally this project explores the potential of developments within evolutionary biology - epigenetics research - and its potential to inform an architecture. In this case the geometric code of forms are programmed with switches that imitate the function of epigenetic switches within DNA proteins.

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This theory is fundamental to describing diversity within nature - â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tawidâ&#x20AC;? - patterns within patterns

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Reflecting on civilization ...commenting on the times Major Project_03.indd 34

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02b Option Explicit Sub GeneticScript Dim strObject_01, lngSegments, ptarray_01, i, PlatePt_01(2), arrPlatePts_01 Dim maxSegments, Rotations Dim origin Dim strObject_02, ptarray_02, PlatePt_ 02(2), arrPlatePts_ 02 Dim strObject_03, ptarray_03, PlatePt_ 03(2), arrPlatePts_ 03 Dim strObject_04, ptarray_04, PlatePt_ 04(2), arrPlatePts_ 04 Dim strObject_05, ptarray_05, PlatePt_ 05(2), arrPlatePts_ 05

04 Epigenetic Switch Within DNA Code

Dim strObject_06, ptarray_06, PlatePt_ 06(2), arrPlatePts_ 06 Dim strObject_07, ptarray_07, PlatePt_ 07(2), arrPlatePts_ 07

Pilotis

Dim diagonal_01, diagonal_02, diagonal_03, diagonal_04, CenterPt_A, CenterPt_B, Center_ A, Center_B ‘Dim pt1, pt2, pt3, pt4, pt5, pt6, pt7, pt8 Dim Vector(2), VectorLength, UnitVector(2), GrowthRate, RingPt(2), distanceHgt, x Dim arrRingPt(), Line, distance Dim k, arrCurvePt, CurvePt(2), Line2, ProfileCurve Dim arrPlateCrvs, plateCrv strobject_01 = Rhino.GetObject (“Select curve”, 4) strobject_02 = Rhino.GetObject (“Select curve”, 4) lngSegments = Rhino.GetInteger (“segments”,4) GrowthRate = Rhino.GetInteger (“rowth rate as factor”,2) Rotations = Rhino.GetInteger (“number of rotations”,4)

Facade

Roofing System

//_EPIGENETIC SPRIPT_form mutating to environment Piloties, facade system, roofing system and Hamam roof are generated from the “epigenetic” script. The form mutating in each case in response to environmental conditions using buleon statements similar to epigenetic switches within DNA.

ptarray_01 =

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f

//_ON THE GROUND_ Participating in Architectural Discourse

01

This project explores the link between Morpho-Ecologies + the Islamic philosophy of 01 Tawid. Tawid in this case being expressed as patterns within patterns, often through geometry. Here the biological paradigm is examined through both the western scientific and Arabic cultural lens. A link between contemporary mathematics/biology and tawid is reestablished. Contemporary biological and genetic theories identify epigenetic switches within DNA chains as a key cause for environmental mutation, variation and evolution. 02

‘...The missing link in the traditional chain nature- architecture-building is “architecture”: the jump is straight from nature to building.’ Vidler 2001

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morpho-ecologies + tawidd ...cross cultural exchange Major Project_03.indd 36

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Option Explicit

Dim diagonal_01, diagonal_02, diagonal_03, diagonal_04, CenterPt_A, CenterPt_B, Center_A, Center_B

Sub GeneticScript Dim strObject_01, lngSegments, ptarray_01, i, PlatePt_01(2), arrPlatePts_01 Dim maxSegments, Rotations Dim origin Dim strObject_02, ptarray_02, PlatePt_02(2), arrPlatePts_02 Dim strObject_03, ptarray_03, PlatePt_03(2), arrPlatePts_03 Dim strObject_04, ptarray_04, PlatePt_04(2), arrPlatePts_04 Dim strObject_05, ptarray_05, PlatePt_05(2), arrPlatePts_05 Dim strObject_06, ptarray_06, PlatePt_06(2), arrPlatePts_06 Dim strObject_07, ptarray_07, PlatePt_07(2), arrPlatePts_07

‘Dim pt1, pt2, pt3, pt4, pt5, pt6, pt7, pt8 Dim Vector(2), VectorLength, UnitVector(2), GrowthRate, RingPt(2), distanceHgt, x Dim arrRingPt(), Line, distance Dim k, arrCurvePt, CurvePt(2), Line2, ProfileCurve Dim arrPlateCrvs, plateCrv strobject_01 = Rhino.GetObject (“Select curve”, 4) strobject_02 = Rhino.GetObject (“Select curve”, 4) lngSegments = Rhino.GetInteger (“segments”,4) GrowthRate = Rhino.GetInteger (“rowth rate as factor”,2)

03

02 Ceiling System

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01

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Drawing from contextual characteristics the edge condition of the site is defined. Responding to master planning strategies a broad sense of massing is established. 07

In response to organisational strategies and drivers of urban form observed earlier, a vector field is used to deform the massing streams. 09 These streams are deformed to attraction + repulsion points. The points located according to intended intensities in the urban fabric. This design strategy also occurs in section as seen in the central chamber of the Hamam - opposite.

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A â&#x20AC;&#x153;softâ&#x20AC;? grid is generated. These cells are then mutated to programmatic and environmental conditions. 10

Each element above is a mutated cell.

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//_ON THE GROUND_ Process not Preconceptions

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Rule Generated Framework ...creating a robust concept Major Project_03.indd 38

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-VE

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+VE

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t Major Project_03.indd 39

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Gaudi + Biological Paradigm â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; The intention of this paper is to help sustain the value of observation of the natural world around us. Taking its cue from the methods of Gaudi, it proposes that observation can be combined with more intuitively driven design sensibilities, providing a real alternative to the exclusive acceptance of the seductive powers of the digitally engaged algorithmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Burry, 2006

Eisenmanns use of field conditions, contextural grids and overlays.

h

//_ON THE GROUND_ Precedent

In the biological sciences the study of forms and their categorization, or morphology, was the first instrumental set of zoology, predating evolutionary theory. More recently morphology has outstripped its historical confines, becoming morphogenesis, with an emphasis on the forces that generate living forms, on how forms and environments come into beings.

The original idea ...or reworking past masters Major Project_03.indd 40

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Stan Allens theory on field systems. ‘By comparison with classical western architecture, it is possible to identify contrasting principles of combination: one [Arabic] algebraic working with numerical units combined one after another, and the other [western] geometric, working with figures (lines, planes, solids) organised in space to form larger whole... Field configurations are inherently expandable. ...by understanding construction as a ‘sequence of events’, it becomes possible to imagine an architecture that can respond fluidly and sensitively to local differences while maintaining an overall stability’

Stan Allen, 1997

Zaha Hadid - Soft grid and the arabesque.

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//_ON THE GROUND_ Environmentally Sustainable Design

i

01 ESD is explored on many levels within this project. There is a focus on variation, self similarity, and mass customisation orientated around evnironmental performance criteria.

Contemporary construction techniques are combined with traditional thermal mass technologies. The extensive use of arabesque screens as solar and thermal heat screening devices is evident. Additionally these screens are deployed as natural ventilation systems. 02

The use of natural light is prioritise and used in strategic places. This is evident in the light wells within the main atrium. 03

These light wells double as natural ventilation shafts. This element posed design challenges within hospital guidelines as an extensive use of glass would be in breach of fire regulations. Hence the use of pattern to control aperture size. 01

Fundamental to initial design strategies was a focus on water collection and retention. The fluted columns form driven, in part, for the need to collect water and store it in underground reservoirs for emergency use.

01

...specific solutions Major Project_03.indd 42

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B13 B13 B13

staff rest

01

03

02

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//_PLASTICITY_ Experimental Studio in Emergence Theory

“Plasticity may be seen in the expressive flesh covering the skeleton as contrasted with the articulation of the skeleton itself. In my work the idea of plasticity may now be seen as the element of continuity.” Frank Lloyd Wright (quoted in Colin Rowe, The Architecture of Good Intentions’, p129)

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Firmly grounded in the biological paradigm, this studio explored the potential for biological systems to inform our development of design system. Central to this studio was a focus on experimentation and observation. To this end we experimented with the emergent properties of slime mould. 01

//_PLACTICITY_ Introduction

The ideas of the studio was to develop plastic systems. Systems that are flexible enough to adapt to specific conditions whilst maintaining their overall integrity. The intended design outcome would contain a level of continuity and integration. The preferred system responded to the suburban grain of the context. Twisting, pulling, compressing to site and programmatic conditions the grain deforms along the numerous streams. 02

Comprehensive site analysis was used to establish the various site conditions and their dynamic potentials which were then turned into a series of rules. The field system was then given characteristics and rules that enabled its response to these conditions, generating a logical continuity of response and adaptation across the site.

Major Project_03.indd 46

01

27/05/2008 3:14:30 PM


//PLACTICITY_ Context and Identity Major Project_03.indd 47

a

02

27/05/2008 3:15:53 PM


01 Central to the spatial organisational strategy of this project is the creation of multiple access points and visual connections to any space - responding to Adolf Loos and the Muller Villa where he reconnects with classical configurations of space.

b Private spaces are mediated by anterooms with specific transitional functions. Public spaces are interwoven with private space whilst maintaining controlled access and exposure.

b

//_PLACTICITY_ Permeability

Gradients of privacy and publicity are increased toward the periphery of each unit. Research, aged care, and c child care programs are interwoven creating a sense of community. Aged care residents become a central player in child care activities and research communities, giving them a sense of worth and stimulation.

The central tenant of this d project is to use architecture as an instrument for social transformation. Here it addresses issues such as the alienation of the aged population, the integration of child care into the community, and opening these institutions up to sociological, psychological and medical researchers.

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//PLACTICITY_ Eroding Social Boundaries

d

c

01

//PLACTICITY_ Social Responsibility

01

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As stated earlier the focus of this studio was to explore and understand the plastic characteristics of biological systems and the potentials of developing this understanding into an architectural process that creates a homogenous design approach.

Once again the need for architects to look beyond their own profession for inspiration and innovation is evident.

e

//PLACTICITY_ Discourse Beyond Architecture

Studies into the emergent properties of slime mould were undertaken. The close interaction and scientific observation of the behaviour of this organism not only revealed an understanding of its qualities, but also the benefits of adopting a scientific approach to design research.

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02

03

01

One of the aims of this project was to explore the integration of environmental/green technologies into the design. As the design was a seamless integration of architecture and landscape architecture â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swalesâ&#x20AC;? were deployed as generative components of the design. Swales are used to collect runoff and redirect water to areas that are in need. 02

Additionally operative permeable facade systems were designed to respond to environmental and social circumstances. The facade system acts like a skin. Pores opening to either collect the prevailing winds or vent the internal space, as well as allowing for controlled solar penetration. 03

01

Innovations and developments in alternative energy sources and technologies were explored and adapted to the design.

Major Project_03.indd 51

i

Borrowing from the ancient dwelling traditions of arid climates in Asia the architecture is embedded into the landscape utilising courtyards and the Thermal mass inherent in buried dwellings

//_PLACTICITY_ Environmentally Sustainable Design

01

27/05/2008 3:33:42 PM


01

A side project within the plasticity studio was the exploration of field systems and their ability to develop into adaptive dynamic structures that deform in real time. This is in response to contemporary design practices that use deformative/inter-active process which then become frozen and turned into static pieces of architecture. Here parametric design based on data fields is developed into a flexible structure that can respond to environmental conditions by deforming its shape and changing size. it was exhibited at RAIA National Conference 07 and Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Oreal Fashion Festival 08 Iterative design processes are explored. It was evident that these processes must be tied to qualitative or quantitative criteria by which to judge any outcome. Without these conditions then the outcome becomes as arbitrary as cloud reading. 02

f

//_PLACTICITY_ Participating in Architectural Discourse

01

Major Project_03.indd 52

01

02

03

EVEN DISTRIBUTION

EVEN DISTRIBUTION

SUBURBAN GRAIN

CONTOUR DEFORM

JOIN TO SITE HOLES

EXPAND TO EXISTING BL

02

27/05/2008 3:33:50 PM


Several precedents were examined in relation to field systems. The Gothic was studied with emphasis on the structural systems deployed and their articulation. The Gothic tectonic is examined in relation to the patterns of decoration revealing a material logic in relation to openings and wall systems. A clear mediation/gradient in the scale of openings articulated by window mullions is evident and was adapted in the final design.

Lars Spuybroek’s Analog experimentations and design processes were examined and inspired me to become more open with experimentation and alternative methods of generating architecture and form. Ultimately this resulted in the development of our “architecture machine” 04

Kokkugia’s approach to generating architecture from the interaction of field system operating on different scales and planes was fundamental to our approach.

Stan Allen’s “From Object to Field” was fundamental in changing my approach to generating architecture.

03

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04

g

Foreign Office Architects Yokohama International Port Terminal provided formal and structural inspiration for our final design where spaces are intertwined at various levels. Roller coaster construction technologies could also be used in our design.

Arakawa and Gins reversible destiny theory provided inspiration into how architecture can be used to transform sociological and physiological behavioural

//PLACTICITY_ Precedent

03

27/05/2008 3:34:19 PM


01

Experimentation into biological systems and networks with emergent characteristics set up a direction for research and design development 01

Site analysis revealed the Contextural framework that the design would respond to. The edge condition of the site became very important as the project developed into an experimentation into the integration of private facilities in a very public site. Ultimately the site analysis resulted in rule generated design. 02

In response to contemporary design practices that still use the bubble diagram the programmatic loop Method was developed. This method allows for exploration of programmatic adjacencies in plan and section simultaneously Moving beyond the bubble diagram

02

03

h

//_PLACTICITY_ Process not Preconceptions

03

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01

02

03

04

EVEN DISTRIBUTION

EVEN DISTRIBUTION

CONTOUR DEFORM

JOIN TO SITE HOLES

EXPAND TO SITE HOLES

EXPAND TO EXISTING BLDGS

CONTOUR DEFORM

EXPAND TO SITE HOLES

CONTOUR DEFORM

CLUSTER TAILS

JOIN TO EXISTING BLDGS

SUBURBAN GRAIN

SUBURBAN GRAIN

04

Iterative design process A system of components was set up according to rules. Changing the relationship of the componentsrules-situation generated multiple outcomes.

JOIN TO EXISTING BLDGS

EXPAND TO EXISTING BLDGS

CONTOUR DEFORM

05

Iterative design machine The dynamic design machine allowed us to quickly see the relationships between components transform and rules and situations changed. It was an effective design tool.

06

Interactive Representation The “Unreal” game engine was deployed as a representational tool.

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//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ 303 Collins St. Melbourne


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Phase 2

Transfer Levels

SuperStructur e Zone

Phase 1

0

//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Introduction

Tower_Malapropos 303 Collins St Melbourne Vic City of Melbourne Council This project resulted from a search for an appropriate site for a large tower in the Melbourne CBD. The reconsideration of the identity inferred by Melbourne city skyline was fundamental to the conceptual development. The result of this inquiry, which included an examination of the programs existing within the city and their organization, identified the AXA building and its adjacent forecourt on Collins St as an appropriate site for a malapropos program. This aimed at constructing an ethical discourse into the organization of the city, in particular its corporate sector, and the way in which the notion of public space and access can be reconsidered. Rather than design an autonomous object, the 60 storey tower grafts over the existing AXA building and reconfigures it usage. This combined entity is wrapped in a camouflage skin, creating plays on the tension between what occurs within and what the public is aware of on the outside. The notion of skin in relation to the dialogue that a

building constructs with its surrounding environment was examined. The Conventional functions within Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial district intermingle with unconventional activities such as a mosque, brothel and youth hostel in an attempt to awaken a discourse on social responsibility. This project explores the possibilities of programmatically and financially offsetting various institutions to develop an increased sense of social awareness and connectivity with marginalized peoples. In this case there is an interesting social disjunction between the various user groups that share common spaces. The site is of economic and historical importance, and the project responses to this in an innovative way. As this project explores the tower typology there are structural issues, in particular a focus on phased development of the site. There is also focus on ESD, and the development of an environmental facade in particular.

01

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The Crisis of Limits ‘Cities have become deregulated. As with the contemporary city, there are no more boundaries delineating a coherent and homogenous whole.’

Melbourne’s CBD grid is becoming intangible as high rise development spreads. If the massing planning protocol’s called for higher development on the periphery of the grid then the identity of the grid will become articulated. The transgression of which would strengthen the limits enhancing the experience of both the inside and the outside of the CBD.

02

//TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Context and Identity

Tschumi-Architecture and Disjunction

03

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A primary objective of the TM redevelopment of AXA forecourt was to generate a sense of public communal space that

b

//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Permeability

A primary objective of the TM redevelopment of AXA forecourt was to generate a sense of public communal space that would add to the cultural activities of the west Collins street area. Allowing for permeability to encourage Public activation of corporate space is essential. Hence the openness of the site was preserved along with its access to natural daylight due to its northerly aspect, which is consistent with 2030’s stipulation that ‘public open space should have a northerly aspect.’

Blue = General Public Space Orange = Public Space Red = Corporate/organisation communal space

This notion of public space extends to the buildings relationship with the existing AXA House. A separation is established between the two to create a public access lane way similar to the laneway’s in the surrounding context. Clear views are maintained through this laneway to connect Market and William Street so as to encourage pedestrian movement. Clear views are also provided from the forecourt to this lane and AXA House to encourage movement and allow or ease of navigation. Creating a sense of permeability is crucial in enabling the interaction of various user groups in order to break down social boundaries.

01

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02

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Existing Building Floor Level Difference

21

NGO Office

22

24

Gym

19

NGO Office

AXA Office

18

AXA Office

AXA Office

17

Corporate Office

AXA Office

NGO Office

AXA Office

16 15 14

Corporate Office

11 10 09

AXA Office

NGO Office Restaurant

13 12

AXA Office

Auditorium

06 05 04 03 02 01 00 -01

AXA Office AXA Office

Exhibition Space + Mosque Exhibition Space + Mosque Exhibition Space + Retail

Artist Artist NGO Artist AXA Office AXA Office

Retail

Retail Retail

ffice f Corporate Office

18

16

NG G Office NGO

17

15

Co o Corporate Office

16

14

13 12

12

First Phase of Development

11 10 09

06 05 04 03 02 01 00

Major Project_03.indd 61

Corporate Serviced Apartment C

15

taf aff f Youth Hostel St Staff

th Hostel t Host t Youth

NGO Office

11 10 09

ret r t Minaret que e Mosque ret r t Minaret

08 07

Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential

O Office e NGO

A Auditorium

ditorium d m Auditorium

A Auditorium

ditorium d m Auditorium

A Auditorium

ditorium d m Auditorium

Exhibition Space + Bar

06

Exhibition Space + Bar

05 04 03

Mosque

02

Mosque

Exhibition Space + Bar Concourse

01

GO Shopfront G Sho o Retail + NGO

g

ood Mar o r Organic Food Market

-01

Classification + Programmatic adaptation [cross section]

Corporate Serviced Apartment C

16

13

1/1

01

03

AX X Office AXA

17

NGO 08 Corporate Research 07

Retail Homeless Shelter Reception

01

22

19

14

AXA Office

te Office t Offic ffic c Corporate

18

20

15

Nightclub

Corporate Office

08 07

AXA Office

23

ce c NGO Office

19

21

Gym

e NGO Office

20

22

Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential ate Office a Offi Corporate Retiree Residential Retiree AXA Office Residential Retiree te Office t Offic c Corporate Residential Retiree NGO Office Residential C Corporate Serviced Apartment 17 24

21

23

AXA Office

20

nsfer transfer tr r transfer Office AXA O

23

AXA Office

1/2

Retail + NGO Shopfront Cafe + NGO Shopfront 1/3

02

Privat t Residential Garden Private Retail + NGO Shopfront

Homel l Homeless Shelter Reception

1/4

1/5

03

1/6

1/5 1/7

04

Classification [longnitudinal section]

c

transfer 22

//TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Eroding Social Boundaries

Proposed Development

27/05/2008 6:56:10 PM


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In the 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ...the suburbanites returned to install in the cities a regime of consumerist blandness that is fundamentally anti-urban, in that it evacuates from the city the bad, the ugly, the deformed, the formless and the unmentionable. Rem Koolhaas

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01

Strategies set out in 12.06 A Fairer City call for a wider distribution of social and cultural infrastructure. In the case where the CBD becomes re occupied there must be provision for these services. The placement of exhibition spaces and artist/artisan studios, as well as a short film cinema and school within the corporate precinct will mix user groups, according to 12.06-2 Culture and the Arts, ‘Encouraging a wider range of arts, cultural and entertainment facilities including cinemas, restaurants, nightclubs and live theatres, at Principal and Major Activity Centres.’ The redevelopment of the forecourt and positioning of these public programs round this court deals with 22.01 Public Spaces by ‘Encourage new public spaces to cater for the needs of the City’s diverse communities.’

02

The primary idea behind the client framework is to allow for underprivileged organizations to occupy a programmatically strategic position within the CBD, such that increased exposure to the financially privileged will enable networks to develop. Therefore there needs to be a financial offset between the higher end users and charities/NGOs to assist in funding their lease. 03 04

Essentially the architecture becomes a platform for corporations to establish social responsibility with corporate sponsorship and the media facade advertising offsetting social awareness.

The Programmatic concept also responds to Melbourne Atlas census data that outlines several issues. Such as the deficiencies of kindergartens in CBD when considered per capita of people employed, and health and disability indicators which point toward an increase in mental health contacts within the centre of Melbourne. (DSE 2006, p.5.2) The Melbourne Atlas also indicates a significantly high population of homeless people (3552 in 2001) in the CBD that utilize boarding houses as their primary source of accommodation.

d

//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Social Responsibility

01

04

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05

06

05

06

07

08

Multi media facade technology such as Barko M-Pix was used Anime graphic representation and urban vision, as well as technology was integrated Optical camouflage technology was deployed on a large scale Indian screen structure and layering provided inspiration for facade and structural system

e

//TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Discourse Beyond Architecture

08

07

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This project also seeks to challenge typologies. Do towers really need to have program stacked horizontal floor plates? Is the circulation between floors limited to the elevator? Does the organisation of lease space have to be separated into horizontal bands? What benefits, both socially and in terms of generating a healthy work place, can be achieved by adopting another approach?

It began as a critical response to current approaches to parametric design strategies. I began to question the possibilities of parametric capabilities in producing meaningful conceptual design outcomes that linked the pragmatic approach with the form finding generative processes.

f

//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Participating in Architectural Discourse

One of the aims of this project was to develop an approach to generating a robust conceptual framework. In this case the conceptual relationship was to link the various elements together such that neither component could be removed without the other being jeopardised. So this called for the integration of circulation-structurefacade-voids-environmental system.

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In 1937 Daniel Sheets Dye catalogued various Chinese lattice designs constructed between 1000 BC and 1900 AD. In recent years, shape grammars have been used as a means to explain the designs of the Chinese lattice. The work presented here expands on the original shape grammar implementations (Stiny 1977) and catagorizes a specific Chinese lattice (ice-rays) into 4 sub-categories according to shape grammar rules. haldane@mit.edu

http://web.mit.edu/~haldane/www/icerays/

g

//TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Precedent

Precedence_Form and organisation

Precedence_Form and organisation Major Project_03.indd 67

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06b

06a 01

06c

Programmatic Analysis of CBD

02

Site, Place and Programmatic Opportunity

05

03

Comprehensive Solar Analysis Drives Facade Massing

Programmatic Reorganisation in Section

Proposed Development

Existing Building Floor Level Difference

transfer 22 21

NGO Office

22

24

Gym

AXA Office

18

AXA Office

AXA Office

17

Corporate Office

AXA Office

NGO Office

AXA Office

16 15 14

Corporate Office

12 11

AXA Office

NGO Office

13

AXA Office

08 07 06

04 03

Exhibition Space + Mosque Exhibition Space + Mosque Exhibition Space + Retail

02 01 00 -01

AXA Office

NGO NG G Office

15

Corporate Office Co o

16

14

AXA Office

Retail

AXA Office

Retail

Retail

Homeless Shelter Reception

13 12

12

First Phase of Development

11 10 09

Retail

06 05 04 03 02 01 00

th Hostel t Host t Youth

NGO Office

11 10 09

Minaret ret r t Mosque que e Minaret ret r t

08 07

Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential

NGO O Office e

Auditorium A

Auditorium ditorium d m

Auditorium A

Auditorium ditorium d m

Auditorium A

Auditorium ditorium d m

Exhibition Space + Bar

06

SOLAR EXPOSURE ANALYSIS OF EXISTING AXA BUILDING - LOCATING “TM” IN HIGHEST DENSITY TO ACT AS SOLAR SCREEN AND MINIMISE THE DEPLETION OF LIGHT TO ALREADY SHADED AREAS

Exhibition Space + Bar

05 04

Mosque

03

Exhibition Space + Bar

Mosque

02

Concourse

Private Privat t Residential Garden Retail + NGO Shopfront

01

Retail + NGO GO Shopfront G Sho o

Retail + NGO Shopfront

g

Organic Food Market ood Mar o r

Cafe + NGO Shopfront

1/1

01

04

Corporate Serviced Apartment C

15

Youth Hostel St Staff taf aff f

-01

Classification + Programmatic adaptation [cross section]

Corporate Serviced Apartment C

16

13

NGO 08 Corporate Research 07 Artist Artist NGO Artist

AXA AX X Office

16

17

14

Auditorium

Corporate Office ffice f

17

18

15

AXA Office

10

18

01

19

Restaurant

AXA Office

Gym

Corporate Office ate Off a i

22

NGO Office ce c

19

20

Nightclub

Corporate Office

09

05

AXA Office

22

23

te Offic t ffic c Corporate Office

20

21

Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree Residential Retiree AXA Office Residential Retiree Corporate Office te Offic t c Residential Retiree NGO Office Residential C Corporate Serviced Apartment 17 24

e NGO Office

21

23

AXA Office NGO Office

19

transfer nsfer transfer tr r AXA O Office

23

AXA Office

20

1/2

1/3

02

Homeless Shelter Reception Homel l

1/4

1/5

1/6

03

1/5 1/7

04

Classification [longnitudinal section]

06

Form generated via subtraction of surrounding facades projected at key sun angles.

User group Analysis and Interaction Diagram

h

//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Process not Preconceptions

06d

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04 BCA Stair Module

As stated in the introduction the structural system of TM is based on a module of BCA stairs that is repeated across the length of the building and deforming in the horizontal plane to correspond to the floor plates and changes in lighting requirements of AXA. The Structure is integrated with the circulation of the building and the duel structural skin system is integral to the VDF. The duel structural skin system is designed to allow for maximum structural efficiency in accordance with BF1.1 and BP 1.1, whilst providing column free space for flexibility of program. As this project focuses on the first phase of construction for the high-rise tower provision must be made within the structural design to accommodate BP1.1(b)(xiv) construction activity actions. TM is a high-rise tower typology and therefore is has a LEVEL 3 (Table b1.2a) importance level and designed in accordance with (Table b1.2a). The structure must be engineered in accordance to B1.3 Loads. This is particularly pertinent to the design and construction of the structural knuckles that join the modulated members, which need to comply with C3.16 Construction joints.

Meeting pod

D2.13 Goings and risers determined the structural modulation, in which case (a) was satisfied with only 13 risers per flight and (c) was attained with constant proportions. D2.14 Landings determined the number and space of risers under (a) landings having a maximum gradient of 1:50 may be used in any building to limit the number of risers in each flight and each landing mustâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; (i) be not less than 750 mm long, and where this involves a change in direction, the length is measured 500 mm from the inside edge of the landing; and

SPECIFICATION C1.1 FIRE-RESISTING CONSTRUCTION 3. TYPE A FIRE-RESISTING CONSTRUCTION Table 3 TYPE A CONSTRUCTION: FRL OF BUILDING ELEMENTS

As there is a duel structural system, this modulation is repeated in the external layer. By staggering this system the density of structure is increased allowing the structure to work as a sun-shading device for the internal usable floor space. This meant that the larger landings had to accommodated a flight within their length.

The structural elements of TM are in reinforced concrete to comply with B1.4 (b) Determination of structural resistance of materials and forms of construction, and thus AS 3600. These elements need to be protected from fire in accordance to Table 3. As TM is a multiuse building with multiple classifications per storey then in accordance with C2.8 MODULATION

Parametric Facade Module

As the Structure is modulated according to circulation needs the structure therefore also relates to DP2. This became rather problematic in the design phase of the project where under section DP2.(c) (iii)&(iv) the structural system had to accommodate Australian Standards for suitable landings to avoid fatigue and landings where a door opens from or onto the stairway or ramp so that the door does not create an obstruction

Structure_modulated design approach

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22 24

21

23

20

22

19

21

18

20 01

17

19

16

18

15

17 16

14

15

13

14

12

Internal Gardens as air filters

13

11 10 09

12 11

Auditorium

10

08 07 06 05 04 03

09

Exhibition Space + Mosque Exhibition Space + Mosque Exhibition Space +

NGO 08 Corporate Research 07 Artist Artist NGO Artist

02

06 05 04 03 02

01

05a

05

Proposed Development

04

Existing Building

Internal Gardens

As stated earlier the facade is comprised of a double skin system that is linked to the circulation. The external skin uses a active Ventilation System developed by the Belgium building research institute.

i

//_TOWER MALAPROPOS_ Environmentally Sustainable Design

01

02

The external Double Skin Environmental Facade is comprised of shaft boxes that run vertically up through the facade. Along side these sit the compartment modules which have automatic vents control air flow and temperature. 03

Passive Heating and Cooling is achieved through this integrated system such that air is drawn up through the internal atrium (where it is filtered by skygradens) through the massing envelope and into the shaft boxes. 04

Atriums and Skygardens are placed at strategic points so that the air is purified before entering the occupiable space. These areas also provide breakout space for the offices to improve occupants well being 05a

The design also features a Residential Roof top Terrace as a communal space for leisure activities. This terrace is elevated above the public realm, which enhances privacy whilst still retaining its connection to the plaza so that it is energised.

Major Project_03.indd 70

01

27/05/2008 7:00:40 PM


voids + gardens

04

04

01

Compartmented Shaft Box Module

Motorised Shaft Box Compartmen Module Control Vent

Major Project_03.indd 71

diagram 4.3 Shaft Box Location+operable vents [c2.6]

02

27/05/2008 7:00:51 PM


//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes Major Project_03.indd 72

27/05/2008 7:01:19 PM


Major Project_03.indd 73

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//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes Major Project_03.indd 74

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Major Project_03.indd 75

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//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes Major Project_03.indd 76

27/05/2008 7:09:58 PM


Major Project_03.indd 77

27/05/2008 7:10:19 PM


//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes Major Project_03.indd 78

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Major Project_03.indd 79

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//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes Major Project_03.indd 80

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Major Project_03.indd 81

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//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes Major Project_03.indd 84

26/06/2008 2:26:50 PM


Major Project_03.indd 85

26/06/2008 2:27:17 PM


//_SKETCHES + MODELS_ Crucial Processes Major Project_03.indd 86

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Major Project_03.indd 87

Week 01

Week 10

Week 04

Week 13

Week 07

Week 17

26/06/2008 2:27:24 PM


Daniel Griifin_Academic Portfolio