Issuu on Google+

on the occasion of

Share

the co-operative experience in words, pictures and video


Search...

Sample online stories

Go

0

Traduci

Do you co-operate?

Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl

Share | Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl 03 January 2012 by Carla Ranicki

When the Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl cooperative was founded in 2001, its members produced just 3 tonnes of honey. Now it exports over 500 tonnes of certified organic and fair-trade honey to 10 different countries every year. Though the cooperative works in ten Mexican states, it is based in Morelos, in southern Mexico, and most of its beekeepers work in the foothills of the snow-capped Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico’s second-highest peak. Though traditionally a honeyproducing area, the local honey was not always very high quality, and was often contaminated by toxic residues and antibiotics given to the bees. In contrast, the Miel Mexicana Volcán Popocatépetl cooperative has been certified organic since 2004, and has always worked hard to make sure its 42 members produce only the highest quality honey. Nine different types are produced from local plants— sunflower, chamomile, mesquite, orange, avocado, cactus, Mexican lilac, campanula and morning glory. The cooperative also markets propolis, beeswax, pollen and royal jelly. Over 90% of the annual production is exported to Europe, Japan and the United States, while just 10% remains in Mexico and is distributed by companies specializing in organic products. Fair-trade certification has helped the cooperative reach international markets. Over the years it has won many national and international awards for exports, sustainability, technology transfer, best practices and honey quality. “The cooperative unites indigenous people, women, elderly, youth and adults. All the beekeepers are small producers with limited resources,” said Beate Heims, who has been working with Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl as a consultant for five years. She believes that they have found a formula for a successful social enterprise that is transferable and replicable. Long-term viability is integrated with economical, ecological and social aspects, with an emphasis on sustainability, training and fair trade. “Achieving a synergy between these factors is resulting in international competitiveness and organizational consolidation,” she said. The cooperative’s benefits extend beyond its members: free training is given to around 80 beekeepers in different states every year. The cooperative also develops social projects to promote sustainable development, aiming to improve family and community livelihoods and protect the environment through the application of its core values of solidarity, responsibility and respect. One of the cooperative’s goals is to create jobs to help stem migration to the United States. Says Beate: “Many Mexican men are working illegally in the USA, they earn more money and send the money back to their families in Mexico. This breaks the very important structure of the family and leaves whole towns without men.” The cooperative is proud of the fact that since 2003 there has been zero migration of its beekeepers to the United States.

Co-op name: Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl Main trade: Agriculture Number of employees: 0 Number of members: 42 Website

Sharing exper Description of the co-operative: We are a cooperative formed by 42 small farmers in the state of Morelos 10 years ago. We produce certified organic honey, 93% of which is exported directly to the European Union, the United States, and Japan. Gallery:

Share

this story, get the widget.

Like

Add New Comment

L

Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl

Required: Please login below to comment.

Image

Post as …

Showing 0 comments Sort by

Popular now

Subscribe by email

Subscribe by RSS

Women's Sewing Co-op Cocoki of Kigali, Rwanda Trackback URL http://disqus.com/forums/storiescoop/miel_mexicana_volcan_popocatepetl/trackback/

An initiative of

On the occasion of

Emelienne Nyiramana, now 37, used to fetch water for a living, walking 17 kilometers from her home in Kigali and earning 25 cents on each trip to provide for her family of six. She didn’t have a bank account, and school fees and groceries for her four children were never certainties. Now, Emelienne earns more than $5 a day running a profitable export business, enough not only to feed her family and pay for her children’s school fees, but to deposit the remainder in a savings account. The turning point was in 2007. “Me and my fellow women who shared the same problem of poverty decided to start a cooperative with the help of an organization who found us, Indego Africa,” Emelienne said. Theirs was the first group of artisan women to partner with the non-profit, whose long-term approach towards lifting African women out of poverty was through a combination of

fair trade partnerships (members of the all-women forprofit co-operatives they partner with get a fair wage that includes 50% in advance of production), international exports, and training programs. Emelienne’s sewing co-operative, Cocoki (Cooperative de Couture de Kicukiro), now includes 40 women who use foot-powered sewing machines and coal-powered irons to craft vibrantly-colored bags, fabric-wrapped bracelets, and wrap-skirts using traditional wax prints. On their fifth year, they’ve fulfilled orders for large U.S. fashion brands including Nicole Miller and Anthropologie, and are currently finishing production on a large scale order for J.Crew for their Spring/Summer 2012 collection. Profits are used to have fund programs in English literacy, and training in computers, management and accounting. “All members of Cocoki have a dream. Their dream is to become rich from their hands,” Emelienne said.

Sh

Supported by

Wome Kigali, 27 Feb by Rat

Co-op Coutur Main tr Numbe Numbe Websit

Descri A wom Kigali, handicr brands Nicole Crew.

Gallery

ge

Like

4 people liked this.

Wo


What’s Stories.coop Stories.coop is the world’s first global, digital campaign to spread the benefits of cooperation through the tradition of story-telling. Stories connect people through the power of words and the power of pictures. Stories tell the facts and they connect to our emotions, so your story of cooperation can make a lasting impact. Stories.coop delivers the UN’s message “Cooperative enterprises build a better world” to the global public in International Year of Cooperatives 2012.

We want the stories of cooperation from every corner of the globe; from the smallest cooperative to the biggest; from the cooperators with personal stories to tell or the stories of business success; to those with observations on the cooperative model. We want to demonstrate to the globe the benefits of the cooperative way of doing business, through your story of cooperation. Your stories will paint a picture of the enormous diversity of the co-operative experience.

Please play your part in our campaign.

Share your experience.


How I can promote stories.coop and collect stories 1. Email/call your contacts at cooperatives • Invite them to submit their own story (or tell them we have writers who can help write their story) • Invite them to put the Stories.coop widget on their website (easily customizable and downloaded from the stories.coop homepage) • download the Stories.coop widget to your website (the link is on the homepage at www.stories.coop). This allows you to have the links to the latest stories of the day right on your site or to one particular story. It is customizable to fit your website and easy to use.

2. Re-tweet stories.coop twitter tweets from your account 3. Share stories.coop stories

and facebook posts on your social networks (the stories are easily shared directly from the story page)

4. Add comments

to Stories.coop stories (comments are shown below each story)

Find us on facebook

Find us on twitter

Find us on stories.coop


Search...

Sample online stories

Go

0

Traduci

Do you co-operate?

Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl

Share | Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl 03 January 2012 by Carla Ranicki

When the Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl cooperative was founded in 2001, its members produced just 3 tonnes of honey. Now it exports over 500 tonnes of certified organic and fair-trade honey to 10 different countries every year. Though the cooperative works in ten Mexican states, it is based in Morelos, in southern Mexico, and most of its beekeepers work in the foothills of the snow-capped Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico’s second-highest peak. Though traditionally a honeyproducing area, the local honey was not always very high quality, and was often contaminated by toxic residues and antibiotics given to the bees. In contrast, the Miel Mexicana Volcán Popocatépetl cooperative has been certified organic since 2004, and has always worked hard to make sure its 42 members produce only the highest quality honey. Nine different types are produced from local plants— sunflower, chamomile, mesquite, orange, avocado, cactus, Mexican lilac, campanula and morning glory. The cooperative also markets propolis, beeswax, pollen and royal jelly. Over 90% of the annual production is exported to Europe, Japan and the United States, while just 10% remains in Mexico and is distributed by companies specializing in organic products. Fair-trade certification has helped the cooperative reach international markets. Over the years it has won many national and international awards for exports, sustainability, technology transfer, best practices and honey quality. “The cooperative unites indigenous people, women, elderly, youth and adults. All the beekeepers are small producers with limited resources,” said Beate Heims, who has been working with Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl as a consultant for five years. She believes that they have found a formula for a successful social enterprise that is transferable and replicable. Long-term viability is integrated with economical, ecological and social aspects, with an emphasis on sustainability, training and fair trade. “Achieving a synergy between these factors is resulting in international competitiveness and organizational consolidation,” she said. The cooperative’s benefits extend beyond its members: free training is given to around 80 beekeepers in different states every year. The cooperative also develops social projects to promote sustainable development, aiming to improve family and community livelihoods and protect the environment through the application of its core values of solidarity, responsibility and respect. One of the cooperative’s goals is to create jobs to help stem migration to the United States. Says Beate: “Many Mexican men are working illegally in the USA, they earn more money and send the money back to their families in Mexico. This breaks the very important structure of the family and leaves whole towns without men.” The cooperative is proud of the fact that since 2003 there has been zero migration of its beekeepers to the United States.

Co-op name: Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl Main trade: Agriculture Number of employees: 0 Number of members: 42 Website

Sharing experi Description of the co-operative: We are a cooperative formed by 42 small farmers in the state of Morelos 10 years ago. We produce certified organic honey, 93% of which is exported directly to the European Union, the United States, and Japan. Gallery:

Share

this story, get the widget.

Like

Add New Comment

L og

Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl

Required: Please login below to comment.

Image

Post as …

Showing 0 comments

Stanford Cooperative Houses

Sort by

Popular now

Subscribe by email

Subscribe by RSS

Share

Trackback URL http://disqus.com/forums/storiescoop/miel_mexicana_volcan_popocatepetl/trackback/

An initiative of

On the occasion of

Supported by

Stanford C 27 Decemb by Steven

Cooperative living has been an integral part of Stanford University's residential system for the last 41 years. It's been an integral part of my life for the last four years, and this is what coops mean to me. Cooperative living, to me, means sharing ownership and responsibility not just for a building, its supplies, and its upkeep, but also for the health of the community. This goes to the heart of an "intentional community." We relate to each other not just by accident, by default, or by dint of living in physical proximity, but because we intend to make a thriving community by putting in the work to make it happen, work that is paid out tenfold in the joys of an authentic and deep connection to the friends we live with. Sustainability-minded, socially responsible, and a little countercultural, we are here day in and day out, proving that it is possible to live in a way that's good for the residents AND good for the world. Whether you're in Chi Theta Chi, Columbae, The Enchanted Broccoli Forest, Hammarskjöld, Kairos, Synergy, or Terra, you share in the cooperative model and in its joys. The feel of daily life includes the idea that compassion and compromise starts at home. It includes the idea that active listening and consensus decisionmaking hold the promise of change in a world tethered to ideologies, dogmatism, and partisanship. We share the most psychologically central and intimate parts of our lives with our housemates, deciding where people sleep, what food will be bought and served, explorations of the idea of personal space: all are part of being open and honest with other people about your needs, and the onus is on the group to find creative solutions that meet the needs of every member. We are all equally important voices in the community, and collectively our voices sing the praises of cooperative living that we and the world would be tragically lacking without.

Co-op nam Houses Main trade Number of Number of Website

Descriptio The motto community Smarts. It e houses, Ch Enchanted Hammarsk Terra. The cooperative they also ru household Gallery:

S

th get

Stan


Sample

Search...

Go

0

A billion cooperative v Traduci

Do you co-operate?

Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl

online stories

Share |

Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl 03 January 2012 by Carla Ranicki

When the Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl cooperative was founded in 2001, its members produced just 3 tonnes of honey. Now it exports over 500 tonnes of certified organic and fair-trade honey to 10 different countries every year. Though the cooperative works in ten Mexican states, it is based in Morelos, in southern Mexico, and most of its beekeepers work in the foothills of the snow-capped Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico’s second-highest peak. Though traditionally a honeyproducing area, the local honey was not always very high quality, and was often contaminated by toxic residues and antibiotics given to the bees. In contrast, the Miel Mexicana Volcán Popocatépetl cooperative has been certified organic since 2004, and has always worked hard to make sure its 42 members produce only the highest quality honey. Nine different types are produced from local plants— sunflower, chamomile, mesquite, orange, avocado, cactus, Mexican lilac, campanula and morning glory. The cooperative also markets propolis, beeswax, pollen and royal jelly. Over 90% of the annual production is exported to Europe, Japan and the United States, while just 10% remains in Mexico and is distributed by companies specializing in organic products. Fair-trade certification has helped the cooperative reach international markets. Over the years it has won many national and international awards for exports, sustainability, technology transfer, best practices and honey quality. “The cooperative unites indigenous people, women, elderly, youth and adults. All the beekeepers are small producers with limited resources,” said Beate Heims, who has been working with Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl as a consultant for five years. She believes that they have found a formula for a successful social enterprise that is transferable and replicable. Long-term viability is integrated with economical, ecological and social aspects, with an emphasis on sustainability, training and fair trade. “Achieving a synergy between these factors is resulting in international competitiveness and organizational consolidation,” she said. The cooperative’s benefits extend beyond its members: free training is given to around 80 beekeepers in different states every year. The cooperative also develops social projects to promote sustainable development, aiming to improve family and community livelihoods and protect the environment through the application of its core values of solidarity, responsibility and respect. One of the cooperative’s goals is to create jobs to help stem migration to the United States. Says Beate: “Many Mexican men are working illegally in the USA, they earn more money and send the money back to their families in Mexico. This breaks the very important structure of the family and leaves whole towns without men.” The cooperative is proud of the fact that since 2003 there has been zero migration of its beekeepers to the United States.

Co-op name: Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl Main trade: Agriculture Number of employees: 0 Number of members: 42 Website Description of the co-operative: We are a cooperative formed by 42 small farmers in the state of Morelos 10 years ago. We produce certified organic honey, 93% of which is exported directly to the European Union, the United States, and Japan. Gallery:

Share

this story, get the widget.

Like

Add New Comment

Image

Hansalim

L og

Miel Mexicana Volcan Popocatépetl

Required: Please login below to comment.

Post as …

Showing 0 comments Sort by

Popular now

Subscribe by email

Subscribe by RSS

Share

Trackback URL http://disqus.com/forums/storiescoop/miel_mexicana_volcan_popocatepetl/trackback/

An initiative of

On the occasion of

Supported by

In the Korean language, “han” refers to all living things on earth, while “salim” means to revive and give life. So the compound “Hansalim” means “save all living things”.

Hansalim 06 Januar by Carla R

An ambitious name, but then Hansalim, Korea’s biggest consumers’ cooperative, is an ambitious project. Founded in 1986 as a single grocery store, it now has 284,000 consumer members, 2,000 producer members, 328 employees, 131 stores and a turnover in the millions of dollars ($160 million in 2009). Hansalim is a cooperative association that produces environmentally friendly, organic products and organizes direct trade between farmers and consumers. Hansalim deals not only with food (like rice, grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, meat, seafood, dairy, jams, sauces, tofu, noodles, dumplings and snacks) but also books, cosmetics, eco-friendly detergents and toilet rolls. Food production follows agreed standards, for example using no pesticides or chemical fertilizers and avoiding artificial additives. Consumer members monitor all processes and help inspect production centres. But Hansalim is much more than a distributor of fair-trade, organic products, as Gyu Ho Jeong, a researcher at Hansalim’s Moshim and Salim Institute explains: “Hansalim has been working under the slogan, ‘producer takes responsibility in consumer's life and consumer takes responsibility in producer's livelihood.' So the unique quality of Hansalim is that we are not just working for the consumer's rights and interests but also trying to build up a society where the urban area and the rural area, human and nature can coexist and develop together.”

Co-op nam Main trad Number o Number o Website

Descriptio Consumer environme products a between fa Gallery:

Producer communities in rural areas and consumer members in urban areas cooperate together, trading directly through Hansalim’s own distribution system. Product prices are determined by consultation between producers and consumers, independent from the market's price system. Hansalim producers own their own farms or processing facilities, and all products are delivered from production sites to consumers directly through the distribution centre, without any commission-based sales. Payments to producers account for 76% of the price structure, while the remaining 24% is used for transportation, labour and social activities “aimed at creating a better world.” Hansalim headquarters in Seoul establishes the policy and strategy for the movement and coordinates business activities, while 20 local Hansalim cooperatives around Korea carry Hansalim products and coordinate environmental campaigns from the grassroots level. Community regeneration is currently a top priority. Says Gyu Ho Jeong: “We are working in various fields of activity, not just food, but also environment, welfare, education, autonomy and so on, to make our community more sustainable based on the empowerment of the organized members.”

S

t get

Like

1 person liked this.

Add New Comment


How I can tell my story TIPS ON HOW TO WRITE YOUR STORY • Take some time to consider how you want to tell your story. Is it going to be told through the eyes of someone in your organisation? Think about who has been in your organisation for a long time who might have some interesting stories to tell. How about a new member’s view of what you do? • A good way to think about stories is that personal stories are more engaging than stories which list a bunch of facts. (Not that we’ve got anything against your facts, in fact, there’s a box on the right hand column of every story on stories.coop which is set aside for precisely that information, but they can weigh down a story). • The more concisely you can tell your story the more likely you are to grab and keep the interest of your reader. Stories.coop can take stories as long as 550 words approximately, but you might find you can get across the same information in as little as 200, or even 100, words. • Take a look at some of these stories to get a feel for how to tell a story well: (Argan Tree, Keta Sandlanders, People’s Food Co-op) • Use the highest quality pictures to illustrate your story that you can find. Pictures of people shaking hands, or accepting a cheque, or standing in front of a sign or logo won’t tell a story as well as pictures of people doing their jobs, or high quality, professionally-taken close-ups of individuals.

TIPS ON HOW TO VIDEO YOUR STORY • Video stories are accepted via a link to YouTube, so your video must first be uploaded there, either on your own page or on the stories.coop YouTube page. Please contact info@stories.coop if you need assistance with this. • Making a video can be as simple as putting together a series of still images – it doesn’t need to be moving footage to make a Youtube video (see TIPS ON HOW TO MAKE AN AUDIO SLIDESHOW below). • Youtube has many tips on how to produce videos with moving footage at http://www.youtube.com/t/yt_ handbook_produce

TIPS ON HOW TO MAKE AN AUDIO SLIDESHOW • Record your story on your computer, or smartphone, or video camera. It can be as simple as recording your story in your own words on your computer. Or you can find someone in your organisation, a co-worker or a member, who would like to speak about the organisation. Play around with your positioning in relation to the microphone to make sure you’re recording the best quality sound. You can also use music – as long as you have permission from the artist/s – and other sounds which might help tell the story. • Gather together the photos you want to use. You might be surprised about how many pictures you will need. Expect that it will take at least 30 really good photos to make an audio slideshow work well. • Divide your photos into sequences. The best audio slideshows are between two to three minutes long – in our opinion. Imagine that for a slideshow of this length you will need as much as 40 photographs divided into between five and six sequences. The photos should be a mixture of close ups and wide-angled shots.


Our value, our stories.

an initiative of

supported by


Stories.coop