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2 0 1 6 A N N UA L R E P O RT


VNA is caring, professional, and the most wonderful people you could have in your home to help you. I am grateful for VNA!”

—Home Health patient

Our capable and caring staff lives out TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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Mission, Vision, Values

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Letters from Leadership

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Hospice Care

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Marceil Lauppe Employee of the Year

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Grief Counseling and Support

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Gifts Received

Home Health Care

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Patient Satisfaction

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Financial Report

Help at Home

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Special Events

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Board of Directors

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Employees in the Community


OUR MISSION

OUR VISION

The Mission of the Douglas County Visiting Nurses Association, Inc. is to provide excellent community-based health care and support services throughout the continuum of care.

To be the Home Health and Hospice provider of choice to our community through continued excellence in healthcare services and business practices.

our mission, vision, and values every day. O U R VA LU E S To affirm the dignity, worth, and quality of human life in all of its phases To promote creativity and lifelong learning in an atmosphere of cooperation, teamwork, and fairness To be honest and maintain confidentiality in all of our interactions To be a financially viable, cost-effective not-for-profit organization that meets the needs of clients and staff To maintain excellence as evidenced by positive, measurable outcomes

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There is one thing of which I’m confident: Douglas County Visiting Nurses is a trusted member of this community’s healthcare continuum.”

—Cynthia Lewis, Chief Executive Officer

2016 was an extraordinary year for Douglas County Visiting Nurses! Both our Medicarecertified Home Health and Hospice Cynthia Lewis programs saw historical highs in admissions. I strongly believe this is the reflection of two key variables: people want to remain in their homes, and our community continues to place a great deal of trust in Visiting Nurses to provide a high quality of care that allows them to do so. The agency also celebrated the 35th anniversary of our Hospice program. Following the launch of home care in Lawrence/Douglas County in 1969, some patient needs shifted from post-acute support in the home to end-of-life care. That change resulted in the agency’s Board exploring and ultimately formalizing the Hospice program in August 1981. Over these three and a half decades, the number of people served annually has grown from very few (fewer than 10) to 285 in 2016. In addition, we’ve enhanced our bereavement support services to meet the diverse needs of individuals experiencing loss.

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One of VNA’s long-time employees, Mary Hane, retired from the agency in early May after 34 years. Mary was one of our Administrative Assistants who provided phone and reception services, and was a beloved member of the Visiting Nurses family. While bittersweet to say farewell to her smiling voice, it was a joy to send Mary into the next phase of her life! Technology enhancement has been at the core of our services for many years. Two advancements in 2016 involved our clinical field staff. As you witness in visiting a variety of healthcare providers, electronic medical records are no longer a luxury, but a necessity. While Visiting Nurses has had this capability for more than two decades, we converted to an iPad platform this year which creates significant efficiencies for our clinical field staff. Further, we integrated new telemonitoring equipment that allows our patients to assess key vital signs. That data is then transmitted to our nursing staff to remotely monitor the well-being of their patient. This technology is highly effective for patients with chronic conditions such as heart failure or chronic pulmonary disease. We added two new services to our clinical care repertoire. One of our Physical Therapists completed certification in myokinesthetic treatment — muscle stimulation through touch that can alleviate pain,

restore movement and function, and improve posture depending on individual challenges. One of our Registered Nurses completed her certification in wound/ostomy care based on an increasing volume of patients with wounds and more complex wounds. Visiting Nurses is always striving to raise our bar to meet the ever-changing needs of patients in their homes. As occurs annually, a number of changes occurred within VNA’s Board of Directors. Steve Tesdahl and Elaine Penny completed their second threeyear terms, and Carol Wheeler and Grace Marion chose to retire from the Board after one three-year term. We welcomed new members Allen Belot, Jeff Peterson, Janelle Williamson, and Rosalie McMaster. It’s always an exciting opportunity to welcome fresh perspectives and energy. On a sadder note, we lost Dr. Ralph Tanner in the fall. Even prior to joining the Board, Dr. Tanner was a strong advocate for VNA and home care. He is and will continue to be missed by all with whom he was connected. Despite the volume of unknowns in healthcare, there is one thing of which I’m confident: Douglas County Visiting Nurses is a trusted member of this community’s healthcare continuum. We also enjoy the generous support of so many individuals and businesses in our service area, and VNA is grateful!


VNA’s programs and services are important to the health and well-being of our community.”

—Sheryle D’Amico, President, Board of Directors

Healthcare is changing continuously, especially over the past few years. Whether the change comes from advancing technology, innovation Sheryle D’Amico in treatment, or new rules and regulations, we must always be ready to meet each new challenge in order to meet the needs of our patients. As VNA’s Board President and an administrator at LMH, I’m proud to be part of VNA which embraces the challenges in our ever-changing health landscape.

one out of every five Medicare patients discharged from a hospital are readmitted within 30 days. These readmissions cost Medicare more than $17 billion per year. Coordination and transition models are critical in preventing hospital readmissions, and home care plays a significant role in reducing these readmissions. VNA consistently evaluates its care models in order to reduce the potential for patient readmissions, thus increasing their value in the healthcare continuum and enhancing patient satisfaction. VNA’s programs and services are important to the health and well-being of our community. I hope you enjoy the patient stories and information contained in this report that reflects that significance.

LETTERS FROM LEADERSHIP

We’ve recently seen Medicare and other payers change reimbursement models, focusing less on “volume” and more on “value.” This means that healthcare providers are reimbursed based on the quality of care delivered to patients. In this time of change, it is important to capture how hospitals are changing to meet the needs of every patient, as well as their role in the overall health of the community. One of the ways chosen to capture this is through patient readmission data. Medicare statistics show that

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H O M E H E A LT H C A R E

26,776 Home Health Care visits in 2016

1,204

patients received Home Health Care in 2016

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Rachel Hunter’s lower right leg was draining the life from her. After surgeries to replace and repair her artery, the doctor told Rachel the bottom half of her leg was going to die and kill her as well if she did not have it removed. While this was difficult to hear, Rachel also saw it as an opportunity to get her life back. “I had been under a tremendous amount of pain, nerve pain in my foot and my leg,” she said. The nerve pain had changed Rachel’s personality and appetite. She decided to go ahead with the operation to remove her right leg from just below the knee. The decision was validated almost immediately. “Everything came back after the amputation — my appetite, my whole attitude, my sense of humor, my energy,” Rachel said. While the amputation quickly improved Rachel’s quality of life, it was not without challenges. Immediately following the surgery, she spent a month in the hospital to recover and start physical therapy. Back at home, she started receiving Home Health Care from Visiting Nurses. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy from VNA helped her adjust to life at home without her lower right leg. “The thing that really hit me the most was that I had completely lost my sense of balance,” Rachel said.

Her Physical Therapist, Chad, worked with her to improve her strength and balance so she could safely complete daily tasks. Kari, her Occupational Therapist, helped her find ways to do normal activities more safely and comfortably. Kari worked with Rachel and her son to rearrange Rachel’s house to make it more accessible. They moved her bedroom to the first floor, reorganized her bathroom to accommodate her wheelchair, built an outdoor shower, and put in a ramp leading to the back door. Kari even helped Rachel acquire another wheelchair to move through doorways more easily. “She said I needed a slightly narrower chair and that made a huge difference. She arranged it — she made a phone call and arranged for it to be delivered, which was really helpful,” Rachel said. Kari’s suggestions also included Rachel getting a smaller keyboard so that she wouldn’t have to reach as far for her mouse, which was causing some shoulder pain. Rachel enjoyed working with VNA’s staff for more than just the care they provided. “I would say all of the help is greatly appreciated, the ideas and everything, but also the social connection. My mood would brighten when I knew someone was coming,” Rachel said.


19,382 hours of Help at Home care were provided in 2016

184

patients were served by Help at Home in 2016

H E L P AT H O M E Mary Easley was diagnosed with dementia three and a half years ago. Over that period of time, her memory has gradually declined. She now has difficulty remembering tasks that used to be simple, such as brushing her teeth or bathing. Her husband, John’s, love for her has remained as strong as it was 64 years ago when they were wed. They raised six children and now have 11 grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. They all love her and her joyful, loving personality. Despite her memory loss, Mary has maintained her wonderful personality. “The best thing is that she is usually in a good mood and friendly all the time. She has forgotten a lot of things, but she hasn’t lost her sense of humor or her friendliness,” John said.

“After they were finished, we decided we needed a little respite care and based on our experiences, we chose Visiting Nurses,” John said.

John does his best to care for Mary, but in order to care for her, he has to make sure he takes care of himself. John reached out to Visiting Nurses’ Help at Home program to give him some extra help a few times per week. That assistance allows him to take care of other important responsibilities. John had experience with Visiting Nurses’ Home Health program when they cared for Mary as she recovered from a broken hip.

The Help at Home program’s Certified Dementia Care Aides help Mary with bathing and personal care, do laundry and other light housework, and provide companionship for Mary so John can take care of errands. The respite care allows him to handle what he needs to, and gives him peace of mind because he knows that Mary is in good hands. “I feel comfortable knowing that Mary is being well taken care of while I have the respite time,” John said.

The care that Mary receives from VNA’s Help at Home program helps her stay at home, which is extremely important to John and the rest of their family. It allows John to remain by her side in a manner that is safe and affordable for them. “It’s very important from the point of companionship and also financially with the cost of full-time care being so astronomically high,” John said. While being a full-time caregiver is very difficult at times, with the help of Visiting Nurses, John hopes to care for Mary in their home as long as he can do so safely.

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285

9,644

Hospice patients served in 2016

Hospice visits in 2016

HOSPICE CARE For 51 years, Patty and Charles Douglas Coffman Jr. — known by his family and friends as Doug — were happily married. Their wonderful relationship began when they met as teenagers while attending church with their families. After two years of dating, 18-year-old Patty and 19-year-old Doug got married. Patty went straight from living with her parents to living with Doug in a small apartment. Ten years later, they bought Patty’s childhood home from her parents and moved into the house that she now has called home for all but a decade of her life. Their son grew up in that home, as well, making it a very special place to all three of them. So when Doug became ill, that home was the only place that he and Patty wanted to be. Doug’s health issues began in 2006 with diverticulitis. A diverticula became infected and ruptured, leading to seven years of surgeries and battling infection. “Everything that could go wrong, went wrong,” Patty said, regarding Doug’s health issues.

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Their first experiences with Visiting Nurses came when Doug received Home Health Care following some of his surgeries; however, in 2013, he was in need of Hospice Care. Patty remembers the desperation she felt when his illness progressed and he could no longer get out of bed on his own. “He was too big for me to move, and I didn’t know how to take care of him. I called Visiting Nurses and I just begged them for help,” she said.

Doug received Hospice care for six weeks before he passed away in their home, just where he wanted to be. “It was important to him. The bed he died in, he had made in his senior year of high school in woodworking class, the year before we were married,” Patty said.

Even now, four years after Doug’s death, it helps Patty to know that Doug was where he wanted to be when he passed. “I still sleep in that bed. It’s a comfort for me to know At that point Doug needed Hospice that I did everything I could to Care and Patty needed support to follow his wishes. It left no sad care for him. “Everything I needed to impressions on me as far as him know, they told me. They brought out dying in that bed, because it is a supplies and you just can’t imagine comfort knowing that I was right what a relief it was to me,” she said. there with him,” she said.


The end of life deserves as much

beauty, care, and respect as the beginning.

1,186

Hospice patients cared for in the last five years (including 2016)

In 2016, VNA Hospice celebrated 35 years of serving Douglas County. Over these years, Visiting Nurses has helped thousands of patients and families achieve physical and emotional comfort by improving the quality of their life through dignity and compassion.

VNA Hospice Care offers

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Bereavement Programs and

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Caregiving Support Programs

VISITING NURSES HOSPICE

to help family members of patients navigate grief and the challenges of being a caregiver.

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G R I E F CO U N S E LI N G A N D S U PP O RT Visiting Nurses Hospice bereavement care goes beyond the 13-month period mandated by Medicare. VNA believes that bereavement care and grief support are essential components of hospice care and the grieving process. Each person takes his or her own journey through grief, which is why VNA offers a broad spectrum of support, all of which is open to both patients’ families and the community. Life After Loss – A Bereavement Gathering Life after Loss is a confidential bereavement group which includes presentations and workbook-driven discussions on managing the grief process with voluntary participation. This is paired with written and experiential grief and loss activities, and is open to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, who seeks support and information. Caregiver 101 Caregiver 101 is designed for those caring for a loved one through the end of life process. Information, resources and confidential support is offered from others who understand the special benefits and unique burdens of caregiving. The First Year There is no wrong way to grieve a loss. The First Year offers an opportunity to learn about the natural grief process and what to expect in the first year of the grief journey. This bereavement group is offered with tips, tools, and resources from the Grief Toolbox along with support and encouragement from other survivors.

Multiple Losses Workshop – Managing Complicated Grief Acute grief is often a different experience that is unique to each person and each loss. The Multiple Loss Workshop helps participants understand how grief emerges naturally after a loss and how to recognize and deal with complications that can stall or halt the healing process. This workshop allows participants an opportunity to share their story in a compassionate setting and learn about what complicates grief, as well as treatment options and resources to help move forward while honoring the losses. Keepsake Place for Children Experiencing Grief and Loss Keepsake day is an afternoon workshop for school-aged children, teens and their parents/caregivers who are grieving the death of a close family member or friend. Through the use of art and activities, participants are helped through the grieving process.

approximately

Managing Grief through the Holidays The holidays can be a very difficult time to cope with grief. Managing Grief through the Holidays is a lighthearted gathering to provide support, information, and ideas for celebrating holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, and other special days in honor of lost loved ones. It provides an opportunity to explore new traditions through the grief journey. Casual Coffee Casual Coffee provides an opportunity for anyone who is grieving to drop in for coffee and conversation with others grieving the loss of a loved one and receive informal, uplifting support. There is a men’s group and women’s group facilitated by a male and female grief counselor respectively. Individualized Grief Counseling and Bereavement Support VNA offers bereavement support in the form of newsletters and written grief resources, personal, confidential phone calls with a grief counselor and grief counseling for individuals or families either in the home or at the VNA office with the VNA bereavement team.

1,214

hours of grief counseling and support were provided in 2016

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to

1,074

contacts


S AT I S FA C T I O N

HOME HEALTH (medical) VNA scored better than 100% of other Home Health agencies serving Douglas County when looking at rehospitalization rates 91.7% of VNA Home Health patients had an improvement in surgical wounds compared to 90.5% nationally VNA exceeded the national benchmark for patients who would recommend us for Home Health services

HOSPICE 100% of families/caregivers felt their treatment preferences were respected and addressed

95% of families/caregivers believed they received desired emotional/religious support

The skilled and certified staff members at Visiting Nurses strive to exceed the expectations of our patients and their families/caregivers. We evaluate this through standardized surveys for our Home Health and Hospice programs, and an agency-specific survey for our Help at Home program. Providing excellent care to our patients is our number one priority as we continue to serve our community.

97% of families/caregivers felt their beliefs/values were respected

HELP AT HOME (non-medical)

100% of clients polled feel Help at Home services help them feel safe at home

100% of clients polled feel Help at Home services help them maintain overall health

100% of clients polled would recommend VNA’s Help at Home services

GIVING BACK TO OUR PATIENTS VNA provided $383,182.95 in charity care to uninsured and underinsured patients 947 donors generously gave $409,475.58 in monetary and in-kind donations

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SPECIAL EVENTS In keeping with our mission, VNA provides a variety of health-centered and community-related activities year round.

Mary Hane’s Retirement After 34 years of dedicated service, VNA celebrated the retirement of long-time employee, Mary Hane, in May 2016. Employees gathered in the reception area to present her with a special gift, take pictures, and wish her well in retirement. Health Fairs Every year, VNA’s Marketing and Development departments attend various health fairs in the community. These health fairs allow community members to ask questions and receive information and education about services VNA provides. Health/Flu Shot Clinics VNA continues to promote good health and prevention practices by providing numerous health care screenings. Blood pressure and flu shot clinics are offered throughout the year, free of cost to community members, in order to fulfill this goal. Exercise Clinics Physical and Occupational Therapists from VNA’s Home Health program lead exercise clinics throughout the year to encourage exercise and good health. The chair and standing exercise classes are enjoyed by many residents of independent living and assisted nursing facilities where VNA cares for patients. Grief Support VNA understands the importance of providing crucial support to survivors following the loss of a loved one. Various grief support programs are offered through VNA’s Hospice program, to all ages, to educate survivors and help find ways to cope with their grief.

This page, from top: Mary Hane’s retirement celebration, health fairs, health/flu shot clinics, exercise clinics Opposite page, from top: Transformations Gala, the “Before I Die Wall” in the Lawrence Public Library, the 10th annual 3.d Casino Night fundraiser

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United Way Health Care Access/VNA Clinic In 2016, through the United Way Health Goal funding, VNA and Health Care Access partner together to provide physical therapy to patients in need. This clinic helps patients who could not otherwise afford this necessary care, while providing health education so patients can work towards a healthier lifestyle. Having Difficult Conversations In November 2016, Janelle Williamson, Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner and VNA Board member, presented at the Lawrence Public Library on the important topic of discussing palliative and hospice care with patients so they can experience the best quality of life possible. The presentation provided great information for medical professionals and was open to the public. Transformations Gala VNA’s Hospice Volunteer Coordinator, Sarah Rooney, was selected for the 2016 Transformations Gala in which candidates represent a social service agency of their choice in a pageant-style event. VNA employees and supporters enjoyed watching Sarah on stage while she competed for charitable funds to benefit VNA’s Hospice program. “Before I Die Wall” In partnership with Lawrence Memorial Hospital, VNA helped build and place a “Before I Die Wall” in the Lawrence Public Library. This project invited people to ponder their mortality and reflect on their lives by writing the things they want to do most while they are alive. 3.d Casino Night Fundraiser VNA’s 10th annual 3.d “Dine, Dance, Donate” fundraiser featured casino games, music from 105.9 Kiss FM’s DJ Shonzi, ticket drawings, a silent auction, the return of VNA’s Prize is Right game show hosted by Not So Late Show’s Mike Anderson, and more. It was a fun-filled night at The Oread that raised vital funds to support VNA’s mission.

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V N A E M P LO Y E E S I N T H E C O M M U N I T Y

United Way Chili Feed VNA partnered with Health Care Access, Lawrence/Douglas County Health Department, Heartland Community Health Center, and Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center to support the United Way with the Community Health Facility Chili Cook-off Fundraiser. This fun and tasty event gave employees the opportunity to enjoy a wide variety of homemade chili by making a donation to the United Way.

Food Drive VNA employees generously donated enough non-perishable food items to fill the barrel provided by Just Food in the 2016 VNA Employee Food Drive. These items were given to Just Food to help fight hunger in Douglas County.

Toys for Tots/Blue Santa In the spirit of the holiday season, VNA employees donated more than $800 worth of toys to Blue Santa and Toys for Tots in December 2016. The donated toys benefited children in need.

As a director of a social service agency, I see the important role that agencies like Visiting Nurses bring to the community. When the VNA team goes above the call of duty each month to support other agencies, they strengthen our community through partnership, collaboration and the collective goal of improving our community.” —Elizabeth Keever, Executive Director of Just Food

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Festival of Trees VNA employees have a longstanding tradition of donating items to trim the VNA Christmas tree that is donated to the Festival of Trees Fundraiser, benefiting The Shelter, Inc. The 2016 VNA tree, “Adorable Playful Snowmen,” raised $1,300 for a great cause.

Memorial Garden The VNA Memorial Garden at the Community Health Facility allows employees and community members to donate a plant, dedicated to a patient or loved one that has passed away. The garden provides a way to honor patients and loved ones with a donation that will help their memory live on, while providing a beautiful sight for those entering the Community Health Facility from the north.

School Supply Drive For the seventh year in a row, VNA employees gave to children in the community by donating backpacks, notebooks, crayons, markers, glue sticks, pencils, and more. The VNA School Supply Drive provided these important supplies to the United Way in a community-wide effort to help children in need. Jeans Day Each Wednesday, VNA employees have the opportunity to wear jeans to work by providing a $5 donation each to a specified charity or cause which changes monthly. In 2016, Jeans Day benefited organizations including the Falling Forward Foundation, Boys & Girls Club of Lawrence, StopGap Incorporated, Just Food, The International Dyslexia Association Kansas/ Missouri Branch, Cooper’s Cause Foundation, Toys for Tots/Blue Santa, and Douglas County United Way.

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M A R C E I L L A U P P E E M P LO Y E E O F T H E Y E A R The Marceil Lauppe Employee of the Year Award is presented annually to an employee who exemplifies the mission and values of Visiting Nurses. Debbie Carter is the 2016 Marceil Lauppe Employee of the Year award recipient. Debbie’s dedication to VNA is clear to her coworkers. Here are some of their comments about working with Debbie: “She is exceptional at all of her responsibilities and maintains a good attitude at all times. She is intelligent, perceptive, insightful and friendly.” “She is one of the most positive people I know. She values the VNA mission and the work we do with patients/individuals in our community. She is a wonderful team player as evidenced by her presence on several committees. She is always willing to jump in and help when a call goes out for volunteers to help with a project or VNA event. She represents the spirit of VNA!” “She embodies VNA and you can tell she really loves being here. She strives to be helpful to everyone and does so continually with a smile and positive attitude. It is obvious she enjoys the work and the people at VNA. She truly believes in the values, mission and vision of VNA.”

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“She is great at helping us in the field. Anytime we need anything, she is very helpful and happy to find the answers.” “This person has the vision of VNA clearly before her and works hard to see it represented in the community as well as within our walls and hallways. She is well deserving of this reward as her character and spirit embody all we want for our agency. She is always friendly and goes the extra mile to help. She answers our phones and greets employees, family members and customers at the front door and is our first line person to represent our agency. Part of that job is practicing confidentiality and respect for others. Her professional demeanor exudes kindness, honesty and genuineness. And best of all, she brings us food!”

Congratulations, Debbie, for being selected as the recipient of the 2016 Marceil Lauppe Employee of the Year Award. Thank you for your dedication to VNA!


GIFTS RECEIVED: D O N AT I O N S A N D F U N D R A I S I N G I N I T I AT I V E S Visiting Nurses is fortunate to have such a large community of donors and wishes to thank them for their generosity and support. For a complete list of donors, please visit our website at www.kansasvna.org. 3.d Gross Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 55,177.76 3.d Gross In-Kind Donations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 33,859.32 Rice Foundation Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 50,000.00 United Way Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 53,182.95 Douglas County Community Foundation Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5,000.00 Douglas County Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 280,000.00 Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas Foundation Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 4,000.00 Annual Appeal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 22,015.00 Memorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 33,362.50 Other Gifts Estate Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 125,000.00 Other In-Kind Donations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 110.00 Other Monetary Donations General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 14,386.80 Home Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 11,944.00 Hospice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 13,860.24

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F I NA N C I A L R E P O RT 2 0 1 6 Support County Funding............................................................................................................................................... $ 280,000 Value of Donated In-kind Services................................................................................................................. $ 493,809 Contributions*................................................................................................................................................. $ 807,087 Fundraising (net).............................................................................................................................................. $ 21,190 United Way (includes direct designations)..................................................................................................... $ 53,183 Grants.............................................................................................................................................................. $ 59,000 Investment Income.......................................................................................................................................... $ 85,770 Gain on Investment ....................................................................................................................................... $ 171,478 Total Support...............................................................................................................................................................................................$ 1,971,571 Revenue Total Patient Revenue.......................................................................................................................................................................$ 5,776,057 Total Support Revenue....................................................................................................................................................................$ 7,747,574 Investment Account Total Investment Account...........................................................................................................................................................$ 4,577,959 Expenses Direct Expenses............................................................................................................................................... $ 4,320,597 Administrative Expenses................................................................................................................................. $ 2,341,395 Total Expenditures................................................................................................................................................................................$ 6,661,992

*Some bequests were acknowledged in the 2015 Annual Report, and accounted for in 2016.

2,309

hours were donated by volunteers in 2016, which equated to a

$57,586

savings to the organization

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B O A R D O F D I R E C TO R S

Sheryle D’Amico, M.H.A., P.T., President

Scott Shmalberg, President (at beginning of 2016)

Judith Calhoun, Ph.D., A.P.R.N., Vice President

Paul Morte, D.O., Secretary

Elaine Penny, M.S.W., Secretary (at beginning of 2016)

Emily Donaldson, J.D., Treasurer

Tim Keller, M.A.I., Treasurer (at beginning of 2016)

Allen Belot, M.Arch., B.S.J.

Luke Huerter, M.D.

Sue Iverson, M.S.M., B.S.N., B.S., R.N.

Grace Marion, Spec.Ed.

Rosalie McMaster, Ph.D.

Jeff Peterson, A.A.M.S.

Shari Quick, M.D.

Jeff Sigler, R.Ph., Pharm.D.

Ralph Tanner, Ph.D., L.H.D.

Steve Tesdahl

Carol Wheeler, R.N., B.S.N., F.A.C.H.E.

Janelle Williamson, N.P.-C., A.C.H.P.N.

Ex Officio: Cynthia Lewis, M.H.S.A., C.P.H.Q.

200 Maine Street, Suite C Lawrence, KS 66044 785-843-3738 • www.kansasvna.org

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The help we received was amazing. It was all we could have hoped for and more. They were informative, caring, and just all around awesome!”

—family member of a Visiting Nurses Hospice patient

all your home care needs under one roof HOME HEALTH • REHABILITATION • HOSPICE • HELP AT HOME

200 Maine Street, Suite C Lawrence, KS 66044 785-843-3738 • www.kansasvna.org

Visiting Nurses 2016 Annual Report  

Take a look at the Visiting Nurses 2016 Annual Report to see what VNA accomplished in the community last year.

Visiting Nurses 2016 Annual Report  

Take a look at the Visiting Nurses 2016 Annual Report to see what VNA accomplished in the community last year.

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