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we see through a glass, darkly NIETZSCHE SURMISED THAT “ALL THINGS ARE SUBJECT TO INTERPRETATION. WHICHEVER INTERPRETATION PREVAILS AT A GIVEN TIME IS A FUNCTION OF POWER NOT TRUTH”. HOWEVER, LEO TOLSTOY PROPOUNDED THAT “FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE WAS STUPID AND ABNORMAL”. WE LOOK AT THE SUBJECT OF OBJECTIVITY AND IN DOING SO GET HORRIBLY CAUGHT UP IN THE WHOLE PROCESS.

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n this edition we aim to analyse the selective nature of our existence. The following articles consider journalism, history and science, and highlight some of the factors that determine the paradigms through which we see the world. If knowledge is power, then those that control it are the most powerful of all. Contemporary journalism appears to be bringing with it an ever greater focus on fulfilling the desires of the reader as opposed to notifying the reader of what he ought to know. We have, as a society, learnt to accept that reports of Jordan’s new boob job will be on the front page, whilst the deaths of hundreds in an Indian earthquake will be relegated to an obscure inside leaf. The increas-

ing transfer of news from radio and papers onto the web marks a new stage in this trend of reader controlled journalism. The BBC website operates a system by which the stories that attract the most clicks become the top stories, receiving wider coverage and follow-up reports. This leads to instances of stories such as “Dog gets sucked up by vacuum cleaner” dominating the newsfeed. Do journalists have a responsibility to inform the public of what they should know? Information must, of course, be filtered; that is both a primary function and constraint of any narrative. How do we decide what deserves to be said and what can be ignored? Is journalism a form of education or a form of entertain-

ING, STRIDING BEHIND YOU, OR YOUR SHADOW AT EVENING RISING TO MEET YOU. THINK ABOUT YOUR CASUA

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