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Diploma Programme Handbook


Secondary Curriculum

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) Curriculum Guide 2012 - 2014 PO Box 3180, Ban Sapanthong Tai, Vientiane, Lao PDR Tel: +856 21 486001 Fax: +856 21 486009 Email: contact@vislao.com Website: www.vislao.com

Challenging, Inspiring and Preparing Learners for Life

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Secondary Curriculum

Š 2012 by Vientiane International School All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher. Printed in the Lao People‘s Democratic Republic. Author: Todd Richer and IBDP Teachers (adapted from IB publications) Cover Design: Saeng Touttavong and Shaun Cunningham Cover Artwork: Rebecca Weiss

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Secondary Curriculum

Contents Section One: 1.1 1.2 1.3

What is the IBDP?

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VIS Mission Statement and Objectives IB Learner Profile The IB Diploma Programme at VIS

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Section Two: 2.1 2.2 2.3

Theory of Knowledge Creativity, Action, Service Extended Essay

Section Three: 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7

The Subjects

Language and literature Language acquisition Individuals and societies Experimental sciences Mathematics The arts Online Learning Opportunities

Section Four: 4.0 4.1

The Core

Contact Us

Secondary school contact List of sources

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Secondary Curriculum

SECTION ONE – What is the IBDP? 1.1 VIS Mission and Objectives 1.1.1 Mission At Vientiane International School our mission is to

challenge, inspire and prepare learners for

life. We provide a safe, respectful, collaborative and sustainable learning environment, a high quality holistic education, empower learners to be internationally minded global citizens and enrich learning experiences through interaction with the Lao community and our international communities. 1.1.2 Objectives and Outcomes We provide a safe, respectful, collaborative and sustainable learning environment  Students have a sense of identity and feeling of belonging, within the VIS community  VIS is a healthy and safe school which has a respectful, caring and supportive learning environment with an awareness of human rights  A environment of collaboration exists  Practices and understandings are followed for sustainable growth and development  Parents, teachers and students are actively involved in the process of learning We provide a high quality holistic education  The VIS community demonstrates the IB Learner Profile characteristics and attitudes  Students experience a balanced and holistic education and demonstrate the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.  VIS delivers the International Baccalaureate, an internationally recognized curriculum  Students are challenged and motivated to reach their potential  Students are creative and critical independent thinkers with life-long learning skills We empower learners to be internationally minded global citizens  The VIS community is committed to community service and action  Students are confident and creative builders of the future  The VIS community demonstrates intercultural awareness and a sense of internationalism  Students are able to communicate effectively in more than one language We enrich learning experiences through interaction with the Lao community and our international communities  Students are aware, understand and appreciate the culture of Lao PDR  The VIS community collaborates with the international and Lao communities.

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Secondary Curriculum

1.2 The IB Learner Profile The attributes of the profile express the values inherent to the IB continuum of international education: these are values that are infused in all elements of the Primary Years Programme (PYP), Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme and, therefore, the culture and ethos of our IB World School. The learner profile provides a long-term vision of education. It is a set of ideals that inspire, motivate and focus the work of schools and teachers, uniting them in a common purpose. With the development of a continuum of international education, teachers, students and parents are able to draw confidently on a recognizable common educational framework, a consistent structure of aims and values and an overarching concept of how to develop international-mindedness. The IB learner profile is at the heart of this common framework, as a clear and concise statement of the aims and values of the IB, and an embodiment of what the IB means by ―international-mindedness‖.

IB Learner Profile

Learner Attributes that we all need to develop

Caring

They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

Principled

They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

Open-minded

They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Balanced

They understand the importance of their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

Risk-taker

They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Inquirers

They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

Knowledgeable

They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinker

They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicator

They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

Reflective

They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

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Secondary Curriculum

1.3 The IB Diploma Programme at VIS The curriculum of the 11th Grade and 12th Grade at VIS is the IB Diploma Programme. However, we offer variations of this curriculum: 1. IB Diploma Programme 2. IB Diploma Courses 1.3.1 IB Diploma Programme The programme of studies for the International Baccalaureate (IB) is a two year sequence for students in their final two years of secondary school. It is a challenging programme for students with different abilities and aptitudes who come from varying educational backgrounds and who have differing educational and occupational ambitions. The IB Diploma Programme allows for breadth and depth in academic subjects.  Breadth: students must study a literature course, a second language, a science and social science/humanities subject and mathematics.  Depth: students take 3 courses at Higher Level, providing them with a sophisticated grasp of the skills and knowledge of three disciplines.  The IB Diploma Programme is not just academic: all students must also engage in creative, action and service activities.  It provides students with essential skills for life.

Adapted from DP: From Principles into practice; IB, 2009.

The IB Diploma hexagon shows the student at the center with the Learner Profile, then the three ‘core’ elements (Theory of Knowledge, Extended Essay, Creativity Action Service) and finally, the 6 main subject groups.

1.3.2 Details of the IB Diploma Programme 

Each student takes six main courses, one from each subject group. Page 6 of 47


Secondary Curriculum    

Three of these courses are taken at Higher Level and three at Standard Level All students take the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course, where they have a chance to reflect on the knowledge they are gaining, and investigate how knowledge is gained and the implications of the knowledge. Students all do Creativity, Action, Service (CAS), where they are engaged in long term activities participating in the communities and learning about themselves and others. Each student writes an Extended Essay on a research question of their own choice, working independently.

1.3.3 Course Options for VIS IBDP Candidates Group     

1 Studies in language and literature English A1: Language and literature (HL or SL) Lao A1: Literature (HL or SL) Thai A1: Literature (HL or SL) Korean A1: Literature (HL or SL) School-supported self-taught language A: Literature (many different languages) (SL only)

Group    

2 Language acquisition English B (HL or SL) French B (HL or SL) Spanish ab initio (SL only through Pamoja education) Mandarin ab initio (SL only through Pamoja education)

Group   

3 Individuals and societies History (HL or SL) Geography (HL or SL) Economics (HL or SL only through Pamoja education)

Group   

4 Experimental sciences Biology (HL or SL) Physics (HL or SL) Chemistry (HL or SL)

Group 5 Mathematics  Mathematics (HL or SL)  Mathematical studies (SL only) Group 6 The arts  Visual arts (HL or SL)  Theatre arts (HL or SL) 1.3.4 The Core Elements   

Theory of knowledge Creativity, Action, Service Extended essay (started in December of the first year and completed by November of the second year)

1.3.5 Changes to Subject Choices Students are permitted to change subjects up until the first week of September in grade 11. 1.3.6 Subject Levels Page 7 of 47


Secondary Curriculum At the beginning of grade 11, students are not required to decide which of their subjects will be taken at Higher Level. During the first semester, elements of the courses will be covered, which are part of both the Standard Level (SL) and the Higher Level (HL) courses. By December, grade 11 students will commit themselves to a choice of Higher Levels and Standard Levels. 1.3.7 Requirements for the IB Diploma After the completion of the course and the final exams, final grades are awarded by the IB based on all the components. Each of the 6 main subjects is graded on a scale from 7 (the highest) to 1. The grades are then added up to create ‗IBDP points.‘ The Extended essay and TOK are graded from A to E, and between them, can earn up to 3 more points. The final possible total of IBDP points is then 45. A student who … … … … …

achieved 24 points Completed CAS satisfactorily No subject with a grade 1 No HL subject with a grade below a 3 …will receive the IB Diploma!

1.3.8 IB Diploma Courses During the first semester of 11th grade, some students may decide to pursue IBDP Courses rather than the full diploma after discussion with the IBDP Coordinator and parents/guardians. A suitable programme will be arranged and at the end of the two year course, IB Course students will take the final IBDP exams in appropriate subjects. They will receive an official document of results from the IB certifying the grades they earned in those subjects. 1.3.9 VIS Diploma Graduation at VIS is marked by the award of the VIS Diploma, which is a document showing completion of a secondary school (9-12) programme of study in an accredited school. This diploma is based on a credit system starting in 9th grade. A passing grade of at least a 3 on a 7 - 1 scale, in a course that meets on average at least 150 minutes per week, earns one credit per year. A course that meets less than 150 minutes per week receives 0.5 credits per year. A student must accumulate 24 credits to earn the VIS Diploma, and they must earn the following credits as a minimum. Subject

Minimum credits

Language A or B: English Humanities Mathematics Science Language A or B: Mother Tongue or Other Language Physical Education The Arts Design Technology IBMYP Personal Project IBDP Extended Essay IBDP Theory of Knowledge

4 3 3 3 3 1 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

Other (Additional to minimum in any Learning Area)

3.5

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Secondary Curriculum Core Requirements IBDP Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) IBMYP Community and Service To achieve the VIS Diploma the student needs to accumulate a total of 24 credits and successfully complete the core requirements. Students who enroll at VIS without comparable grades from their previous school may receive the VIS Diploma based on their performance at VIS, on a pro-rated credit system. Two years‘ attendance at VIS is the minimum requirement for this. Students who transfer to VIS in Grade 11 from a school that did not deliver the IBMYP in Grade 9 & 10 will be exempted from the community and service core requirement.

1.3.10 Transcripts VIS Vientiane International School publishes a transcript for each secondary school student. This is the official document which is forwarded to any secondary school or university which needs a student‘s official academic record. Transcripts are confidential and never issued directly to parents or students. A request for a transcript to be sent should be made 5 working days before it is needed. The transcript contains the names and levels of all courses taken during grades 9-12, along with the final grades and the credits earned. IB The International Baccalaureate issues its own diploma and documentation of results. 1.3.11 Assessment VIS Assessment Philosophy Assessment in education is the process of gathering, interpreting, recording and using information about students‘ learning. (Harlen, Gipps, Broadfoot, Nuttal;1992). The central purpose of assessment at VIS is to provide information on student achievement and progress and to set the direction for ongoing teaching and learning. It provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their understandings of issues of local, national and global significance. Assessment at VIS is viewed as integral to planning, teaching and learning. The purposes of assessment are to improve the learning outcomes of all students, to provide information about whether the learning goals of the teaching programme have been achieved and to assist with making decisions about subsequent teaching and learning. Students are the centre of assessment and at VIS the students‘ current knowledge and experience are assessed before embarking on new learning. Students are involved in both peer and self-assessment and provided with regular opportunities for reflection on their own learning. prompt feedback to inform and improve their learning.

Students are provided with regular and

At VIS teachers use a balanced range of strategies for formative and summative assessment which are reviewed regularly. At VIS we believe formative and summative assessment are interconnected. They Page 9 of 47


Secondary Curriculum seldom stand alone in construction or effect. The vast majority of genuine formative assessment that is undertaken is informal, with interactive, regular, timely feedback and response to students to inform and improve their learning. VIS believes that formative assessment has the greatest impact on learning and achievement. VIS recognizes the profound influence of assessment on students‘ motivation and self-esteem. VIS believes that assessment improves learning when;  students are provided with effective feedback,  students are actively involved in their own learning,  teaching and learning is adjusted in response to the results of assessment,  pupils are involved in assessing themselves and understanding how to improve. Grade 11-12 Assessment The formative and summative assessment strategies employed by the teacher in the classroom are connected to IBDP syllabus objectives. Student learning is regularly assessed against the objectives and assessment criteria specific to each IBDP subject. VIS uses the 1-7 grading system used by the International Baccalaureate, which is criterion based. Every teacher uses the subject specific criteria in order to assess student achievement. The criteria enable students to understand the expectations of a course and how to improve their level of achievement (Vientiane International School Board Policy 7.6; Assessment, 2009)

IB Diploma Programme Assessment Internal Assessment As part of every IBDP subject, students must complete certain internal assessments. These are assessed by the subject teacher then sent to the IB for external moderation. Internal assessment primarily addresses those skills and areas of understanding that are less appropriately addressed through external examination papers. Internal assessment is not used as a tool for monitoring syllabus coverage, but is focused on assessing student learning of particular skills. Internal assessment tasks should not duplicate the kind of work that is carried out for extended essays in the same subject. Wherever possible, internal assessment tasks become an integral part of classroom teaching and/or homework for that subject. Where different internally assessed tasks are carried out over a prolonged period within a Diploma Programme course (to make up a portfolio of work, for example) allowance is made for student improvement over this period. This final internal assessment mark reflects a student‘s best level of performance during the course is not an average of performance over the whole course. School due dates are recorded on a school calendar which is on the school website, emailed to students and displayed on the student notice-board. Final internal due dates indicate the end of the production of the internal assessment for the item and subject concerned. External Assessment Students must also complete external examinations for each IBDP subject. Almost all courses have exams as one form of external assessment. IB Diploma exams take place in May of the 12 th grade. They are administered by the DP Coordinator, under rules established by the IB. 1.3.12 Academic Honesty Page 10 of 47


Secondary Curriculum Academic honesty includes proper conduct in relation to written examinations, research, and all other forms of assessment. Plagiarism, collusion, cheating, etc. is unacceptable and will be penalized. The following points summarize the VIS Academic Honesty Policy which applies to all members of the VIS learning community. The school has a subscription to turnitin.com and your teachers will use this service to check for academic honesty. For further information on academic honesty, refer to the VIS Academic Honesty Policy at www.vislao.com Personal skills

Learners at VIS are independent and possess a sense of integrity that gives them confidence in their work. They are capable of self-evaluation and the work they produce is authentic where they appreciate and respect intellectual property rights. They conduct themselves properly in relation to written examinations, research and all other forms of assessment. This implies that they understand plagiarism, collusion, duplication of work and are aware of other forms of malpractice with regards to academic honesty. They are also aware of the repercussions of failing to abide by the VIS Academic Honesty Policy.

Social skills

Learners are comfortable and confident in collaborative work, and are willing contributors to the efforts of the group. They are capable of fairly and honestly, carrying out and accepting peer-evaluations. They acknowledge work of others when necessary.

Technical skills

Learners at VIS are fully aware of and are able to use the various ways of acknowledging other people‘s work. For example, the learners know how to write references, a bibliography, how to quote from a text, using systems such as APA referencing. Students are aware of copyright laws and how they can use resources and stay within the proper frame of possible usage of such resources.

Consequences / Actions The following will result in handling cases of plagiarism: 1. Every a. b. c.

instance of plagiarism will be dealt with firstly by the teacher a clear explanation of the malpractice by the teacher will be given to the student, an email will be sent to the Coordinator informing them of the incident evidence will be provided to the Coordinator so that it can be included in the Coordinators files. d. The piece of work plagiarized will be given a mark of zero.

2. Repeated instances will be dealt with by the Coordinators a. Coordinators monitor instances of plagiarism through step 1 above. b. In the case of a second instance a letter to the parents will be written and included in the VIS Student Files (located in the VIS Office) c. The third instance may be dealt with by suspension by the administration to emphasize the gravity of the situation.

1.3.13 Homework Homework is given to students to reinforce and extend the material covered during class. For the typical student, assigned homework should average about 15-20 hours per week. Students will get some study periods during school hours. Should a student find that homework for a particular class is consistently above this standard, the issue should be discussed with the teacher involved and IBDP Coordinator. 1.3.14 Parent/Guardian of IBDP Students Page 11 of 47


Secondary Curriculum Parents/Guardians are encouraged to be involved, to know what is going on in their son‘s/daughter‘s studies. Talking about learning experiences may assist in increasing parental involvement and support. Ongoing communication with the IBDP Coordinator is encouraged. There are also contributions that parents/guardians can make in the areas of CAS (where parents/guardians may have contacts who can help initiate new service projects) and Extended Essays (where parents/guardians may have access to sources useful for research).

SECTION TWO – The core elements 2.1 The core elements Theory of Knowledge (TOK) Aims and Objectives The TOK course encourages critical thinking about knowledge itself, to try to help young people make sense of what they encounter. Students will develop an awareness of how knowledge is constructed, critically examined, evaluated and renewed. They will be encouraged to reflect on their experiences as learners and to make connections between academic disciplines and between thoughts, feelings and actions. They will be asked to examine their own personal, ideological and cultural assumptions. The ethical responsibilities associated with knowledge will be considered and students will be encouraged to recognize the need to act responsibly in an increasingly interconnected world. The TOK programme is composed of questions, the most central of these questions are:  How do we acquire knowledge?  How do we use that knowledge?  How can we be certain that what we know is true? Through the critical examination of knowledge students will develop an appreciation for the quest for knowledge, in particular its importance, its complexities, and its human implications. TOK encourages students to gain and apply their own knowledge with greater awareness and responsibility Page 12 of 47


Secondary Curriculum Process The process of TOK is distinctively different from that in standard academic disciplines. At the centre of the course is the student as knower. By the time students enter the DP, they have accumulated a vast amount of knowledge, beliefs and opinions. In TOK they have the opportunity to step back from this relentless acquisition of knowledge in order to consider knowledge issues. They will do this through:      

Collaborative learning opportunities such as debates, role playing, simulations, games, discussion based upon readings and journal reflections Journal entries may be based upon class discussions, on specific tasks set, on the student‘s own reflections, on items collected by the student Essay writing: essays will help students to prepare for their summative assessment (final externally assessed essay), as well as helping them to link and explain concepts Peer editing of essays, essay drafts and essay plans will help students become familiar with assessment criteria Use and evaluation of sources Presentations by students applying ‗TOK‘ thinking to ‗real life‘ issues

Adapted from: Theory of knowledge guide; IB, 2009.

Assessment The assessment model in TOK comprises two components, both of which should be completed in the time designated for the course: IB External Assessment  Essay on a Prescribed Title (1200-1600 words) One essay on a title chosen from a list of ten titles prescribed by the IBO for each examination session IB Internal Assessment  Presentation (approximately 10 minutes) One presentation to the class, about a current issue, examined through ‗TOK thinking skills‘ The presentation is an integral part of the TOK course. Page 13 of 47


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2.2 The core elements Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) Aims and Objectives CAS stands for creativity, action and service and requires participating students to spend significant amounts of time in each of the three areas over an eighteen month period. Participation and completion of the CAS requirements is a prerequisite for completion of both the International Baccalaureate Diploma and the VIS Diploma. CAS is experiential learning designed to provide real, challenging, achievable tasks that must be given thoughtful planning, reporting and reflection. The activities should be appropriately adapted to the students‘ circumstances, and take into account aptitudes and preferences. The experiences should reward and enrich all involved and when well carried out, CAS should build self-esteem, self-confidence, autonomy and self-reliance. Learning Outcomes Judgment on successful completion in CAS is achieved by the student supplying evidence of:        

Increased their awareness of their own strengths and areas for growth Undertaken new challenges Planned and initiated activities Worked collaboratively with others Shown perseverance and commitment in their activities Engaged with issues of global importance Considered the ethical implications of their actions Developed new skills

This focus on learning outcomes emphasizes that it is quality of a CAS activity that is of most importance. The guideline for the minimum amount of CAS activity is approximately the equivalent of half a day per school week (three to four hours per week}with a reasonable balance between creativity, action and service. Description of the Three Areas of CAS: Creativity This aspect of CAS may be interpreted imaginatively to cover a wide range of arts and other activities outside the normal curriculum. The activity should include creative thinking in design and execution. Examples:  Creation of bulletin boards  Development of agendas, programs, or signs for events  Designing or developing plans for activities with senior citizens or children.  Art/photography exhibition  Drama production  Preparing teaching resources for assisting younger students with their learning

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Secondary Curriculum This aspect of CAS requires action contributing to a healthy lifestyle. Students should be encouraged to participate in group and team activities, but an individual commitment is acceptable where the general requirements of CAS have been met; that is, goals are set and reflection occurs. Examples:  Playing on a sports team --all time practicing and playing count; sitting on the bench does not.  Participating in a production eg dance--includes on and off the stage, these activities will involve other categories.  Walking, running, hiking, biking Service This category involves actions on the part of the student that benefit others and improve their existing situation. The identification of needs, toward which a service activity will be directed, has to involve prior communication and full consultation with the community or individual concerned. Examples:  Fund raising project  Yearbook  Tutoring students before/after school or on the weekends  Library/laboratory help  Hospice/hospital visit Monitoring Progress CAS Manager Each student has access to ManageBac, with each student having an account to submit activities for approval, keep track of progress and complete evaluations and submit the finished work for final approval. The CAS coordinator has access to all students‘ accounts whereby he/she can monitor progress and achievement toward learning outcomes. CAS Adviser Each student is assigned a CAS adviser. A CAS adviser is a teacher at the school. Each of the CAS

students has an adviser. The adviser assists each student in the successful completion of their CAS commitments through monitoring progress and ensuring quality of activities and journal entries. Through regular meetings students can be encouraged to maintain steady progress toward their eventual goal CAS Coordinator Meetings At least once each semester the student meets with the CAS coordinator to discuss progress and the likelihood of new activities. Semester Reports Student progress is reported on twice yearly through semester reports. The main emphasis is on achievement of learning outcomes, and if necessary comment is made if the student is at risk of non-completion of CAS requirements.

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2.3 The core elements Extended Essay Aims and Objectives The Extended Essay provides students with an opportunity to engage in research of a question of their choice, within a chosen subject. The extended essay is an independent, self-directed research project culminating in an essay of 4000 words. It provides practical preparation for the kinds of undergraduate and postgraduate research required at university level. Process The Extended Essay is process begins in November of the 11 th grade and October of the 12th grade. The Extended Essay is to be done outside school hours and is student directed. Students are encouraged to devote regular time to their Extended Essay throughout this period to ensure the essay is completed by the due date. Students choose the subject they will do their Extended Essay in, and with the guidance of their supervisor, create their research question. Students are required to do extensive research and/or experimental work before writing the first draft during the June-August holidays. They then get an opportunity to redraft the essay after feedback against criteria from the supervisor. Students are strongly encouraged to choose a topic that is of genuine interest to them and is of a scope that is not too wide or too narrow to research. Assessment The Extended Essay is compulsory for IB Diploma candidates. The Extended Essays are sent to IBDP examiners to be externally assessed.

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Principled . Thinkers . Risk-takers . Inquirers . Open-minded . Knowledgeable . Communicators . Balanced . Reflective . Caring

Principled . Thinkers . Risk-takers . Inquirers . Open-minded . Knowledgeable . Communicators . Balanced . Reflective . Caring


Principled . Thinkers . Risk-takers . Inquirers . Open-minded . Knowledgeable . Communicators . Balanced . Reflective . Caring

Principled . Thinkers . Risk-takers . Inquirers . Open-minded . Knowledgeable . Communicators . Balanced . Reflective . Caring


Secondary Curriculum

SECTION THREE – The subjects 3.1 Language and literature School-Supported Self-taught Language A Literature (STANDARD LEVEL ONLY) Aims and Objectives The IB encourages students to pursue study in their mother tongue. This means taking their literature course in their mother tongue or first language. The course is offered in more than 40 languages. VIS makes every effort to set up School-Supported Self-Taught Language A courses in the languages our students require. There is emphasis on internationalism and interculturalism in the IB Diploma; however, a student should also pursue knowledge within his/her own culture. Each student taking a self-taught course is advised by the Diploma Programme Coordinator, by the Language Coordinator, by an experienced Language A teacher and by a tutor proficient in the language being studied. The student studies 10 works of literature and eight of those are works originally written in the language of the Language A course. The other two are world literature ―Works in Translation.‖ Process At the beginning of the course, the student and a Language A English teacher work together to select the 10 works to be studied. The students attend classes taught by a Language A English teacher for three periods per week in grade 11 and two periods per week in grade 12. Students work with tutors one period per week. Practice assignments are set by the tutor, and the tutor will monitor progress towards the assignments that count towards the final IB grade. Assessment All assessment in this course is external assessment.

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3.1 Language and literature Language A Literature (STANDARD and HIGHER LEVE) Aims and Objectives The IB encourages students to pursue study in their mother tongue. This means taking their literature course in their first language. VIS makes every effort to allow for students to enroll in a Language A course that is the student‘s mother tongue. Language A courses that VIS offers vary from year to year depending on cohort profile. Each student taking a Language A course is advised by the Diploma Programme Coordinator, by the Language Coordinator, by an experienced Language A teacher and by teachers in the language being studied. Process Before the beginning of the course, the student and a Language A teacher work together to select the works to be studied. The students attend classes taught by a Language A English teacher and by Language A teachers. Assessment IB External Assessment Paper 1: Guided Literary Analysis for Standard Level The paper consists of two passages. Students choose one and write a guided literary analysis in response to two questions. Written tasks for Higher Level Students produce at least four written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit two of these tasks for external assessment. Paper 2: Essay The paper consists of three questions for each literary genre. In response to one question students write an essay based on at least two works studied Written assignment Students submit a reflective statement and literary essay. Individual oral commentary Formal oral commentary. Individual oral presentation The presentation is based on works studied. It is internally assessed and externally moderated.

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3.1 Language and literature English A – Language and Literature (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives The language and literature course is to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts. The language and literature course is to develop skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. The aims of Language A - language and literature at SL and HL are to:         

introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections develop the students‘ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication encourage students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received encourage, through the study of texts, an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning encourage students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature. develop in students an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts encourage students to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose

Process A wide range of learning strategies, learning activities and processes will be commonly used to deliver the curriculum. The IB particularly values the ―close reading‖ of texts, and the activities employed in class are primarily designed to encourage the skills necessary to do this well. Students will regularly discuss the works they are reading in processed group and class activities. There will be teacher lead discussions, group discussions, oral presentations, question and answer activities, essay planning and writing, short text analyses, note taking, graphic organizing, and tests and essays. These processes are primarily designed to meet the aims and objectives of the course; however, the processes are also designed to give students the skills necessary to perform well on all assessments both internal and external. Topics/concepts Language A: language and literature includes four parts—two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. Part 1: Language Part 2: Language Part 3: Literature literary texts). Part 4: Literature texts).

in cultural context and mass communication - texts and contexts (SL students study two literary texts. HL students study three - critical study (SL students study two literary texts. HL students study three literary

Assessment Page 21 of 47


Secondary Curriculum IB External Assessment Paper 1: Textual analysis The paper consists of two unseen texts. Students write an analysis of one of these texts. Paper 2: Essay Students write an essay based on the literary texts studied in part Written task for Standard Level Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course. Written tasks for Higher Level Students produce at least four written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit two of these tasks for external assessment. IB Internal Assessment Individual oral commentary Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4 of the course. Students are given two guiding questions. Further oral activity Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment.

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3.2 Language acquisition English B (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives The primary goal of this course is to provide students the opportunities to refine their skills in speaking, understanding native spoken English, reading authentic texts and writing for a variety of purposes. Students may study English B at standard or higher level. This course also enables students to discover and understand different cultures. Process Language acquisition will be achieved through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills and competencies. Elements of language include vocabulary, grammatical structures, register, pronunciation and intonation. Topics to be covered in English B include the following: Grade 11 Unit 1 – Leisure Unit 2 – Social relationships (friends and family) Unit 3 – Communication and media

Grade 12 Unit 4 – Health Unit 5 – Global issues Unit 6 – Final review for the IB exam

Assessment IB External Assessment Paper 1: Receptive skills Paper 2: Written productive skills Written assignment: one piece of writing based on the intertextual readings for Standard Level. One piece of creative writing connected to one of the two works of literature studied for Higher Level IB Internal Assessment Interactive Oral The best of three classroom activities assessed by the teacher (presentation, role-play, speech, report, debate) will be chosen. Individual Oral A 10 minute presentation based on the course options.

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3.2 Language acquisition Language AB Initio French (STANDARD LEVEL ONLY) Aims and Objectives This course is intended for students who have no previous or very limited knowledge of French. The course will develop students‘ interactive, receptive and productive skills through a topic/concept based and communicative approach. Intercultural understanding is at the heart of the ab-initio programme. Process Language acquisition will be achieved through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills and competencies. Elements of language include vocabulary, grammatical structures, register, pronunciation and intonation. Topics

     

11th grade Personal details Routine Leisure The house Education Employment/holidays

12th grade     

Services Food and drinks Physical health Environment and global issues Media

Assessment IB External Assessment Paper 1: Receptive Skills Reading four written texts and answering the questions based on them. Paper 2: Written productive skills Section A: Attempt any one from the given two tasks (minimum of 50 words). Section B: Attempt any one from the given three tasks (minimum of 100 words). IB Internal Assessment Interactive oral The best of three main in-class oral assessments (presentation, role-play, speech, report) will be chosen. Individual oral An oral presentation (description of a picture and interviews on the topics studied) will be recorded and sent to an IBDP examiner.

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Secondary Curriculum

3.2 Language acquisition French B (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives The primary goal of this course is to provide students who have previously studied French language the opportunity to refine their skills in speaking, understanding native spoken French, reading authentic texts and writing for a variety of purposes. Students may study French B at standard or higher level. This course also enables students to discover, understand different cultures and help them become aware of the value of studying a second language. The French B program‘s aim is to allow students to use their skills in diverse authentic situations of communication. Process Language acquisition will be achieved through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills and competencies. Elements of language include vocabulary, grammatical structures, register, pronunciation and intonation. Topics Topics to be covered in French B include the following: Grade 11 Unit 1 – Leisure Unit 2 – Social relationships (friends and family) Unit 3 – Communication and media

Grade 12 Unit 4 – Health Unit 5 – Global issues Unit 6 – Final review for the IB exam

Assessment IB External Assessment Paper 1: Receptive skills Paper 2: Written productive skills Written assignment: one piece of writing based on the intertextual readings for Standard Level. One piece of creative writing connected to one of the two works of literature studied for Higher Level IB Internal Assessment Interactive Oral The best of three classroom activities assessed by the teacher (presentation, role-play, speech, report, debate) will be chosen. Individual Oral A 10 minute presentation based on the course options.

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3.3 Individuals and societies Economics (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives The study of economics is essentially about the concept of scarcity and the problem of resource allocation. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. The aims of all subjects in Group 3, individuals and societies are to:      

encourage the systematic and critical study of human experience develop in the student the capacity to identify, to analyse critically and to evaluate theories, concepts and arguments enable the student to collect describe and analyse data promote the appreciation of the way in which learning is relevant to both the culture in which the student lives, and to the culture of other societies develop an awareness in the student that human attitudes and beliefs are widely diverse and that study requires an appreciation of such diversity enable the student to recognize that content and methodologies are contestable

In addition, the aims of the economics syllabus at SL and HL are to enable students to:   

develop an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theories and concepts and their real-world application develop an appreciation of the impact on individuals and societies of economic interactions between nations develop an awareness of development issues facing nations as they undergo the process of change.

Having followed the Diploma Programme course in economics, the objectives are that the student will be expected to:    

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of specified economic content demonstrate application and analysis of knowledge and understanding of economic concepts and theories demonstrate synthesis and evaluation of economic concepts and theories select, use and apply a variety of appropriate skills and techniques in economic contexts.

Process Students will obtain information on economic theory from a variety of sources and will have a textbook as a personal resource. Students will practice communicating their understanding of economic theory through regular practice exams. Students will also practice applying economic theory to situations described in current events articles by giving oral commentary, oral presentations, creating analysis outlines, and writing formal commentaries. In addition there will be opportunities for students to participate in other activities.

Topics Page 26 of 47


Secondary Curriculum Microeconomics – including markets, elasticity, government intervention, market failure and theory of the firm and market structures (HL only). Macroeconomics – including the level of overall economic activity, aggregate demand and aggregate supply, macroeconomic objectives, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and supply-side policies. International economics – international trade, exchange rates, the balance of payments, economic integration, and terms of trade (HL only). Development economics – including economic development, measuring development, the role of domestic factors, the role of international trade, the role of foreign direct investment, the roles of foreign and multilateral development assistance, the role of international debt and the balance between markets and intervention. Assessment IB External Assessment Extended-response paper This paper consists of extended-response questions based on microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students are offered a choice and answer one question from each topic. Data-response paper This paper consists of data-response questions based on international economics and development economics. Students are offered a choice and answer one question from each topic. HL extension paper (HL only) This paper consists of three questions including HL extension material from all sections of the syllabus. Students answer two questions. IB Internal Assessment Both SL and HL economics students produce a portfolio or three commentaries based on articles from published news media. The commentaries enable students to demonstrate the application of their knowledge and understanding of economic theory to real-world situations. Each commentary must:  

explain the linkages between the extract and an economic theory taken from the section of the syllabus on which the commentary is based demonstrate economic insights into the implications of the extract (that is, it should provide evidence of the candidate‘s ability to evaluate current events from the point of view of an economist).

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3.3 Individuals and societies Geography (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives Geography is a dynamic subject that is firmly grounded in the real world and focuses on the interactions between individuals, societies and the physical environment in both time and space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions and examines the processes behind them. The Diploma Programme Geography course integrates both physical and human geography. The aims of all subjects in group 3, individuals and societies are to:      

encourage the systematic and critical study of human experience develop in the student the capacity to identify, to analyse critically and to evaluate theories, concepts and arguments enable the student to collect describe and analyse data promote the appreciation of the way in which learning is relevant to both to the culture in which the students lives, and to the culture of other societies develop an awareness in the student that human attitudes and beliefs are widely diverse and that study requires an appreciation of such diversity enable the student to recognize that content and methodologies are contestable

In addition, the aims of the geography syllabus at SL and HL are to enable students to:   

develop an understanding of the interrelationships between people, places, spaces and the environment develop a concern for human welfare and the quality of the environment, and an understanding of the need for planning and sustainable management appreciate the relevance of geography in analysing contemporary issues and challenges, and develop a global perspective of diversity and change.

Having followed the Diploma Programme course in geography, the objectives are that the student will be expected to:    

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of specified geographic content demonstrate application and analysis of knowledge and understanding of geographic concepts and theories demonstrate synthesis and evaluation of geographic concepts and theories select, use and apply a variety of appropriate skills and techniques in geographic contexts

Process Students will achieve the aims and objectives of the course through dynamic classes integrating a range of learning activities and both print and electronic resources. Students have the chance to demonstrate their understanding of the content and concepts through practice exams and end of topic tests. Students will also undertake a field work assessment that offers an opportunity to demonstrate their geographic skills. Students will have a text book as a course companion.

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Secondary Curriculum Standard and Higher Level Core Theme – Patterns and change  Populations in transition  Disparities in wealth and development  Patterns in environmental quality and sustainability  Patterns in resource consumption Optional Themes  The geography of food and health  Leisure, sport and tourism Higher Level Core Theme – Global interactions Optional Themes  Hazards and disasters – risk assessment and response Assessment IB External Assessment Paper 1 – Core Theme This paper consists of four sections based on the topics in the Core Theme. Two of the questions will have stimulus materials such as maps, diagrams or graphs. Each section consists of two short answer questions and two paragraph style questions. Paper 2 – Optional Themes In paper two students will choose from two questions for each of the themes studied (The geography of food and health and Leisure, sport and tourism). Standard Level students will choose two themes, Higher Level students will choose three themes. Paper 3 (HL only) This paper contains questions on the Higher Level theme of Global interactions. Students will choose one of three questions. Each question has two parts, both requiring an extended response. IB Internal Assessment The geography course includes field work as an internal assessment. This field work is linked to a topic that is studied throughout the course. For Standard Level students the internal assessment is 25% of the final IB grade. For Higher Level students the internal assessment is 20% of the final grade. The internal assessment is one field work report, with a maximum word limit of 2,500 words.

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Secondary Curriculum

3.3 Individuals and societies History (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives History is an exploratory subject, which poses questions and provides opportunities for the students to engage in the selection, interpretation and critical evaluation of primary historical sources and the work of historians so that they can understand the past. History is a subject through which students gain an understanding of the world today and of different perspectives and cultures that help develop understanding of the present as well as the past. The aims of all subjects in Group 3, individuals and societies are to:      

encourage the systematic and critical study of human experience develop in the student the capacity to identify, to analyse critically and to evaluate theories, concepts and arguments enable the student to collect describe and analyse data promote the appreciation of the way in which learning is relevant to both the culture in which the student lives, and to the culture of other societies develop an awareness in the student that human attitudes and beliefs are widely diverse and that study requires an appreciation of such diversity enable the student to recognize that content and methodologies are contestable

Having followed the Diploma Programme course in history, the objectives are that the student will be expected to:      

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of twentieth century history apply and interpret knowledge evaluate different approaches to, and interpretations of, historical issues and events synthesize by integrating evidence and critical commentary structure an essay using evidence to support relevant, balanced and focused historical arguments demonstrate evidence of research skills, organization and referencing

Process A variety of teaching and learning strategies will be used throughout the IB Diploma History course that will meet all learning styles and abilities, such as; discussions journals, essay writing, peer editing, group work, note-making, class lectures, ICT, use and evaluation of historical sources, problem solving, presentations, applying TOK thinking to issues. Topics Communism in crisis 1976-1989 Nationalist and independence movements in Asia and Africa The Cold War Aspects of the history of Asia and Oceania in the 20th Century (2000).

Assessment Page 30 of 47

SL & HL SL & HL SL & HL HL


Secondary Curriculum IB External Assessment Paper One Candidates will complete an in-depth study of 20th century world history subjects: 

Prescribed subject 3: Communism in crisis 1976-1989

The purpose of paper one is to give the students the opportunity to demonstrate their skills of comprehension, analysis, evaluation and application Paper Two The students will complete an in-depth study of the Cold War and nationalist and independence movements in Asia and Africa. Students will be required to complete two analytical essays. Paper Three The students will complete an in-depth study of aspects of the history of Asia and Oceania and will be required to complete three analytical essays. IB Internal Assessment The students are to complete a historical investigation. This is a problem-solving activity which enables the students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge in an area which interests them. Students are expected to apply the skills of a historian, such as making sense of source material and managing conflicting interpretations. The students are required to search for, select, evaluate and use evidence to reach a decision or solve a problem. The internal assessment is assessed internally and moderated externally.

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3.4 Experimental sciences Biology (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives Through the study of biology students should become aware of how biologists work and communicate with one another. In this course there is an emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work. In this context all biology students should be able to develop their experimental and scientific investigative skills, develop their ability to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize biological information, and to apply and use the body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize working biologists. Process In biology, short laboratory practicals, longer term practicals, computer simulations, data gathering exercises, data analysis exercises, and general laboratory work and fieldwork are all used to illustrate, teach, and reinforce theoretical concepts, develop an appreciation for the hands-on nature of biology, and to develop an understanding of the benefits and limitations of biological research. Topics The core topics covered in biology are:  Cells  Chemistry of life  Genetics  Ecology  Evolution  Human health and physiology Students electing to study biology at the Higher Level will also study the topic of plant science during the first year of this course The topics of evolution and ecology and conservation are studied further by all students during the second year of biology. Assessment IB External Assessment Both HL and SL students will sit for three separate IB exams at the end of the two year course. The exams account for a total of 76% of the final IB grade awarded to the student. The exams have a mixture of multiple choice questions and longer more analytical short response questions. IB Internal Assessment The internal assessment accounts for 24% of the students‘ final IB grade. This consists of a practical scheme of work which will serve the following purposes:  illustrating, teaching and reinforcing theoretical concepts,  developing an appreciation of the essential hands-on-nature of scientific work,  developing an appreciation of the benefits and limitations of scientific methodology,  developing the ability to communicate using a standard scientific report format,  assessing students‘ ability to design an experiment, collect and process data and evaluate the outcomes. Group 4 Project The group 4 project is a collaborative interdisciplinary activity where students work on a scientific or technological topic allowing for concepts and perceptions from across the sciences to be shared. This project is carried out over the course of a 2 day period and occurs once each year.

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Secondary Curriculum

3.4 Experimental sciences Chemistry (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. It is called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science and environmental science, and serves as useful for employment. It is the intention of the Diploma Programme to enable students to achieve the following objectives:  demonstrate an understanding of and apply scientific facts and concepts, the scientific method, manipulative skills, scientific terminology and methods of presenting scientific information.  construct, analyze and evaluate the hypotheses, research questions and predictions, scientific methods and explanations Process There is an emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work which provides opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students. A body of knowledge is taught which students can apply to other science situations developing an ability to analyze evaluate and synthesize scientific information. Topics For both HL and SL, students will cover the following:  Quantitative chemistry  Atomic structure periodicity  Bonding  Energetics  Kinetics  Equilibrium  Acids and bases  Oxidation and reduction  Organic chemistry  Measurement and data processing Options For both HL and SL, students must select two of the following:  Modern analytical chemistry  Human biochemistry  Chemistry in industry and technology  Medicines and drugs  Environmental chemistry  Food chemistry  Further organic chemistry

Assessment Page 33 of 47


Secondary Curriculum IB External Assessment Both HL and SL students will sit for three separate IB exams at the end of the two year course. The exams account for a total of 76% of the final IB grade awarded to the student. The exams have a mixture of multiple choice questions and longer more analytical short response questions. IB Internal Assessment The internal assessment accounts for 24% of the students‘ final IB grade. This consists of a practical scheme of work which will serve the following purposes:  illustrating, teaching and reinforcing theoretical concepts,  developing an appreciation of the essential hands-on-nature of scientific work,  developing an appreciation of the benefits and limitations of scientific methodology,  developing the ability to communicate using a standard scientific report format,  assessing students‘ ability to design an experiment, collect and process data and evaluate the outcomes. Group 4 Project The group 4 project is a collaborative interdisciplinary activity where students work on a scientific or technological topic allowing for concepts and perceptions from across the sciences to be shared. This project is carried out over the course of a 2 day period and occurs once each year.

3.4 Experimental sciences Physics Page 34 of 47


Secondary Curriculum (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences as it seeks to explain the universe itself. At higher (HL) and standard levels (SL), both theory and experiments are undertaken to develop a student‘s knowledge and understanding of physics. They are tailored to complement one another naturally, as they do in the wider scientific community. The course allows students to develop traditional skills and techniques and the application of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills and information and communication technology skills in group activities which are essential in modern scientific endeavor and are important lifeenhancing, transferable skills. As the students‘ knowledge develops, they will become more aware of how physical principles can be applied to alter the material world to suit their needs. Students are encouraged to discuss the impact of physics on society and on the environment and the moral and ethical dilemmas which may arise. Physics is therefore, above all, a human activity and students become more appreciative of the context in which physicists work. Although the laws of physics are a universal phenomenon, the rich history of physics detailed in the course illustrates that science is an international enterprise recognizing the contributions from many different cultures and nations. Process Students should be able to study and be successful in IB Physics if they have a good knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Students do not need a prior knowledge of physics in order to succeed. Throughout the course, the students will learn about physics and it laws through the use of a textbook written specifically for the IB course. The students will also learn to use a variety of simulations geared at demonstrating physical laws and their effects on the world and its environment. Topics The core syllabus material is common to both SL and HL and will be covered by the two groups during the first year of the course. Standard Level (SL) students will choose two additional subjects to study during the second year of the course. Higher Level (HL) students will study each of the unit below to a higher degree as well as choose two additional subjects to study during their second year.Both HL and SL students will study the following:        

Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit Unit

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

– – – – – – – –

Mechanics Thermal Physics Oscillations and Waves Electric Currents Fields and Forces Atomic and Nuclear Physics Energy, Power and Climate Change Options

Assessment IB External Assessment Both HL and SL students will sit for three separate IB exams at the end of the two year course. The exams account for a total of 76% of the final IB grade awarded to the student. The exams have a mixture of multiple choice questions and longer more analytical short response questions. Page 35 of 47


Secondary Curriculum IB Internal Assessment The internal assessment accounts for 24% of the students‘ final IB grade. This consists of a practical scheme of work which will serve the following purposes:  illustrating, teaching and reinforcing theoretical concepts,  developing an appreciation of the essential hands-on-nature of scientific work,  developing an appreciation of the benefits and limitations of scientific methodology,  developing the ability to communicate using a standard scientific report format,  assessing students‘ ability to design an experiment, collect and process data and evaluate the outcomes. Group 4 Project The group 4 project is a collaborative interdisciplinary activity where students work on a scientific or technological topic allowing for concepts and perceptions from across the sciences to be shared. This project is carried out over the course of a 2 day period and occurs once each year.

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Secondary Curriculum

3.5 Mathematics Mathematical Studies (STANDARD LEVEL ONLY) Aims and Objectives Mathematical Studies caters for students with varied backgrounds and abilities in mathematics. Mathematical Studies is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics in students who do not necessarily need mathematics in their future studies. It is also designed to provide a realistic mathematics course that develops the skills needed to cope with mathematical demands of a technological society and to apply mathematics to real life situations. Objectives Objectives for the Mathematics Programme are:         

to know and use mathematical concepts and principles; to select and use appropriate mathematical techniques; to communicate mathematically, using a wide range of symbols and language; to demonstrate a good mathematical proficiency in oral and written justification for the method and process; to organize and analyze data; to recognize patterns and structure; to apply technology to problem solving, to investigate and to research; to evaluate different approaches to problem solving to evaluate the significance and reliability of findings.

Process The processes in which mathematical knowledge will be communicated involve different methods of instruction which are designed to meet all learning styles and ability levels. They include:            

individual and group work; lecture; work with graphic calculators and computers; class discussion; oral and written presentations; logical reasoning; research, library work and investigation; brainstorming; mathematical challenge; dynamic answers; problem solving and problem creating; development of abstract thinking.

Topics Topics to be covered in the Mathematical Studies course include the following:       

Introduction to the graphic display calculator (GDC) Number and algebra Sets, logic and probability Functions Geometry and trigonometry Statistics Introductory differential calculus Page 37 of 47


Secondary Curriculum 

Financial mathematics

Assessment IB External Assessment The students will sit for two IB exams at the end of the two year course which account for 80% of their final IB mark. The first test consists of 15 short answer questions while the second involves longer more analytical questions. IB Internal Assessment The students will also have to produce an individual piece of work involving the collection of information or the generation of measurements, and the analysis and evaluation of the information or measurements. This final project will account for the remaining 20% of the final IB mark.

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Secondary Curriculum

3.5 Mathematics Mathematics (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives Higher Level Mathematics caters for students who have very good background knowledge of mathematics and who have good analytical and technical skills. It will give students a strong knowledge of mathematical concepts and will be useful for students wishing to pursue higher mathematics, physics, engineering or technology. It is recommended for students who have a high degree of interest in the subject. Standard Level Mathematics requires a strong understanding of mathematical concepts and processes. Objectives for Mathematics are to:           

know and use mathematical concepts and principles read, interpret and solve a given problem using appropriate mathematical terms organize and present information in tabular, graphical and/or diagrammatic forms know and use appropriate notation and terminology formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly select and use appropriate mathematical strategies and techniques demonstrate an understanding of both the significance and the reasonableness of the results recognise patterns and structures in a variety of situations, and make generalizations recognise and demonstrate an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics use appropriate technological devices as mathematical tools demonstrate an understanding of and the appropriate use of mathematical modelling

Process The processes in which mathematical knowledge will be communicated involve different methods of instructions which are designed to meet all learning styles and ability levels. This includes individual and group work, lectures, work with graphic calculators and computers, class discussion, problem solving, research work, development of abstract thinking and brainstorming. Topics  Algebra  Functions and equations  Circular functions and trigonometry  Matrices  Vectors  Statistics and probability  Calculus Option Syllabus (High Level only) – students must also study one of the following options:  Statistics and probability  Sets, relations and groups  Series and differential equations  Discrete mathematics

Assessment Page 39 of 47


Secondary Curriculum IB Internal Assessment Two portfolio pieces are worth 20% of the final mark, which includes:  one piece of work involving mathematical investigation (10%)  one piece of work involving mathematical modelling (10%) IB External Assessment High Level Exams consist of 3 papers worth 80% of the final mark. Paper 1 will be with no calculator allowed Paper 2 allows the use of a GDC calculator. Both papers have short-response questions based on sections of the syllabus, and more complex extended response questions requiring a detailed knowledge of the whole syllabus. Paper 3 has extended-response questions based on the syllabus option chosen for that year The exams consist of 2 papers worth 80% of the final mark.

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3.6 The arts Visual Arts (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives The aims of the course are to enable students to:      

investigate and respond to past, present and emerging forms of visual arts and engage in producing, appreciating and evaluating these forms using specialist visual arts vocabulary develop an understanding of art from a local, national and international perspective develop and present independent ideas and practice, and make contextual connections between these and the work of others build confidence in responding visually and creatively to personal and cultural experiences develop and demonstrate technical and artistic skills in producing personally relevant artwork take responsibility for the direction of their learning through effective working practices

Process Students will:     

demonstrate through purposeful exploration an enquiring and integrative approach to a variety of visual phenomena synthesize art concepts and skills in works that are personally, socio-culturally and aesthetically meaningful solve formal and technical problems encountered in studio practice exhibit technical skills and appropriate use of media produce works of art with imagination and creativity through individual and, where appropriate, collaborative work

The Visual Arts course consists of two linked compulsory parts taken at a higher or standard level. Studio Work This involves practical exploration and artistic production in chosen media. Investigation This involves independent contextual, visual and critical research and reflection, both visual and written. It is theme based and open-ended. Units of work are developed individually through guided collaboration between the student and teacher. Higher and Standard Level Options Option A Studio (external) 60% Students prepare a selection of studio work in the form of an exhibition. This is externally assessed by a visiting examiner following an interview with the student about the work. Investigation (internal) 40% Students present selected pages of their workbook that have been produced during the course. This selection is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

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Secondary Curriculum Option B Investigation (external) 60% Students present selected pages of their investigation workbooks that have been produced during the course. This selection is externally assessed by a visiting examiner following an interview with the teacher. Studio (internal) 40% Students present a selection of their studio work. This is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Assessment The assessment of visual arts is in two integrated parts; a selection of studio work and an investigation workbook. These are assessed by external and internal examinations. Students can choose between two options for Standard Level (SLA or SLB), or Higher Level (HLA or HLB). There is no set quantity of work specified though expectations are higher at HL. Assessment at both levels relates to a demonstrated level of achievement within the set hours, as indicated by the mark-band descriptors.

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Secondary Curriculum

3.6 The arts Theatre Arts (STANDARD AND HIGHER LEVEL) Aims and Objectives The aims of the course are to enable students to:       

experience and participate in a wide and varied range of theatre activities and develop proficiency in more than one area of theatre technique become familiar with forms of theatre from their own and different cultures explore different theatre traditions in their historical contexts develop academic skills appropriate for the study and understanding of theatre become reflective and critical practitioners in theatre develop the confidence to explore, to experiment and to work individually and collaboratively on innovative projects, which should involve challenging established notions and conventions of theatre understand the dynamic, holistic and evolving nature of theatre and the interdependencies of all aspects of this art form.

Process Students will:        

demonstrate a theoretical and practical knowledge of theatrical traditions from more than one culture demonstrate an understanding of production elements and theatre practices evaluate critically a range of diverse performances engage practically in creating and presenting performances, which will include a basic level of technical proficiency reflect on their own development in theatre through continual self-evaluation and recording acquire appropriate research skills and apply them demonstrate an ability to interpret play texts and other types of performance texts analytically and imaginatively demonstrate initiative and perseverance in both individual and group projects.

In addition, students at HL will be expected to:  

evaluate the relevance of selected research sources to personal practice demonstrate an understanding of the complex processes of performance, from its initial conception to the impact the final result leaves on spectators.

The Theatre Arts course consists of four linked compulsory parts taken at a higher or standard level. Theatre in the Making This involves an exploration of the process of theatre making. It encompasses the acquisition and development of all skills required to create, present and observe theatre.

Theatre in Performance Page 43 of 47


Secondary Curriculum This involves the student in various aspects of presenting theatre, and requires that practical skills be applied in different roles (as performers and as part of the production team), while also building upon the knowledge they have acquired in other areas. Theatre in the world The focus of theatre in the world is on a practical and theoretical exploration of a range of theatre traditions and cultural practices around the world. It allows students to explore the origins and traditions of a variety of theatre conventions and practices from diverse cultural and historical contexts. Independent Project Higher and Standard Level Options Option A Devising practice—allows students to develop and explore in depth the devising and actualization of a performance concept. Option B Exploring practice—allows students to undertake a comparative study of theatre in advanced practice. Assessment Theatre Arts is assessed through 4 major tasks, each contributing 25% of the final mark. IB External assessment  A Research Investigation. Students are required to produce a dissertation (2,000-2,500 words in length for Higher Level, 1,000-1,250 words for Standard Level)) with supporting visual materials.  A Practical performance proposal. Students are required to produce a proposal of 250 words with supporting visual materials. For Higher Level, an additional report of 1,000-1.250 words is required. IB Internally assessment  Theatre performance and production presentation. Students are required to do an oral presentation, including the use of supporting images. 30 minutes (HL) or 20 minutes (SL).  Independent project portfolio. Students are required to produce a portfolio of 3,000 (HL) or 2,000 (SL) words on their independent project (either option A or option B) and its connection to their experiences in the core syllabus.

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Secondary Curriculum

3.7 Online Opportunities Online Learning The 2012 – 2014 IBDP students at VIS will have the opportunity to select from a more diverse range of subject choices through the provision of online learning opportunities in the IB Diploma Programme offered by Pamoja Education http://www.pamojaeducation.com/. Pamoja education works in ‗close cooperation with the International Baccalaureate®… and offers a wide range of top quality online IB courses.‘(Pamoja Education, 2012). Course outlines for the following can be accessed through link provided Group 2 Language acquisition 

Spanish ab initio - SL http://www.pamojaeducation.com/courses/13,spanish-ab-initio

Mandarin ab initio – SL http://www.pamojaeducation.com/courses/14,mandarin-ab-initio

Group 3 Individuals and societies  

Economics – SL http://www.pamojaeducation.com/courses/2,economics-sl Economics - HL http://www.pamojaeducation.com/courses/3,economics-hl

For further details relating to Pamoja online learning please visit http://www.pamojaeducation.com/ and make an appointment with the IBDP Coordinator at VIS.

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4.0 Contact Us If you have any questions or information requests, please do not hesitate to contact the Diploma Programme Coordinator (IBDPC) or the Secondary Principal. Kim Green Secondary Principal

Todd Richer IBDP Coordinator

Vientiane International School PO Box 3180 Vientiane, LAO PDR Tel + 856 21 486 001 kimg@vislao.com

Vientiane International School PO Box 3180 Vientiane, LAO PDR Tel + 856 21 486 001 toddr@vislao.com

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Secondary Curriculum

List of Sources The VIS MYP Curriculum Guide has been developed using the following sources; IB Learner profile booklet, IB, 2009 IBDP From principles into practice, IB, 2009 IBDP Language and literature guide, IB, 2011 IBDP School supported self taught guide, IB, 2011 IBDP Language B guide, IB, 2011 IBDP Language ab initio guide, IB, 2011 IBDP Economics guide, IB, 2010 IBDP Geography guide, IB, 2009 IBDP History guide, IB, 2009 IBDP Biology guide, IB, 2007 IBDP Chemistry guide, IB, 2007 IBDP Physics guide, IB, 2007 IBDP Mathematical studies guide, IB, 2004 IBDP Mathematics standard level guide, IB, 2006 IBDP Mathematics higher level guide, IB, 2006 IBDP Theatre guide, IB, 2007 IBDP Visual arts guide, IB, 2007 IBDP Theory of knowledge guide, IB, 2006 IBDP Creativity, action and service guide, IB 2008 IBDP Extended essay guide, IB, 2007

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Vientiane International School P.O. Box 3180 Saphanthong Tai, Vientiane, Lao PDR Tel: +856 21 486001 Fax: +856 21 486009 Email: contact@vislao.com

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Principled Thinkers Risk-takers Inquirers Open-minded Knowledgeable Communicators Balanced Reective Caring

IBDP Curriculum Handbook  

Guidelines to the Diploma Programme

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