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2018


Cover Cropping: Getting Started IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS WHEN CHOOSING COVER CROPS 1. Start small to build your knowledge before scaling up. 2. Start with the basics. Cereal rye establishes well in late summer and early fall, is winter hardy, and is easier to terminate in the spring than legumes. 3. Determine which outcomes most interest you (e.g. erosion control, reduction of offsite movement of nutrients, grazing, etc) to decide which cover-cropping system fits your needs. 4. Have a plan. For example, if cover crops are seeded into soybeans, and they are winter hardy, what is the plan for planting corn not only in high-residue, but also void of fall tillage? (Strip-tillage is a viable option for many corn and soybean growers.) 5. Check herbicide rotational restrictions. 6. Contact your insurance provider before proceeding with your cover crop plan. 7. Pick a uniform spot in your field and plant with and without cover crops. Keep everything else constant. With yield monitors, and adequate replication, you can assess if cover crops are a good fit for your farm. 8. Be prepared to move quickly in the spring: overwintering cover crops can add biomass quickly. 9. Call us with questions! 800-352-5247

COVER CROP SEEDING 1. Ensure good seed-to-soil contact, proper seeding depth, and adequate soil preparation. 2. If possible, time cover crop seeding with forecasted rain. 3. If using cover crops for forage, increase seeding rates by 50%. 4. If broadcasting or aerial seeding cover crops, increase seeding rates by 25%-30%. 5. Some crops, like cover crop radish, can be precision planted on rows, lowering overall seeding rates.

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Seeding Rate (lbs/acre)

Seeding Date

Approx. In Mix Seeds/lb 25-75 18,000

Aug.-Nov.

96-128

48-64

16,000

Aug.-Sept.

1 - 2''

YES

-

F

VG

E

E

E

15-20

20-30

4-5

227,000

Aug.-Sept.

¼ - ½''

YES

-

G

VG

VG

E

E

Tillage Radish

6-8

8-10

3-4

25,000

Aug.-Sept.

¼ - ½''

2

YES

-

VG

VG

E

VG

E

Purple Top Turnips

4-6

6-8

1-2

220,000

July-Aug.

¼ - ½''

YES

2

-

-

F

G

G

E

Forage Rape

4-8

8-10

1-2

145,000

July-Aug.

¼ - ½''

YES2

-

VG

VG

VG

VG

E

Mustard

15-20

20-25

2-4

180,000

Aug.-Sept.

¼ - ¾''

YES

-

G

VG

VG

VG

P

Phacelia

7-12

Not Recommended

3-5

220,000

Aug.-Sept.

¼''

YES

-

-

VG

VG

E

-

45-100

55-125/Aerial not advised

15-25

15,000

May-Aug.

½ - 2''

YES

G

G

G

F

F

VG

E

E

E

Species Name Winter Rye

Drilled 50-100

Broadcast1/Aerial 120-150

Oats

64-96

Annual / Italian Ryegrass

Buckwheat

Seeding Winter Total N3 P & K Erosion Weed Quick Grazing Depth Kill2 (lb/A/yr) Scavenger Control Control Growth 1'' NO VG E E E E 2

NITROGEN PRODUCING COVER CROP LEGUMES

Hairy Vetch

25-35

30-40

15-20

16,000

Aug.-Oct.

½ - 1’’

NO2

70-200

Common Vetch

50-60

60-75

20-40

7000

Aug.-Sept.

½ - 1''

YES

50-120

Winter Peas

50-100

Not Recommended

25-50

2000

Aug.-Sept.

1 - 2''

YES

70-150

Field Peas

100-200

Not Recommended

50-100

2000

Mar-May, Aug.-Sept.

2 - 3''

YES

70-150

Lentils

40-50

50-75

10-20

15000

Mar.-May, Aug.-Sept.

1 - 1½"

YES

20-30

Chickling Vetch

60-70

Not Recommended

20-30

2600

Mar.-May

1 - 1½"

YES

80-100

Balansa Clover

5-8

6-9

2-3

500,000

Mar.-May, July-Sept.

¼''

YES

50-100

50-90

Not Recommended

20-40

4000

Mar.-May

¼ - ¾''

YES

100-200

Lupin

2

Crimson Clover

12-25

25-30

2-5

150,000

June-Sept.

¼ - ½''

YES

55-130

Cowpeas

50-100

Not Recommended

20-30

3000

June-Aug.

½ - 1''

YES

100-150

Sunn Hemp

15-20

Not Recommended

4-8

11,000

June-Aug.

½ - 1''

YES

100-140

Berseem Clover

12-15

15-20

2-5

200,000

May 15-Aug 30

1/4 - ½''

YES

55-100

Yellow Blossom

8-12

15-20

2-5

259,000

Feb-May; Aug.

1/4 - ½’’

NO

100-200

Mammoth Red Clover

8-12

15-20

2-5

272,000

Feb-May; Aug.

1/4 - ½’’

NO

70-150

100-150

Not Recommended

1 - 3”

YES

50-140 50-75

G

Faba Beans

25-50 1,200-1,600 Mar.-April; Aug.- Sept 15

COVER CROP MIXES

NitroMax CC1

75-125

90-150

-

Varies

Aug.-Sept.

1/2 - 1”

YES2

ValueMax CC2

15-20

20-25

-

Varies

Aug.-Sept.

1/4 - 1/2

YES

30-65

VG

VG

E

E

VG

WinterMax CC3

40-50

50-75

-

Varies

Aug.-Sept.

1/2 - 1”

NO

50-75

G

VG

E

E

E

GrazeMax CC4

15-20

20-25

-

Varies

Aug.-Sept.

1/4 - 1/2”

YES

-

VG

VG

E

VG

E

AerialMax CC5

60-70

75-80

-

Varies

Aug.-Sept.

1/2”

NO

20-40

VG

E

E

VG

E

SummerMax CC6

50-75

75-80

-

Varies

May-Aug.

1/2 - 1”

YES

50-100

VG

E

E

E

G

MultiMax CC7

15-20

20-25

-

Varies

Aug.-Sept.

1/4 - 1/2”

YES2

30-65

G

VG

VG

VG

E

CultivationMax CC8

12-15

15-20

-

Varies

June-July

1/4 - 1/2”

NO

2

30-65

G

G

F

G

VG

Plowdown Blend CC9

12-15

15-20

-

Varies

Feb.-May

1/4 - 1/2”

NO

2

50-100

E

G

G

P

VG

2

2

Incorporating broadcast seed by dragging or lightly disking will increase successful germination • 2 winter kill success will vary. Typically dependent on severity of winter and snow cover • 3 total N/year is dependent on several factors including soil temperature, how long crop is allowed to grow, etc.

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ORDERING & INQUIRIES

SHIPPING

To place an order, check pricing and availability, and to receive a shipping quote, call or email!

1) We ship with UPS, SpeeDee Delivery, and common carrier throughout the country. 2) We can help determine the best way to ship. Rates are affected by weight and destination. 3) We attempt to ship in-stock orders within 48 hours of receiving your of payment but cannot guarantee delivery dates or times.

Phone: (800) 352-5247 Email: seedhouse@alseed.com

All prices are subject to change without notice. Please call ahead to check availability before arriving for pickup or shipment.

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Cover Cropping 101 COVER CROPPING IN NO-TILL CORN-SOYBEAN ROTATION Research indicates that, on its own, a no-till system takes several years before crop yields increase as soil productivity ramps up and more nitrogen is stored in the soil in organic matter and humus. Cover crops can help no-till farmers eliminate yield decreases as they get through the transition hump. No-till corn-soybean rotations benefit from the nitrogen management offered by integrating cover crops. Although corn is a heavy nitrogen feeder, soybeans benefit very little from cover crop nitrogen. Example No-Till Rotation with Cover Crops

CORN > WINTER RYE > SOYBEANS > WINTER RYE Winter rye scavenges nitrogen after corn and becomes a long-lasting residue that retains soil moisture and suppresses weeds for your soybeans. Plant rye as soon as possible after corn harvest. If you need more time in the fall, try overseeding in rowed beans at drydown in early fall, or in early summer at the last cultivation of corn. Kill the rye once it is about knee-high or about two weeks before soybean planting. (Farmers are experimenting with “planting green” - planting soybeans directly into growing rye. Learn more: bit.ly/2Jg3OJ5.) If soil moisture is low, consider killing the rye earlier. Follow the beans with small grain mixture.

SMALL GRAIN COVER CROPS BENEFITS Small grains offer many benefits for the soil, including organic matter addition, improved erosion control, soil biological diversity, water infiltration, drainage, nutrient availability, weed suppression, and fertility retention. • Relatively Inexpensive - Cover crops are planted at a third to a half of the forage seeding rate. • Easy to Manage - Large seeds establish easily when planted at the right depth and grow quickly and tiller in the fall when planted on time. • Easy to Control - Weediness is minimized by proper spring control (tillage, mowing, or grazing). • Nutrient Uptake - Root masses penetrate downward and outward, scavenging nutrients from manure applications and leachate from the previous crop, often making off-season manure applications possible. • Organic Matter - Excellent sources of over-winter soil organic matter. • Multi-Purpose - Plant at a full rate, and small grain stands can be grazed or harvested in fall or spring. • Flexible in Rotations - Most small grains can still be planted after corn silage harvest. Triticale and rye often can be planted after corn grain harvest. Oats can be planted in late summer and will winterkill. 4


Cover Crop Termination SPRAYING TERMINATION Timing of herbicide application is critical for contact and systemic chemicals. Only spray when plants are actively growing (usually late morning through early afternoon) and temperatures are warm. Always consult the label and discuss your chemical applications with your local co-op or chemical expert.

TILLAGE/MOWING TERMINATION Allow cover crops to develop as much as possible to grow the most biomass, build soil, and fix nitrogen. The closer to reproductive maturity, the better depending on the situation. Ease of termination by mowing/tillage will depend on the cover crop species, growth stage, timing of passes, and the following crop.

GRAZING TERMINATION Nearly all cover crops and cover crop mixes can be grazed and will provide excellent forage. Proper management is critical to ensure correct time of grazing, utilization rate, and grazing height. Success of kill by grazing will depend on cover crop species, growth stage, and timing of grazing events.

Local Pilots and Aerial Applicators Company

Location

Phone

Arnt Aerial Spraying

Worthington, MN

507-376-3305

Agri-Tech Aviation

Indianola, IA

515-240-0560

Bart’s Flying Service

Storm Lake, IA

712-732-6494

Blue Earth Aviation

Blue Earth, MN

507-526-7264

Fairmont Aerial Ag.

Frost, MN

507-236-1938

Heiderscheidt Aerial

Sleepy Eye, MN

507-794-7540

Hoppe Airspray

Conrad, IA

319-610-3628

J-Bird Helicopters

Mankato, MN

507-245-3939

Klinkenborg Aerial

Parkersbug, IA

720-878-1670

Lowry Flying Inc.

Grinnell, IA

641-325-0261

Meyer Agri Air

Wellsburg, IA

641-640-8723

Olsem Aeriall LLC

Westbrooke, MN

507-360-1281

Pocahontas Aerial

Pocahontas, IA

712-335-4860

R&M Spraying

Sioux Center, IA

712-722-2293

Scott’s Helicopter

Le Sueur, MN

507-665-4064

Storm Flying Service

Webster City, IA

515-832-3723

Thisius Flying Service

Wells, MN

507-383-9157

Todd’s Flying Service

Ankeny, IA

515-964-0380

Wells AG Supply

Fonda, IA

712-288-6210

(Inclusion on this list does not imply an endorsement.)

5


Albert Lea Seed Cover Crop Mixes NitroMax CC1

Oats 48.5% + Field Peas 48.5% + Radish 3% Cover crop blend designed for maximum green manure production in the fall following early-harvested crops like small grains, sweet corn, vegetables, corn silage, or early soybeans. Tall growing oats and field peas are a good complement to the radish in resource use and optimization and provide numerous benefits both above and below ground. Diversity in this blend will maximize soil coverage and will work on a variety of soil types. Winterkills in Upper Midwest. • Excellent for chopping or grazing • Good scavenger of N and other leachable nutrients • Excellent fall growth and biomass accumulation • Avoid aerial application. Not a good fit after grain corn or soybeans Planting Date: August 1st – September 15th Seeding: 75-125 lbs/acre at ½ to ¾ in. deep. Drill or broadcast Conventional________________ $0.50/lb $25.00/50lb bag Organic____________________ $0.64/lb $32.00/50lb bag

All ingredients on our cover crop mixes are variety not stated 6

ValueMax CC2

Conventional Blend: Annual Ryegrass 60% + Crimson Clover 20% + Radish 15% + Dwarf Essex Rape 5% Organic Blend: Organic Annual Ryegrass 65% + Organic Alsike Clover 20% + Organic Radish 15% A diverse combination of small seeded cover crops that builds healthy soils, fixes nitrogen, and sequesters nutrients. Annual ryegrass adds biomass and is an excellent weed competitor; crimson clover fixes N and radish and rape accumulate nutrients and mitigate compaction. Mix will winterkill in the Upper Midwest. High diversity and high seeds per lb. stretch your dollars and maximizes your cover crop investment. • Excellent for aerial application into standing crops in the fall or for seeding at V6 in corn • Can establish under shade & canopy with adequate moisture • Suitable for grazing in the fall • Not a good fit after grain corn or soybeans. Later seeding will reduce clover growth Planting Date: Last cultivation; August 1st - September 15th Seeding: 15-20 lbs/acre at ¼ to ½ in. deep. Drill, broadcast, or aerial apply Conventional________________ $1.10/lb $55.00/50lb bag Organic____________________ $2.00/lb $100.00/50lb bag

WinterMax CC3

Winter Rye 75% + Hairy Vetch 20% + Radish 5% Our most winter-hardy blend specifically formulated for growers in northern climates. The winter rye and hairy vetch in this diverse blend will reliably survive the winter in the Upper Midwest and provide good soil coverage along with excellent biomass yields in the spring. Combines the hardiness and aggressiveness of winter rye, the N-fixation potential of hairy vetch with the deep soil penetration of the radish. • Winter-hardy species provide maximum soil health benefits; covering the soil during periods of peak erosion • Widely adaptable for all soil types and fertility levels • Suitable for fall or early spring grazing • Best planted after small grains, vegetables, corn silage, or early soybeans. Can be planted after corn grain or soybeans _but hairy vetch/radish growth will be minimal Planting Date: August 1st – September 15th Seeding: 50-75 lbs/acre at ¼ to ½ in. deep. Drill, broadcast or aerial apply. Conventional________________ $0.62/lb $31.00/50lb bag Organic____________________ $0.90/lb $45.00/50lb bag


GrazeMax CC4

Oats 95% + Radish 3% + Turnips 2% Mixture specifically formulated for cost-effective biomass production for grazing in the fall. Radish & turnips diversify this blend and add highly digestible protein; cows & other grazing livestock often will paw the taproot/bulbs out of the ground after a frost. Oats consistently produce the most fall tonnage in the Upper Midwest. Mix will winterkill in the Upper Midwest. Excellent tonnage potential for pennies on the dollar. • High seeds/lb & low cost make this an easy choice for fall forage • Well adapted to varied soil types & seeding methods • Excellent fit after hayfield termination, small grains, sweet corn, or silage corn • Not a good fit after full-season grain corn or soybeans Planting Date: August 1st – September 15th Seeding: 75-100 lbs/acre at ¼ to ½ in. deep. Drill or broadcast. Conventional_________________ $0.34/lb $17.00/50lb bag

AerialMax CC5

Winter Rye 75% + Lentils 15% + Turnips 5% + Dwarf Essex Rape 5% Specialized cover crop mix designed specifically for aerial application into standing corn or soybeans in the Upper Midwest. Created in collaboration with Practical Farmers of Iowa based on on-farm trialing of fall growth and biomass accumulation. Mixture provides excellent fall and early spring soil coverage and mix diversity maximizes rotational benefits. Winter rye will survive the winter, other species will winterkill. • Best results when flown on or applied prior to corn dieback (at or before black layer) or at soybean leaf yellowing and leaf drop • Time your fly-on with a predicted rain for best establishment success • Not a good fit for V6/last cultivation seeding in corn • Can be planted later than range but later planting will lessen growth of lentils, turnips and rape Planting Date: August 1st – September 15th Seeding: 60-70 lbs/acre at ½ in. depth. Drill, broadcast or aerial apply. Conventional __________________ $0.52/lb $26.00/50lb bag

SummerMax CC6

CultivationMax CC8

Conventional Blend: Buckwheat 30% + Soybeans 30% + Sorghum/Sudangrass 15% + Japanese Millet 15% + Sunn Hemp 10%

Organic Annual Rye 40% + Organic Radish VNS 20% + Organic Medium Red Clover 20% + Organic Alsike Clover 15% + Organic Hardy Alfalfa 5%

Organic Blend: Organic Buckwheat 35% + Organic Soybean 40% + Organic Viking 220 Sorghum Sudangrass 15% + Organic Corn 10%

Shade-tolerant blend of organic cover crop species formulated for seeding at last cultivation in corn (~V6 stage). Well adapted to varying soil types and field conditions. With adequate moisture, cover crops will emerge and stay semi-dormant until the corn crop starts dying back in the fall. Will not impede growth or harvest of the corn. We don’t recommend interseeding into soybeans as the canopy is too shady to allow for cover crop survival. • Excellent small seeded mix for companion planting with corn at last cultivation (~June) • We’ve seen the best success with this system when timed with a rain at seeding and specialized interseeding equipment is used (vs. broadcasting) • Mixture best suited for medium to heavy textured soils; will likely struggle on sandy soils without irrigation Planting Date: June 1st – July 5th ; V6/last cultivation will depend on planting date and corn maturity Seeding: 12-15 lbs/acre at ¼ to ½ in. deep. Drill or broadcast Organic_____________________ $2.60/lb $130.00/50lb bag

Warm-season cover crop mix blended for maximum summer growth, weed suppression, and soil building. Vigorous growing combination of summer annual grasses, broadleaves, and legumes will compete with any weed and put on tremendous growth and biomass. Jump-start your soil health regimen with this hearty mix. Provides good summer grazing/forage in a pinch. Plant after all danger of frost has passed. • Ideal for summer fallow soil building, prevent plant situations, or as a diverse grazing/forage mixture • Suitable for all soil types and field situations • Control mixture at first sign of buckwheat and/or sunn hemp flowers to prevent volunteer seed • Introduce grazing animals slowly to sunn hemp-heavy stands. Sunn hemp seed is toxic to livestock, and the plant can get woody and overly fibrous if allowed to grow past first flower (>60 days) Planting Date: May 30th – August 15th Seeding: 50-75 lbs/acre at ½ to 1 in. deep. Drill or broadcast. Conventional_________________ $0.68/lb $34.00/50lb bag Organic_____________________ $0.88/lb $44.00/50lb bag

Plowdown Blend CC9

Organic Mammoth Red Clover 30% + Organic Alsike Clover 30% + Organic Yellow Blossom Clover 25% + Organic Hardy Alfalfa 15%

MultiMax CC7

Annual Ryegrass 40% + Crimson Clover 15% + Berseem Clover 15% + Lentils 15% + Radish 5% + Turnips 5% + Dwarf Essex Rape 5% Our most diverse cover crop blend designed to meet or exceed the requirements of the USDA EQIP program for cover crop cost-share. Diversity of grasses, legumes, and brassicas make this mix adaptable to any field condition and soil type. Smaller seed size and high seeds/lb provide a premium level of diversity for a relatively low cost. Mix will winterkill in the Upper Midwest. • Excellent candidate for aerial application into standing crops or at the V6/last cultivation stage • Time your fly-on or application with a predicted rain for best establishment success • Can establish under shade and canopy with adequate moisture • Not a good fit after grain corn or soybeans. Later planting will lessen prevalence of clovers Planting Date: Last cultivation ; August 1st - September 15th Seeding: 15-20 lbs/acre at ¼ to ½ in. deep. Drill, broadcast or aerial apply Conventional____________________ $1.32/lb $66.00/50lb bag

Our most popular cover crop legume mixture for nitrogen plowdown. Well adapted to varying soil types and field conditions. Produces abundant biomass and fixes a good amount of N for the following cash crop; positions your fields well for corn the following year. Should not interfere with small grain growth or harvest. • Excellent fit for underseeding spring small grains or frost seeding into winter small grains • Suited for all soil types from heavy to dry • Can potentially fix 50-100+ lbs N/acre for the following crop • Legumes will be at peak N-fixation potential at flowering Planting Date: February-May; August 1st – August 15th. Seeding: 12-15 lbs/acre at ¼ to ½ in. deep. Drill or broadcast. Organic_____________________ $2.90/lb $145.00/50lb bag

Custom Mixes Not Finding What You Want? We Do Custom Mixes! Albert Lea Seed can custom blend cover crop mixes to fit any field, rotation, or soil type. Call for a quote: (800) 352-5247 7


Grazing & Biomass Cover Crops Winter Rye*

Most common and most hardy fall-seeded cover crop in northern climates. It can be grazed deep into the fall, competes heavily with weeds and produces lots of forage/ green manure in the spring. Will germinate down to 35°F soil temp. Excellent feed value as forage with protein levels up to 18%. • Best used as a cover crop, forage crop and/or grain crop • Well adapted to all soil types including low fertility, acidic, or sandy soils • Can be planted deep into the fall (basically until snow flies) • Can suppress germination of following crops (esp. small seeded crops). It is recommended to allow _ biomass to decompose for 7-10 days prior to planting • Heavy N and water user in the spring. Kill early if _ drought is forecasted Price/bag

1-9 bags

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

Conventional

ASK

ASK

ASK

ASK

Organic

ASK

ASK

ASK

ASK

Aroostook Winter Rye • Specially selected winter rye variety by the USDA • An early-heading variety currently favored in organic no-till systems with a roller-crimper • Excellent for use as a cover crop after full-season crops • Good spring recovery and early-season vigor • Very tall variety, early maturity Price/bag

1-9 bags

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

Conventional

ASK

ASK

ASK

ASK

Organic

ASK

ASK

ASK

ASK

Cover Crop Barley* • A cheap option for cover cropping • Excellent for fall forage and grazing Conventional____________ $9.50/48 lb bag Organic_________________ $20/48 lb bag 8

Annual Ryegrass*

Cover Crop Oats*

Buckwheat*

Phacelia*

The most economical grass choice for cover cropping. High seeds/lb and rapid growing plant with an extensive root system that builds soil structure and holds soil in place. Very good cold tolerance, can survive the winter if planted in zone 5 or warmer. Excellent for fall grazing and forage; although oats and winter rye will give you more tonnage. Very good candidate for aerial application. • Low-cost cover crop that be seeded at last cultivation/V6 or flown on into standing corn or soybeans • Well adapted to varying soil types • Root structure will be large even though above-ground growth may be minimal • May have winter survival more north based on the severity of the winter. Be prepared to spray or till in the spring to ensure complete kill Conventional_________________ $0.84/lb $42/50 lb bag Organic_____________________ $1.60/lb $80/50 lb bag

A quick-growing, broadleaved summer annual ready to incorporate in 35 to 45 days. Potential for multiple crops per year. Grain crop reaches maturity in 70 to 90 days. Very competitive with tough-to-control perennial and annual weeds like giant ragweed and Canada thistle. Easy to control and residue breaks down rapidly making this an ideal choice for small-scale producers. Excellent scavenger of P and other nutrients. Attracts beneficial insects and pollinators with its abundant flowers. • Excellent full-summer cover crop & pollinator-forage crop • Thrives on nutrient poor and varying soil types, but not on compacted, droughty, or wet soils • Sensitive to frost, drought, excessive heat, and any carryover herbicides • Terminate crop at first sign of flowering to avoid volunteer weed issues 1-5 bags

6-39 bags

Conventional

$35

$32

$29

$27

Organic

$39

$36

$33

$31

Price/bag

40-199 200+ bags bags

Economical oat blend suitable for cover cropping and fall forage. Oats are fast establishing, produce abundant biomass, and are competitive with weeds. Fibrous root system builds soil structure and captures excess nutrients. Oats are good scavengers of P and other soil nutrients. Easy to control and can fit into almost any rotation. Oats will winterkill. • Cost-effective cover crop choice for soil coverage in the in fall • Excellent biomass production and fall forage potential (more than annual ryegrass) • Best fit after small grains, vegetables, corn silage, or early soybeans. Not a good fit after grain corn or soybeans • We’ve seen limited success with aerial application Conventional________________ $7.50/bu $11.25/48 lb bag Organic______________________$12/bu $18/48 lb bag

• Non-leguminous annual broadleaf with fern-like leaves and purple blossoms • Provides early-season soil coverage and produces abundant flowers that are very attractive to pollinators. Flowers 6-8 weeks after emergence • Will winterkill at 18°F and residue breaks down quickly. Plant early enough in the fall • Avoid broadcasting/aerial application Conventional__________________ $3.40/lb $170/50 lb bag


Dwarf Essex Rape

• A succulent, leafy and quick-growing fall brassica • Good biomass accumulation; especially ideal for fall grazing. Leafier and taller than turnips • We like dwarf essex rape in cover crop blends for its rapid and vigorous growth, low cost and high seeds/lb • Has tested better than radishes for aerial application under dry soil conditions Conventional___________________$.90/lb $45/50 lb bag

Cover Crop Radish*

• Vigorous growth and taproot growth accumulates leachable nutrients, protects soil, improve infiltration and mitigate compaction • Well adapted to all soil types, except wet areas • Plants will break down completely by spring; no need for aggressive fall or spring tillage. Plan on light field cultivation in the spring for optimum seedbed prep • Winterkills in the Upper Midwest • Not suitable for spring planting; will bolt and shed seed Price/lb

Carwoodi Oilseed Radish NEW!

• European variety developed for nematode suppression • Branching root system is excellent at trapping excess nitrates in soil • More lateral roots than daikon radish, concentrated closer to soil surface • Allow 60 days for maximum biomass production. • Will winterkill at 20-25° F Conventional__________________ $2.20/lb

1-499 lb

500-1999 bags

2000+ lbs

Conventional

$1.60

$1.45

$1.30

Organic

$3.20

$3.05

$2.90

Tillage Radish

• The radish that started it all; daikon radish bred specifically for its long taproot • Breaks up plowpan & loosens soil • Excellent scavenger of N, P & Ca • Non-bolting if planted in the fall Price/lb Conventional

1-499 lb

500-1999 lb

2000+ lbs

$2.60

$2.45

$2.30

Yellow Mustard*

• Economical choice for cover cropping • Good fit if frost-seeded before soybeans or flown in fall • Very fast growing, potential for smoother crop • Control plant at first flower to avoid seed set and volunteer weed issues Conventional__________________ $1.20/lb $60/50 lb bag

Pacific Gold Mustard

• Certified, Non-GMO variety of brown mustard bred specifically for cover cropping • Excellent biomass production and rapid growth. Good competitive ability with weeds • High levels of plant glucosinolates can reduce pathogenic soil fungi and nematodes. Chop or mow the mustard prior to incorporation to maximize effect • Mustards do not thrive in mixtures with other cover crops • Control plant before seed set to avoid volunteer weed issues Conventional Certified Blue Tag______ $2.90/lb $72.50/25 lb bag

Purple Top Turnips

• Hardy, leafy, large-rooted brassica that produces abundant biomass above and below ground • Excellent fall grazing potential • Good competitor with weeds. Thrives on all soil types. • Will scavenge N and other excess nutrients in the soil and prevent them from leaching Conventional__________________ $1.50/lb $75/50 lb bag Organic______________________ $2.40/lb $120/50 lb bag

Do Radishes Plug Tile Lines?

Although rare, occasionally farmers report plant roots plugging their main tile lines and laterals. Most clogged tile line problems show up in late spring after the dead covercrop roots start to slough off and accumulate at lateral junctions in tile lines. Farmers may assume their cover crop radishes are to blame. It is true that radishes planted in June or July can develop large and aggressive root systems that put tile lines – especially shallow lines – more at risk; however, corn, wheat, and annual ryegrass roots occasionally can plug tile lines, too.

If you’re concerned about roots infiltrating and clogging tile lines here are some tips: • Lower the radish seeding rate to 1 lb – 2 lbs / acre • Rather than pure stands of radish, plant a cover crop mixture. • Delay seeding radish in the Upper Midwest until mid-August 9


Nitrogen-Fixing Cool Season Cover Crops Hairy Vetch*

Winter annual, viney cover crop legume with purple blossoms and compound leaves. Exceptional biomass; can be a heavy N-fixer (up to 100+ lbs N/acre at flowering). Improves soil structure, scavenges P, and competes well against early season weeds. Can winterkill if planted past recommended dates. • Best fall-planted legume for nitrogen fixation • Companion seed with oats, winter rye or another nurse crop to increase chances of winter survival • Produces hard seed; control plant before seed set Do not seed vetch into small grains if harvesting for marketable grain. Vetch seed is hard to separate from small grains • Very viney: can clog equipment Conventional_____________ $1.50/lb $75/50 lb bag Organic_________________ $2.00/lb $100/50 lb bag

Purple Bounty Hairy Vetch • Winterhardy, early maturing hairy vetch from USDA • Selected for high nitrogen fixation potential and increased biomass • Flowers two weeks earlier than common hairy vetch making it ideal for Upper Midwest rotations Organic_________________ $2.20/lb $110/50 lb bag

Chickling Vetch*

• Viney, spring-seeded cover crop legume used for plowdown and N production • Frost and drought tolerant, high moisture efficiency • 8-10 weeks of growth produces 80-100lbs N/acre • Can be cut for forage, but do not feed seed to livestock • Do not broadcast seed Conventional________________ ASK Organic_____________________ ASK

Common Vetch*

• Viney legume with pea-like flowers, compound leaves • Good growth for cover cropping if seeded early in the fall, excellent candidate for aerial application •Will winterkill in the Upper Midwest Conventional______________ $.90/lb $45/50 lb bag Organic____________________ ASK 10

Icicle Winter Peas NEW! • Strong winter hardiness – potential for overwintering in the Upper-Midwest • Excellent root system and high biomass production in the spring • Small seed with good viability; lowers seeding costs • White flower; more digestible and sweeter tasting to livestock compared to Austrain Winter peas • Can also be used as spring forage pea in cover crop mixes or forage blends Conventional__________$30/50 lb bag

Austrian Winter Peas*

• Viney, fall-seeded, winter annual legume excellent for use as cover crop or forage crop • Can produce up to 1-2 tons dry matter/acre and fix 90-150 lbs N/acre • High quality forage with a protein content of 14% to 20% • Not reliably winter hardy in MN/WI/SD, plant early in the season with a nurse crop to ensure best chance of survival Conventional__________$30/50 lb bag Organic______________$38/50 lb bag

* = variety not stated

Yellow Blossom Sweet Clover*

• Tall-growing biennial clover closely related to alfalfa with high biomass and N-fixation potential • Very drought tolerant and very winter-hardy, good scavenger of P, K, and other immobile nutrients • Best plowdown legume for lighter and/or sandy soils • Cut or plowdown before seed set to avoid volunteer weed issues Organic_________________ $1.70/lb $85/50 lb bag

Lentils*

• Short-growing, cool season legume very well suited for cover cropping • Shorter stature than peas but very good drought and frost tolerance • Smaller seed size makes lentils ideal for aerial application into standing crops, will winterkill in the Upper Midwest and can be spring planted as well • Well suited for all soil types including drier soils. Can fix moderate amounts of N Conventional_____________ $0.72/lb $36/50 lb bag

White Sweet Lupin*

• Good legume option for early spring or fall cover cropping • Excellent forage quality for grazing or cut forage in the fall or spring; best companion seeded with a small grain for optimum tonnage • Peas need to be drilled or planted, not broadcasted Conventional__________$19/50 lb bag Organic______________$25/50 lb bag

• Cool-season cover crop legume with upright showy flowers and hollow stems • Aggressive taproot builds soil structure deep in the profile; lupins make immobile P, Mn, and other nutrients available to the following crop • Easy to control by mechanical tillage, excellent N fixation potential • Avoid heavy clay soils or waterlogged soils. Well suited for lighter soils Conventional_____________ $1.80/lb $90/50 lb bag

Mammoth Red Clover*

Faba Beans

Spring Peas*

• Single-cut red clover most frequently used as a cover crop • Excellent choice for underseeding small grains in the spring, frost seeding into winter grains, or fall seeding into standing crops • Establishes faster and is coarser stemmed than medium red clover • Minimal recovery after cutting. Avoid droughty soils Organic_________________ $2.40/lb $120/50 lb bag

• Tall, bushy annual legume excellent for use in cover crop mixtures: Thrives under cool, wet conditions • Can produce 3.5-6 tons/A DM as a cover crop & can fix up to 140 lbs N/A. Large taproot breaks up compaction • Not tolerant to heat & drought, somewhat frost tolerant • Slow to emerge due to large seed; important to plant early • Suitable for hay or silage; good forage quality Conventional_______ $.68/lb $34/50 lbs Organic___________ $.84/lb $42/50 lbs


Warm-Season Cover Crops Crimson Clover*

• Rapidly growing warm-season cover crop clover • Seed as early as possible in the fall for maximum growth and biomass accumulation • Commonly used legume component in cover crop blends • Later seeding into September will result in less growth before freeze up Conventional_____________ $1.20/lb $60/50 lb bag NEW! Organic_________________ $3.30/lb $165/50 lb bag

Iron & Clay Cowpeas

• Vigorous-growing summer annual legume that thrives in hot, wet conditions • Excellent drought stress tolerance (better than soybeans) and good N-fixation capacity (up to 150 lbs N/acre) • Widely adapted to varied soil types including nutrient poor, sandy or droughty soils. Ready to plowdown 60- 90 days after planting • Plant after soil temperatures are >65°F in the summer Conventional__________$44/50 lb bag

* = variety not stated

Balansa Clover*

• Quick establishing, cool season, annual legume with hollow stems • Good biomass accumulation and N-fixation potential • More cold tolerant than crimson clover; can potentially overwinter • Potential early fall cover crop option after silage corn, small grains or early soybeans Conventional_____________ $2.40/lb $120/50 lb bag

Frosty Berseem Clover Sunn Hemp*

• Tall-growing, warm-season annual legume with tremendous biomass potential and N-fixing capacity • Quick growing, very heat and drought tolerant has the potential to put on over 5,000 lbs of biomass in 60 days. Thrives on poor soils • Plant after soil temperatures are >65°F in the summer. Requires same inoculant as cowpeas • Terminate crop at first flower (~60 days) to avoid fibrous stalks Conventional_____________ $1.60/lb $80/50 lb bag

NEW! • Bred for later maturity, cold tolerance, productivity, and nutritional value • Multi-cut variety; capable of delivering multiple harvests per season • Aggressive growth, establishes quickly • Produces good biomass amounts quickly and fixes up to 100 lbs N/acre at flowering • Excellet palatability - cows selectively graze for it • No recorded cases of bloat • Slightly more cold tolerant than crimson clover but usually winter kills • 80/20 alfalfa/berseem clover mix could increase yield, crude protein, and water soluble carbohydrate levels in hay fields Conventional_____________ $2.60/lb $130/50 lb bag Organic_________________ $7.20/lb $360/50 lb bag 11


Winter Rye As A Cover Crop Winter rye (aka cereal rye) is a winter grain seeded in the fall and is the most widely planted cover crop species in the Upper Midwest. It provides winter ground cover, vigorous early spring growth, and serves as a cover crop, forage, and grain. Rye is a cereal grain like wheat and barley and should not be confused with annual or perennial ryegrasses. Winter rye is the superior choice as a fallplanted overwintering cover crop when compared to perennial ryegrass, or annual ryegrass.

WINTER RYE FAST FACTS • Plant from mid-August until the end of October. Winter rye germinates down to 35o F but adequate snow cover needed for very late planting • Drilling: For cover crop drill seed at 50-100 pounds per acre at a depth of 3/4” to 1-1/2”. For grain or forage, plant 100 lbs per acre. (25-35 plants per square foot). • Broadcast/Aerial: Fly 50 to 100 lbs per acre into field corn, sweet corn, and soybeans at the beginning of leaf senescences (browning) for a strong rye stand or for late fall grazing and again in early spring. • Drill soybeans after rye termination. Alternately, soybeans can be no-till drilled into green rye and then terminated in the spring.

• Stands of rye can be very tall and thick by the time of planting into living rye: prepare the planter for the biomass with adequate down pressure and seed depth/furrow closure adjustments. • Winter rye does not require supplemental fertilizer, but you may add 20 to 30 lbs/ acre of early spring-applied N. • Terminate rye 10-14 days prior to planting corn. • However you choose to plant rye, start clean. Excessive crop residue may prevent seed from reaching the soil, causing an uneven stand. Also, decomposing rye reside ties up nutrients and can have an allelopathic effect on corn.

WINTER RYE YIELD RESULTS (2015-2017, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA) Cultivar Aroostook Elbon Hazlet KWS Bono1 KWS Brasetto1 Maton II Musketeer ND Dylan Oklon Prima Rymin Spooner Wheeler Mean (bu/acre) LSD (0.1)

Lamberton 2017 3 Yr

Le Center 3 Yr

2017

2017

81 84 116 153 144 80 95 100 83 99 102 88 74

78 84 115 160 141 77 95 78 110 105 99 60

100.2 6

St. Paul 3 Yr

Kimball2 2 Yr

2017

3 Yr

2017

3 Yr

53 86 120 249 188 70 69 88 66 66 96 86 64

70 78 119 190 162 73 89 72 93 108 100 47

53 55 155 210 187 62 83 105 65 97 97 89 43

77 73 132 173 157 75 81 80 95 103 108 47

70 78 119 190 162 73 89 72 93 108 100 47

78 77 120 165 157 68 100 99 65 113 114 102 42

68 72 129 172 170 64 105 65 110 108 96 41

73 78 123 175 162 72 92 100 76 98

67 73 125 187 167 63 96 68 108

82.3

59.9

76.7

56.2

65.6

76.7

71.1

13

35

17

30

23

14

29

2016 and 2017 data (3 year data is predicted value). 22015 and 2016 data.

1

12

Crookston

State

103

111

84

101

63

35

60.3

71.7

56.1

19

8

11


Winter Rye & Winter Barley

* = variety not stated

Winter Rye Winter Rye is the most winter-hardy winter grain. It can be grazed deep into the fall, competes with weeds, and produces lots of forage/green manure in the spring. Germinates down to 35˚F. Performs well on low fertility and/or droughty soils. Excellent feed value as forage. Average grain yields range from 35-55 bu/acre. Markets are slowly growing for winter rye grain for milling/distilling in the Upper-Midwest. Best Use: Cover Crop, Fall/Spring Forage, Grain, Malting/ Distilling Planting Date: September 1st – November 15th Adaptations: All soil types & environments Requirements: Be sure to kill winter rye at least 10 days to 2 weeks before planting cash crops in the spring.

Especially competitive for moisture & nutrients in dry years. Can lodge on heavy soils with excess fertility. Seeding: 50-100 lbs/acre [cover crop] ; 100 lbs/ acre [forage, grain]

Winter Rye* • Economical choice for forage, grain or cover cropping • Northern origin (Canada, MN, WI, ND, SD) Price/bag Conventional

Aroostook

Organic

• Very tall variety with good winter hardiness • Early-heading. The variety of choice for roller-crimper application in organic no-till systems • Good spring recovery and early-season vigor 1-9 bags

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

$15.50 $20.00

$13.50 $13.00 $12.50 $18.00 $17.50 $17.00

Price/bag Conventional Organic

1-9 bags

ASK ASK

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

ASK ASK

ASK ASK

ASK ASK

ND-Dylan (Requires license agreement) • NDSU release w/outstanding grain yield and hardiness • Excellent standability and heavy test weight 1-9 bags

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

Conventional

$14.00

$12.00

$11.50

$11.00

Organic

$19.00

$17.00

$16.50

$16.00

Price/bag

Hybrid Winter Rye Hybrid Rye – Game Changer! We launched our first hybrid rye variety, Brasetto, for the 2016 growing season. Growers had huge yields and success. Based on customer demand we now offer three KWS varieties for 2018, each with their own unique characteristics. But why hybrid rye? 1. It yields up to 140 bu/acre (up to 100% more than open pollinated varieties) 2. Plants are shorter, excellent standing, and uniform in height and maturity. 3. Disease resistant! All have minimal risk for ergot. 4. Excellent winter hardiness. 5. Superior grain quality for milling, distilling, and feed markets. 6. As part of a feedstock, rye has advantages for livestock health.

Seeding: 800,000 viable seeds/acre, which is about 6580 lbs per acre depending on seed size and germination. Seed ½” to 1” deep. Management: Hybrid rye requires higher management than open pollinated rye. Fertility and disease management should be similar to wheat. About 1 lb of

available nitrogen per bushel of grain. Uniform seed spacing is essential.

Bono**

Dolaro** • Outstanding grain quality • A short plant with good lodging resistance • Very good disease resistance

• Highest yields by University of MN in 2016 and 2017 • Excellent drought tolerance – best dryland variety • Very large, deep root system

Conventional

1-9 Price/bag bags Conventional $52.00

Progas**

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags $50.00 $49.50 $49.00

Brasetto • Dramatically higher grain yields than common varieties • Very good standing, good resistance to fusarium • Low ergot, superior grain quality for milling, _ distilling, or feed • Note: Seed at 65 to 80 lbs per acre maximum Price/bag Conventional

1-9 bags $52.00

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags $50.00 $49.50 $49.00

Price/bag

1-9 bags $52.00

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags $50.00 $49.50 $49.00

• Silage-specific or grazing variety • Tall, high tonnage Price/bag

1-9 bags

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

Conventional and Certified

$ASK

$ASK

$ASK

$ASK

**Cannot save seed, requires license agreement

Winter Barley Winter barley has shown excellent promise as a productive feed & malting grain for the Upper Midwest. Winter barley typically has higher yields, less disease issues, lower input needs, and provides more ecosystem services compared to spring barley. New winter barley genetics for improved survivability in northern winters with reliable yields for feed & malting markets. Best Use: Grain, Forage, Malting Planting Date: August 15th – September 15th Adaptations: All soil types; sheltered fields likely fare best

Requirements: Early planting is essential for best chance of surviving the winter.

LCS Calypso (2-Row) NEW! • An early two-row malting barley; high yield potential • Very good winter hardiness • Excellent tillering with medium plant height • Good standability • LimaGrain release – requires license agreement Conventional Certified____________ASK

LCS Violetta (2-Row) • Bred for superior malt quality, earliness, short _ height, disease resistance. • LimaGrain release – requires license agreement Conventional Certified____________ASK

SB151 (6-Row) • Bred for superior malt quality, earliness, short _ • Early maturing, medium height with excellent standability, and disease resistance • Awnless for improved feed quality Organic & Certified______________ASK 13


Winter Triticale & Winter Wheat Winter Triticale

Winter Triticale is a cross between winter wheat and winter rye that combines the high yield potential, grain quality, and disease resistance of winter wheat with the winter hardiness and low fertility requirements of winter rye. Provides the best forage quality of all the winter grains. Cut before heading for best forage quality. Best Use: Forage, Cover Crop, Grain Planting Date: September 1st – October 15th Adaptations: All soil types Requirements: Triticale is often less winter hardy than winter rye. Plant early for best overwintering potential. Seeding: 100 lbs/acre [forage, grain]

Winter Wheat Best Practices

NE426GT

• Drill 100 – 140 lbs/acre. Seed about 1-2 inches deep. • Optimum planting dates for southern MN are September 10 - September 30. • Avoid planting winter wheat on corn ground or wheat stubble. • Work the soil as black as possible when following sweet corn or corn silage to reduce the likelihood of Scab (Fusarium Head Blight). • Planting past the optimum seeding date increases the risk of winter kill and can reduce grain yield. • Seeding too early can result in excessive growth in the fall making plants more vulnerable to winter kill and creates a green bridge for a number of winter wheat pests. • Watch chemical rotation restrictions. • Winter Wheat in rotation gives you an excellent window for seeding cover crops after the crop comes off in late summer.

• Good dual-purpose variety for forage or grain • High grain yields, low ergot (110 bu/acre in Arlington, WI by our seed grower!) • Medium maturity, moderate straw strength • Good grain quality for feed 1-9 bags

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

Conventional

$17.50

$15.50

$15.00

$14.50

Organic

$21.50

$19.50

$19.00

$18.50

Price/bag

Fridge

• Awnless forage triticale with excellent quality • Tall growing with vigorous early growth and development • Strong straw strength • Cut or chop before heading (boot stage) for best quality 1-9 bags

10-39 40-199 200+ bags bags bags

Conventional

$17.50

$15.50

$15.00

$14.50

Organic

$21.50

$19.50

$19.00

$18.50

Price/bag

Go to www.alseed.com for complete Winter Wheat Best Practices.

Winter Wheat (call for pricing) Variety

AC Emerson Organic Certified

Expedition

Organic Certified Conv. Certified

SY Wolf

Conv. Certified

LCS3204 Organic Certified

LCS3334 Organic Certified

Features

Rust Resistance Avg. Test Fusarium Height Winter Protein Head Type Maturity Lodging Yields Weight (in) Hardiness Percent Leaf Stem Stripe Blight Bu/Ac Lbs/Bu

Very late heading variety, medium height Excellent test weight and baking/milling quality Resistant to FHB (scab) in Canada, but less resistance in Dakotas & Nebraska Resistant to stem rust & stripe rust

Hard Red

Late

33

1

E

58.3

57

13.9

MS

R

MR

MR

Standard for yield, winter hardiness, and test weight Good baking and excellent milling quality Early maturing, medium height, good standability

Hard Red

Early

34

4

E

68.8

56.7

13.3

MS

R

S

MS

Top yielder with excellent agronomics Semi-dwarf height, excellent standability Widely adapted to different field & management types

Hard Red

Medium

32

1

VG

80.5

56.9

Avg.

MR

R

MR

MS

Outstanding top end yield and test weight Medium maturity, tall, excellent standability Excpetional resistance to most diseases including scab Widely adpated across the Northern US

Soft Red

Medium

39

1

E

E

E

ID

MS

ID

R

MR

Very high test weight and yield potential Medium to early maturity – good standing Excellent tolerance to current chains of stripe rust

Soft Red

Medium

38

R

R

Chart values derived from SDSU, U of MN, & UW Trial Results. LimaGrain provided data on LCS3204

14

Lodging 1=least prone 9=most prone

MR

S=Susceptible MS=Medium Susceptible, MR=Medium Resistant, R=Resistant


Fall Grazing Brassicas Turnips Requirements: Watch intake on animals new to pasturing brassicas. Recommend bulking up animals on dry feed or other pasture before grazing heavy stands of brassicas. We have found turnips to overwinter in MN/WI/IA/SD in 2015 & 2016. Seeding: 4-8 lbs/acre

Highly digestible leaves & roots, which makes for excellent grazing in the early fall, into the winter. Roots grow half out of the ground and provide a high-energy feed with 85% TDN and up to 10% protein. Root bulbs stockpile well as cattle & other livestock will paw them out of the ground, even under snow cover. Leaves are susceptible to frost. Hardy growth and very adaptable to variable soil types and growing conditions. Pairs well with other fall grazing species like oats, winter rye, annual ryegrass, etc.

[based on availability]

• Vigorous all-purple root • Good leaf & root yield with high sugar & dry-matter content • Hardy to early frost conditions and very palatable • Good resistance to bolting and can be grazed multiple times with proper management Conventional Uncertified __________ $2.35/lb

Forage Rape

Best Use: Cover Crop, Fall Forage Planting Date: July 15th – September 15th (later seeding dates will lessen growth) Adaptations: All soil types & environments Requirements: Watch intake on animals new to pasturing brassicas. Recommend bulking up animals on dry feed or other pasture before grazing heavy stands of brassicas. We have found dwarf essex rape to overwinter in MN/WI/IA/SD in 2015 & 2016. Seeding: 4-8 lbs/acre

• Economical and commonly used variety for cover cropping & fall grazing • Good choice for low fertility fields Conventional Uncertified __________ $1.50/lb Organic Uncertified__________ $2.40/lb

Barkant

Best Use: Cover Crop, Fall Forage Planting Date: July 15th – September 15th (later seeding dates will lessen growth) Adaptations: All soil types & environments

Succulent & leafy brassica related to cabbage which makes excellent forage for hogs, sheep, cattle, & young stock. Fast establishing. Persists well after the first frost. Ready to pasture in about 6-8 weeks with fast regrowth for multiple grazings. Higher protein level & dry matter accumulation compared to turnips. Adaptable to varied soil types including droughty soils. Pairs well with other fall grazing species including oats, winter rye, annual ryegrass, etc.

Purple Top*

Kale Barsica Forage Rape

• Highly palatable forage suitable for multiple grazings • High protein & energy • Fast maturing • More heat tolerance vs. turnips Conventional Uncertified________ $1.59/lb

$39.75/25 lb bag

Dwarf Essex Rape*

• Economical choice for grazing & cover cropping. Conventional Uncertified________ $0.90/lb

$45/50 lb bag

The most frost tolerance of all the brassicas; it produces good yields and retains excellent feed value during cold weather. Livestock almost prefer it more after a frost due to increased sugar content in the leaves. Will remain green down to 10˚F. Comparable protein & feed value to alfalfa. Will often produce the most tonnage of all the fall brassicas, stems more palatable vs. forage rape. Good pairing with other fall grazing species like oats, winter rye, annual ryegrass, etc. Best Use: Fall Forage Planting Date: May 1st – September 1st (later seeding dates will lessen growth) Adaptations: All soil types & environments Requirements: Watch intake on animals new to pasturing brassicas. It’s usually recommended to bulk up animals on dry feed or other pasture before grazing heavy stands of brassicas. Seeding: 3-4 lbs/acre

Forage Kale*

• Economical, cold tolerant choice for grazing Conventional Uncertified________ $4.00/lb 15


www.alseed.com • 1-800-352-5247

1414 W. Main Street, P.O. Box 127 Albert Lea, MN 56007

Cover Crops Work IT’S ALL ABOUT THE SOIL Cover crops protect and build your most valuable farm resource: your soil. Healthy soil keeps your farm profitable, insulates you from weather extremes, keeps surface waters clean, and builds your farm for future generations However, there is not a one-size-fits-all approach to cover cropping. We know the way you farm is not how your neighbors farm. We take time to work with you individually, ask the right questions, and come up with seed options that will match your farming system and your goals.

We believe in cover cropping, and we can help make it work for you!

2018 Cover Crop Seed Guide  

Browse our cover crop seed products for 2018.

2018 Cover Crop Seed Guide  

Browse our cover crop seed products for 2018.