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What Is The Vital Ground Foundation?

he grizzly bear is the most powerful symbol of American wilderness. Since our early ancestors recorded the story of Ursus arctos horribilis on cave walls, the bear's presence as an "umbrella" species has represented a healthy, viable ecosystem for all plants and animals. In these modern times, however, one of the most noble animals in North America faces an uphill battle with humans for prime habitat. Grizzly bear populations have plummeted dramatically since the late 1800's. In 1975, they received listing as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. Grizzly bears once numbered more than 50,000 and roamed the prairies, forests and foothills from the Great Plains to the California Coast and south to Mexico. Now, there are less than 1,000 grizzlies remaining in less than 1%of their historic home range in the lower 48 states. :.. . . . Even under federal protection and with thousands of acres of public land to roam, the fate of the i " '.'; , grizzly often rests on private lands. Nearly two thirds of grizzly bear mortality occurs on less than F[~m the first time Iheld ,Bart in arms a~d , ' 5 percent of the habitat base-areas where grizzlies and people come into conAict. Pressures in hand-fed him milk {ramo bottle; I knew he \yos ' " these "conflict" areas continue to grow with man's expansion into vast, untamed habitat. Protect­ ing these private lands and reducing human-bear conflicts will be the key to preventing the bear's ci special animal. His wlkJ 'home·had-been lost' extinction. ,along withhi'~, llJother wh,o was tragically killed. ' The Vital Ground Foundation was formed with the primary objective of conserving wildlife .f.l)y famil), nurfured, trainedan'dpr6vided',him '~. habitat through a variety of creative strategies. The foundation seeks to identify strategic private with a home. Bart in t\.lr,n has proviaed me'with lands that link with public lands to provide year long grizzly habitat, then either acquire or " 0 career as awanimal trainer and coach for ' conserve through easement these key habitats. Typically, these lands lie adjacent to national "' marethan 18,years and a life$~I~ th~t h'qs , forests, national parks and wilderness areas. • < oeen extrem~lyrewarding. ' Bart has appemed Partnerships with other non-profit conservation organizations, state and federal agencies, and , ,in numerous motion pictures, in~ludirtg Th~ , ' private landown.ers will play an important role in conserving a non-renewable resource".the land, > , 'Beof, Clan-of the Cave Bear, Walt DisnE;lyls:~, , By developing entrepreneurial approaches to habitat conservation and executing on-the-ground , , " White Fang, an'd Legends d ,the Fall. , , : " ,', Having achieved'success in our own' ' ,'­ efforts, Vital Ground will not only ensure the future of the grizzly but other plants and animals that ,~ profession thro~gh 'Bart,, 1 feint was Jime thaf we " require undeveloped open space, _' , ',' . took'a step back and returned something to' the ;, , _', wild 'creature wnogave uS9ur life. LYlJne~and I, • ".: ~ , ,,,,,orki~g;coliectiv~lY'with ,fri:e~ds and ?ssociates, ' , _ establlshed,tKe VltaLGro,uno Foundallon. Our , ; vision,from·the beginning was to do-scimething : ,' , , ':"",orthwhile for the ervironment and f.O! Bart's ' b.rothers, sistersand cousins. _ -" , , With 'our board of directors, founding " contributors and numeroos behind,the-scenes ,people, we created a-,national non:profit" ',,' ,foundqtion that is .working on habiklt solution!> ,' , , • ,for the Gre.at Bear. "I invite you to l oin u~ in " , keeping part-oLour envfronment heallhy and • wb"ole enoughOfodhe great grizzly~to walk in ' ' ~' peace... fo( wrere hedyvells, all·things,wild may , , thrive: '< ,' , _' , ' " . . ' ~ ~ ' " " , ] ,

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_D'~ar .Friend

, ,~ Fore.ver Wild, .t

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" DougS~ys

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, Founder and President '

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1. To safeguard vital ground through the simplest, fastest and

most effective methods possible: creative land acquisition

techniques and conservation easements.

2.

To establish partnerships with private landowners, other

conservation organizations and government agencies to work

on habitat protection and conservation strategies.

3.

To educate people on the impacts of habitat loss, not only for grizzlies but for other wild creatures that share their range.

Arne l. Schmidt: "Chairman

'. Lo; {\~~~e~, California .'

of the Board ' '

Doug Selis: Pjesid~nt arid Founder , Heber, Utah ic

Lynn~ Seus:~SecretarY and Founder ,

Heber, Utah ",~

Dedicated volunteers are the foundation on which all successful non-profit organizations are built. Board members step forward from within this framework in order to play an active role in shaping the foundation's future . Vital Ground's board oftrustees were chosen early on when the founders solicited the support of many friends, family and business

associates from around the world to assist this fledgling organization. The current board of

trustees leading Vital Ground are: Doug and Lynne Seus, the founders of the Vital Ground Foundation, are well-known

"

Susan Bridges: Treasu'rer ,( , San M~nticito, California ' '

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,

Doug Chadwick Whitefish, Montana

EXECUTIVEDIRECTOR Daniell. Walker, Missoula, Montana

throughout the country and in the film community as animal trainers and coaches. Their

active role in the environmental community is far-reaching, with memberships and support of numerous causes throughout the world. They have contributed to the study of animal

Dr. John Weaver,

behavior and biological studies of bears and wolves. Vital Ground was established as a U _.Jlsh 9.n.d-.WildJlfe Seciice1=-.----=~....-:t ='-';":-~-I=P,emlOal~milment"by the Seu-? te €live semething back-te- the aAiffloo that h()v~ ­ provided them with a rewarding career.

SCIENTIFIC ADVISOR

Arne Schmidt, Chairman of the Board, has worked in film production for over twenty years. As a producer of seven feature films, including RoboCop and Awakenings, he brings professional management and leadership skills to Vital Ground . Laurel Moore, his wife, has assisted Vital Ground over the yeors in fund raising and communications and helped manage the office in the early days of development. Arne's passions include wading in trout waters with fly rod in hand and boating in the Pacific.

Susan Bridges moved to Montana in 1971 to attend the University of Montana . Her field of interest was English literature. Susan has participated in numerous environmental causes and political issues with her husband Jeff Bridges and their children . Susan's fund

raising skills and commitment to the Foundation have been instrumental in Vital Ground's success . The Bridges spend summers on their Montana ranch relaxing under the Big Sky. Doug Chadwick brings to Vital Ground a source of strength and inspiration as an author, conservation professional and dedicated wildlife biologist. Having written

numerous books and hundreds of articles in such magazines as National Geographic, he considers his work a source of motivation . Doug lived off and on for seven years with the

grizzly in the Bob Marshall Wilderness and Glacier National Park. He was employed as a seasonal biologist in Glacier for three of those years. Dr. John Weaver recently resigned from the board to fulfill his new duties as Deputy Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Grizzly Bear Recovery Team. John has agreed to continue advising Vital Ground as its first Scientific Advisor. He has extensive experience with wolves and grizzly bears as a wildlife ecologist, and holds a M .S. degree in Wildlife Science . He was a visiting scholar at Yale and recently received a Ph.D from the University of Montana . For ten years, John was the U.S. Forest Service Grizzly Bear and Endangered Species Specialist for Region One. Bart, Vital Ground's ambassador, stands 9'5" and weighs close to 1,500 pounds. He serves as the inspiration for all of us to continue driving forward with the mission of conserving important habitat for his wild brothers and sisters.

CHARITABLE ADVISORS

lisa A -BeCKer Jeff Bridges " RQgerA. Caras _ , Michael crichton , Does,Plenty Good Deeds • Ernest Gold , ­ I'eggy: GoWo'n ' Gaorield Gutentag Anthony Hopkins Jack Horner

Jea~ ~~digheadGeorge

, Joanne Horner ' Bob Ki'e~li f\'g

, TerrxlLeon,ard

_ Penn"y Marshall

SfeveMElrtin - Ken-McConnell , ', Laurel-Moore

', Tom Napton

, lisa Plonsk~r

.. Helen,e PolIQck

Jbhn Q, :fripp'

Galen Rowell

Louisa WHlc~x ,.-'

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lh~ Vital Ground F~lind6tio~ newsletter is' ' published twoti~es .il year in'Missoula, • Montena, Vital Ground is a recognized ',~, 501 (c)3 'non'profit ~orporotion, TheJocus ' and goal. of the Foundation is to acquire om} conse ~ve through easements strategic ': <­ , habitats tho,t benefit Jhe grizzly and all plants ,and animals within its ecosystem , Donatlons . an€ correspondence may'be sent to P,O, Box 2?71, Missgula" Montan(J598Q6, ' "


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in ' th!lrespying on , unison-and danced and " ,~ crossed his patli deep. in the-Bob Marshall ' , j ~mped sideways down fh~ trai,I:. ~ Wildern~ess', A~ a wi-an,gler" packer9",d gUicfe , "As We rounded the bend and dropped ; "-forWilderness' Outfitters;Jwas thankfUl thai ioto the marshy bottom,iheCmy le lraio,carrying' these"expe'riences'ca nie on rate 'Occasions. ' a full · IQ.~ d of packs stuffed with sl ~eping bags, ' For three slLmmers Ili~eq (n the back ' clothing,food'and camp gear bec9me cou,ntry, guiding fly fishermen, :!l[ltert.oining i~cre9~inglY ne;vous ." ," " ,,' ,'g u ~s's_onmou'ntain-peaKS' al)d setting _ ; Thecmules le& their usual niarcning:rank i ' '. 'comfortable camps far from '~iviliiation , , bashi ~g irt6 treesa~d drifting aimlessly dQ.~n ·>Childhood dreams became re ality as 1fulfilled the trail. Something wo's'wrong; a' ste,ady, , '2" my cowboy fania..sies,working from the b9ck-9f ' dhor;e iri,a wild, unto'medsetting , . mduniein-wise muletearn and ci horse like . Prince rarely b~h~~~ in.suc~ un~ontr9H~d ,:.-: ~ P~ri~drcally, lencduntered tell,tale ~igns of~ man'her. '" ,," ",' ' . the great bea[; t law scrap~s on trees 'and paw ··Prince re~dy to exploq'e. ~n~ g~ew eveil •priRtsin th~ mud , H; visited me on the trail one more agitated each time 1tur ned him back night, leaving only his print it[ the·dirt less than c Dan Walker on ihe trail<~uFi~g his ~ilderness days " onto the trail. 'Seconds seemed like minutes as '. 100 feet from wher~ '!.slept; 'For that 1was ' " . ,'j n th ~ Bob Marshall. ' ~ ,. ' ',' ' . mysense~ drifted.from the horse and m u les't~ : .'-, ·Jharikful. Jl,Jst knowing·that he was there : the ground. beneatbr:ne " D~ep'conc'ern "',. ~.lIowedmY.'aJeani to become reQI. < " settled; the last thing Lneeded was a'mule Eleven years have passed since my COWboy -I shore ,my wljderfless 'story as just on~ wreck in thenliddle of ~ilder~e:ss: ' '. days. Tnos'e memories are boried deep in chapt~r from my life in Mon~ai:la. Times h'qve Looki[lg down on t~e tr9i l, 1spotfedthe , tho,uglitbutrecently. wer e bF~ught tq the ' changed quickly, with transfor.nj.otrons on tlie , unexp-~cJe<d :" Directly ~elow me was the ' foref(ont agai'n by a q ,mmitted group of . ,,:< ',_ I.orid o'Ccurring armost <;Iaily, C~wboys are ,at , ,......."""_.;;..._.,..........._~~_ _~-::-..-~ 'risk Of lOsing not onJy their'wesiern,ftagiiiQ.ns _ _ picture-perfect. track of a grizzlp yiih' water ,seeping ever so slowly ~ack into the place , but their h~ritage. Ranching families are ~ . ,. whe~e he st~od only SE;lcol)ds before , Thi~' . knewhe~was~there ~' - bein'g bouglitoutby-..,developers· dn~ the.. , track was too fresh forcorrifort cind my , . > .~ , . _ ".' , ' , ... " landscape is be_c.omiilg inh6sl?i!9bJe for both , Goncern to hair,rdisingqoubt. ,I knew catt,le a ane) . ,' he was there only feet f~om wher~we 'passed; , . ' ' '. . , '. . _.. to some degree a vIsionary dreamer~ 1m back . yet 1cOl:lld' not see him, . ,p' .:~ in ~hEi's9ddle;:vorkfng,towar9 < h.o.~ itat sol~tions' . : Luck was on my side that deay: We ",' , ' ,,:,. ,. , , ,on the land, ' . , . 'We. ar~ losing9r.ou ~d each (jay ~nd ifmy continued on down the trail without so much as a s<3imd from~the<'bear" ,- , people calling' th~mseJves,the Vitql Ground .....:--" kids ang yours wish to enjoy'the open' spate' ' : Thi~ was my FIrst encounter with a' grizzly, Foun.dation" -When tKe board offered 'me th~ values 'o fwild country and wil<;llife>we mus( nearly:11 y'ears' ago, Emotions from t~at executive dir'ecioj positio n, 1drifted,back;. and . act today: M~re importantly" the'grj zzly . ,',,_ for the fi rst time I rrmy·life saw an opport~ nity .rE!mdins <a threatened sp-ecies and there is (OJ ,r , ' momefit in~time have dissolved to fragmente<:l meroorie~ ,: j neyer saw, he9rd n'o~ slY),eJled him' , to c6ptur~ fore~er the spiritof'wi1dernEiss. _. VE;lry ~eal possibility that he may follow a pat~.' ' , ~ ot nQ ~eiyr~ , al,l at the hands 9f man.: F9r me,it: . : , would be a personal tragedy to simply telLmy ~ beo( story around a campfir~, iri twen tY'yegr~ ..: .<' ,~ without knowi n'g that he may bebuttnere ' :-: somew here :· ' . '. : .' ' Vital Ground has'take~ on aoew: l~ok; and ,the 'bQord of trust~es has strateglc~lIlmcipped ' 9ut,its role of saving important habita\ f0J the - grizzly. With 9!1 adion'orient9tion, a'sounq :, ' plar') and suppgrt'from inJerested' conserv9tion,:' , isis, we wiU:leave a legacy ofla~d pro'tection . ,as our story so that futu re generatiens may ' . experien.ce that spine-tingling realizatio.n that so'mewllere, agrizzly is'watching ffom tne ~ sid ~ ?fthe 'trail. " "

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"---~----"--,.~---,--,-:,.--~ .'0; Dr. Jo~n Weav,er.~'" ...

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grizzlie~ cqnnot ab~orbeyen a ~~dest, de~in ;'

rat~ 'in) he wild , ' ,'" ', .. ' ~' • ", " ." In th~ lowet 48 staies, 'smoll populatip~s of -' grizzlies rerr1ain'irl a(ewisolated areas tnat ' ' sef\~edas' ~lbodrd of t~usteeand' . •" are referred to as 'iisland~'! or-habitat., These Vital Grou (1d~'A : . , fragment~ of land make up ies~ than 2%;;ithe ' ­ p,iograppyof JO'hn app$,ars'ory " ' bear's historic range. Dato,on other illreat, ' ened~ or endpngered sp~cies sho";;-s that ,' .,' ::-. . pqge 'With J.o~n /s, exte n sive ' "islai]d,fragmentatior1" is detrimental tothe ,. ,' kn9wre~g~/' be ~il l be ,writing : : , su r~ivgl of q plant'or oi;1irnql speci~s . In she-rt, ~, ' aboutJne bea(ir:l~eoch'issLie, offhe , " species ihatrelYon and'live withinth~se, - ~'., , . ."", islanas sta~d ti high probabiJiiy ~f pe[ishin~, . " ~', 'newsleiter: ' following arfi~le'~ ~' With'the drasticdeclin'e of habitat and ' ~. ,co.vers basic b~.9f~ecO.logy~a~d "" " , '. g(jizlyb~arnuirJbefs,the' bia~ ';"cis list~,d in ~" " ' 1975 asa thre'atened spe,cies und~'r the;, ' ' 9~Q~lfop,hk, l()cation/ igentifying ",.,.... cn'd~ ng'ered Species Act::. TodbY, six ecosys~ .·,· the- problen'1/sol~ti()n apprpa.c-h fo ,~ . te~s ("islands") remain in the lower 48 states'. , bear.:mgnagem'~n]; ~ ,.. ' . These ecosystems are as follows: YellQw~t6ne . --, .-. ­ , " Nationalp.ark Ecosystem, the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosysterrf in northern Idaho and northwest • . : rizziy,bears' ar~ th~.I~;'gest ~~ . _.Montana, the Selway-Bitterroot, the Northern ," omnivor~s in North-America , Adult" '.; Contine!1t9IDivide E€osystem in Montana, the ' . It .··· " maleb~arsi;"the IQwe~i8 ~ta'ies ' ~ " '" Selkirks 'Ecosystem in northeast Washington . " , .weig~ frorn,40_0 to 800 'pounds,·qnd ' ana n'oJih Idaho and the North Cascades in ': - ' female~ weigh from 250 t6.400 pO\lnds, , nortbwest Washington state .. :·,.Thei-r d!et j'n. the Ro~ky- Mo~ntains consists ,of .' -- _ . " The Vital Ground Foundation's objective about 8O~90% vegetation; i~cludihg a'variety . griz-zly beers MV~ one of the lowest reproduc, will be to aequi ~e strategic habitats and <. , ,'0ffor~s, berfi ~s~ pine nuts an~-grasses. ,-.' -- tiverates among terrestrialmamma1s.=rhis . conserve: throogh dondted~eus~ments 19naS ' ~ Grizzlies' supplement their diets.hy " leads to aco~sequence ofc riticaUmpo'rtqnce: that may link th'ese ecosystems, protect . , ': e9ting,w.inl.er,killed.UngLrlates '- " .' " seasonal range that borders these 9reas or minimizes the t.hreat of encroachments 0(l vital .. '.'(elk for example), small Historical8t'Prese~tDistribution , • grQundJor the grizzly. Through creative , mamrnalsand }n.sects. ': - 6fGri_zzly~earsin " "North America. Grizzly b~ar . ". _ . .<;:onservbtior,;strdteg ies,padner~hrps wrth ~, ,,' home ranges can . .'stat.e and 'federal agenGies, and most impor' vary"from about20 ' ~~~ , ' feintly Flartnersh'fps with- prival.e.lmiqowners,~ _, . 'Vital Gr6~rid Wi Ii pjayan e~tremery impOrtaRI-... " toh'undreds ofsquare , . , . miles. Grlizly bearsrequ ire large ~. . '" role i ~ ;ovjng 119bitatJ:E,r the g~i.i:zlyand othe ~ .~ ,;: . wildlife. ., · • '~ ,

, : hom~e 'ranges in drderto .encomp(:lss " " .' ]he'v~r'i ;;us seasonal habitat,types ~' ., ·'.il

-. ~ '. .' necessary fo,supply their diverSe dier .()

:.Grizzly bears.:'arenoiterrltbri.a l dnd ~ , '·U

" home ranges of irld'ividuallolears do :'

~veriap . ', ,'. - . . : A. ' (;rlhly~ear.s -ccirdive 20 to ';30

ye~m or longer. Addlt grizzly bkars. -.~,'

ar~ mostly soliiqry creaJures except , .

duriiigmpfing, periods 6r when " '. :',~,

.,' fem'qle~ a~e'atcoinPdnied.by.their " " young : Immaiu;'ehecirs, m~st ' '

. commonly ~ ibling s; often travel '" '

, together for a yeat or f!1ore 'cifterlElCl;vihg ,

theii' mother. ': '" , '.', J , _ _ .',

Femdies. gen~'ipIlY do' n,dt breed.: u;'~I ,,_

5 or 6; and:at irit~r',falS af3'years or , .

•, Jonger. Litter size.is typ.i<:;ally1 to,4 ~ubs ; '­

,;vith) .being most"eommon: About 50%'of <

'. cubs survivelo"adulthodd. T~is lim ited '" '

rep~~ducii~e'capadtY preCiudes,'any rapiej

increose' in grizzly bear POF,uICltioos: Irlfact, .

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' he thanks early , .. , '. work of.Vitcil Ground, th~ grizzly ~bear_s • , on.the Eastern Front of the R9cky . . ., Mountains in Montana nave a home,to return to after a lengthy ~inteJ ;I~ep: ' . " , . On March27, Mike-Ma'del of the Montana Depcirtrl] eni:of fi~h; Wildlife and .ParRs ha.a reports of two grizzlies drifting-through the Toy property on TetQA Creek. .:. _ The Toy property was the first ~cq~i ~ iti6n , '­ completed bY'yitaLGrd,und. The tand COYerS.- , nearly 240a cres~ofprime hapiict boi-derin,g ' ~ thaNature Conservclncy's,Pine ~utt.e Swamp' Preserve . 'Thelandscape:is breathtakIng, ""iih ' . the Eastern Fron.! 9f the Rockies ~towering to Jlie . west, Teton Creek'c arvi ng through the · . . property to j he nortb, the begirmj ng of the gre~t!'>Iaihs sprayvlihg ~to ihe.easr and the, Pin~ Butte Swa.rT!p<Presei-v,e borderi ngthe south . ~ Imp9rta nl habitat vC!lues for thegii zzlyand . oIh~r wildlife include s~curity cover,succulent forbs; grqsses,anaavaiJa'bl~ range for early ' spri ng'. :Historic~al~~sexist o~the propertY as well, ' inc!udin-g old tepeeringS'(lnda ~uffalo jump_9ropping diredly) n\o r~ton Creek. ~1h$ lucky,eyem.Oy .alsb pick-up ori-:"orrowhead .o r . ~oonJheland . :, ." , ~' . The conserva~l6n . . . -.

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p~rtn~e~ship that ev~lved : - -. :-..." . , . '~'

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betweenth~ Na;ure C,o~s~rv~ncy-a~a Vit91 . ' .

Ground o~ th'is' a,cq ~ isiti6ri illustrates the " impbrtan~e of:N~rking G~lIediyely:with other, co,nservati9h 'g~up_s, on conservtng strategic habitat for the ,grizz~y: " .

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-:" Most irftportahtly,; this bna ,«il lbep;o.tecte~':·. " forever-<lnd-represents' tli.er9Ie thatVitbl, . ,: ' :'Grou ~ <;l will pLay 'in its missioJ) 6fcollser-ving '. . - habitat. ." ' . ,:""


~ \' ~, \~I ,.•~~~·::;r;~~i~~~nO~il~~;il~O::~~~t~f~~o:~~~~~;t~~:oi~"."': .t \J .qVk:kl~ to meet it~ goal of conserving sirqtegicl?r1ds. Theboc~b.ohe .

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and'lifeblood'of tnisfoundation-:is in the ha'nds of con'cenled do'nors wno_wish .; . ,to leaY~ q:ha,pitotJega'cy:fQrthe greptbear~' Char!Jablesypportc6m~es f,re.rn , .'-: . .­ " i ~divi'dual-s~ foun9ation,soii dcorpo~atlons ,throughout!he Gountry. ,,' .:' , . Ihe b~o~rd ~f trusf~es -'lqs established the firs~-everPartri.ers of Jhe Griizly- ' Fu ndand,theYH9t Habitat Cund.to SlJ~ce'sslullym~et h~ mis§L6,ri'.~· ' •

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Partners of the Grizzly Fund: $10 to $999

: The Partners of'the GrizzlyEund p rovide~ ", .' do-nots witllan opportunity ti:>. step fo~yjard . ' ~ith an ~nn'ual' gift for tne fTlissionof;sciving '! . 'wiid lands 9nd jmportanj habitad~rJhe ,,' " - ,: '. grizzly, The hmd w ill pla,y,a ~ ignifi ca ~l'i'ole in , " '.. furthering Vital Gtound'smissl on.(ind allow " . donors an opportunity t~ realize a' i?artnership ' , in. ·the Fo,undation. Revenue from this fundwill ge u ~ed to establish h~bifat'r,elatea programs ' enCll allow Vital Grouhd to meet the'challenge ' oFacguiring and conserving "v~al gr~und" for .' ' the great b(ilar . . ' , . ' .­ . '. Donations wilrbe dcc~pted FlIJually or

Vital Habitat Fund levels are: Friend .. ... .. ...... .. .. .. .. ... ... .. .. .. ,... ... ..... .... ,... .... .... .. $1,000 to $5,000 Associate .. .... ,.. ..,... .... .. ... ... ........ ,........ ... ,........ $5,001 to $10,000 Investor .............. .. ...... .. ... .. .. .. .. .................... $1 0,001 to $25,000* Partner .......... .. .. .. ......................... ...... .......... $25,001 to $50,000 Benefactor .... " .... .. .. .,....... .. ...... ... ..... .. .,... .... $50,001 to $100,000 Golden Benefactor ,......... ,... ........ .,............ ....... .. . $100,OOland up (All contributions are cumulative)

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,.:' '" pledges may be paid_rllonthly th roushoutthe . . -. '" , ' . : ' .. , '.' .­ ~-. : . yea.r. This.pa rtnersh!p fund,allows those'"" , and con~er~e ' sl ~n1flcant I ~mds :'Ithln ~nzzly . , •. concerned cOflservati~nist~ with 'an opportu, ,--:' ~ear range, habitat c,apltal,for Imm.e~ ~ate. ;md : .­ nitytod0nate $lOto $999 Jor.Vital Gro vnd's ' c ' tlm.elyuseolJ th.e.ground ; andcre~ l~d J lyand - " mission . . It's €I fa rrteslic.w aY fOfcpeoplefro''; '. " p~wer to mo.ve,forward with othe.r land · I.',', ... all walks of lif~' to 'joi'n us in our partnersnip steward.s andconservdtion,groups to protect r efforis ~~ ~ .-., ~ , . key habitats that are in jeopa rdyof.develop. ' -:.~ ­ ' AlI'denors will rec~;i ve Vital Grou~ci's ' ~ .'!lentor other negative impacts: ,.. ... .i, ~. newsletter and · ~nf1ua·l · ap~eals for special ~' -~ '" Benefits ,to the Vital Habitat Fund contributor ~. '. . ('*:o,t-the:lnvestor level and above) include 'a ~ . " projects. ' . ." • •• ' seat on the Vital G round Habitat Advisory , .

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"'Committeewhich 'meetsonceay~arih

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Jhe Vital Fidbitat fund will

b~ u~ed for the .

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' Moni<i~a for d ~o-day retr~at. 'The two day .

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event will include educafional seminars ftom "

pu~poses of acquisition p nd ~asem~nt sup-port" . ~ .leadIng wildlife biologists. social functions, , in area; ofstrategic imp'brtance. .,,' : The mainf6cus forJand acquisition a'nd securing donated coiis.ervoJion egsemenls for '

recreationaLactivlties, natural history ' p'resentations and direct input (1) key project needs f6r th'e proiection gnd recovery of the

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SpeCJQ 'Cnarlto _e .~~ G·ft :ld ' '. F' ~ D" I .eas or QnGrs..

.~ Th~rear~ a number of-options.dvailable for ' donors who are interesl eq i ~,'supporti'ng the ' , : ' conservation,efforts of-Vital 'Ground 'through creative tax and estate planning vehicles, We enco~rage you to sp~qk with your legal . ..$­ , counsel and,accountant about the option that . may best suit YOl!~ 'needs. "~ . ," ..' . . -. ' • Gifts of Secorities .' • Real Estate Gift • ~equests , • ~ife-Income G.ifts gn'd Trusts u': • Charitable Rem,aiiider Trust • Cfia£itable Gift .Afrinuity '. '.". ,

ihe Vital Ground Founct9tion lies in Montanq , " ~- grizzly, We "":ould be hoppy 't~:s~n9 y~uadditi~~~I ' . Donors wh0 pledge arid contribute $5 ;000 ~ .' infor.malioi! on oneor,allof the programs .Vital 'GrOliJidwili dlso be linking migmlion - corrid.ors a~d ~cosys. tems,· coi:lse;ving Idna,in '. mor.e will dls,o receive the Vital Gro.und , listed .. Plea,se ~end your contributions'to: , , : other stat!Js and Canadian provinces, and'. ~, • -· bronze of a sow g'rizzly ood ner-two c ub's, . workil'!.g withlandowr.rerscon· habit~tcar~ 6,nd ,'. _ fhi~ limited eQiti on '~olrectbr's piece was ' Vital Ground Foundation • m~ il')te nanc~ ,th[Qugh fhe Vital flabitatFund , " created exclusively.for Vital'Ground by well, .• P.O. Box 2971 T:hese'spec,i al c;ontribution s will giye the ' . '.­ known fine,artist 'B9b Scriver. '. ., Missoula, MY 59806 . } £ital Gr ound Foundation.the ability to ac.citJir~ . : ,.' ",:,

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IIIr TrlllunelSunday/FebnIaJy 511995

.'7A,

AMERICAN NOTEBOOK

' Cof1~ervaticm Agr~ernent :_o ~ Propos~d, EOfThee,GrizzlyB~ar '~ >,

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'~onservqti~npartnership between ' '" orie of,the largest private larjdowners of grizzly bear habitat 6~d ~t~te 'a nd ' federal agencieswas:cmnoun:cec( in : March by Plum Creek Timber Company, , : ­ Montana Department ~f State Lands (DSL)" , ; , , " V.S.D,A Forest Service (USFS) and the U.S : ,_' ' -Fish and Wilcllife Service. 'The proj~~t are~covers nearly 370,000 acres in<west ern ' • '" Montana. ,'" 'fhe cmrlOunce;;'ent was touted as "a .fandinarkagreement in principle fort~i '-, ,conservation of grizzly bears in the,Swan . Vall~-/~f Mbntanci':' '_ ' •' . Major elements of the 'agreement include protection 6f grizzly bear "Iin~age zones" in . the Swan Valley, limitatio'ns on commercial -timber hqrvest, protectiono f stream slde areas "'and road management. Th~ ' ;'lirikqge ~ones" ' will prOVide critical corridors for·bears-to move' be\w.een the Bob MarshGlIl and the Mi_ssion Mountain Wilderness Areas, , " The agreement also provides for ongoing . , monitoring a,ndresearch.ofgrizzly 6eais~ Plum Creek, as the nation's largest private land!=,wner of grizzly bear habitat, DSL arid ~. USFS will ,play. key roles in the rec~very of th~ _ bear. • --' ,

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. . The'conservalion ~greement outli'~es strategie~ through which the landpwners can

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._ coopetgtive[y manage their lands to enhance ', bear-recovery eff_ort~ while ~ontinui~g f'o~es!ry,< ,activities, II will'nofiake effect however, until , the U'S "Fish and Wildlife Servieecbmpletes 'Jfie'appro~risite environmental qssesshients " " and publiF 9pinion polls, , '

E'd ucat'i o'n Notes

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*VitaI9ro,und-board members Doug ,and Lynne Seus hGve conductec;!. nLimerpus , educational se,m!nars using Bart, a 1,50,cf{ pound grizzly, ani:Ltheir other trained animals , , Fo~ thousands of people si nce the ' . organ ization's,inception . 'Schoots,-boy '~nd girl scout troops, and local church and civic " grQups ha~e all'learned kom the Seus', Their • '­ ,message fOGuses on the Jmportance of ... p ·rotecting hGbitat, wildliFe awareness and , conservation for fhegreat-bear and other wild -, animals : • ,.' " , • , , ' ,

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telatively undisturbed, fomted land.

Mlaoa1a, MOIIt. In tar nonhwestern Montena, the

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Grizzly bears' survival rests in human hands that touch habitat

'*More than 275 peo~le atte~ded a social!

How the arizzly inleTlCll with man and is afI'tcted by bit na_ alterin& habi.. is a com,. aub­ ject. But it boils down to a simPle equation: The easier it is for man to pi into bear habitat, the more beara will die­

the winter.

As they sleep in their dens, livina

off fitt reserves for tbe next few months, a lonl-runninl bailIe

about their future will continue to

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Isolated in their wilderness . . doubt ­ cut off from tarser bear populations and blocks of suitable habitat to the east by the loaina roads, timber cleat-aJts, housins developments and farms that mark man's intrusion into their world ­ the dozen or SO srizzlies remainins in the Cabinets &R liv­ ina on the precipice.

people," said Rick MIce, • .. IC8n:b bioIosist with the Montana Department of F..... Wildlife and Parks.

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The conftict is clear in the al foresIs of the northern Roddea, which &R III&IIIIOd IIIIder • "mul­ tiplo-Ule" mandate that is aupo to ~ rooIl! ~or bunq

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The fraci1ity of this remnant pop­ ulation underscores the obstacles to preserving wbat one writer called the "symbolic and livina embodiment of wild nature un­ conllOUed by man." Grizzly bears once numbered more than SO,OOO and ranaed across a dozen states &om the mid-Plains to California. Ni_ teen years after the federal govern­ ment put the arizzly on its list of threatened species, the srizzIy's rapid decline has been halted. But for all the attention and resources - CUJTentiy $2 million a year , lavished on UTSUS arctos horribi, "lis) . there stiD is rio consensus about bow to auarantee its sur­ vival. The publication last y~r of a ~ vised version of the ,overnment'J plan for arizzly recovery has . . kindled a fiem: conflict amona conservationists, biologists and land manaaen. It is waged on many &onts, from the esoteric

::~t!!:p::~~ ~~a~!tt~ ':: elusive, far-ranain, mammal in rou", and wild country to the federal courts, where the recovery plan is beiDa chaIIenaed by some envimnmentalllOURSAnd because it involves millions

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acres of public land aImody

beiDa fought over by environmen­ talists, lops. ranchers, miners and recreationists, the conftict is u much political u scientific.

Bear researchers estimate that 900 to 1,000 ~es &R left in a few hical1y dislinct _ in the

~8 states. The \araest popu­

lation ­ several hundred beara ­ inhabits a 10,QOO.squaro-mile area of Montena !mown u the North­ ern Continental Divide ~ tem, which spreads over Glacier National Park and adjacent na· tional forests.

All estimated 2S0 srizz!ies occupy YeUDWSIone National Park and surroundina national fores... Per­ haps several dozen live in the Sel­ kirk Mountains of nonheastern Washin,lon and nonhwestern Idaho, 10 the west of the smaU arizzly population in the Cabinets­ It also is believed that a few grizz­ lies move in and out of the north­ ern Cascades in north-central

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For _pie, the Kootenai Na­ tional FOIaI, whidI includes the Cabinet Mountaina, baa 7,200 mila of roads, _ of them buih for ~ _ _ Since the bear wu listed u thrateoed in 1975, S.3 biIliOll boanI-&et of timber

haw beeft' I~ ill the Kootenai; and since 197~, about 1,600 mila of road have been CODIInICIed. From the air, the roads 8pPC!1 u a vast latticework COIIIIeCIIDI bllD­ cbeds of timber clear...... - all of it a beni.er to pizZIy movement

between recov~ zones.

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UDder IepI &om .vi­ ronmentaliats and admiDiItratiw nudlina by the U.S; Filii and WiJclIife Servi<e, national fIIIaIa in bear country &R acceIenlilll the pace of b10ckiDa and cIoaiDa roads. But Dot fUt eDOUIb. I&Y many critica.

WashinatOD, , The !imitin, factor for the arizzly is the inexorable shriokaae of hab­ itaL To satisfy their enormous protein and carbohydrate require­ ments, the omnivorous J>ears have large home ranaes. and they need

Rep~i ~.i;a Frorn.lhe'Miimeapolis Star Trib;';n~, Mirineapol(s Mrrin~sotci. '·,.• .

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' educ~li6n~1 CFuncti'on h;n~rin~ Vital Gr6Crid in.' .

Los Angeles, talifo~~ia and hundreds·of -, people attended the dedicatio~ for the first acquisition project in Montana . , . *The U.S. FarestService has benefited by ' te­sting '~ Bear Proqf Boxes a-~d Panniers," wrih • ,Bart, and through edUc(ltional Films on _safe ~ ~, " camping 'and hiking in beqr country also: , featuring ,Bart. -, '

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strategic acres conserved will be the itnmedj:' " ate.focus of fhenew execuli\'e (h~ctor.- To' '::­ .date; the founders and vorunle~r board of ' ,truslees have cqmpleted a. npmber'of sig'nifi­ cant ccmsElrvation p-rograms. A summQr,yof " these prcijeci~ qnd a' progress reporCV:ill.be ,: , ' featured In-eac;:hissue pf the 'newsle~er. :_ ':""'"'f

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. *Rc;lseardi projects have also been' ' '\' c ;;..completed using the s~us' \Yolf pacJ and olner .,>< animals: These studiesha~e ineiuded scat ' - While the di~ection ofViial Gro~~a ' ' genetic informati~n (es~~r(::h: c,ontinues to matu~e,d0ilar~ on-the-grou~d .ahd ' " . a~aly~is Gnd I' - '.' .... :.. .:::­

Projects To Date ' .

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· pa-rtnersof.ihe:Grinly:

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. ' Ihaye e,ndosed o l1 d pl~dge mY'onr:iu9 1s.upport ih th~amOun't of $_: _~.,,_--,--_ ~

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, Yit~'IJ~obitat ~u;'d: ~._ . __ . ,.'". . I wish t9 in'crea~e my level9f support

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by participating in the.Vital ·Habitat Fund jnjhea[nQunt of $~._. -:-:' --,-'___~.'

·F~ie~d: , .. .~ .:".~:~.- :~ . :>.:.;._ ;..,. ::'.:.. .:.:.::.. ~ ... . ~ .....· ~1 ,009 fO.$5~OOO~ .' . po;t~er': " " "" :" :~" H" ;':: "'_;~' :'" :. ~.'.,:..~~.. :... :;. $25) 001 to $50,000~ ­ Associate :.... :......... .. ....: .. :..: ....... ..:.:: ... •,...-:..:: $5,001 io $10,000 .

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Ih~e~t~r:

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BelJefactor: .:.: :.:.'.... .-........ :.. .: .. .. ... :: .. :.:.. ;•. $50,QO 1.fo $100,000

~: . / .. ~ .. :.. ~:~:: ..~~: ...'.. ;.-.-:;:>;.$:10,001 to $2~;bO:6 . GoI9.enBer:lefqct~r ....;:::.. .: ;: .: .:..... :,'., .. ;~ .. :~ .. :. :. $JOO,OO ( COlnd up' .

Name._____________________________________.Address________________________________________________ ,.. :.

City_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _~_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.State._ _ _ _ _ _Zip_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ Home Phone_______________________ Business Phone________________________.FAX._______________________

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Individual Gift

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Foundation Gift

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Corporate Gift Individual donors: please note that your employer may match your gift.

Check with your personnel department and strengthen your gift to the Vital Ground Foundation . Business/Foundation Name.___________________________________________________________________________

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Please contact me regarding planned giving (wills and bequests)

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Please contact me regarding other Charitable Gift Ideas

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BULK RATE U.S. Postage

. PAID _ Missoula, MT _ . - Permit No.

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:-' :Forwa rd[ng& Retu;~ '.: Postage' Gucir~ l,1 t~et.l, , Address Correction _: .'.:, Requ ~sted .'

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Vital News, Spring/Summer 1995, PREMIERE ISSUE