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love Bruges

Visitors guide | 2011

Flanders, Belgium

the official city guide

www.bruges.be/tourism


Table of Contents 35()$&( » 1 $%58*(66725< » 2 7(1,55(6,67,%/(%58*(6&/$66,&6 » 6 %58**(&,7<&$5' » 10 :$/.6 » 16 proud World Heritage City » 16 Bruges: B of Burgundian » 26 Strolling through silent Bruges » 36

,17(59,(:6 » 46 The Magic of Bruges » 46 Flemish Primitives in the spotlight » 54 A Lively and Varied Cultural Palette » 62 Bruges, a Bike-friendly City » 70 Three-Star Gourmet » 78

$:$5':,11,1*5(67$85$176 » 86 6289(1,56)520%58*(6 » 88 .12:<285:$<$5281'%58*(6²683(5($6<$1'+$1'< » 92 Museums » 94 Places of interest » 104 Discover Bruges » 108 Bicycle rental points » 114 Out in Bruges » 116 Tailor-made for children » 118 Get even more out of your stay in Bruges » 122 Bruges’ wet- and woodlands » 123 A trip to the seaside » 128 Battlefields: Flanders and the Great War » 130 Other Places of Interest » 133

35$&7,&$/,1)250$7,21 » 134 675((71$0(6 » 136

Welcome to the World Heritage City of Bruges It is only fair to say that the places that stir all your senses and creep under your skin are extremely rare. Places that turn you upside down at every visit, but whose secrets you can’t unlock completely although they’ve captured your heart. Bruges happens to be such a unique place. It is at the same time cultural and artistic, cosmopolitan, unashamedly Burgundian and mysteriously medieval. Strolling through her network of medieval streets and alleys (the entire historic centre is a Unesco World Heritage site) or sauntering along her picturesque canals and verdant ramparts you cannot but fall hopelessly in love with her elegant mysteriousness. In winter, her winding cobbled streets and canals shrouded in fog take on an even more poetic personality. It’s as if the city is waiting for darkness to descend before she’s willing to show her fairest face. Although it is true that Bruges has one foot firmly in the past, it is equally true that she cherishes her future and that she fully invests in culture and architecture. It is therefore no surprise that the 15 city museums house the Flemish Primitives as well as contemporary art. Moreover, a fair number of enthralling cultural events set the city alight throughout the year, from groundbreaking dance productions and fascinating one-man shows to delightful festivals and international exhibitions. And thanks to the Brugge City Card (see page 10) you can now explore all these wonderful events at bargain prices! Indeed, this handy city pass allows you free entrance or gives you a hefty discount at countless attractions, museums and places of interest in and around Bruges! Easy and inexpensive! The delights of Bruges’ Burgundian life can be sampled in one of the countless cafés and restaurants, from authentic pubs to trendy eating places and famous gourmet restaurants. Indeed, the citizens of Bruges have known for centuries how to eat and drink well. Would you like to spend some more time with us? Why don’t you book a rroom in a cosy Bed and Breakfast or in one of our charm hottels? We hope that this visitor’s guide will be your trusty ccompanion in case you lose yourself in one of Bruges’ many sstories.

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W We and our fellow townspeople wish you a memorable stay! Jean-Marie Bogaert, Alderman for Tourism Patrick Moenaert, Burgomaster


A Bruges Story History in a nutshell

Taking off

Decline

When the city’s direct link with the sea was in danger of silting-up in the 12th century, Bruges went through a period of anxiety. Fortunately, the new waterway of the Zwin brought relief. As a result Bruges was able to call itself the most important trade centre of Northwest Europe in the following century. The world’s first Bourse began business. Its financial exchanges took place on a square in front of the premises that belonged to Van der Beurse, a Bruges merchant family. In spite of the typical medieval maladies, from epidemics to political unrest and social inequality, the citizens of Bruges prospered, and soon the city developed a magnet-like radiation. Around 1350 the inner city numbered no fewer than 35.000 inhabitants.

The death of the popular Mary of Burgundy in 1482 marked a sudden change of fortune. The relationship between the citizens of Bruges and their lord, the widower Maximilian, turned sour, and his Burgundian court left the city. The international merchants followed. Long centuries of wars and changes of political power took their toll. By the middle of the 19th century Bruges had become an impoverished city. Funnily enough, a novel would turn this wretched tide.

Golden Age A Gallo-Roman settlement was established on Bruges territory in the 2nd century, maintaining close trade relations with the rest of Gaul and England. It would take another seven centuries though before the name of Bruges – a derivation from the old-Norse bryggja or jetty – surfaces for the first time. The Vikings kept fairly quiet here, in spite of their ferocious reputation. The impressive fortress that adorned the Burg square back then might have had something to do with that. In the course of the centuries Bruges became an outstanding mercantile centre.



Success continually increased. In the 15th century - Bruges’ Golden Age things improved further when the royal house of Burgundy took up residence in the city. New luxury goods were produced in abundance, and famous painters such as Jan van Eyck and Hans Memling - the great Flemish Primitives – found their creative niche here. The fine arts flourished, and besides a goodly number of fine churches and unique merchant houses, a monumental town hall was also erected. Bruges’ success seemed imperishable.

Revival In Bruges la Morte (1892) Georges Rodenbach aptly describes Bruges as a somewhat sleepy, yet extremely mysterious place. Soon Bruges’ magnificent patrimony was rediscovered and her mysterious intimacy turned out to be her greatest asset. This élan gave Zeebrugge a new seaport, whilst Bruges itself carefully took her first touristic steps. Success wasn’t long in coming. UNESCO added the medieval city centre to its World Heritage list. The rest is history.




From early settlement to international trade centre (â&#x20AC;Ś-1200) 851 863

Earliest mention of the city Baldwin I takes up residence at Burg 1127 Charles the Good, Count of Flanders, is murdered in the Church of Saint Donatus. First town rampart. First Bruges city charter 1134 Creation of the Zwin that links Damme with the sea





Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Golden Age

(1369-1500)

1369 Margaret of Male marries Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Beginning of the Burgundian period 1384 Margaret succeeds her father Louis of Male 1430 Marriage of Duke Philip the Good with Isabella of Portugal. Establishment of the Order of the Golden Fleece 1436 Jan van Eyck paints the panel Madonna with canon Joris Vander Paele 1482 Death of Mary of Burgundy after a fall from her horse 1488 Maximilian of Austria is locked up in Craenenburg House on Markt for a few weeks





An impoverished town in a pauperised Flanders (1584-1885) 1584 Bruges becomes reconciled with the Spanish king 1604 The Zwin is closed off 1713-1795 Austrian period 1717 Foundation of the Academy of Fine Arts, predecessor of the Groeninge Museum 1795-1814 French occupation 1799 Demolition of the church of Saint Donatus and renovation of Burg 1815-1830 United Kingdom of the Netherlands 1830 Independence of Belgium. Birth of the poet Guido Gezelle 1838 First railway station







Bruges as the economic capital of Northwest Europe (1200-1400)

The city gets her second wind (1500-1578)

Provincial town with revived ambitions (1885-1970)

1245 Foundation of the Beguinage 1297 Second town rampart 1302 Bruges Matins and Battle of the Spurs 1304 First procession of the Holy Blood 1350 Reconstruction in stone of the Belfry after the destruction of its wooden predecessor 1376-1420 Construction of the town hall

1506 The cloth merchant Jan Mouscron acquires Michelangeloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Madonna with Child 1528 Lancelot Blondeel designs the mantelpiece of the Liberty of Bruges 1548 Birth of the scientist Simon Stevin 1562 Marcus Gerards engraves the ďŹ rst printed town map of Bruges 1578 Bruges joins the rebellion against the Spanish king

1887 Unveiling of the statue of Jan Breydel & Pieter de Coninck (Markt) 1892 Publication of Bruges la Morte by Georges Rodenbach 1896 Start of the construction of the seaport 1897 Dutch becomes the ofďŹ cial language. Dutch Yeast and Methylated Spirits Works 1902 First exhibition of the Flemish Primitives

The new city

(1971-â&#x20AC;Ś)

1971 Amalgamation Law incorporates former suburbs 1985 King Baldwin opens new sea lock at Zeebrugge 2000 Historic city centre is given World Heritage status, Euro 2000 (European Football Championships) 2002 Cultural Capital of Europe 2008 In Bruges is released worldwide in cinemas 2010 The procession of the Holy Blood is granted intangible cultural heritage status by UNESCO





1914-1918 The Great War. Zeebrugge becomes a German naval base 1940-1945 Historic city centre survives Second World War almost unscathed 1958 First Golden Tree pageant




10 irresistible Bruges classics > 03

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THE FLEMISH PRIMITIVES: WORLD-FAMOUS ART FROM BRUGES (more information on page 54) Admire the unique and worldfamous collection of pictures by the Flemish Primitives in the very city where they were painted. Or do you prefer the groundbreaking contemporary art scene, or perhaps poignant and romantic folklore or majestic town palaces? The Bruges Museums will happily serve all your needs.

2 THE CANALS OF BRUGES: THE CITY’S ARTERIES age-old tradition. Cruising Bruges’



canals – the remarkable city arteries – you will discover secret gardens, picturesque bridges and wonderfully beautiful still lives. Although it sounds incredible, Bruges’ loveliest places ooze even more charm when you admire them travelling by boat. 3 THE BEGUINAGE AND MINNEWATER: HUSHED BEAUTY you will have no choice but to fall silent. The beguinage is such a beauty spot. When you amble through its quiet inner court, its purity will leave you speechless. Therefore take your time and while away along the romantic Minne-

water where you will fully enjoy the age-old view. 4 THE CENTURIES -OLD BRUGES SKYLINE: WELCOME CHURCH OF OUR LADY, BELFRY, SAINT SAVIOUR’S CATHEDRAL Three spires dominate the Bruges skyline each in their own way. The imposing Belfry has been the proud symbol of Bruges’ independence for centuries. The stiff climb up its stairs will be rewarded with an unforgettable panorama. The brick tower of the Church of Our Lady – the highest of its kind in Europe – exemplifies the craftsmanship of Bruges’ artisans. The spire of Saint Saviour’s Cathedral has recently been completely renovated.

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5 BURG AND CITY HALL: MEDIEVAL OPULENCE (more information on page 20) The Burg is one of the city’s handsomest squares. For more than six centuries Bruges has been governed from its 14th-century city hall, one of the oldest and most venerable in the Low Countries. All this time this remarkable historic building has dominated this majestic square. Nowhere else will you be able to experience the city’s wealth and affluence so strongly.


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6 ALMSHOUSES: CHARITY FROZEN IN STONE (more information on page 22) Almshouses are tiny villages within the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ramparts. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how these medieval residential courts are best described. Centuries ago they were built out of mortar and charity. Today their picturesque gardens, whitewashed façades and glorious silence are the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s havens of peace par excellence. 7 BRUGESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CITY FESTIVALS: INFECTIOUS AMBIANCE From the MA Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ancient music and the rousing world music



sounds of the Bruges Festival to the rocking Cactus Festival, the swinging Klinkers and the impressive ďŹ lm experience of Cinema Novo. Throughout the year the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festivals guarantee a wonderfully infectious and varied ambiance thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible to ignore. 8 THE WORLDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CAPITAL OF CHOCOLATE (more information on page 91) Over 50 chocolate boutiques, the chocolate museum Choco-Story, a chocolate trail and a chocolate fair. It goes without saying that Bruges is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital of chocolate. The only way to discover this tasty

universe is by eating and sampling chocolate, of course. 9 BRUGESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; CULTURAL SHRINES: CULTURE WITH A CAPITAL C (more information on page 116) perience culture under the best possible conditions. What about an opera at the state-of-the-art Concert Hall? Or perhaps a groundbreaking performance at the theatre? It is absolutely no coincidence that this grand building is one of Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best preserved city theatres. Whatever you choose, you can be sure of a great time in an exceptional setting.

10 LISSEWEGE: ONE OF FLANDERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; PRETTIEST VILLAGES (more information on page 123) Barely a handful of bicycle miles from Bruges, the ďŹ ne polder village of Lissewege welcomes you with open arms. With its charming canal, its renowned barn complex of the Abbey of Ter Doest, its whitewashed polder cottages, its imposing church steeple and its vast ďŹ&#x201A;owering meadows, it is no coincidence that Lissewege was elected one of Flandersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; prettiest villages.




+2:'2(6,7:25." Choose the validity period yourself: 48hrs or 72hrs. From page 94 onwards you will find a detailed overview of all museums, places of interest and attractions in and around Bruges. If you see a then the Brugge City Card lets you , then you receive a hefty discount on the individual in for free. If you see a price. In addition, the free monthly magazine events@brugge handily lists all the events where the Brugge City Card offers you an extra discount. The card will be automatically activated as soon as you use it for the first time. The card expires once the time-limit has been exceeded. You can visit each attraction only once. Bear in mind that most museums are closed on Mondays and that there are a few attractions that allow you to use your Brugge City Card only within certain periods or blocks of time. CITY CARD

CITY CARD

Brugge City Card Endless bargains!

48h 72h

Would you like to explore Bruges and go easy on your wallet at the same time? Would you like to enjoy special offers whilst getting to know the city in all its facets? With the Brugge City Card you will accumulate one discount after another and even visit countless attractions completely free! This super bargain card is handy and inexpensive and your unique chance to save more than € 200.00!



These are our special offers! » places of interest in Bruges! And a hefty discount at the museum shops to boot! Admire the world-famous paintings of the Flemish Primitives, gaze down onto the city from the top of the majestic Belfry and visit Choco-Story, the world’s largest chocolate museum, or one of the other prestigious art collections. » A free round trip on the canals (1 March-15 November)! This is your chance to experience Bruges as never before and to explore its secret nooks and crannies and its romantic hotspots! » At least 25% discount on not to be missed concerts, dance and theatre performances! » At least 25% discount on your bike rental!

» At least 25% discount at your underground car park! » At least 25% discount at various museums, places of interest and attractions in the vicinity of Bruges! » Only € 6.00 for a three-day pass of De Lijn, valid on all buses and trams in the whole of Flanders! :+$7:,//,7&267<28" BRUGGE CITY CARD

BRUGGE CITY CARD -26

€ 34.00

€ 31.00

€ 39.00

€ 36.00

+2:723/$&($125'(5" Call in at the information offices in the Railway Station or [Concertgebouw] or order your City Card at www.bruggecitycard.be.




Visit museums for free! CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

Groeninge Museum

€ 8.00

Memling in Sint-Jan-Hospitaalmuseum

€ 8.00

Bruggemuseum-Gruuthuse

€ 6.00

Bruggemuseum-Belfry

€ 8.00

Bruggemuseum-City Hall

€ 2.00

Bruggemuseum-Liberty of Bruges

€ 2.00

Bruggemuseum-Welcome Church of Our Lady

€ 2.00

Bruggemuseum-Archaeology

€ 2.00

Arentshuis

€ 2.00

Bruggemuseum-Folklore Museum

€ 2.00

Bruggemuseum-Gezelle

€ 2.00

Our Lady of the Pottery-Hospitaalmuseum

€ 2.00

Bruggemuseum-Sint-Janshuis mill

€ 2.00

Bruggemuseum-Koelewei mill

€ 2.00

Choco-Story

€ 7.00

/ Chocolate Museum

Lumina Domestica

Memling in Sint-Jan-Hospitaalmuseum

€ 6.00

/ Lamp Museum

Belgian fries museum

€ 6.00

Diamant Museum + Diamond cutting demonstration

€ 10.00

Museum-Gallery Xpo Salvador Dalí

€ 10.00

CITY CARD

+ discounts in the museum shops of the City Museums (Musea Brugge)

25%

CITY CARD

+ discount in the museum shop of the Diamond Museum

10% Admire places of interest for free!

Groeninge Museum

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

1(: 1 Brugge City Card B for youngsters -26 years



St. Saviour’s Cathedral

€ 2.50

Beguine’s house

€ 2.00

Brewery De Halve Maan

€ 6.00

/ guided tour + tasting

Lace Centre

€ 2.50

Culture and events CITY CARD

Concertgebouw

CITY CARD

Cultuurcentrum Brugge

CITY CARD

Art Centre De Werf

30% 30%

/ cultural centre

25%




Boattrip Lamme Goedzak (Bruges-Damme)

Boudewijn Seapark (Bruges)

Sightseeing for next to nothing

Museums around Bruges € 8.00 → € 5.50

CITY CARD

Mu.ZEE (Ostend)

€ 5.00 → € 3.75

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

Permeke Museum (Jabbeke)

€ 3.00 → € 2.25

CITY CARD

Boat trip Lamme Goedzak Damme

CITY CARD

Uilenspiegelmuseum (Damme)

€ 2.50 → € 1.50

CITY CARD

Harbour Round Trip Zeebrugge

CITY CARD

Saint-John’s Hospital (Damme)

€ 1.50 → € 1.00

CITY CARD

Bruges Ballooning

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

€ 9.00 Bruges by boat (1/3 > 15/11)

€ 6,90 € 7.50 → € 5.50 € 9.00 → € 6.50 € 160.00 → € 120.00

Roman Archaeological Museum (Oudenburg)

€ 5.00 → € 3.00

CITY CARD

Talbot House (Poperinge)

€ 8.00 → € 6.00

CITY CARD

Canada-Poland War Museum (Adegem)

€ 5.00 → € 4.00

CITY CARD

Parking Centrum-Zand/Centrum-Station/Pandreitje/Katelijne

CITY CARD

Wijnendale Castle (Torhout)

€ 5.00 → € 3.00

CITY CARD

3-day pass of De Lijn*

CITY CARD

Torhout Pottery Museum (Torhout)

€ 1.25 → € 0.75

CITY CARD

Ensorhouse (Ostend)

€ 2.00 → € 1.50

CITY CARD

Tour of Flanders Centre (Oudenaarde)

€ 7.00 → € 5.00

Attractions around Bruges CITY CARD

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

Boudewijn Seapark (Bruges)

€ 20.00 → € 12.00

Sea Life Marine Park (Blankenberge)

€ 16.50 → € 8.25

Seafront (Zeebrugge)

€ 10.50 → € 7.00

Transport

Bicycle rental points CITY CARD

Fietsen Popelier

25%

CITY CARD

Fietsen ’t Koffieboontje

25%

CITY CARD

Concertgebouw B-Bike

25%

CITY CARD

Bauhaus

40%

CITY CARD

Bruges Bike Rental

25%

CITY CARD

Fietspunt (railway station)

25%

* Only available at the information offices in the railway station or



25% € 6.00

[Concertgebouw]




» START gebouw], ‘t Zand » DISTANCE 3 km » FINISH Old Saint Joh n’s Hospital

Bruges, Proud World Heritage City

Bruges may be rightly proud of her World Heritage status, the city happily embraces the future, too! This walk takes you along world-famous panoramic views, sky-high monuments and centuries-old squares invigorated by contemporary constructions. One foot planted in the Middle Ages, the other one firmly planted in the present. This walk is an absolute must for first-time visitors who would like to explore the very heart of the city straight away. Keep your camera at the ready!



DISCOVER BRUGES, MADE TO MEASURE! Would you like your walk to contain just the sights you want to see? Then www.citytripplanner.be provides you with a quick and easy way to choose a walk tailored to your requirements.


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05

From â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Zand to Simon Stevinplein

Markt and Burg

This walk starts at the Tourist Information ofďŹ ce [Concertgebouw]. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Zand is dominated by the Concertgebouw (concert hall) 13 , Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brand-new modern attraction. A clear-cut proof that this World Heritage city isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afraid of the future. The top ďŹ&#x201A;oor of this culture temple houses the Klankentoren 42 , where a grandiose panoramic view awaits you. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to drop in at [Concertgebouw] on the ground ďŹ&#x201A;oor: here you will ďŹ nd all the necessary tourist information as well as expert advice on all cultural events.

Continue down Oude Burg, a street in the right-hand corner of the square. Before long you will see the Cloth Halls on your left. These belong to the Belfry. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re allowed to cross the hallsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; imposing inner court between 8.00 a.m. and 6.00 p.m. during the week, and between 9.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. at weekends. The Markt is at the other end of the yard. If the gate is closed, turn back and walk down Hallestraat, which runs parallel to the Halls. Walk II (page 29) comments extensively on Markt.

Leave [Concertgebouw] behind you, walk along the square and turn into Zuidzandstraat, the ďŹ rst street on the right. Saint Saviourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cathedral looms up ahead on your right after three hundred metres 20 . Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; oldest parish church is located on its original street level, i.e. lower than the present Zuidzandstraat. The street level gradually rose throughout the Middle Ages as people simply threw their refuse out onto the street where it was then ďŹ&#x201A;attened by passing carts and coaches. Inside Saint Saviourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the church towerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wooden rafters can be lit. The cathedral treasury displays a.o. interesting copper memorial plaques, ďŹ ne examples of gold and silver and paintings by Dirk Bouts, Hugo van der Goes and Pieter Pourbus.

Return to the Belfry 39 and walk down Breidelstraat, a trafďŹ c-free alley on the corner. Continue to Burg. Along the way on your right you will notice the Garre, a narrow alley. This may be the narrowest street in Bruges (try walking side by side here!), it nevertheless boasts a fair number of cosy cafĂŠs. Burg is the most majestic square in the city. So, take your time to admire its grandeur. The main character in this medieval story is the Bruggemuseum-City Hall 38 (1376-1420), one of the oldest city halls in the Netherlands and a gothic example for all its brothers and sisters that were built later, from Louvain to Oudenaarde and Brussels. Having admired its exterior, enter the impressive Gothic Hall and gaze in admiration at the polychrome ďŹ&#x201A;oating ribs of the vaulted ceiling. Hiding on the right-hand side of this gothic monument is the Basilica of the Holy Blood 05 , a mystical double chapel, below which sits the Romanesque church of Saint Basil (1139-1149). One ďŹ&#x201A;oor up is a basilica in Gothic revival style where the reliquary of the Holy Blood has been kept since time immemorial. Each year on Ascension Day the reliquary is carried along in the Procession of the Holy Blood, a much-loved event that has been warming the

Continue past the cathedral and walk down Sint-Salvatorskerkhof immediately on the right. Turn left into Sint-Salvatorskoorstraat. Simon Stevinplein opens up at the end of this street. This attractive square, lined with cosy cafĂŠ terraces, is named after Simon Stevin, a well-known Flemish-Dutch scientist. His gracious statue naturally takes centre stage. 




BURG: AN ARCHITECT URAL SYNOPSIS Art lovers have already noticed that Burg projects a wonderful cross-section of stunning architectural styles. It is, indeed, a summing-up in one place of all the styles that have caught our imagination throughout the various centuries. From Romanesque (Saint Basil’s Church) and Gothic (City Hall) by way of renaissance (civil registry) and baroque (deanery) to classicism (mansion of the Liberty of Bruges) and 21st-century architecture (Toyo Ito). There’s no need to go and dash all around Bruges to see it all!

35

heart of the entire population from as early as 1291. Facing the basilica is the gleaming renaissance façade of the erstwhile Civil Registry (1534-1537), adjacent to the Bruggemuseum-Liberty of Bruges 32 . Its showpiece is a splendid oak mantelpiece with an alabaster frieze (1529). Adjoining is the former mansion of the Liberty of Bruges (1722-1727). It is from here that the country around Bruges was administered. After 1795 a court of justice was installed. It has been the city’s administrative centre since 1988. Once upon a time Saint Donatus’ Cathedral graced the spot directly in front of the City Hall. The church was destroyed in 1799. Today you find Toyo Ito’s futurist pavilion on that spot. Adjacent to it is the deanery (16551666) of the cathedral.

The Vismarkt opens up immediately past the bridge 35 . At first, fish was sold on one of the Markt’s corners, but as the townspeople complained about the stench, the fishmongers were forced to move and sell their wares here. In the covered arcade (1821), specially erected for the purpose of selling fish, fresh seafish was sold, a delicacy that only the rich could afford. Today you can still buy your fresh saltwater fish here every morning from Tuesday to Saturday.

Fishy stories Proceed to Blinde Ezelstraat, the little street to the left of the City Hall. Don’t forget to look back at the lovely arch between City Hall and Old Civil Registry. Do you see Solomon? Left of him is the statue of Prosperity, to the right the statue of Peace. According to legend, Blinde Ezelstraat (Blind Donkey Street) owes its name to… a blind donkey. The house in the left-hand corner hugging the Canal used to house a mill driven by a donkey. In order to preserve the poor animal from the depressing thought that the only thing it had to do was turn endless rounds, a blindfold was put on the donkey. A new street name was born. Look left on the bridge: Meebrug is said to be the oldest bridge of Bruges.



Retrace your steps and turn left in front of the bridge towards Huidenvettersplein. Whereas the Vismarkt served the rich, Huidenvettersplein (Tanners Square) served the poor. No sea fish on the menu here, but affordable freshwater fish. The post in the middle of the square used to have a twin brother: in between the two posts hung the scales that the fish were weighed on. The large, striking building dominating the square used to be the guildhall of the tanners. Here they turned cow hides into leather. As this was a rather smelly job, it is no coincidence that the tanners’ guildhall adjoined the fish markets. Look out for the statuette adorning the corner of the hall. It’s no surprise that the little fellow raises his nose.




ALMSHOUSES, THE QUICKEST WAY TO HEAVEN These 14th-century dwellings were charitable institutions, sometimes set up by the guilds to lodge their elderly members, sometimes set up by widows or well-to-do burghers who wanted to ensure their place in heaven. For that purpose, each set of almshouses had its own chapel where the occupants of the almshouses would be expected to send their prayers of thanks up to heaven. Practically all of the almshouses have been carefully restored and modernised and offer cosy living to today’s elderly, whilst their small yet picturesque gardens and whitewashed façades offer welcoming peace and quiet to the present-day visitor. Feel free to enter these premises, but don’t forget to respect their perfect tranquillity.

Continue to Rozenhoedkaai. Keep right. Rozenhoedkaai is the most photographed spot of Bruges! So, take out your camera! This used to be the salt port. In the Middle Ages salt was as expensive as gold: it served to preserve food and to season dishes. A word like salaris (Dutch), salaire (French), salary still harks back to medieval times. The word derives from sal, which is Latin for salt. Roman soldiers’ wages were paid in salt!

From Groeninge to the Bonifacius bridge

Continue along Dijver. Many centuries ago all manner of druids gathered on this holy spot to give praise to their gods and spirits. Along this atmospheric stretch of water, you will first find the College of Europe (numbers 9 to 11) 03 , an international postgraduate institution that focuses on Europe, and then the Groeninge Museum (number 12) 20 , Bruges’ most renowned museum. On display are world-famous masterpieces by Jan van Eyck, Hans Memling, Hugo van der Goes, Gerard David and many other Flemish Primitives. The museum also has a valuable collection of Flemish expressionists, neoclassical top notch paintings from the 18th and 19th centuries and post-war modern art. Overall, the museum shows a complete overview of Belgian and southern Dutch (Flemish) painting from the 15th to the 20th century. The museum entrance is reached through a few pictur-



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esque courtyard gardens. Would you like to find out more about the Flemish Primitives? Then leaf through to the interview on page 54 with Till-Holger Borchert, the Groeninge Museum’s chief curator. Continue along Dijver. The entrance gate to the Gruuthuse museum is on your left just beyond the little bridge. Would you like to know more about the Bruggemuseum-Gruuthuse 21 ? Then leaf through to Walk II on page 28. Continue to Guido Gezelleplein, then bear left in front of the Welcome Church of Our Lady 14 and follow the narrow footpath to the picturesque Bonifacius bridge. The crosses that you see all over the place don’t belong to graves at all! They are crosses taken down from church steeples during the First World War so as to disorient the enemy pilots. The crosses have never been put up again. Close to the Bonifacius bridge is Bruges’ smallest Gothic window. Look up! It was through this window that the lords and ladies of Gruuthuse were able to peer down onto their private jetty. Across the bridge is the charming city garden of Arentshuis 02 , an elegant 18th-century abode. The top floor houses work by the versatile British artist Frank Brangwyn. The ground floor is reserved for temporary exhibitions. Rik Poot’s remarkable sculpture group in the garden represents the Apocalypse: famine, death, revolution and the plague. A theme that appealed to the painter Hans Memling as well. Go through the garden gate to reach the Groeninge Museum 20 , where more work by Memling is displayed.




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On to the Beguinage! Leave the garden once more through the narrow garden gate and turn left into ‘Groeninge,’ a winding street. Turn right again at the intersection with Nieuwe Gentweg. Notice the Saint Joseph Almshouses (17th century) and the De Meulenaere Almshouses (1613). Continue down the street. On the left-hand corner of Oude Gentweg and Katelijnestraat is the Diamond Museum 18 , Bruges’ most glittering museum and the place to be for all lovers of bling. It goes without saying that an inspiring diamond museum simply couldn’t be absent in the most romantic city of the western hemisphere! Turn left into Katelijnestraat, then immediately right into Wijngaardstraat. Cross Wijngaardplein – a stopping place for coachmen. A little further on turn right onto the bridge beside the Sashuis (lockhouse) to enter the Beguinage. The bridge offers a fine view of the Minnewater. The Minnewater used to be the landing stage of the barges or track boats which provided a regular connection between Bruges and Ghent. Today it is one of Bruges’ most romantic beauty spots. Equally atmospheric, yet of a totally different nature, is the Beguinage. Although the ‘Princely Beguinage Ten Wijngaarde’ 01 , founded in 1245, is no longer occupied by beguines, but by nuns of the Order of Saint Benedict, you can still form an excellent picture of what daily life looked like in the 17th century. The imposing courtyard garden, the whitewashed house fronts and blessed peace create an atmosphere all of its own. The entrance gate closes each day at 6.30 p.m. without fail. You have been warned!



Walk around the Beguinage and leave through the main gate. Turn left after the bridge and left again to reach Walplein. De Halve Maan 12 , a brewery established as early as 1546, is at number 26. This is Bruges’ last surviving city brewery. Their speciality is ‘Brugse Zot’ (Bruges Fool), a spirited top-fermented beer made from malt, hop and special yeast. The name of the beer refers to the nickname of the Bruges townspeople, a name allegedly conferred upon them by Maximilian of Austria. In order to welcome the duke, the citizens paraded past him in a lavish procession of brightly-coloured merrymakers and fools. When a short time later they asked their ruler to finance a new ‘zothuis’ or madhouse, his answer was as short as it was forceful: ‘The only people I have seen here are fools. Bruges is one big madhouse. Close the gates!’

A splendid finish at Old Saint John’s Hospital Turn left into Zonnekemeers. Once across the water, turn right to enter Old St-John via the car park. The former Hospital of Saint John (13th-14th century) 25 has a proud eight century-long history. The oldest documents even date back to the 12th century! Here nuns and monks took good care of pilgrims, travellers and the sick. And people sometimes chose to die here. Hans Memling once was a patient here too. According to a much later legend, he rewarded his benefactors with no fewer than six masterpieces. Turn the corner, enter the building and weave your way through the medieval wards, the incorporated church, the Diksmuide attic and the old dormitory. Don’t forget to pay a visit to the adjoining 17th-century pharmacy. The herb garden grows all the ingredients for gruut: lady’s mantle, bog myrtle and bay laurel. On the picturesque square that leads to this garden is ‘The Arteries of the Convent’, a work by the contemporary Italian artist Giuseppe Penone. How history feeds the present. The World Heritage city of Bruges couldn’t possibly find a better representation of her intentions. In Walk II – on page 28 – the meaning of gruut is explained.




» START Guido Gezelle plein, Welcome Church of Our Lady » DISTANCE 2,5 km » FINISH Prinsenhof

Bruges: B of Burgundian When, during Bruges’ Golden Age Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, married Margaret of Male, the daughter of the last Count of Flanders, the county of Flanders suddenly found itself belonging to Burgundy. As the Burgundian court liked to stay in Bruges, the port city became a magnet for noblemen, merchants and artists. They naturally all wanted to get their share of the city’s wealth. Today the Burgundian influence is still strongly felt throughout Bruges. Let’s discover a northern city with a southern character.



DISCOVER BRUGES, MADE TO MEASURE! Would you like your walk to contain just the sights you want to see? Then www.citytripplanner.be provides you with a quick and easy way to choose a walk tailored to your requirements. 


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From Guido Gezelleplein to Markt This square is named after the Flemish priest and poet Guido Gezelle (18301899). Take a seat on one of the squareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s benches and enjoy Gezelleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lovely statue and the side-view of the Welcome Church of Our Lady 14 . Its one hundred and twenty-two metres high brick tower is sure proof of the craftsmanship of Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; artisans. Take a look inside and admire the rich art collection that includes Michelangeloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world-famous Madonna and Child d and the 15th- and th 16 -century mausoleums of Mary of Burgundy and Charles the Bold. On your left is the striking residence of the lords of Gruuthuse, now the BruggemuseumGruuthuse 21 . The tower and well were status symbols, and evidence of the Gruuthuse familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great wealth. They made their fortune from their exclusive rights on gruut, a herb mixture that, ages before hop, was used to ďŹ&#x201A;avour beer. Louis of Gruuthuse not only commanded the army of Charles the Bold, he was also the personal bodyguard to Mary of Burgundy. A cultured man, he owned the Gruuthuse manuscript, a famous medieval codex containing amongst its many texts no fewer than 147 songs. The familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto was Plus est en vous (There is more in you than you think). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proudly displayed above the door of their residence Continue along the narrow footpath to the left of the church. Look up immediately beyond the bend. Do you see the chapel that seems to hold the Bruggemuseum-Gruuthuse and the Welcome Church of Our Lady in a close embrace? As the lords of Gruuthuse were far too grand to mingle with the populace, they had their own private chapel high above the street, where they could follow Mass. This intimate place of worship can still be visited.



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Retrace your steps, cross the attractive Gruuthuseplein and turn right into Dijver. Number 12 is the Groeninge Museum 20 , Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most famous museum. An interview with chief curator Till-Holger Borchert is on page 54. Further along Dijver is one of the locations of the College of Europe, numbers 9-11 03 , an international postgraduate institution that focuses on Europe. Carry on down Dijver and turn left into Wollestraat. Perez de Malvenda is an impressive mansion on the corner of Wollestraat. This 15th-century town house, now a food shop, has been restored from attic to cellar. Just before Markt are the Cloth Halls 13 , the Belfryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 39 warehouses and sales outlets. Street side were countless stalls where the townspeople bought herbs for their medicinal powders and potions. Indeed, in Burgundian times, Bruges used to import herbs from all over Europe.

Markt, Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; beating heart Wollestraat leads to Markt. Markt is dominated by its Belfry 39 , for centuries the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foremost ediďŹ ce and the perfect look-out in case of war, ďŹ re or any other calamity. You can still climb to the top of the tower! En route you pass the former medieval treasure chamber and the forty-seven silver-toned bells of the carillon, altogether twenty-seven tons of bronze melodiousness. Your climb up the Belfryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 366 steps will be rewarded with an unforgettable panoramic view. At the foot of the Belfry are the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most famous chippies (frietkoten)! The statue of Jan Breydel and Pieter de Coninck graces the middle of the square. These two popular Bruges heroes resisted French oppression and consequently played an important part during the Battle of the 


SWANS ON THE CANALS After the death of Mary of Burgundy, Bruges went through some troubled times. The townspeople, enraged by new taxes Maximilian of Austria, Mary’s successor, had imposed upon them, even rose in revolt against their new ruler. As Maximilian was locked up in House Craenenburg on the market square, he helplessly witnessed the torture and eventual beheading of his bailiff and trusted councillor Pieter Lanchals. According to legend, once the duke had regained power, the citizens of Bruges were ordered to keep swans or long necks (langhalzen) on the canals for all eternity.

Spurs in 1302. Their statue neatly looks out onto the Gothic revival style Provincial Palace (Markt 3) 31 . Until the 18th century this used to be the extremely busy Waterhalle, a covered warehouse where goods were loaded and unloaded along the canals that ran alongside the square. Today the canals are still there, albeit underground. Would you like a break? Then treat yourself to a coach ride and explore the city by horse and carriage for half an hour. Or maybe you prefer a fifty-minute city tour by minibus? You can continue your walk after your trip.

From Markt to Jan van Eyckplein Ignore Markt on your left and continue straight ahead to Vlamingstraat. In the 15th century this used to be the harbour area’s shopping street. A fair number of banks had a branch here, and wine taverns were two a penny. Each of these had a deep cellar where French and Renish wines could easily be stacked. In the medieval vaulted cellars of Taverne Curiosa (Vlamingstraat 20), the alcoholic atmosphere of those bygone days can still be inhaled. Halfway along Vlamingstraat is the elegant City Theatre 33 on your left. This royal theatre (1869) is one of Europe’s best-preserved city theatres. Behind the eclectic façade lie a palatial auditorium and a regal foyer. Papageno, the bird seller from Mozart’s opera, The Magic Flute, guards the entrance. His score lies scattered on the square opposite.



Continue along Vlamingstraat and turn right into Kortewinkel just before the canal. Somewhat hidden from gazing eyes, Kortewinkel boasts a unique 16th-century wooden house front. It is one of only two left in the city (you will come across the other one further along this walk). Just a few metres on is another delicious discovery at number 10. The Jesuit College has a magnificent secrretive courtyard garden. Is its door open? Then walk in an nd enjoy its heavenly peace. K Kortewinkel turns into Spaanse Loskaai, the home port of th the Spanish merchants in Burgundian times. T The picturesque bridge on your left is the Augustine b bridge, one of Bruges’ oldest specimens, what with its seven hundred summers. The stone seats were originally intended to display the wares of the diligent o ssellers. The bridge affords an excellent view of the house in the right-hand corner, which connects Spanjaardstraat with Kortewinkel. This used to be not only a monastery but also a haunted house, so say the locals. When an amorous monk was rejected by a nun, the man murdered her and then committed suicide. Ever since they have been haunting that ramshackle building… Continue along Spaanse Loskaai, go down the first street on your right and proceed to Oosterlingenplein. During Bruges’ Golden Age this was the fixed abode of the so-called Oosterlingen or German merchants. Their imposing warehouse took up the entire left side of the square. Today the only remnant is the building to the right of Hotel Bryghia. Their warehouse must have been truly grand!




Beyond Oosterlingenplein is Woensdagmarkt. You will then find yourself on the square on which the statue of the painter Hans Memling attracts all attention. Turn right into Genthof. Here the second of two authentic medieval wooden house fronts draws attention. Notice that each floor juts out a little more than the next one. This building technique, which helped to avoid water damage, was consequently used in various architectural styles.

THE LITTLE BEAR OF BRUGES When Baldwin with the Iron Arm, the first Count of Flanders, visited Bruges for the first time, the first creature he saw was a big brown bear. According to legend, all this happened in the 9th century. After a fierce fight the count succeeded in killing the animal. In homage to the courageous beast he proclaimed the bear to be the city’s very own symbol. Today the bear in the niche of the Burghers Lodge is festively rigged out during exceptional celebrations.

Continue along Academiestraat.

Burgundian Manhattan THE CORRECT TIME

Proceed to Jan van Eyckplein. This was Burgundian Bruges’ Manhattan, the place to be! Here ships docked, cargoes were loaded and unloaded and tolls were levied. In this unremitting hustle and bustle a cacophony of languages was heard above the din, the one sounding even louder than the other. What a soundtrack! Each business transaction required a few local sounds too, of course, as there always had to be a Bruges broker present who would naturally pocket his cut. On the corner 16th-century Huis De Roode Steen has been sparkling in all its glory since its restoration in 1877. At numbers 1-2 is the Old Tollhouse (1477) 38 , where all tollage was settled. To the left of this monumental building is Pijndershuisje, Bruges’ narrowest dwelling. The house belonged to a pijnderr or docker, a name that you can easily derive from its telling façade, that is if you keep your eyes peeled. The hunched pijnders were employed to load and unload sacks and casks. A gleaming terrestrial globe proudly sits on top of Boechoute, the house on the corner. This building from 1477 with its original lean-to-roof is now the Meridian 3 tearoom. When the Brussels to Bruges railway line was inaugurated, not all clocks in Belgium were found to keep the same time. The shortcoming was cured by the globe. At noon exactly the sun coincided with its shadow through a hole in the globe. The line that was thus drawn can still be traced today thanks to a string of copper nails.



Right on the corner with Jan van Eyckplein is another remarkable construction, distinguished by its striking tower. This is Burgher’s Lodge 28 , a kind of 15th-century private club where prominent burghers of Bruges could mix socially with foreign merchants. Hidden in a niche of this Burghers Lodge is the little Bruges Bear, one of the city’s most important symbols. Proceed to Grauwwerkersstraat. The little square connecting Academiestraat with Grauwwerkersstraat has been known as ‘Beursplein’ since time immemorial. Here merchants were engaged in high-quality trade. The merchant houses of Genoa (later renamed Saaihalle and today Frietmuseum) 04 , Florence (now De Florentijnen restaurant) and Venice (now De Slegte bookshop) once stood here side by side like brothers. In front of Huis ter Beurze (1276), the central inn 24 , merchants from all over Europe used to gather to arrange business appointments and conduct exchange transactions. The Dutch word for stock exchange became ‘beurs’, derived from the name of the house. Many other languages would take over this term, such as French (bourse) or Italian (borsa). Turn into Grauwwerkersstraat and stop immediately in your tracks. The side wall of Huis ter Beurze, and more precisely the part between the two sets of ground-floor windows, bears the signatures of the stonemasons. This way everybody knew which mason cut which stones and which mason remained to be paid. The house next-door to Huis ter Beurze, called the Little Beurze, still sits on its original street level.




PRINSENHOF GOSSIP > As Philip the Fair hadn’t yet laid eyes on his future wife, he sent Jan van Eyck to Portugal to paint her portrait. This way the duke wanted to make certain he had made the right choice. The duke’s ploy worked, because history teaches us that the couple had a happy marriage. > Although the popular Mary of Burgundy incurred only a minor fracture due to her fall off her horse, the accident would eventually lead to her death at Prinsenhof. Back in those times there was no cure for inflammation. > During the recent hotel renovation no fewer than 568 silver coins, minted between 1755 and 1787, were dug up. After some careful counting and calculations it is assumed that the energetic English nuns entrusted the coins to the soil so as to prevent the advancing French troops from stealing their hard-earned capital. 29

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Turn left into Naaldenstraat. On your right, Court Bladelin 20 with its attractive tower looms up ahead. In the 15th century, treasurer of the Order of the Golden Fleece Pieter Bladelin, portrayed above the gate whilst praying to the Virgin Mary, leased his house to the Florentine banking family of de Medici, who set up one of their branches here. Today the edifice belongs to the Sisters of Our Lady of Seven Sorrows. We highly recommend you to ring at the door between 10.00 a.m. and noon or between 2.00 p.m. and 5.00 p.m. The sisters will allow you to have a peek inside, so that you can admire the magnificent courtyard garden and the city’s first renaissance façade, embellished with two stone medallions representing Lorenzo de Medici and his wife Clarissa Orsini. Somewhat further along, next to another ornamental tower, turn right into Boterhuis, a winding cobbled alley that catapults you back straight into the Middle Ages. Keep right, pass Saint Jacob’s church and turn left into Moerstraat. The Dukes of Burgundy and the vast majority of foreign merchants patronised Saint Jacob’s church 19 . Their extravagant gifts have left their glittering mark on the interior.

Prinsenhof (the Princes’ Court), home base of the Dukes of Burgundy

(Our Flanders), which represents a noblewoman on horseback, was designed by the Belgian sculptor Jules Lagae. At the end of Geerwijnstraat turn right into Geldmuntstraat. The walk’s finishing point is Prinsenhof. We end the walk on a highlight. Prinsenhof used to be the palace of the counts and dukes. This impressive mansion, originally seven times the size of what you see today, was erected in the 15th century by Philip the Fair to celebrate his (third) marriage to Isabel of Portugal. When Philip the Bold remarried Margaret of York, a swimming pool and a zoological garden were added to the ducal residence. It is no surprise that Prinsenhof not only became the favourite pied-à-terre of the Dukes of Burgundy, but also the nerve centre of their political, economic and cultural ambitions. Both Philip the Fair (d.1467) and Mary of Burgundy (d.1482) breathed their last here. After the death of the popular Mary of Burgundy the palace’s fortunes declined, until it eventually ended up in private hands. In the 17th century English nuns converted it into a boarding school for girls of well-todo parents. After the nuns had gone, the complex changed ownership many times. Today Prinsenhof belongs to the Kempinski hotel chain, which turned it into Bruges’ first five-star hotel. Non-residents are allowed to have a look inside.

Turn left into Geerwijnstraat and carry on to Muntplein. Muntplein (Coin Square) belongs to nearby Prinsenhof 29 . As you might have guessed, this was where Bruges’ mint was situated. The statue Flandria Nostra






» START Choco-Story (Wijnzakstraat) » DISTANCE 4 km » FINISH Café Vlissinghe in Blekersstraat

Strolling through silent Bruges Although the parishes of Saint Anne and Saint Giles are known as places of great tranquillity, the fact that they are off the beaten track does not mean that the visitor will be short of adventure. How about a row of nostalgic windmills? Or perhaps some unpretentious working-class neighbourhoods or a couple of exclusive gentlemen’s clubs? Will you be able to absorb all these impressions serenely? Don’t worry. After the tour we invite you to recover your breath in Bruges’ oldest café!



DISCOVER BRUGES, MADE TO MEASURE! Would you like your walk to contain just the sights you want to see? Then www.citytripplanner.be provides you with a quick and easy way to choose a walk tailored to your requirements. 


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From Choco-Story to Gouden-Handstraat

Saint Gilesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, home base of workmen and artists

Choco-Story (Wijnzakstraat 2) 41 is the perfect starting point for the longest walk in this visitors guide. The museum of chocolate not only dips you in the yummy history of chocolate and cocoa, it also offers extensive chocolate tasting. If you wish, you can also buy your supplies here. No doubt the chocolate will help you to keep up a brisk pace! At the same address Lumina Domestica 43

Cross the bridge, turn right along Spiegelrei and turn into Gouden-Handstraat, the fourth street on your left. In the 15th century Gouden-Handstraat and the parish of Saint Giles were known as the artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; quarter. Hans Memling may have lived a few streets further down in Sint-Jorisstraat, the fact of the matter is that Jan van Eyck had a studio in Gouden-Handstraat, and that his somewhat lesser known fellow-artists also used to congregate in this neighbourhood.

contains the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest collection of lamps and lights. The museum also houses 6.000 antiques. Turn left into Sint-Jansstraat, carry on to Korte Ridderstraat and turn left to Sint-Maartensplein. Saint Walburghaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church 21 rises up in all its magniďŹ cence right in front of you. This baroque ediďŹ ce (1619-1642) boasts a remarkable marble communion rail and high altar. In summer, glorious classical music recitals are offered free to church visitors. At number 4 is the erstwhile Scottish warehouse. Continue down Koningstraat to the bridge. This bridge, which connects poetic Spinolarei with Spiegelrei, affords a lovely view of Oud Huis Amsterdam on your left. Today this historic town house is an elegant hotel. This area used to be mainly populated by the English and Scots. TheEnglish merchants even had their own steegere or stair where their goods were unloaded. The stair is still there, and the street connecting it is appropriately called Engelse Straat. The digniďŹ ed white school building across the bridge was once a college of English Jesuits.



Turn right into Sint-Gilliskerkstraat. This street bumps into Saint Gilesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church 17 in the heart of the tranquil quarter of Saint-Gilesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Initially a chapel, this house of God was upgraded to a parish church in 1258. In spite of its interior in Gothic revival style and its superb paintings, the church takes on the appearance of a simple, sturdy village church. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be misled. In and around the church countless famous painters were buried, such as Hans Memling (d.1494), in his time the best paid painter, Lanceloot Blondeel (d.1561) and Pieter Pourbus (d.1564). Their graves and the cemetery may have disappeared, but their artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; souls still hover in the air. Walk around the church and turn into Sint-Gilliskoorstraat. Although the workmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dwellings in these streets are rather small, they nevertheless display a bricked up window. As it happened, a tax on windows was levied in 1800. As a consequence, a large number of windows were walled up.




BRUGES AND THE SEA For centuries, Potterierei ensured the city’s wealth. This canal ran to Damme where it was connected to a large lock, called ‘Speie’, which in turn was connected to the Zwin, a deep sea channel and tidal inlet. While Damme developed into an outport, Bruges grew into Northwestern Europe’s greatest business centre of the Middle Ages. The arts flourished, culture thrived, prosperity seemed to be set for all eternity. The tide turned when Mary of Burgundy suddenly passed away. The relations between Bruges and the Burgundians turned sour and the Burgundian court left the city. The foreign merchants and their wealth followed in its wake. The Zwin silted up and Bruges lost her privileged commercial position. The city thus fell into a deep winter sleep.

From Potterierei to the Ramparts (Vesten) Turn right into Langerei at the end of the street. Cross lovely Snaggaardbrug, the first bridge you get to, and turn left into Potterierei. You will have to follow the canal for some time. After a fair distance along A P Potterierei is Bruges’ Great S Seminary at number 72 04 on yyour right. A unique place with a lush orchard and meadows with cows at pasture. Between w 1628 and 1642 a new Cistercian abbey was erected here, which a later on would achieve great fame for the wealth and erudition of its occupants. During the French Revolution the abbey was brought under public ownership, and the abbot and monks were chased away. The 17th century abbey buildings were first used as a military hospital and then as a military depot and a grammar school before they were eventually taken over by the Great Seminary in 1833. Up to the present day the Seminary has been training catholic priests here. Just a few yards further down at number 79 is the Hospitaalmuseum-Our Lady of the Pottery 37 . Its history goes back to the 13th century. Diligent nuns used to treat pilgrims, travellers and the sick here. The Gothic church with its baroque interior and its rich collection of works of art, accumulated by the hospital through-



out the centuries, is open to the public. It’s a well-hidden gem that’s certainly worth a visit! Carry on to the lock and turn right. This idyllic spot is where the canal Damse Vaart heads out across the other side of the ring road towards the equally romantic town of Damme. It’s hard to believe that this area around the canal was once a scene of great controversy. Up until the Eighty Years’ War Bruges was connected to Sluis by way of Damme. Ambitious Napoleon Bonaparte had the link with the tidal inlet of the Zwin, the natural predecessor of the Damse Vaart, dredged by Spanish prisoners of war so as to create a watercourse that would run all the way to Antwerp. His plan then was to develop the port city of Antwerp into a naval base, which would enable him to avoid the English sea blockade. Napoleon’s project left Damme cut in twain, even if the wild plans of the Little General were never fully realised. When Belgium became independent in 1830, the new authorities stopped the project, which in the end would go no further than Hoeke, one of Damme’s boroughs. Today the low-traffic bicycle path skirting the canal is a most attractive route linking Bruges with Damme. The trip is highly recommended, as it traverses le plat pays, that flat country made famous by Jacques Brel in the moving song of that name. Imagine! In the middle of a unique polder landscape this truly poetic u ccanal strip, bordered by lofty poplars bended down by eternal westerly winds. b




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THE ARCHERS‘ GUILD: 165 MEN AND 1 QUEEN! Although this used to be one of the poorer areas of the city for a very long time, the district includes two exclusive clubs. A greater contradiction cannot be found! Are you sitting comfortably out of harm’s way on the slope of Saint John’s House Mill? Then look down on your left. There is Saint George’s Guild, a fellowship of crossbow men. Down on your right is Saint Sebastian’s Guild with its remarkably elegant tower. This guild goes back more than six centuries, which makes it unique in the world. The society numbers 165 male members exactly and one notable female member: the Queen of England. Ever since the exiled English king Charles II took up residence in Bruges in the 17th century, the city and the British royal family have always been closely associated. Whenever the British royal family is on a state visit to Belgium, so the rumour goes, they first of all pop in at the Archers’Guild.

Turn right and carry on along the Ramparts, which surround the city like a ring of green. In the 16th century more than thirty windmills were turning their sails here. Today only four are left. In the 18th century the millers stood by helplessly when bread consumption took a dive and people started to consume more potatoes. Eventually steam machines would take over the millers’ tasks. The BruggemuseumKoelewei Mill 25 and Saint John’s House Mill 32 are open to visitors. The miller will happily explain the workings of his mill, and he will gladly give a milling demonstration, too. Make sure you climb the slope upon which Saint John’s Mill (the third mill) is standing! The hill affords a fantastic panoramic view of the city. This



is the perfect spot to brush up on your amassed knowledge of Bruges. And there’s more! Down below on your right is Verloren Hoek (Lost Corner), now an authentic working-class district, but back in the 19th century an impoverished neighbourhood with such a bad reputation that even the police didn’t dare enter its streets.

Silent Bruges Descend down the slope and turn right into Rolweg. Right on the corner is the Bruggemuseum-Gezelle 22 , the birthplace of Guido Gezelle (1830-1899), one of Flanders’ most venerable poets. On display are handwritten letters, writing material and a deliciously peaceful garden with an age-old Corsican pine. Gezelle’s parents worked here as gardener and caretaker, in exchange for which, they and their family received free board and lodgings. Little Guido grew up in these idyllic surroundings. He would eventually return to Bruges many years later and after many a peregrination. Upon his return he became curate of Saint Walburgha’s Church. He also took over the running of the English Monastery (Carmersstraat 83-85), where he would die. These were his last words, reportedly: ‘I have so loved hearing the birds singing.’ Here, in this most verdant part of Bruges, we still know precisely what the priest and poet meant. Turn into Balstraat, the second street on the left. This picturesque working-man’s alley houses the Bruggemuseum-Folklore 27 . The 17th-century row of single-room dwellings, restored and converted into authentic artisans’ interiors such as a milliner’s, a confectioner’s and a small classroom, will take you back to bygone days. The tower of the 15th-century Jerusalem




07

Church 07 can easily be spotted from these premises. This church was commissioned by the Adornes, a prominent Bruges merchant family of Genovese origin. In 1470 Anselm Adornes collected one of his sons (the father had no fewer than sixteen children) in Padova before setting off on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Upon his return to Bruges Anselm decided to build an exact copy of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The result can be said to be remarkable, indeed! Next door to the church is the Lace Centre 24 . Here the young as well as the more experienced can take workshops as well as quick courses. The lace centre has its own museum. Until fifty years ago the row of restored almshouses used to be inhabited by lace-makers. If you enter the museum during a lace-making demonstration, then time will seem to have stood still all those years. At the crossroads turn right into Jeruzalemstraat, then, at the church, left onto Sint-Annaplein. The tiny square is dominated by the apparently simple church of Saint Anne 16 . Her exterior may be austere, her interior on the other hand is one of Bruges’ most splendid examples of baroque architecture. As this neighbourhood gradually went upmarket, so did the church, naturally!



With the church behind you turn left into Sint-Annakerkstraat and then right into Sint-Annarei. At the corner of the confluence of the two waterways one of Bruges’ most handsome town houses is proudly showing off its rococo credentials. Sit yourself down on a shady bench and enjoy this exceptional prospect. Retrace your steps for just a few yards and turn right into Blekersstraat next to the bridge. Café Vlissinghe at number 2 is undoubtedly Bruges’ oldest café. This has been a tavern since 1515. It is no surprise then that you will find oodles of ambiance here. It is therefore the perfect place to settle down and let the wonderful memories of your walk slowly sink in. A local beer will be your ideal companion. Cheers!




!,GHQWLNLW Name: Pieter Aspe Date of Birth: 3 April 1953 Born in Bruges, lives in Blankenberge, author of more than twenty-five crime fiction novels with Bruges as a backdrop.

The Magic of Bruges Bruges World Heritage City Rudy Collier, former editor-in-chief of the Flemish quality newspaper De Morgen, is now editor-in-chief of De Morgen Magazine, the newspaper’s Saturday supplement featuring photo-reportages, lifestyle, gastronomy and travel.

Bruges is a feast for the eye: wherever you look, everything is of World Heritage class. Yet Shakespeare already knew: ‘There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy’. Mysteries, secrets and machinations, they’re all part and parcel of Bruges’ medieval past. No one senses this more than Pieter Aspe, a native of the city and the most successful crime writer in Belgium, boasting more than twenty-five thrillers starring detective chief inspector Van In. Bruges, too, plays a major role in each book. This is Pieter Aspe, the man who sends out the enigmatic mix of mysterious and contemporary Bruges to the farthest corners of the world.

Pierre Aspeslag is his real name, a name he used until he was forty-two years of age. It was only then that he decided to become a writer. It was to be the start of an impressive career. For years now Flanders has been under the spell of the adventures of detective chief inspector Van In and his girlfriend Hannelore. The television adaptations on Flemish television have been a spectacular success for six seasons, and success abroad is not far away. Indeed, the impressive series of more than twenty-five crime fiction novels has become immensely popular in France, Italy and other countries, and the television series is broadcast in Germany and the Netherlands. Pieter Aspe, however, remains modest, which is no surprise really, as most of his fellow townspeople are also somewhat self-effacing and introverted. It is fair to say that the natives are no loudmouths, even when they have much to shout about. Aspe, born and bred in the historical heart of the city,

would probably never have written a single book if he hadn’t held a very curious job. For eleven years he was the caretaker at the world-famous Chapel of the Holy Blood. This 13th-century Romanesque chapel contains the relic of the Holy Blood of Jesus Christ. The relic is supposed to have come to Bruges from Constantinople. It is only logical that countless stories sprang up surrounding the fortunes of the Holy Blood. Stories, for example, about the Noble Brotherhood of the Holy Blood (still in existence), which managed to save the relic several times from occupying forces. There is even a link with the Knights Templar. Millions visit the chapel every year, amongst them many pilgrims from all around the globe. A man like Aspe had no choice but to become impressed by it all. Pieter Aspe: ‘The atmosphere that reigned there can’t possibly be put into words. You constantly feel the serene mysticism, unique in the world. You become one with that awesome history. To




be honest, I felt really good all the years I worked there. It gave me the time and the opportunity to dream, to think and to use my imagination.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Aspe shows a yellowed decades-old book about a priest called Van Aken, who was a curate of the chapel of the Holy Blood at the end of the 19th century. There were rumours about black masses and Satanism. A wonderful source of inspiration for someone with the mind of a writer. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the most incredible murders and conspiracies take place against the backcloth of Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; unique World Heritage, for your entertainment only. Pieter Aspe: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;In truth Bruges is almost a crimefree city. But it is the contrast between ďŹ ction and reality that creates credibility. Innocuous places are the ideal location for gruesome crimes, such as a mass murder inside the church of Saint Jacobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or the decapitation of the statue of Guido Gezelle, Flanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cherished Heimat poetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. The Lake of Love, the museums exhibiting works by Hieronymus Bosch and the Flemish Primitives, the ever so quiet Beguinage, the chapel of



the Holy Blood, the Belfry, the painting by Michelangelo in the Church of Our Lady, the canals, alleys and winding streets, they have all received pride of place in Aspeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oeuvres. Aspe: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bruges is a fantastic backdrop for a crime novel. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to write stories that took place in locations that no one had ever heard of. People not only remember the crime, they also remember the place where the crime was committed.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bruges plays such an important part in his books that the city even has a special Aspe Walk. It is an initiative the writer is absolutely delighted with, mainly because the walk drops in on quite a few hidden places that only he has discovered and cherished, such as the home of his protagonist, detective chief inspector Van In. It is a dwelling in such an inconspicuous yet charming alley that even natives think it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist. Aspe: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The house is close to where I was born, near Vette Vispoort, where the poor used to live. Fatty ďŹ sh (vette vis) was food for the needy only.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Unknown Pieter Aspe: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;In all these years, from my childhood until now, I have seen Bruges transform itself and change into a ďŹ&#x201A;ourishing place. The historical town centre and those wonderful canals that vein the city used to be terribly neglected. Bruges did indeed breathe the atmosphere of Bruges-la-Morte, of a dead town, as the

the North.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The visitor to Bruges will undoubtedly conďŹ rm that there is much room for fantasy and mysticism. Delightful, lesserknown yet fascinating places such as the Jerusalem Church or the baroque Church of Our Lady of the Pottery can stir the imagination no end. The Jerusalem Church could appear in the Da Vinci Code without any problem.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bruges is a terrific setting for writing thrillers.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; writer Georges Rodenbach set down in the 19th century. The only visitors were English children on a school trip or people who wanted to attend the procession of the Holy Blood. Today everything has changed. The canals have become, quite rightly too, the pride and glory of the city, making sure that Bruges has earned her description as the Venice of

A certain Anselmus Adornes once brought the designs of Jerusalemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s church of the Holy Sepulchre from the Holy Land. His descendants erected an accurate copy of the building. On entering, a creepy silence makes your hair stand on end. And it gets even creepier when you see the mausoleum of Anselmus Adornes and his wife, the altar




CITY CARD

BRUGES FROM THE WATER

You really can’t say that you have seen Bruges if you haven’t been on a boat trip on her famous canals. You will appreciate the city from a completely different angle, and you will cruise past a few places that are only accessible to boats. Go aboard at one of the five landing stages for a half-hour trip and some expert commentary from the skipper.

adorned with skulls and bones and the burial niche, a replica of the Holy Sepulchre. Equally overpowering is the Hospital Church of Our Lady of the Pottery, tucked away in the real silent Bruges off the beaten track, next to the Great Seminary. This is a must! Step inside and you will immediately experience the mysticism hidden behind and under the stones. It is in these places that any dark conspiracy in Pieter Aspe’s novels becomes more than plausible.

The Oldest Café The contrast between a tranquil historical city and proliferating crime and 

murders naturally reminds oneself of the world-famous adventures of Inspector Morse in Oxford. Although Pieter Aspe can see the analogy, he insists he wasn’t in the least influenced. Inspector Morse has a global reputation for his regular pub visits, but this reputation is nothing compared to inspector Van In’s drinking habits. This man invariably dusts off his little grey cells and celebrates his solved crimes in the company of a few pints of Duvel. What’s in a name? Duvel means devil! It is a strong blond beer with a lavish head that will force any foreigner to his knees. Inspector Van In often lets his Duvels loose in Vlissinghe, the oldest café in Bruges. In days gone by the café used to be a stopping place for stagecoaches. Pieter Aspe: ‘I went to school at the College of Saint-Leo’s opposite the café. We sneaked in whenever we had the opportunity.’ Let there be no mistake: Pieter Aspe is a Burgundian. Gastronomy is one of the temptations that make him come back to Bruges time and time again. To the threestarred restaurant De Karmeliet for example, which by the way already featured in one of his books. Pieter Aspe is conquering Europe. Five of his whodunnits have already made a stir in France, and his books have also been translated into German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Afrikaans and Polish. It goes without saying that the Bruges café terraces will soon be swamped by international Aspe fans collectively ordering Duvel beer.

Best of Bruges by Pieter Aspe  MY FAVOURITE SPOT ‘Minnewater Park (Lake of Love) takes me back to my childhood. When we were little brats we used to force our way into the uninhabited and somewhat dilapidated castle that once stood there on private land. The city bought the land in the seventies and transformed it into a magnificent and bustling municipal park. A bit further down is Canal Island, where tourist coaches come and go. It is the ideal operating base from which to explore the city.’ Minnewater Park



Bistro Refter

MY RESTAURANTS ‘For me the greatest revelation these past few yyears has been Bistro Refter, the bistro owned by Michelin-starred chef Geert van Hecke. The food M there is as delicious as in his starred restaurant De Karmeliet, but at unbelievably affordable prices. K Otherwise I prefer somewhat plainer food, such as O at Mojo or De Willemijn. The natives and I go to that popular restaurant for dishes they grew up with, su uch as steaks or rabbit. De Wijngaert on the other ha and serves the most mouth-watering grilled food, wh hereas Les Malesherbes is an excellent Southern Frrance-oriented bistro. As it is to be found in the sm mallest street of Bruges, which is in itself worth see eing, you only have to blink once and you’ve missed it. Only the natives know precisely where it is.’




MY CAFÉS M





MY SECRET TIP

‘D During my school years I sneaked into café Vlissinghe whenever I had the opportunity. The café was situated oppow ssite my school. I still go there regularly. It is the oldest café in ttown and it still has a wonderful atmosphere. At least as ffolksy is Joey’s Café. It is small and snug, and the perfect place to meet genuine Brugeans. It is a tiny place and as it is always packed to the rafters, it is the ideal place to see and a hear the authentic Brugean and they often have concerts Vlissinghe there. ’t T Terrastje lies outside the regular tourist circuit, yet in a truly handsome and authentic neighbourhood. As its name indicates, the tiny terrace is an inviting place, especially after a night out. Although Jerry’s Cigar Barr is in fact a tobacconist’s, it has a bar at the back where you can sip some excellent rums and whiskies. Even the hot chocolate and coffee are not to be sneezed at. Now and then I treat myself to an expensive cigar. Vuurmolen welcomes you day and night. No wonder it is one of Bruges’ most popular cafés. When I’m tired of peace and quiet, then café Vuurmolen is the place to be.’

Hemelrijk, meaning Kingdom of Heaven. It is a dirt track between blind walls, no more than a hundred and fifty metres long, off the Great Seminary. Fantastical and unreal. It’s as if you find yourself in another dimension. I was so captivated by it that I gave it a cameo role in one of my books. Everything in Bruges is inspiration.’

Hemelrijk

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Pieter Aspe’s Addresses

MY SHOPPING LIST ‘I gladly refer devotees of interior design and decoration to Maisons du Monde. They have everything in store for a stylish interior with a personal touch, from exotic furniture and trendy tableware to romantic candles. In one word: styles and influences from all over the world under one roof. And I myself? I just love old silver and I therefore find it always hard to pass byy Alfa Papyrus. Although the name suggests a stationer’s, it is actually an antique shop. I bought my wedding ring at Quijo’s, a jeweller’s who give brilliant professional advice. The jeweller has even enjoyed global renown with an exclusive diamond-cutting method. It was this man who got robbed in my first book. I naturally hope that this will never happen to him in real life! Bruges wouldn’t be Bruges without some gastronomic temptations. You won’t find a better caterer in or outside town than Deldycke. The owner  is an extremely charming person, which I really appreciate. Zucchero is a sweetshop where a young couple is still manufacturing toffees in a truly traditional way, a process that you can follow through the shop window. They have created a very special technique to hide the newborn baby’s name inside the sugared almonds. Truly ingenious.’ Zucchero

Minnewater Park » Bistro Refter, Molenmeers 2, tel. +32 (0)50 44 49 00, closed Sunday and Monday, www.bistrorefter.com » Mojo, Schaarstraat 4, tel. +32 (0)50 68 05 09, closed Tuesday and Wednesday, www.restomojo.tk » Willemijn, Gentpoortstraat 51, tel. + 32 (0)495 62 53 29, closed Tuesday evening, Wednesday and Thursday » De Wijngaert, Wijngaardstraat 15, tel. +32 (0)50 33 69 18, closed Wednesday, www.wijngaert.com » Malesherbes, Stoofstraat 3-5, tel. +32 (0)50 33 69 24, closed Monday and Thursday » Café Vlissinghe, Blekerstraat 2, closed Monday and Tuesday, www.cafevlissinghe.be » Joey’s Café, Zilversteeg 4 (square Zilverpand), tel. +32 (0)50 34 12 64, closed Sunday » ’t Terrastje, Genthof 45, tel. +32 (0)50 33 09 19 » Jerry’s Cigar Bar, Simon Stevinplein 13, closed Sunday, www.jerrycigarbar.com » De Vuurmolen, Kraanplein 5, www.vuurmolen.com » Maisons du monde, Steenstraat 20, tel. +32 (0)50 34 76 94, closed Sunday » Alfa Papyrus, Walplein 41, tel. +32 (0)50 33 66 87, closed Sunday » Peter Quijo, Breidelstraat 18, tel. +32 (0)50 34 10 10, closed Sunday, www.quijo.be » Deldycke Delicatessen, Wollestraat 23, tel. +32 (0)50 33 43 35, closed Tuesday, www.deldycke.be » Zucchero, Mariastraat 18, tel. 032 (0)50 33 39 62, closed Tuesday, www.confiserie-zucchero.be » Hemelrijk




!,GHQWLNLW Name: Till-Holger Borchert Date of Birth: 4 January 1967 Chief curator of the Groeninge Museum. He is also the author of countless publications on the Flemish Primitives.

Till-Holger Borchert sings the praises of Bruges as a uniquely beautiful city.

Flemish Primitives in the spotlight Till-Holger Borchert puts magnificent permanent collection in the spotlight Laurens de Keyzer is a columnist with De Standaard and the author of diverse journalistic and literary publications.

He was born in Hamburg, he lives in Brussels and he thoroughly enjoys his work in Bruges as he finds himself surrounded by six centuries of fine arts, and especially the magnificent masterpieces of the Flemish Primitives. In 2002 Till-Holger Borchert was one of the curators of Bruges, Cultural Capital of Europe. Today he is chief curator of the Groeninge Museum and the Arentshuis. ‘Every day I go and greet two masterpieces in this city.’

‘And with me most Germans, rest assured. It is also a wonderfully liveable place, partly because of the clever and careful way in which the city has been able to mix her medieval character with a modern ambiance. For sure, I have discovered myself abundantly that Bruges is no isolated locality. Indeed, the Flemish Primitives were of the same conviction all those centuries ago. Bruges was a formidable magnet for artists. As early as the 13th century, the concentration of wealthy citizens enabled Bruges to become the commercial heart of Northwestern Europe. In the 15th century, the Burgundian authorities took successful structural measures which resulted in an increase of the population, an intervention that strengthened the city’s development in no uncertain way. And last but not least, Bruges is of

course a well-preserved city, as it suffered far less than other towns from the iconoclastic fury in the 16th century. That spirit of respect and tolerance still pervades the city today. I must say it is a great joy to be here. The countless inhabitants and visitors will surely fully agree with me.’

A Woman From Around the Corner ‘Nearly every day I go and greet two masterpieces: Jan van Eyck’s Madonna With Canon Van der Paele at the Groe-


The tomb of Charles the Bold isn’t the only attraction of the Welcome Church of Our Lady. Mary of Burgundy, Charles’ daughter and only child, lies buried in its crypt. She was barely twenty-five years old when she died after falling from her horse when hawking. The face on her coffin was modelled after her death mask. The metal casket with the heart of her son Philip the Fair is exhibited in the choir aisle.

ninge Museum and Hans Memling’s Madonna and Maarten van Nieuwenhove at the Hospitaalmuseum-Memling in Sint-Jan, one of the very few diptychs from that time whose two tablets have never been separated. I will be the last to admit that I find something new and exciting every time I admire these masterpieces. Yet, as my curiosity remains as great as my enjoyment, I find myself constantly looking up as much as I possibly can about these fascinating works of art. I sometimes wonder why people from all corners of the world have always found the Flemish Primitives so absorbing. The answer perhaps lies in the fact that for the very first time in art history we are confronted with recognisable people and familiar objects that correspond to today’s reality. Even a Madonna seems to look like the woman



from around the corner, a woman that we all know and remember. In other words, the Flemish Primitives laid the foundation of an artistic concept that in its realism is perfectly recognisable and therefore understandable to a modern-day observer. The Flemish Primitives discovered the individual. Quite a feat. Those Flemish painters were also dab hands at solving the problems of materials, colour and space. They explored space in an incredibly skilful and sophisticated way, for example by placing a mirror somewhere in the room. In Memling’s diptych, which I have just mentioned, a round mirror on the left-hand side behind the Madonna reflects the interior she is sitting in. In it, her own silhouette is painted just a whisker away from the silhouette of the patrician Maarten

van Nieuwenhove, Memling’s patron. Truly magnificent. Are these works of art still capable of moving me? Absolutely. But I admit I experience more of a purely emotional reaction with Rogier van der Weyden than with Jan van Eyck. It is first and foremost the intellectual and conceptual element of Van Eyck’s or Memling’s work that I find most poignant. Whenever I see how Van Eyck is able to come up with solutions for, say, the painting’s composition, he takes my breath away. Yet, it is above all Van der Weyden who excites the spectator. He excites me as well. Van der Weyden and Van Eyck may be poles apart, but both masters give us so much pleasure that they alone make a visit to Bruges’ chamber of treasures more than worthwhile.’

Permanent collection It has been a while since the splendid permanent collection of the Groeninge Museum was shown in its entirety. Till-Holger Borchert: ‘2011 will at last be the year when the public will be able to come and admire the glory of our permanent collection, approximately 200 works of art spread out over eleven galleries. The oldest pieces are late 14th-century fragments of city hall statues by Jean de Valenciennes. The most recent ones date from the 1980s. We have opted for a chronological arrangement. Confrontations are considered only as part of certain contemporary art exhibition projects, if meaningful, that is to say. Do we want to economise in this way? No, not really. Though the cost of




CITY CARD

MUSEUM SHOP

Best of Bruges

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whoever enters the museum shop of the Groeninge Museum will leave with some wonderful memories, that I can assure you. Perhaps you will take home your favourite art treasures in that handsomely illustrated book or as a reproduction on a poster maybe, or depicted on a few picture postcards. And why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you surprise yourself with an original souvenir? I have caught not only some of my delighted fellow curators buying just such a present for themselves, but my wife as well!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

cross-border loans is hefty, that is not the reason why we are now showing our own collection. It is because we want to re-establish calm in our house for a while. Since 2009 we have continually been setting up and dismantling exhibitions, putting up decorations, altering and converting galleries and so on and so forth. And as other Bruges museums are presenting separate projects in 2011, we can now tinker with our own collection and presentation for a time, and focus more profoundly on our digital archives and scientiďŹ c catalogues. At the same time we naturally want to renew the arrangement of our exhibits. This year for example we present the recently restored Wijts Triptych, a 17th-century copy after Jan van Eyck, a work that was seen for the

by Till-Holger Borchert MY FAVOURITE SPOT

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The great churches of Bruges possess wonderful art collections, containing pieces that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disgrace any topďŹ&#x201A;ight museum. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to look up at the tower of the Church of Our Lady. It is, with its 122 metres, the tallest brick building in the world. Mausoleum of the de Gros family When in Saint Saviourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, do go and marvel at the frescoes in the baptistery. And Saint Jamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Church is worth its while for the impressive mausoleum of the De Gros family, because this sculptural masterpiece reveals par excellence the self-conďŹ dence and power of the Burgundian elite, of whom dozens of representatives lie buried here.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

last time in Belgium in 1902. And we are obviously proud to present our latest acquisitions, expressionist works by Wouters, Permeke and Brusselmans. And after that? During a couple of sizeable restoration campaigns we will give a special welcome to art in ecclesiastic ownership. The Church of Our Lady for example closes its doors for some chancel restoration. We would therefore gladly give their panel paintings by David, Isenbrandt and Pourbus a place in the museological context of 15th- and 16th-century Flemish painting. This gives us the opportunity to look at our combined artistic wealth fraternally in a historic perspective.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;



MY RESTAURANTS



â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I once saw a German restaurant critic copying the complete menu at Den Amand. Need I say more? I took the opportunity of recommending the chicory soup to my fellow countryman at the 15th-century Cafedraal, the regional dishes and the Karmeliet on draught g at â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Schrijverke, j and an exotic moment at the reďŹ ned table of the Japanese restaurant Koto. The man o is still talking about his experience! I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to show him the way to Den Gouden Harynck, as he had known D about this restaurant for quite some time a already. His choice didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t surprise me, a of course, because it is one of the most o delightful gourmet restaurants in d tthe region.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Den Amand






MY CAFÉS ‘The Irish pub Boru breathes a pleasant international ambiance, and they’re always having a ball there. I also like to drop by The Druid’s Cellar, if only to see Drew at work, my favourite barman. De Lokkedize is most at mospheric and within a Boru Irish Bar & Restaurant stone’s throw from the Concert Hall, so ideal for an after-concert drink or a chat with the musicians. Den Express at the railway station is tailor-made for travellers such as me, because I can happily smoke a cigarette there and drink my last cup of coffee before I jump on the train. And if I yearn for a popular Belgian beer, then you can find me at Hollandse Vismijn. Cheers!’

MY SHOPPING LIST ‘Music shop Rombaux sells listening treasures in all genres, and the shop has so much character that it is a real joy to go and browse there. I buy my socks at Parallax. They’re past masters, too, at stylishly camouflaging my beer belly. The antiquarian bookshop of Marc van de Wiele offers one of the best art and history selections in the whole country. Reading matters of a different kind are found at De Reyghere, where the tourist immediately  feels at home in a sea of foreign newspapers. And then there is De Striep for contemporary comic strip art, of course.’

Music shop Rombaux



MY SECRET TIP ‘Whenever I want to take a breather, I saunter down Saint Anne’s, Bruges’ most striking working-class neighbourhood. You can still sense the charm of an authentic community in the streets around the Folklore Museum. It goes without saying that it is very peaceful there at night, a very rare occurrence in a city like Bruges. The area boasts many fascinating places, too. Off the cuff, if I may: Our Lady of the Pottery, the Lace Centre, medieval Jerusalem Church and the Gezelle Museum.’



Jerusalem Church

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Till-Holger Borchert’s Addresses Den Amand, Sint-Amandsstraat 4, tel. +32 (0)50 34 01 22, closed at Dinnertime on Sunday and on Wednesday, www.denamand.be » Cafedraal, Zilverstraat 38, tel. +32 (0)50 34 08 45, closed Sunday, www.cafedraal.be » ’t Schrijverke, Gruuthusestraat 4, tel. +32 (0)50 33 29 08, closed Monday, www.tschrijverke. be » Koto, Potterierei 15, tel. +32 (0)50 44 31 31, closed on Monday and every day for lunch except Sunday, www.hoteldemedici.com » Den Gouden Harynck, Groeninge 25, tel. +32 (0)50 33 76 37, closed Sunday and Monday, www. dengoudenharynck.be » Boru Irish Bar & Restaurant, Burg 8, tel. +32 (0)50 34 91 45, www.boru.be » The Druid’s Cellar, Sint-Amandstraat 11, tel. +32 (0)50 61 41 44, www.thedruidscellar.eu » De Lokkedize, Korte Vulderstraat 33, closed Monday and Tuesday, tel. +32 (0)50 33 44 50, www.lokkedize.be » Den Express, Stationsplein » Hollandse Vismijn, Vismarkt 4, closed Tuesday, tel. +32 (0)50 33 33 01 » Muziekhandel Rombaux, Mallebergplaats 13, closed Sunday and Monday morning, www.rombaux.be » Kleding Parallax, Zuidzandstraat 17, closed Sunday, www.parallax.be » Antiquariaat Van de Wiele, Sint-Salvatorskerkhof 7, closed Sunday,www.marcvandewiele.com » Boekhandel De Reyghere, Markt 12, closed Sunday, www.dereyghere.be » De Striep, Katelijnestraat 42, closed Sunday morning and Monday morning, www.striepclub.be » Museumshop, Arentshof, Dijver 16, closed Monday, www.museabrugge.be » Bruggemuseum-Folklore, Bruggemuseum-Gezelle, Our Lady of the Pottery – Hospitaal-museum, Jerusalem Church and Lace Centre: info on page 95




!,GHQWLNLW Name: Jorijn Neyrinck Date of Birth: 4 September 1978 Born in Bruges, co-founder and co-ordinator of the non-profit organization Tapis Plein, a centre of expertise that devotes its heart and soul to cultural heritage & the public.

A Lively and Varied Cultural Palette Bruges’ cultural choice charms both young and old, connoisseur and layman alike Travel journalist Guido Elias writes for the daily Het Laatste Nieuws and the travel magazine Pasar. He’s also the author of several travel guides published by Lannoo.

From childhood Jorijn Neyrinck has shown a great passion for heritage and culture. It is precisely in this sector that this philosopher/anthropologist is active on many a level and she is therefore delighted with the metamorphosis Bruges has undergone since the city became the 2002 European Cultural Capital. She particularly applauds the countless cultural initiatives, and has welcomed with open arms the Concert Hall, whose arrival has contributed to a large extent to the dazzling cultural vitality.

As Jorijn learned culture at her mother’s knee, it was only natural that she committed herself to the Bruges heritage circle for young people at a tender age. ‘We tried to approach classical heritage themes in an inventive, almost quixotic way. Bruges 2002 did indeed mark a turning point for the city, in that it allowed a generation of twenty-year-olds to add its creativity to the cultural scene and to have a say in cultural matters.’

Power to the Young It was in the aftermath of that cultural year that the non-profit organisation Tapis Plein saw the daylight as a heritage project house. The present permanent staff of this independent organisation, led by Jorijn, not only contributed to that particular cultural year, but also gained a lot of experience in the process. ‘Open Monument Day, an event that focuses on cultural heritage, lay at the root of our association. We were given the possibil-

ity, together with a few young people that had just completed their studies, to take matters into our own hands. Admittedly, the city kept a watchful eye on our actions. In truth, we enjoyed an almost unlimited freedom. We turned out some impressive creations at different sites in the city, in buildings and at historic monuments, and in public places such as squares. Our aim was to work out our very own interpretation of Open Monument Day. The initiatives struck a chord with the public. We consequently were of the opinion that this favourable climate


USE-IT Tourist info for young people! Its motto: no-nonsense and non-commercial. All information vital for youngsters, and all without too much fuss. What, where, when? But above all: how much? Practical information compiled by authentic Brugeans. The free Use-It City Map can be downloaded on www.useit.be or picked up at the information offices at the railway station or Concertgebouw.

ation of our initiatives. The next step was quickly taken, as together with a few kindred spirits we soon set up Tapis Plein.’

The Eye-catching Concert Hall The time proved ready for a cultural sea change. Certainly, Bruges boasted a great number of magnificent museums. At the same time the city was in

pens. The cliché view of a medieval city obviously contributes to this problem. I admit the clichés about Bruges sometimes vex me enormously, simply because the city has undergone a transformation in the past few years. The arrival of the Concert Hall was in this respect a true pivoting point.’ ‘The Concert Hall has created a whole range of new opportunities. And it has also resulted in cultural activity throughout the year. It is of course in-

‘The clichés about Bruges sometimes vex me enormously.’ search of its own identity and a broader view on living culture. ‘People often have the wrong idea of Bruges. Bruges suffers too much from the image of a sleepy place, a place of dead monuments, where nothing or too little hap-



valuable that an authority such as Jos Van Immerseel has linked his name and his orchestra Anima Eterna to the city. It contributed to a large extent to the international reputation the Concert Hall has been able to acquire in such a

Cultural Revolution

short space of time. It is gratifying, too, that young artists are given a chance. I myself am particularly captivated by the contemporary dance programme, such as the December Dance Festival, with splendid productions of a truly international quality. It’s all part and parcel of the Concert Hall’s strategy, together with other cultural partners in the city.’

In the past few years Bruges has seen a cultural revolution sweep through its cultural landscape, resulting in countless new and impressive initiatives that caught the imagination of an ever growing public. ‘This is something incredibly positive. Bruges has evolved from a city with lots of summer activity to a place that excites the cultural aficionado throughout the year. This also means a goodly number of smallscale but often charming and original initiatives. Think of Art Centre De Werf, where creations by young dramatists take centre stage. Or Entrepot, a sanctuary for up and coming young talent. Then there is Quartier Bricolé, which we started up with Tapis Plein in order to provide a ‘forgotten’ city dis-




BRUGGE CITY CARD -26 Are you younger than 26? Do you have a limited budget? Would you like to discover Bruges in all its facets? Then the Brugge City Card -26 is tailormade for you: for € 31.00 (48 hours) or € 36.00 (72 hours) the card allows you to roam Bruges and its surroundings unlimitedly, and on top of that you will get hefty discounts. See page 10 for a detailed outline of all available offers and prices.

trict with a different image and some new impulses.’

A City For All Seasons ‘Bruges today is a city for all seasons. There is the Cactus Festival in summer for example, for many the most heartwarming festival in Flanders. Klinkers, another summer event, has now been extended by Vama Veche, a youth festi-

European Youth Festival offers innumerable workshops and fringe activities. But Bruges in winter has much to get excited about, too. I personally look forward to those events that are both fresh and original and target specific audiences as well as a broad public. The cultural mix is remarkable.’ ‘Another jewel in Bruges’ crown is Lumière, a cosy city centre cinema with three auditoriums and a wide-ranging

‘The cultural mix is remarkable.’ val in Astridpark with a highly diverse selection of performances. There is also the Cinema Novo Festival and Feest in’t Park, a small-scale event that has become extremely popular in the past few years. And let’s not forget the festival where world music is in the spotlight. During the spring half-term the



choice of unusual, often European or English-speaking films. A sure-fire revelation for tourists. Bruges, a sleepy place? Who are you kidding? There is so much to see and do here! Yes, I want to enjoy all of it, and possibly more, but that isn’t always easy with two little kids at home.’

Best of Bruges by Jorijn Neyrinck 

MY FAVOURITE SPOT ‘Kruisvest with its four magnificent windmills at the end of Langestraat is a beauty spot I truly cherish, especially at sunset, when a golden glow glides across the city. The hill offers a great view, and it goes without saying that this is a favourite spot for Brugeans who want to read a book or play some Frisbee.’

Kruisvest

 MY RESTAURANTS ‘Tom’s Diner is a no-nonsense pub, serving scrumptious traditional dishes at fair prices. Ryad in Hoogstraat offers stylish Moroccan food. The host is most charming. Frituur & Veggie Eetboetiek Royal at the end of Sans Cravate Langestraat is a friendly chippy, and quite special. The chips are delicious. Many Brugeans call in at De Lotus. Their veggie dish of the day is an absolute must. Non-vegetarian food is also available. Sans Cravate is a cooking theatre, serving a gastronomic cuisine.’






MY CAFĂ&#x2030;S

MY SECRET TIP

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;De e Republiek is a cultural city cafĂŠ with the e ďŹ nest and liveliest inner court terrace you u will ďŹ nd in Bruges. Koek en Zopie is aq quietly situated brand-new coffee ho ouse that I immediately took a liking to.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Vitrines by Tapis Plein is a must for all those that have a soft spot for window shopping. Its permanent location is Langestraat/Hoogstraat. Every two months we display the handicrafts of

If I want good music, I head for De Kleine Na achtmuziek. Quite new is Bar des Amis, on the corner of Eiermarkt. It has become the place to be in no time, and it iss ideal for an aperitif. After my ramble along Kruisvest I often go to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;t Risico, a pub in the Saint-Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s district. An p excellent place for a pleasant natter.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; e

various designers in the shop windows.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Vitrines



PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Jorijn Neyrinckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addresses Koek en Zopie

MY SHOPP SHOPPING LIST â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I wholeheartedly recommend Quartier BricolĂŠ, not just because it is our brainchild, but because you can also snap up hand-made souvenirs there, created by local people. The same project houses Atelier Shop Aline V Vandeplas & Co. Aline Vandeplas creates jewellery that has a story to tell. Quite unique! Depot dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;O is chock-a-block with knickknacks and bibelots from all over the world. A fascinating collection in a fascinating corner house. Au Bonheur des Dames is the perfect place for amusing gadgets, decoration and bijoux. Lunabloom, a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from the Belfry, has a judicious range of designer objects and jolly toys for kids.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;



Luna Bloom



Tomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diner, West-Gistelhof 23, tel. +32 (0)50 33 33 82, closed for lunch and on Tuesday, www.tomsdiner.be Âť Ryad, Hoogstraat 32, tel. +32 (0)50 33 13 55, www.ryad.be Âť Frituur & Veggie Eetboetiek Royal, Langestraat 181 bus A, tel. +32 (0)50 68 41 84 and +32 (0)472 32 39 34, closed on Sunday for lunch, Tuesday night and Wednesday, www.frituur-royal.be Âť De Lotus, Wapenmakersstraat 5, tel. +32 (0)50 33 10 78, closed on Saturday, Sunday and in the evening, www. lotus-brugge.be Âť Kooktheater Sans Cravate, Langestraat 159, tel. +32 (0)50 67 83 10, closed on Sunday, Monday and Saturday for lunch, www.sanscravate. be Âť De Republiek, Sint-Jakobsstraat 36, tel. +32 (0)50 34 02 29, www. derepubliek.be Âť Koek en Zopie, Dweersstraat 3A, tel. +32 (0)472 50 46 26, www.koekenzopie.be Âť De Kleine Nachtmuziek, Sint-Jakobsstraat 60, closed on Tuesday and Wednesday Âť Bar des Amis, Eiermarkt 19, www.bardesamis. be Âť â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Risico, Jeruzalemstraat 53, tel. +32 (0)50 49 11 69, closed on Monday, www.trisico.be Âť Quartier BricolĂŠ, Langestraat 50, tel. +32 (0)70 77 70, closed on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, www.quartierbricole.be Âť Ateliershop Aline Vandeplas & Co, Langestraat 51, tel. +32 (0)486 63 39 54, closed on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, www.alinevandeplas.be Âť Depot Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;O, Ridderstraat 21, tel. +32 (0)495 23 65 95, closed on Tuesday, Wednesday and Sunday, www.depotdo.be Âť Au Bonheur des Dames, Hoogstraat 38, tel. +32 (0)50 33 63 63, closed on Sunday and Monday, www.desdames.be Âť Lunabloom, Eekhoutstraat 17 B, tel. +32 (0)50 34 75 09, closed on Sunday, www.lunabloom.be




!,GHQWLNLW Name: Rik Vanwalleghem Date of Birth: 9 October 1952 Born in Wevelgem, the town where the finishing line of the famous GhentWevelgem bicycle race is drawn. He lived in Bruges for ten years. Rik Vanwalleghem has been the director of the Tour of Flanders Centre in Oudenaarde since 2006. He is also a journalist and the author of several books on cycling.

As the enthusiastic director of the Tour of Flanders Centre in Oudenaarde, Rik Vanwalleghem lived in Bruges for ten years, where he learnt to appreciate its

Bruges, a Bike-friendly City The Perfect Starting Place for the Tour of Flanders Journalist Sophie Allegaert writes for Genieten, a Belgian tourism and lifestyle magazine. She is also the author of Bruges Among Girl Friends, a Dutch-language guide.

Rik Vanwalleghem brought the Tour of Flanders to Bruges, he knows every bike race secret that there is to know and he is unequalled in compressing his passion for cycling in gripping articles and books that are immensely popular with connoisseurs as well as laymen. 

washing their characteristic brown and white bodies. Being completely green, I didn’t know where to look. I had never seen a naked, hairy grown-

‘A bike remains the ideal means of transport for exploring Bruges.’ bike-friendly character. And it all started with Eddy Merckx. ‘When I was 12 or 13 I used to go to the finishing line of Ghent-Wevelgem with my brother-inlaw, who was a real cycling fanatic. Wevelgem is the town where I was born. After the race the riders washed at the local nursery school. It was a ritual we didn’t want to miss. We outwitted the constable who was standing guard, climbed over the wall and hid on the school playground. I remember we once appeared from out of the bushes when we saw Peter Post peeing just a few yards away! A little further, under the covered part of the playground, stark naked cyclists were

up man before. Did I end up with a trauma? Well, no, but it was certainly touch and go (laughs). I was forbidden to talk about it at home, because if I had, then I would have had to admit that I had climbed that wall.’ ‘Another time, when Eddy Merckx had won Ghent-Wevelgem, he came to a


CITY CARD

TRAINERS AND PROFESSIONALS !

IN THE MIDDLE OF THE CITY !

This multimedia Tour of Flanders Centre with its interactive museum, brasserie and museum shop is an absolute must for everyone who wishes to polish up his or her knowledge of cycling. It therefore appeals to young as well as old and to professionals as well as amateurs. In addition, the Brugge City Card allows you to visit the Centre at reduced rates! And don’t forget to make a note of the next Tour of Flanders in your diary: 3 April 2011

Bruges boasts no fewer than 18 bikefriendly hotels! This means concretely that you can stay overnight in 18 places close to a recognised bike route, 18 places where you will be offered an abundance of special bike facilities, from bike sheds to bike repair kits and bike maps. In addition you can rent a bike almost anywhere in town. And there is even more good news! Use your Brugge City Card and earn yourself a 25% reduction on your bike rental! Turn to page 15 quickly!

Markt 43, 9700 Oudenaarde, +32 (0)55 33 99 33, www.crvv.be

sudden standstill just in front of me. For a few seconds I stood face to face with the god of all racing cyclists. Then the crowds took possession of him. In spite of all this I haven’t become a cyclist. Instead I turned into a semi-cycling tourist who loves cycling intensely and who has already conquered a few mountains, although I admit that that happened some time ago. Today I mount my bike on far too few occasions, and when I do, I strictly keep to the recreational kind, simply because of lack of time. Indeed, cycling remains the ideal way to explore a region. When you’re on foot, your range is too limited, and with a car you speed through the country without seeing anything. When we lived in Bruges, we used our bikes all the time. The city isn’t that extensive, and it is very bikefriendly.



Cycling in Bruges is therefore easy, safe and extremely pleasant. And when you’re ready for some greater challenges, you can opt for one of the various themed routes that start in the city itself and then traverse the wetand woodlands surrounding Bruges.’

Lessons For Life ‘Bicycle racing, that’s life, nothing more, nothing less. Yes, it is a cliché as high as a mountain, but it nevertheless all fits. Everything that makes life and human beings beautiful and ugly is to be found a hundredfold in cycling. From enthralling Greek tragedy to unadulterated Romanticism, you get it all, and everything that lies in between. A pure epic adventure. When you run or swim you have to finish first. Bicycle

racing is so much more. It isn’t enough to cycle faster than anybody else. All sorts of factors may play a part. Dutchman Jan Raas once found himself in a leading group with two rivals, whom he knew to be involved in an affair of the heart with a woman. He therefore knew that they hated each other’s guts and that they would not budge an inch. And indeed, both riders ended up destroying each other, after which Raas broke away and won.’

A Wonderful Start ‘It’s nothing more than logical that the Tour of Flanders, the cycle race par excellence, should start on Bruges’ Markt. Bruges is the perfect visiting card for Flanders. The city has a global standing, and you would have to look far and wide to find a place that is as telegenic. In short, the Tour of Flanders and Bruges are a perfect match, and it has resulted in a success that glues sixty million people to their television set year after year. The start also demonstrates that both the city of Bruges and the Tour handle their heritage wisely. You have to cherish the past and respect your historical roots, but you can’t afford to remain stuck in times gone by. Nostalgia and folklore may cause a suffocating




WE’RE OFF ! Jump on your bike and explore Bruges’ splendid surroundings by way of four different signposted themed routes. Will it be the summer castles and abbeys in Bruges’ green belt or the polders between Bruges, Damme and picturesque Lissewege? Or do you prefer the brandnew route along freshwater and saltwater areas that link up Zeebrugge, its port and Lissewege? The bicycle route network of the wetand woodlands surrounding Bruges with its judiciously positioned junctions will help you to plan your own trajectory. For more information: call in at the information offices in the railway station or the Concertgebouw!

Best of Bruges by Rik Vanwalleghem 

MY FAVOURITE SPOT ‘The dunes and the beach at Zeebrugge are a haven of refuge for all those in need of a breath of fresh air.’

Cyclists will have free play on the 3rd Sunday in September when Bruges joins the rest of Europe in organising a Car-free Day. The historical centre will be reserved for cyclists and pedestrians only, and a large number of activities will lighten up the city.

The beach at Zeebrugge

 effect. It’s something the city has understood very well. That’s why you will see in the middle of that impressive historical decor a colourful fullytrained peloton, equipped with the latest technology and ready to do battle in a modern race. I have butterflies in my stomach days before. Here careers will be made or broken, here you will fail miserably or earn yourself eternal glory. It means sweaty hands, goose bumps on your arms and tension from top to toe. You also feel this tension with the cyclists, the team leaders and mechanics and all those that follow the race on motorbikes or in cars. Everyone is on edge. This is the mo-



ment of truth. The large contingent of foreign cyclists is invariably impressed by the circumstances. The enthusiasm of the large crowds, both cycling fans and ordinary spectators, who scream the riders forward from start to finish, is simply unbelievable. Filippo Pozzato, who is after all absolute top class, has recently commented on this in an Italian newspaper. ‘If you really want to know what cycling means and how much passion it can engender, then go and attend the start of the Tour of Flanders in Bruges.’

MY RESTAURANTS ‘Rock Fort serves up original dishes with a modern twist, while In Den Wittenkop offers an authentic grandmother’s cuisine. ’t Zwaantje has honest food with an international hint, and at Hertog Jan the chef has Michelin star quality. When I fancy a pot of mussels I head for Zeebrugge and Sea and Sand.’

Rock Fort




MY CAFÉS

MY SECRET TIP

‘Youth hostel and café De Snuffel is perfect for some international socialising, whereas l’Estaminet is a pub where the world-famous spaghetti is an absolute must. Du Phare and De Versteende Nacht on the other hand breathe a cosy bluesy atmosphere, and De Kroon iss still a favourite haunt for

‘The Old Cemetery at Ver-Assebroek is with its countless monuments and pleasant alleys the perfect place for a spot of reflection about life and death.”



many a café-loving native.’ m

Old Cemetery at Ver-Assebroek

 l’Estaminet

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Rik Vanwalleghem’s Addresses MY SHOPPING LIST ‘There is no better place to start the day than at Servaas Van Mullem. Their breakfasts are scrumptious. Then it’s time for art. At the art shop De Andere Kijk you always leave in a better frame of mind, and at Galerij Pinsart art lovers will feel they’ve died and gone to heaven. If you want to buy a tailor-made work of art, then visit calligServaas van Mullem rapher Kristoffel Boudens. Brugse Boekhandel is where I buy all my books, whether it’s fiction or non-fiction. They always find a way to surprise me with their wonderful selection.’





Rock Fort, Langestraat 15, tel. +32 (0)50 33 41 13, closed on Saturday and Sunday, www.rock-fort.be » In Den Wittenkop, Sint-Jakobsstraat 14, tel. +32 (0)50 33 20 59, closed on Saturday afternoon, Sunday and Monday » ’t Zwaantje, Gentpoortvest 70, tel. +32 (0)473 71 25 80, closed on Wednesday and Thursday, www.hetzwaantje.be » Hertog Jan, Torhoutsesteenweg 479, tel. +32 (0)50 67 34 46, closed on Sunday and Monday, www.hertog-jan.com » Sea and Sand, Zeedijk 8, Zeebrugge, tel. +32 (0)50 54 42 79, closed on Monday and Tuesday » Snuffel Backpacker Hostel, Ezelstraat 47-49, tel. +32 (0)50 33 31 33, www.snuffel.be » L’Estaminet, Park 5, tel. +32 (0)50 33 09 16, closed on Monday,, http://users.telenet.be/fclestaminet/lestaminet.htm » Du Phare, Sasplein 2, tel. +32 (0)50 34 35 90, closed on Tuesday, www.duphare.be » De Versteende Nacht, Langestraat 11, closed on Sunday, www.deversteendenacht.com » De Kroon, Houtkaai 2, tel. +32 (0)50 31 53 89, closed on Sunday and Monday afternoon » Servaas Van Mullem, Vlamingstraat 56, tel. +32 (0)50 33 05 15, closed on Tuesday » De Andere Kijk, Garenmarkt 28, tel. +32 (0)50 34 21 61, closed on Wednesday » Galerij Pinsart, Genthof 21, closed on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, www.pinsart. be » Kristoffel Boudens, Oude Gentweg 171, tel. +32 (0)50 31 42 15 » Brugse Boekhandel, Dijver 2, closed on Sunday, www.brugseboekhandel.be » Oude kerkhof in Ver-Assebroek, Pastoor Verhaegeplein 13




!,GHQWLNLW Name: Geert Van Hecke Date of birth: 20 July 1956 He lives in St Gilesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a district within the historic city centre of Bruges Chef and owner of the three-star restaurant De Karmeliet and of Bistro Refter

Three-Star Gourmet Bruges, culinary capital Willem Asaert is a freelance culinary journalist. He has his own culinary column in newspapers and magazines, he is the author of several cookery books and he works for television.

To savour and to feast, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what Bruges is all about. A land of plenty for lovers of the ďŹ nest delicacies. Nowhere else will you ďŹ nd so many appetising culinary delights in such a compact area. Indeed, the citizens of Bruges themselves are mightily fond of authentic food and drink. Three-star chef Geert van Hecke of the world-famous restaurant De Karmeliet proves that point precisely.



Geert Van Hecke has been cooking professionally in Bruges since 1983. He runs the three-star restaurant De Karmeliet and Bistro Refter together with his wife Mireille and only son Louis. Early last year he opened a second venture next door to the restaurant that has received the highest Michelin grading since 1996. Belgium counts only two three-star restaurants, and it is no coincidence that one of those two is to be found in the culinary hotspot of Bruges. Geert Van Heckeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant is also to be found in 57th place in the international Top 100 of best restaurants in the world. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;It goes without saying that this international appreciation makes me feel proud,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; says

modesty itself. A man of few words who wants his cooking to speak volumes. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cooking is not an art form but an activity that demands lots of energy, time and creativity. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t often ďŹ nd me in the media spotlights. My place is in the kitchen. And when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m free, I pre-

I would never swap Bruges for any other city.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Van Hecke. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;But if truth be told, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t occupy my thoughts very much. Pampering our clients remains our ďŹ rst and foremost objective.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Van Hecke is

fer to go out for a meal with Mireille. Preferably in Bruges. Why would I drive a hundred miles when I can ďŹ nd all I want just around the corner?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;




â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tanuki serves delicious Japanese dishes. Chef Yvan Verhelle, who worked for a couple years in Japan, can vouch for its authenticity. He not only cooks genuine Japanese food but he also has his restaurant soak up the atmosphere of the country as it were. This chef shows his fondness for typical Japanese accuracy and purity of ďŹ&#x201A;avours. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I enjoy lingering over our dinner here.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tanuki, Oude Gentweg 1, tel. +32 (0)50 34 75 12, www.tanuki.be

A Delicate Culinary Signature Geert Van Heckeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for good food and cooking started at home. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;My grandfather was a baker who baked his own bread. The lovely smell of freshlybaked bread stirred my senses at a very early age. Cooking seemed fun. I obviously didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what I wanted to do with my life at that stage. But it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take long before I found out.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Van Hecke attended the hotel school Ter Duinen at Koksijde, one of the best in the country. A school, too, with a European reputation. Countless top chefs, including chefs from Bruges, went to Ter Duinen. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Such training is incredibly important. It lays a foundation. It is due to the intense efforts of that school that Flanders, and Bruges above all, can boast such a great number of outstanding restaurants. We are Burgundians by nature, yet



you do need to prove yourself, of course.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; After his schooling Van Hecke left for France. It was at Alain Chapelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; already a legend in his own lifetime â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that Van Hecke acquired his typical culinary signature. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;For various reasons France remains for me the gastronomic cradle of the world, not just because I was able to develop my cooking skills much further there, but mainly because of the unbelievable wealth of top products we were able to indulge in. It is this rich variety of terroir produce that is still the basis of my cuisine.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Cuisine of Pure Products Geert Van Hecke is the champion of the pure product cuisine. His training in la France profonde has obviously got a lot to do with that. His no-nonsense character and approach to cooking explain his striving for pure, natural and intense

ďŹ&#x201A;avours, too. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We naturally open our minds to innovations from the so-called molecular cuisine. This cuisine certainly has its merits, if only for certain techniques that create lighter dishes. Techniques, of course, are not an end in themselves. As long as they support the actual cooking or create more ďŹ&#x201A;avours, then thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne with me. However, techniques for techniquesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sake or for visual effects at the expense of ďŹ&#x201A;avour are a bridge too far for me. Fortunately I can see many young chefs here in Bruges using these innovations and techniques

that we have a large selection of very ďŹ ne vegetables. And the best and most ďŹ&#x201A;avoursome pork also comes from this region. I use The Duke of Berkshire pork both in the restaurant and the bistro,

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brugeans are truly spoiled as far as our culinary tradition is concerned.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; sensibly. As a result richer and deeper ďŹ&#x201A;avours are created. Ruminations aside I still think that true cooking begins with the right products. We are fortunate here in the Bruges wet- and woodlands

and I happen to know that many chefs in Bruges also like to work with it. What a delicious little pig! Even France hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t got a better tasting one!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;




â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I relish a spicy and exotic cuisine. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I love Bhavani. This Indian restaurant is not only located on a handsome square, dining inside is also very appealing. I particularly enjoy the distinct ďŹ&#x201A;avours and contrasts of their curries, and their vegetarian dishes, too, always pleasantly surprise me.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bhavani, Simon Stevinplein 5, tel. +32 (0)50 33 90 25, www.bhavani.be

A Rich Culinary Tradition Few Flemish cities have such an amazingly rich range of restaurants as Bruges. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ever since I work in Bruges I have been impressed with the number of qualitatively outstanding eating places and specialist shops. People here seem to ďŹ nd it only normal, but when they visit another city of the same size, they do notice the difference quickly. Brugeans are truly spoiled as far as our culinary tradition is concerned. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I love living and working here. I would never swap Bruges for any other city. Bruges is neither metropolis nor village, yet it combines characteristics of both. The cultural and culinary range of choice measures up to anything that an international metropolis has to offer. The countless top museums and almost four hundred restaurants, eating places and delicatessen stacked with goodies certainly prove my point.



Yet you also have the small-scale and picturesque qualities of the village, too. All this makes this city, because Bruges is still a city, of course (smiles broadly), particularly pleasant and great to live in. It feels super to ride a bike, to go and enjoy a pint of lager somewhere, to enjoy a great meal after a refreshing aperitif. Bistro cuisine, Japanese, Indian, exceptional gastronomic food or just a toothsome bag of French fries, anything goes. And as I regularly travel abroad professionally, I am in a perfect position to assess and appreciate the speciďŹ c richness of my city.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Best of Bruges by Geert Van Hecke  MY FAVOURITE SPOT â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Groeninge Museum is of course best known for its collection of Flemish Primitives. I personally have a soft spot for the works of our Flemish artists from the ďŹ rst half of the 20th century, like Jean Brusselmans, Constant Permeke, Gustave de Smet and Frits Van den Berghe. Their subdued colours and expressive power are fairly unique.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Groeninge Museum

MY RESTAURANTS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bistro Christophe is a favourite of mine because they serve for example fabulous ďŹ sh soup and delicate shrimp croquettes. And the kitchen remains open till one oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock at night. After ďŹ nishing our daily stint in our own restaurant we can always go and enjoy a savoury snack there. TĂŞte PressĂŠe, too, is a special place, what with its wide eating counter and unusual refrigerated counter. Their ready-to-eat meals are excellent and very tasty. Another great address is De Kartuizerr with its open kitchen and its range of Franco-Belgian dishes. Brasserie Raymond oozes atmosphere, and their fruits  de mer and steak tartare - raw minced steak â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is worthy of the very m best Parisian brasseries. A simple b yyet appetising cuisine is to be found at Oud Handbogenhof. This restaura ant with its old-Flemish interior also boasts a most welcoming terrace.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Brasserie Raymond






MY CAFĂ&#x2030;S

MY SECRET TIP

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A truly splendid cafĂŠ is Cambrinus, a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from Grote Markt. They serve no fewer than 400 different kinds of beer! Craenenburg on Grote Markt itself is still the meeting place of the locals. Tour-

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A glorious green oasis in the middle of the city is Koningin Astrid Park. This erstwhile seven and a half acre medieval convent garden was laid out as an English garden in the 19th century, and it still enchants because of its abundant and many-coloured range of

ists are welcome, too, of course. De Reisduif is a place for lovers of traditional pints of beer and a must for those in search of authenticity. Barazar, the lounge bar of the Flanders Hotel, has a surprisingly beautiful indoor garden and terrace. To be recommended when the weather is ďŹ ne. And if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re after an excellent glass of wine and some terriďŹ c tapas, then Wijnbar EST is the perfect place for you.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

shrubs and trees.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Koningin Astridpark

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Geert van Heckeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addresses Wijnbar EST

MY SHOPPING LIST



De Westhoek





â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A great address is the Diksmuids Boterhuis. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ nd any better cheeses and charcuterie. And each time you shop there youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd some wonderfully surprising delicatessen. A joy to behold is De Westhoek, a long narrow room ďŹ lled to the rafters with delicacies and regional specialities. The Absolute Art Galleryy in the heart of the historic city centre displays contemporary art by among others Christine Comyn and Carlos Mata. Shoe shops are plenty in every city, of course, but ďŹ rst class quality in a shop like Quicke, which is still going strong after a hundred years by the way, is fairly exceptional. Almost opposite is Knapp-Targa T , a great place for quality clothing, and yet another exceptional shop that has contributed for many decades to the image of Bruges as a shopping centre.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Groeninge Museum, Dijver 12, closed Monday, www.museabrugge.be Âť Restaurant Bistro Christophe, Garenmarkt 34, tel. +32 (0)50 34 48 92, closed Tuesday, Wednesday and for lunch, www.christophe-brugge.be Âť TĂŞte PressĂŠe, Koningin Astridlaan 100, tel. +32 (0)470 21 26 27, closed Monday, www.tetepressee.be Âť De Kartuizer, Langestraat 119, tel. +32 (0)479 68 10 29, closed Monday, www.de-kartuizer.be Âť Brasserie Raymond, Eiermarkt 5, tel. +32 (0)50 33 78 48, closed Sunday, www.brasserie-raymond.com Âť Oud Handbogenhof, Baliestraat 6, tel. +32 (0)50 33 71 18, closed Monday (November to March also on Wednesday), www.hoteldepauw.be Âť Cambrinus, Philipstockstraat 19, tel. +32 (0)50 34 63 42, www.cambrinus.eu Âť Craenenburg, Markt 16, tel. +32 (0)50 32 34 02 Âť De Reisduif, Langerei 30, tel; +32 (0)50 34 63 01 Âť Barazar in Flanders Hotel, Langestraat 38, tel.+32 (0)50 33 88 89, www.hotelďŹ&#x201A;anders.com Âť Wijnbar EST, Braambergstraat 7, tel. +32 (0)50 33 38 39, www.wijnbarest.be Âť Diksmuids Boterhuis, Geldmuntstraat 23, tel. +32 (0)50 33 32 43, closed Sunday Âť De Westhoek, Noordzandstraat 39, tel. +32 (0)50 33 60 32, closed Sunday and Monday morning Âť Absolute Art Gallery, Dijver 4-5, tel. +32 (0)50 49 10 12, closed Wednesday, www.absoluteartgallery.com Âť Huis Quicke, Zuidzandstraat 23, tel. +32 (0)50 33 23 00, www.quicke.be Âť Knapp-Targa, Zuidzandstraat 20-22-24, tel. +32 (0)50 33 31 27, closed Sunday, www.knapp-targa.com Âť Koningin Astridpark, Minderbroedersstraat z.n.




Award-winning restaurants Bruges is called the epicentre of the world’s gastronomy for good reason. The city places itself on the menu with an impressive list of first-class restaurants.

Michelin 2011 » De Karmeliet Chef Geert Van Hecke, Langestraat 19, 8000 Brugge » Danny Horseele Stationsweg 45c, 8380 Lissewege » Hertog Jan Chef Gert De Mangeleer, Torhoutse Steenweg 479, 8200 Sint-Michiels » Sans Cravate Chef Van Oudenhove, Langestraat 159, 8000 Brugge » Den Gouden Harynck Chef Philippe Serruys, Groeninge 25, 8000 Brugge » De Herborist Chef Alex Hanbuckers, De Watermolen 15, 8200 Sint-Andries » De Jonkman Chef Filip Claeys, Maalse steenweg 438, 8310 Sint-Kruis » Aneth Chef Paul Hendrickx, Maria van Bourgondiëlaan 1, 8000 Brugge Source: Michelingids België en Luxemburg 2011

GaultMillau 2011 » Danny Horseele (18/20) Stationsweg 45c, 8380 Lissewege » De Karmeliet (18/20) Chef Geert Van Hecke, Langestraat 19, 8000 Brugge » Hertog Jan (18/20) Chef Gert De Mangeleer, Torhoutse Steenweg 479, 8200 St.-Michiels » Auberge de Herborist (17/20) Chef Alex Hanbuckers, De Watermolen 15, 8200 St.-Andries » A’qi (17/20) Chef Arnold Hanbuckers, Gistelse Steenweg 686, 8000 Brugge » Den Gouden Harynck (17/20) Chef Philippe Serruys, Groeninge 25, 8000 Brugge » De Jonkman (17/20) Chef Filip Claeys, Maalse steenweg 438, 8310 Sint-Kruis » Kooktheater Sans Cravate (15/20) Langestraat 159, 8000 Brugge » ‘t Pandreitje (15/20) Chef Guy Van Neste, Pandreitje 6, 8000 Brugge » Patrick Devos (15/20) Chef Patrick Devos, Zilverstraat 41, 8000 Brugge » Weinebrugge (15/20) Leikendreef 1, 8200 Sint-Michiels 86

» » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » »

Zeno (15/20) Vlamingstraat 53, 8000 Brugge Aneth (14/20) Chef Paul Hendrickx, Maria van Bourgondiëlaan 1, 8000 Brugge Bistro Refter (14/20) Molenmeers 2, 8000 Brugge Le Manoir Quatre Saisons (14/20) Heilige Geeststraat 1, 8000 Brugge The Sixties (14/20) Hotel Ravestein, Molenmeers 11, 8000 Brugge ‘t Stil Ende (14/20) Scheepsdalelaan 12, 8000 Brugge Tanuki (14/20) Oude Gentweg 3, 8000 Brugge Kardinaalshof (13/20) Sint-Salvatorskerkhof 14, 8000 Brugge De Visscherie (13/20) Vismarkt 8, 8000 Brugge De Witte Raaf (13/20) Hallestraat 4, 8000 Brugge Rock-Fort (13/20) Langestraat 15, 8000 Brugge Saint-Amour (13/20) Chef Jo Nelissen, Oude Burg 14, 8000 Brugge Tête Pressée (13/20) Koningin Astridlaan 100, 8200 Sint-Michiels ‘t Zwaantje (13/20) Chef Geert Vanhee, Gentpoortvest 70, 8000 Brugge Channel 16 Werfkaai 16, 8380 Zeebrugge De Florentijnen Academiestraat 1, 8000 Brugge De Mangerie Oude Burg 20, 8000 Brugge Den Dyver Dijver 5, 8000 Brugge Duc de Bourgogne Huidenvettersplein 12, 8000 Brugge Hemelrycke Dweersstraat 12, 8000 Brugge Huyze Die Maene Markt 17, 8000 Brugge La Tâche Blankenbergse steenweg 1, 8000 Brugge Parkrestaurant Minderbroederstraat 1, 8000 Brugge

Source: GaultMillau, Belux 2011

Bib Gourmand 2011 » Assiette Blanche Chef Stefaan Timmermans, Philipstockstraat 23-25, 8000 Brugge » Bistro Refter Chef Geert Van Hecke, Molenmeers 2, 8000 Brugge » Bistro Kok au Vin Chefs Jürgen en Britt, Ezelstraat 21, 8000 Brugge » Tête Pressée Chef Pieter Lonneville, Koningin Astridlaan 100, 8200 Sint-Michiels » Pergola Kaffee Chef Nick Coppens, Meestraat, 8000 Brugge Source: Michelingids België en Luxemburg 2011


Souvenirs from Bruges There is nothing more pitiful than returning home with a trivial souvenir that is immediately exiled to a cupboard. Bruges offers a solution. The World Heritage City impresses with a selection of authentic gadgets, novelties and other objects that you would dearly love to keep yourself. From unique lacework and glittering diamonds to frothy local beers and compellingly delicious chocolate. Too good and too tempting to resist!

Lace You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fancy a boring run-of-the-mill souvenir? Why not purchase some unique Bruges lace? A ďŹ ne piece of fancywork with an incontestable reputation. Bruges and its lace have been inextricably bound up with one another since time immemorial. Thousands of female hands have brought Bruges lace

its deserved worldwide fame, and it also provided countless girls and women with a welcome addition to their income. Once half of the female population of Bruges was making bobbin lace. Today you can still see lacemakers at work here and there. It is such fun to try and follow their dexterity with their ďŹ ngers. Or do you prefer an attempt at bobbin lacing yourself? At the Lace Centre experienced lacemakers will teach you the tricks of the trade. See page 107 for all practical information.

Beer Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not beat about the bush. A Brugean enjoys a pint of beer now and then, especially if the beer has been brewed in his own city. It is therefore only logical that Bruges boasts two au-






thentic city beers: Straffe Hendrik and Brugse Zot. Both beers have been thought up and brewed at De Halve

to take them home with you in order to share them with the rest of the world. After all, it would be a shame to let

mond engagement ring in history. It is obvious the Dukes of Burgundy valued beauty very much. At the Diamond lab

Maan, a brewery right in the historic heart of the city. You won’t find many beers like this. In short, they are internationally acclaimed success stories that taste of more, beers so full of character that you will definitely want

only the citizens of Bruges smack their lips, wouldn’t it? Convinced? Then return to the annual Bruges Beer Festival and discover even more hidden treasures! Read more about the brewery on page 106.

of the Bruges Diamond Museum you will be able to find some sparkling inspiration, and you will also learn how to assess all this brilliance. You will then be able to use your expert eye at the museum shop or the countless jeweller’s in town before you seize your opportunity. Fancy something less expensive? Then surprise your loved one with a small rough or cut diamond from the Bruges Diamond Museum. See page 101 for detailed information.

Diamonds In the 14th century Bruges was already the centre of a thriving diamond industry. Diamonds were expertly cut here. This is really no surprise, because diamond cutting on a revolving disc was invented by the local goldsmith Lodewijk van Berquem in 1476. A year later the emperor Maximilian of Austria offered Mary of Burgundy the very first dia-



Chocolate A deadly serious chocolate guild, a scrumptious city chocolate, a fascinating chocolate museum, a delicious

chocolate walk, an irresistible chocolate fair. What a cornucopia of quality guarantees, wouldn’t you say? It only stands to reason that Bruges calls itself the chocolate capital of the world. In other words, if you don’t succumb to a piece of chocolate here, you’ll never ever taste chocolate in your life. Almost the entire city is covered in the sweet smell of this delicacy, as around every corner a chocolate temptation is lurking. Bruges counts more than fifty excellent chocolate shops, providing the visitor with whatever they’re looking for, from exquisite old-fashioned solidity and delectable trinkets for furtive use to ingenious molecular chocolate hocus-pocus cooked up by Michelin starred chefs. Would you like to know more? Then quickly turn to page 101.




Know Your Way Around Bruges Super easy and Handy!

PAGE 94 > MUSEUMS, a complete overview of all Bruges museums including information on their most important collections, opening times and admission charges. PAGE 104 > PLACES OF INTEREST, six special places that are dying to be discovered by you. PAGE 108 > DISCOVER BRUGES, on foot, by boat, horsedrawn carriage, minibus, hot air balloon, or even on a Vespa. No matter how you want to travel, you will find all the detailed information here. PAGE 114 > BICYCLE RENTAL POINTS, looking for a bike to rent? The choice is all yours! PAGE 116 > OUT IN BRUGES, have a great time with music, dance or theatre in a city perfect for culture. PAGE 118 > TAILOR-MADE FOR CHILDREN,

Do you want to check the exact opening times of a museum? Perhaps you want to organise a jolly day out with the kids, or you fancy a ride in a horse-drawn carriage. This extremely practical overview of all Visitors Guide information shows you everything you may wish or need to know!



farms, amusement parks or indoor playgrounds. Whatever you’re looking for, there is no time for boredom here. PAGE 122 > GET EVEN MORE OUT OF YOU STAY IN BRUGES,

explore Bruges’ wet- and woodlands, take a trip to the seaside or immerse yourself in the history of the Great War. There’s something for everyone, and the Brugge City Card makes it all extra economical.




CITY CARD

GROENINGE MUSEUM The Groeninge Museum offers a varied overview of the history of Belgian plastic arts. Although the Flemish Primitives are a high point, you will also marvel at top 18th and 19th-century neoclassical pieces, masterpieces from Flemish Expressionism and post-war modern art. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday, 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; tickets till 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) 20

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

Bruges Museums Although the Flemish Primitives are undoubtedly Bruges’ showpiece attraction, museum devotees in search of much more will not be disappointed. Indeed, the choice is truly magnificent. From contemporary plastic art by way of Michelangelo’s world-famous Madonna and Child to a sumptuous Burgundian palace. It’s all there for you to discover!



1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12. Due to the dismantling of the Van Eyck to Dürerr exhibition and the partial renovation of the building, the museum will be closed from 1/2/2011 up to and including 31/5/2011 (with reservation). ADMISSION > Including Arentshuis: € 8.00; 65+: € 6.00. Children under 6: free. Youngsters under 26: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Dijver 12, www.museabrugge.be CITY CARD

ARENTSHUIS In this elegant 18th-century town house with its picturesque garden the work of the versatile British artist Frank Brangwyn (1867-1956) is on display on the top floor. Brangwyn’s talent as an architect, painter and designer of glassware, furniture and jewellery is breathtaking. The ground floor is the setting for temporary plastic art exhibitions. 02

OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 2.00; 65+: € 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; combination ticket with Groeninge Museum possible; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Dijver 16, www.museabrugge.be CITY CARD

BRUGGEMUSEUM-CITY HALL Bruges’ City Hall (1376) is one of the oldest in the Netherlands. It is from here that the city has been governed for more than 600 years. An absolute masterpiece is the Gothic Hall with its late 19th-century murals and polychrome vault. The adjoining historic hall calls up the city council’s history with a number of authentic documents and works of art. A multimedia exhibition on the ground floor illustrates the evolution of the Burg square. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.30 p.m. 38




and alabaster mantelpiece. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 9.30 a.m.-12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 12.00 p.m and 4.30 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > Including Bruggemuseum- City Hall and audio guide: € 2.00; 65+: € 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Burg 11a, www.museabrugge.be

able art collection: Michelangelo’s world-famous Madonna and Child, countless paintings, 13th-century painted sepulchres and the tombs of Mary of Burgundy and Charles the Bold. OPENING TIMES > The church: Monday to Friday: 9.30 a.m.-4.50 p.m.; Saturday: 9.30 p.m.-4.40 p.m.; Sunday and Holy Days: 1.30 p.m.-4.50 p.m. The church is not open to the public during nuptial and funeral masses; The museum: Tuesday to Friday: 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m. (last tickets 4.30 p.m.). Saturday: 9.30 a.m.-4.45 p.m. (last tickets 4.15 p.m.). Sunday: 1.30 p.m.5.00 p.m. (last tickets 4.30 p.m.) (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday)

a unique prayer chapel, a five-centuries-old kitchen and a collection of objects illustrating daily life between the 15th and the 19th century, from everyday kitchen ware to superb silverware. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-5 p.m.; last tickets: 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 6.00; 65+: € 5.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Dijver 17, www.museabrugge.be

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1,

Museum : 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > Church: free; Museum: € 2.00; 65+: € 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Mariastraat, www.museabrugge.be

2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > Including Bruggemuseum-Liberty of Bruges and audio guide: € 2.00; 65+: € 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Burg 12, www.museabrugge.be CITY CARD

BRUGGEMUSEUMLIBERTY OF BRUGES From this mansion, erected between 1722 and 1727, Bruges’ rural surroundings were governed. The building functioned as a court of justice between 1795 and 1984. Today the city archives are stored here. They safeguard Bruges’ written memory. The premises also boast an old assize court and a renaissance hall with a monumental 16th-century timber, marble 32



CITY CARD

BRUGGEMUSEUMWELCOME CHURCH OF OUR LADY The 122 metres high brick tower of the Welcome Church of Our Lady is a perfect illustration of the craftsmanship of Bruges’ artisans. The church displays a valu14

CITY CARD

BRUGGEMUSEUMGRUUTHUSE The opulent palace of the lords of Gruuthuse include splendid tapestries, 21

CITY CARD

BRUGGEMUSEUMARCHAEOLOGY This museum presents the unwritten history of Bruges. Its motto: feel your past beneath your feet. Discover the history of the city through different kinds of search and hands-on activities. A fascinating mix of archaeological finds, riddles, replicas and reconstructions shed light on daily life in times gone by, from the home to the workplace and from birth till death. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday – Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 12.00 p.m. and 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 2.00; 65+: € 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters 01




under 26: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Mariastraat 36a, www.museabrugge.be

CITY CARD

BRUGGEMUSEUM-FOLKLORE These restored 17th-century singleroom dwellings accommodate a.o. a classroom, a millinery, a pharmacy, a confectionery, a grocery and an authentic bedroom. Conclude your visit with a pleasant stroll in the garden and a thirst-quenching drink at The Black Cat, the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tavern. New: lace collection in the exhibition attic. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 2.00; 65+: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Balstraat 43, www.museabrugge.be CITY CARD

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BRUGGEMUSEUM-SINTJANSHUIS MILL, KOELEWEI MILL Windmills have graced Brugesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ramparts 32

25



ever since the construction of the outer city wall at the end of the 13th century. Today four specimen are left on Kruisvest. Sint-Janshuis Mill (1770) is still in its original spot and still grinding grain just like its neighbour Koelewei Mill. OPENING TIMES > Bruggemuseum-SintJanshuis Mill: May - August: Tuesday to Sunday, 9.30 a.m.-12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets 12.00 p.m. and 4.30 p.m. (Open on Whit Monday); September: Saturday and Sunday, 9.30 a.m.-12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets 12.00 p.m. and 4.30 p.m. Bruggemuseum-Koelewei Mill: July and August: Tuesday to Sunday, 9.30 a.m.12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets 12.00 p.m and 4.30 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

Bruggemuseum-Sint-Janshuis Mill: 2/6 (afternoon) ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 2.00; 65+: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Kruisvest, www.museabrugge.be

CITY CARD

BRUGGEMUSEUM-GEZELLE The literary and biographical museum of Guido Gezelle (1830-1899) is incorporated in the house where the famous Flemish poet was born. Gezelleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthplace, in a quiet working-class district, displays handwritten letters and writing paraphernalia. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.5.00 p.m.; last tickets 12.00 p.m. and 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 2.00; 65+: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Rolweg 64, www.museabrugge.be CITY CARD

22

39

BRUGGEMUSEUM-BELFRY

stands 83 metres tall. It houses a treasure-chamber, an impressive clock mechanism and a carillon with 47 silvertoned bells. Your reward after a climb up the towerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 366 stairs is a breathtaking and unforgettable panoramic view of

Bruges and her surroundings. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.15 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 8.00; 65+: â&#x201A;Ź 6.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: â&#x201A;Ź 4.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Markt 7, www.museabrugge.be 03 BRUGGEMUSEUM-GENTPOORT Gentpoort (Gate of Ghent) is one of four remaining medieval city gates. An entrance for foreigners, a border with the outside world for the townspeople of Bruges. The gate was a part of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defences as well as a passageway for the movement of produce and merchandise. OPENING TIMES > See www.musea-




Monday and Whit Monday) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1,

brugge.be or telephone +32 (0) 50 44 87 43 ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > Visit on demand only; € 2.00; 65+: € 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00 INFORMATION > Gentpoortstraat, www.museabrugge.be

2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > Including Our Lady of the Pottery-Hospitaalmuseum: € 8.00; 65+: € 6.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Mariastraat 38, www.museabrugge.be

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 2.00; 65+: € 1.00; children under 6: free; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; combination ticket with Memling in Sint-Jan-Hospitaalmuseum possible, Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Potterierei 79, www.museabrugge.be CITY CARD

LUMINA DOMESTICA The museum contains the world’s largest collection of lamps and lights. More than 6.000 antiques tell the complete story of interior lighting. From torch and paraffin lamp to light bulb and LED. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 3.30 p.m. 43

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > CITY CARD

MEMLING IN SINT-JAN HOSPITAALMUSEUM Saint John’s Hospital has an eight hundred- year-old history of caring for pilgrims, travellers and the sick. Visit the medieval wards where the nuns and monks performed their work of mercy and marvel at the impressive collection of archives, art works, medical instruments and six paintings by Hans Memling. Also worth a visit: the Diksmuide attic, the old dormitory, the custodian’s room and the adjoining pharmacy. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.30 p.m. The pharmacy is open from Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-11.45 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter

CITY CARD

25



CITY CARD

OUR LADY OF THE POTTERY HOSPITAALMUSEUM This hospital dates back to the 13th century, when nuns took on the care of pilgrims, travellers and the sick. Over the centuries the hospital developed into a modern home for the elderly. The hospital wards with their valuable collection of works of art, monastic and religious relics and a range of objects used in nursing have been converted into a museum. The Gothic church with its baroque interior can also be visited. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 12.00 p.m and 4.30 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) 37

BRUGES DIAMOND MUSEUM This museum illustrates the history of Bruges as the oldest diamond centre in Europe. Today diamond remains one of Belgium’s most important export products. The daily demonstration of diamond cutting is a sparkling affair. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 10.30 a.m.-5.30 p.m. The daily diamond cutting demonstration starts at 12.15 p.m. Your presence is required by noon at the latest. 18

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

1/1, 3/1-14/1, 24/12 and 25/12 ADMISSION > Museum: € 7.00; Museum + Diamond Cutting Demonstration: € 10.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Katelijnestraat 43, www.diamondmuseum.be

1/1, 3/1-14/1, 24, 25 and 31/12 ADMISSION > € 6.00; 65+ and students: € 5.00; children between 6 and 12: € 4.00; children under 6: free; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Wijnzakstraat 2, www.luminadomestica.be CITY CARD

CHOCO-STORY The museum dips its visitors in the history of cocoa and chocolate. From the Maya and the Spanish conquistadores to the chocolate connoisseurs of today. A chocolate hunt gives children the chance to discover the museum. Chocolates are made by hand and sampled on the premises. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.15 p.m. 41




ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

1/1, 3/1-14/1, 24, 25 and 31/12 ADMISSION > € 6.00; 65+ and students: € 5.00; children between 6 and 12: € 4.00; children under 6: free; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Vlamingstraat 33, www.frietmuseum.be KLANKENTOREN NEW! Discover the sounds of the city in the lantern tower of the Concert Hall by 42

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

1/1, 3/1-14/1, 24, 25 and 31/12 ADMISSION > € 7.00; 65+ and students: € 6.00; children between 6 and 12: € 4.00; children under 6: free; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Wijnzakstraat 2, www.choco-story.be

:$//(7)5,(1'/<086(806+233,1*

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45

BELGIAN FRIES MUSEUM

history of the potato, Belgian fries and the various sauces and dressings that accompany this most delicious and most famous of Belgian comestibles. The museum is housed in Saaihalle, one of Bruges’ most attractive buildings. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets: 4.15 p.m.



means of interactive auditory art, and enjoy the view across the historic city centre and her towers of sound. Opening expected in 2011 OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-5.00 p.m. (Open on Easter Monday and Whit Monday) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 2/6 (afternoon) and 25/12 INFORMATION > www.museabrugge.be and www.concertgebouw.be

MUSEUM-GALLERY XPO SALVADOR DALÍ Admire the fantastic collection of world-famous graphic art, sculptures and drawings by the renowned Salvador Dalí inside the Belfry. All works are originals without a fault, authenticated by the Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí. The collection is presented in a sensational Daliesque decor of mirrors and gold, mother-of- pearl and shocking pink. OPENING TIMES > Daily: 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m. 46

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

1/1 and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 10.00; 65+ and students: € 8.00; children under 12: free; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Markt 7, www.dali-interart.be

DE BRUGGE CITY CARD The Brugge City Card gives free entry to 23 museums and places of interest in Bruges. See page 12 for more information. 3-DAY TICKET The 3-day ticket giving you unlimited access to all city museums (see description from page 95 to 100) only costs € 15.00. Youngsters between 6 and 25 pay € 5.00. The ticket, valid for three days, can be obtained at all city museums and at [Concertgebouw]. COMBINATION TICKET CHOCO-STORY /DIAMOND MUSEUM Combine a tasty visit to Choco-Story with a dazzling look at the Diamond Museum. This combination ticket costs € 10.00. For sale at the abovementioned museums and at [Concertgebouw]. COMBINATION TICKET CHOCO-STORY/LUMINA DOMESTICA/BELGIAN FRIES MUSEUM Visit these three museums at reduced rates. » Combination ticket (3 museums): adults: € 15.00; 65+ and students: € 12.00; children between 6 and 12: € 9.00; children under 6: free » Combination ticket (select 2 museums): adults € 10.00; 65+ and students: € 8.00; children between 6 and 12: € 6.00; children under 6: free » These combination tickets are for sale at the above-mentioned museums and at [Concertgebouw].


Places of Interest Some places are so special, so breathtaking or so unique that you simply have to see them. Bruges is filled to the brim with wonderful witnesses of a prosperous past, whether they be peaceful and picturesque, spiritual or, on the contrary, extremely entertaining.



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BEGUINAGE The ‘Princely Beguinage Ten Wijngaarde’ with its whitewashed house fronts, tranquil convent garden and beguinage museum was founded in 1245. Today the nuns of the Order of Saint Benedict inhabit the site. The Beguinage entrance gate closes without fail at 6.30 p.m. OPENING TIMES > Beguinage: daily 6.30 a.m.-6.30 p.m.; Beguine’s house: Monday to Saturday, 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m., Sunday 2.30 p.m.-5.00 p.m. ADMISSION > Beguinage: free; Beguine’s house: € 2.00; youngsters: € 1.00; 60+: € 1.50; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Begijnhof 24-28-30, www.monasteria.org 01 03

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SAINT SAVIOUR’S CATHEDRAL Bruges’ oldest parish church (12th-15th century) has amongst its treasures a rood loft with organ, medieval tombs, Brussels tapestries and a rich collection of Flemish paintings (14th-18th century). The treasure-chamber displays a.o. paintings by Dirk Bouts, Hugo van der Goes and other Flemish Primitives. OPENING TIMES > Cathedral: Monday to Friday: 9.00 a.m.-12.00 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.-5.30 p.m.; Saturday: 9.00 a.m.12.00 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.-3.30 p.m.; Sunday: 9.00 a.m.-10.00 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.5.00 p.m.; Treasury: daily (except Saturday) 2.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > Treasury: January ADMISSION > Cathedral: free; Treasury: € 2.50; students, 65+ and children under 13: € 1.50; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Steenstraat, www.sintsalvator.be 20




MUSEUM OF THE BASILICA OF THE HOLY BLOOD This double chapel consists of the Romanesque church of Saint Basil (11391149) on the ground floor and the Basilica on the first floor, rebuilt in Gothic revival style in the 19th century. The Relic of the Holy Blood is kept in the Basilica. OPENING TIMES > April-September: 9.30 a.m.-12.00 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.6.00 p.m.; October-March: 10.00 a.m.12.00 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.-4.00 p.m. 05

OPENING TIMES > April-October: daily 11.00 a.m.-4.00 p.m. (Saturday till 5.00 p.m.), guided tours every hour; November-March: weekdays 11.00 a.m. & 3.00 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 11.00 a.m.-4.00 p.m., guided tours every hour ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, weekdays in January, 24/12 and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 6.00 (including refreshment); children between 6 and 12: € 3.00; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Walplein 26, www.halvemaan.be

ful Florentine banking family of De Medici set up a branch here. The stone medallion portraits of Lorenzo de Medici and his wife still grace the picturesque inner court. OPENING TIMES > Inner court: MondayFriday 9.00 a.m.-12.00 a.m. and 2.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m.; Hof Bladelin: by appointment, tel. +32 (0)50 33 64 34 ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

public holidays ADMISSION > Inner court: free; Hof Bladelin: € 1.00 INFORMATION > Naaldenstraat 19

are regularly given. The shop sells all kinds of lace paraphernalia. OPENING TIMES > Monday-Saturday: 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

1/1, 25/12 and public holidays ADMISSION > € 2.50; 65+, students and children between 7 and 12: € 1.50; children under 7: free; Brugge City Card: free INFORMATION > Peperstraat 3a, www.kantcentrum.eu

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

October-March: Wednesday afternoon ADMISSION > Double chapel: free; Treasure-chamber: € 1.50; students € 1.00; children under 13: free INFORMATION > Burg 13, www.holyblood.org CITY CARD

BREWERY DE HALVE MAAN De Halve Maan (1546) is the city’s last working brewery. Their house brew is Brugse Zot, a spirited top-fermented beer made from malt, hops and special yeast. This deliciously refreshing beer can be tasted on the premises. Daily guided tours in various languages. 12



HOF BLADELIN In around 1440 Pieter Bladelin, treasurer of the Order of the Golden Fleece, commissioned the construction of Hof Bladelin. In the 15th century the power20

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LACE CENTRE The Lace Centre is housed in 15th century almshouses funded by the Adornes family, who also built the Jerusalem Church. Lace demonstrations 24




BRUGES ON FOOT Are you not exhausted from walking yet? Are you still in the mood for a tour with a guide? Then hurry to [Concertgebouw] and register for a two-hour fascinating guided walk. Languages: English/German, Dutch and French Jan: on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Wednesday at 5.00 p.m. Feb: on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Wednesday at 5.00 p.m. March: on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Wednesday at 5.00 p.m. April: during the weekends, 11/4-25/4: daily at 2.30 p.m. May: during the weekends, daily at 2.30 p.m. June: during the weekends, 3/6 and 13/6; daily at 2.30 p.m. July: daily at 2.30 p.m. August: daily at 2.30 p.m. September: during the weekends, daily at 2.30 p.m. October: during the weekends, daily at 2.30 p.m. CITY CARD

Discover Bruges You might want to stroll, amble and saunter down the streets of Bruges all day long or even for a whole weekend. Nothing wrong with that. However, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do you any harm if you look at the city from a different perspective. During a walking or bicycle tour a guide will show you numerous secret places. Maybe you prefer a boat trip on the mysterious canals. An unforgettable experience! And a ride in a horse-drawn carriage must surely be the perfect romantic outing. Perhaps you simply want to tour all the highlights as quickly and as comfortably as possible? Then a minibus is what you need, and expert commentary is what you will get. And what about a balloon ride or a daytrip on a Vespa scooter? The choice is yours!



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BRUGES BY BOAT A visit to Bruges isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t complete without a boat trip on its canals. Go aboard at any of the ďŹ ve landing stages (consult city map) for a half-hour trip that allows you to appreciate the most noteworthy delights of the city from a completely different angle. MarchNovember: daily 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m. FEE > â&#x201A;Ź 6,90; children aged 4 to 11 (accompanied by an adult): â&#x201A;Ź 3.20; children under 4: free; Brugge City Card (1/3>15/11): free INFORMATION > www.bruges.be/ tourism

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DISCOVER BRUGES, MADE TO MEASURE! Would you like your walk to contain just the sights you want to see? Then www.citytripplanner.be provides you with a quick and easy way to choose a walk tailored to your requirements.


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Nov: on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Wednesday at 5.00 p.m. Dec: on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Wednesday at 5.00 p.m. FEE > € 9.00; walks in Jan., Feb., March, Nov. and Dec. are free with Brugge City Card TICKETS > Information office at the Concertgebouw or www.ticketsbrugge.be CITY CARD

BRUGES BY HORSE-DRAWN CARRIAGE The half-hour carriage ride along Bruges’ historic winding streets trots off on Markt (at Burg on Wednesday morning). Halfway through the ride the carriage briefly stops at the Beguinage. The coachman gives expert commentary en route. 9.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m.; 9.00 a.m.10.00 p.m. in July and August FEE > € 36.00 per carriage; a carriage seats up to 5 people. INFORMATION > www.bruges.be/ tourism VESPA TOURS Discover the Bruges’ wet- and woodlands in style: book a guided tour with a snazzy Vespa scooter and traverse



the green polders, authentic villages and breathtaking landscapes. A couple of surprises are provided en route. Half day and day tours. Booking essential. Meeting point: ‘t Zand. Dutch, French and English spoken. FEE > half day tour: 1 person per Vespa: € 65.00; 2 persons per Vespa: € 80.00; day tour: 1 person per Vespa: € 100.00; 2 persons per Vespa: € 115.00; helmets, guide, insurance, photo with Vespa and free drink included CONDITIONS > minimum 21 years of age, driving licence B INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)497 64 86 48 or www.vespatours-brugge.be CITY CARD

€ 100.00; Brugge City Card: € 120.00 INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)475 97 28 87 or www.bruges-ballooning.com

BRUGES BY HOT AIR BALLOON

cover the city out of a hot air balloon. A morning flight (champagne breakfast included) or an evening flight (champagne, snacks and beer included) lasts three hours, of which at least one is spent up in the air! On request only. Reservation for a balloon trip on the day itself is however possible until a few hours before departure. FEE > € 160.00; children under 13:

first bus leaves at 10.00 a.m. The last bus leaves at 4.00 p.m. in January and February, 5.00 p.m. in March, November and December, 6.00 p.m. in October, 7.00 p.m. in April, May and June, and 8.00 p.m. in July, August and September. FEE > € 14.50; children aged 6 to 11: € 8.50 INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0) 50 35 50 24 or info@citytour.be, www.citytour.be

CITY TOUR BRUGES The minibuses call at the different highlights of the city. They leave every hour from Markt for a fifty-minute trip. Headphones provide commentary in English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, Italian and Japanese. The




refreshment in a local café. INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)50 33 07 75, www.quasimundo.com THE PINK BEAR BIKE TOURS

A mere five minutes away from bustling

BRUGES BY BIKE QUASIMUNDO BIKETOURS BRUGES > ‘Bruges By Bike’: March-November,

daily 10.00 a.m.-12.30 p.m. The narrow streets reveal the medieval character of the ancient port. The fascinating stories by the guide will catapult you back to a time when knights and counts ruled the town. It goes without saying that there is a stop along the way for a thirstquenching Belgian beer. > ‘Border By Bike’: March-November, daily 1.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m.. A tour through the flat countryside around Bruges, passing through medieval towns such as Damme, peaceful Flemish agrarian villages and dead straight canals.

Bruges lies one of the prettiest rural areas in Europe. You ride to historic Damme, the handsome medieval market town, once Bruges’ outport. A guide will furthermore show you the most enchanting places of the Polders. It goes without saying that there is also a stop at a pleasant café for some Belgian Beers and/or Belgian waffles. On your return you follow the beautiful poplarplanted banks of a canal and discover some of Bruges’ best-kept secrets. 10.25 a.m.-2.00 p.m. Meeting Point: Belfry. English spoken but we are multilingual. A Dutch- or Frenchspeaking guide can be arranged. Booking recommended. FEE > € 21.00; youngsters under 27: € 18.00; children under 9: free; € 15.00 if you bring your own bike. INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)50 61 66 86, www.pinkbear.freeservers.com

THE GREEN BIKE TOUR

Meeting point:

A guided trip to the polders, the flat countryside around Bruges. The tour pulls up at medieval Damme and other important sights along the way for a little extra commentary. 10.00 a.m. to early afternoon from April to October. By appointment only during the low season.

English, Dutch and French spoken. Booking recommended. FEE > € 15.00; € 9.00 if you bring your own bike. INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)50 61 26 67

[Concertgebouw].

Meeting Point: Toyo Ito pavilion on Burg, ten minutes before departure of tour. English and Dutch spoken. Guides are also available in French, German and Spanish. Booking is recommended. FEE > € 25.00; youngsters under 27: € 23.00; children under 9: free; € 15.00 if you bring your own bike. Tour includes guide, raincoat, water and






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STATION LOCATION > Stationsplein at Fietspunt FEE > 1 hour: € 4.00; 4 hours: € 8.00; full day: € 12.00 (Brugge City Card: € 9.00) OPENING TIMES > Monday-Friday 7.30 a.m.-7.00 p.m.; weekends and public holidays: € 9.00 a.m.-9.40 p.m. CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)50 39 68 26

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BAUHAUS BIKE RENTAL

LOCATION > Langestraat 145 FEE > 1 hour: € 3.00; 3 hours: € 6.00; full

day: € 10.00 (Brugge City Card: € 6.00). Students: € 9.00 OPENING TIMES > 7/7; 9.00 a.m.-9.00 p.m. EXTRA > mountain bikes CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)50 34 10 93, www.bauhaus.be/bikes.html

DE KETTING LOCATION > Gentpoortstraat 23

LOCATION >

Monday-Saterday 9.00 a.m.-6.30 p.m. CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)50 34 41 96

FEE > € 8.00

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Bicycle Rental Points Bruges is bicycle heaven. Haven’t you brought your own bike? Don’t worry! The following bicycle rental firms will happily provide you with an iron steed. Let’s mount that saddle!

SNUFFEL BACKPACKER HOSTEL

FEE > € 6.00 OPENING TIMES >

ERIC POPELIER LOCATION > Mariastraat 26 FEE > 1 hour: € 4.00; 4 hours: € 8.00; full day: € 12.00 (Brugge City Card: € 9.00). Tandem 1 hour: € 10.00; 4 hours: € 17.00; full day: € 25.00 (Brugge City Card: € 18.75); price reduction for students OPENING TIMES > 7/7; 9.00 a.m.-7.00 p.m. EXTRA > tandem bicycles CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)50 34 32 62, www.fietsenpopelier.be

OPENING TIMES > 7/7; 8.00 a.m.-8.00 p.m. CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)50 33 31 33, www.snuffel.be CITY CARD

FEE > 1 hour: € 4.00; 4 hours: € 8.00; full day: € 12.00 (Brugge City Card: € 9.00) OPENING TIMES > 1/4-15/10: daily 10.00 a.m.-12.00 a.m. and 1.00 p.m.-7.00 p.m.. 16/10-31/3: weekends only 10.00 a.m.12.00 a.m. and 1.00 p.m.-7.00 p.m. CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)479 97 12 80 CITY CARD

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KOFFIEBOONTJE

LOCATION > FEE > 1 hour: € 4.00; 4 hours: € 8.00; full

day: € 12.00 (Brugge City Card: € 9.00); students: € 9.00. Tandem 1 hour: € 10.00; 4 hours: € 18.00; full day: € 25.00 OPENING TIMES > 7/7; 9.00 a.m.10.00 p.m. EXTRA > mountain bikes, tandem bicycles, buggies for kids and wheelchair CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)50 33 80 27, www.adventure-bike-renting.be 

CONCERTGEBOUW B-BIKE

LOCATION > ’t Zand

BRUGES BIKE RENTAL

LOCATION > Niklaas Desparsstraat 17 FEE > 1 hour: € 3.50; 2 hours: € 5.00; 4 hours: € 7.00; full day: € 10.00 (Brugge City Card: € 7.50); students: € 8.00. Tandem 1 hour: € 8.00; 2 hours: € 12.00; 4 hours: € 15.00; full day: € 20.00 (Brugge City Card: € 15.00) OPENING TIMES > 7/7; 10.00 a.m.-10.00 p.m. EXTRA > Tandem bicycles, baskets, saddlebags, baby/child’s saddles and bike stretchers CONTACT > tel. +32 (0)50 61 61 08, www.brugesbikerental.be


INFORMATION > Vlamingstraat 29, tel. +32 (0)50 44 30 60 (Weekdays 1.00 p.m.6.00 p.m. Saturday 10.00 a.m.-1.00 p.m.), www.ccbrugge.be

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Out in Bruges The city’s high-quality cultural life flourishes as never before. Devotees of modern architecture stand in awe of the Concertgebouw (Concert hall) whilst enjoying to the full an international top concert or an exhilarating dance performance. Romantic souls throng the elegant City Theatre for an unforgettable night. Jazz enthusiasts feel at home at Art Centre De Werf, whereas MaZ is the place to be for young people.

CONCERTGEBOUW The impressive Concertgebouw (Concert hall) with its 1,295 seats and the intimate Chamber Music Hall with its 320 seats serve a delightful mix of music, musical theatre and dance of international quality. The acoustics and intimate comfort of both halls are exceptional. Brugge City Card: 30% discount on in-house productions 13

INFORMATION > ’t Zand, tel. +32 (0)70 22 33 02 (Monday-Friday: 4.00 p.m.-6.30 p.m.), www.concertgebouw.be

events brugge September / Septembre

2010

atre and dance talent as well as for concerts. Big names next to intimate club discoveries. Regular shows and activities for children. INFORMATION > Magdalenastraat 27, tel. +32 (0)50 44 30 60 (Weekdays 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m., Saturday 10.00 a.m.1.00 p.m.), www.ccbrugge.be CITY CARD

CITY THEATRE One of Europe’s best preserved city theatres (1869) boasts a palatial foyer and a majestic auditorium. It is the perfect setting for concerts and contemporary dance and theatre performances. 33

The monthly magazine events@brugge offers a detailed events calendar. It is available free of charge at the information office at the Concertgebouw and the information office at the railway station.

MAGDALENE CONCERT HALL (MaZ) 36

ART CENTRE DE WERF Celebrated den for jazz lovers. An established concert venue for countless Belgian and foreign musicians as well as a perfect spot for that enjoyable contemporary play or kids’ production. Brugge City Card: 25% discount INFORMATION > Werfstraat 108, tel. +32 (0)50 33 05 29, www.dewerf.be 17

Evenementenkalen der Calendrier des événements Veranstaltungsverz eichnis What’s on guide




â&#x201A;Ź 5.00; children smaller than 85 centimetres: free; Pay&Display car park: â&#x201A;Ź 6.50; Brugge City Card: â&#x201A;Ź 12.00 INFORMATION AND TICKETS > A. De Baeckestraat 12, St.-Michiels, tel. +32 (0)50 38 38 38, www.boudewijnseapark.be. Tickets at the amusement park entrance or at the information ofďŹ ce [Concertgebouw]. Boudewijn Sea Park is situated just outside the city centre and is connected to the Bicycle Route Network. Bus: nr. 7 & nr. 17 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stop: Boudewijnpark

Tailor-made for Children A dolphinarium full of happy dolphins, a public observatory that allows you to gaze endlessly at the stars, a working childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s farm and countless swimming pools and indoor playgrounds. Bruges spoils her smallest visitors rotten with an exciting mix of tailor-made animation.



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BOUDEWIJN SEAPARK BRUGGE

A jolly dolphin amusement park chock-a-block with attractions. The dolphins steal the show at the dolphinarium, the sea lions perform a spectacular show at the open air theatre, and the panoramic aquaramas provide a thrilling underwater view. Kids can play to their heartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s content in the indoor play village Boboâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indoor. OPENING TIMES > July and August: daily 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m.; 11/4-25/4: 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; May and June: daily (except Wednesday) 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; September: every Saturday and Sunday 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m. ADMISSION > All-in ticket (park, shows, play village): children taller than 1 metre and adults: â&#x201A;Ź 20.00; children between 85 centimetres and 1 metre:

INDOOR PLAYGROUNDS These indoor playgrounds offer a handy solution for boisterous birthday parties, school excursions or rainy days. And whilst the kids let their hair down, the adults can keep an eye on them from the cafeteria. DE TOVERPLANEET OPENING TIMES > Wednesday 1.00 p.m.8.00 p.m., Friday 3.30 p.m.-8.00 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and school holidays 10.30 a.m.-8.00 p.m.; may be closed on hot summer days. ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 6.00; after 5.00 p.m. â&#x201A;Ź 5.00; children under 3 and accompanying adults: free. INFORMATION > Legeweg 88, St.Andries, www.detoverplaneet.be; Bus: nr. 9, Stop: Rozenhof (map A10) HET OVERDEKTE SPEELDORP OPENING TIMES > school holidays, weekends, public holidays and




Wednesdays: 1.00 p.m.-6.00 p.m.. ADMISSION > € 5.00; children under 3 and accompanying adults: free INFORMATION > Diksmuidestraat 5, www.speeldorp.be; Bus: nr. 14, Stop: Krakelebrug or De Veste (map E3)

BEISBROEK MUNICIPAL DOMAIN, TUDOR AND CHARTREUZINNENBOS These extensive nature reserves ensure hours of walking enjoyment. The vast Beisbroek municipal domain (160 hectares) comprises woods,

CHILDREN’S FARM DE ZEVEN TORENTJES This 14th-century farmstead houses a

alleys, pastures and heathland. A signposted trail connects the three areas of the domain. Its nature centre spoils nature lovers with an interactive exhibition and a children’s lab. A stone’s throw away from Beisbroek is another magnet: the Tudor Municipal Domain. Although the Tudor-style castle catches the eye, its ornamental garden and herb garden are also more than worth the while. The park itself boasts pastures and gigantic deciduous trees. The Chartreuzinnenbos

merry working children’s farm with a superb recreation area and a gaggle of farmyard animals. The beautifully restored dovecot and the Gothic barn are also worth a visit. The educational component can be found at www. bruges.be under “kinderboerderij” (children’s farm). OPENING TIMES > From sunrise to sunset. Cafeteria open from Tuesday to Sunday: 11.30 a.m.-9.00 p.m. ADMISSION > Free INFORMATION > Canadaring 41, Assebroek; bus: nr. 2 A.Z. St.-Lucas/ Assebroek. Stop: Zeven Torentjes



(wood of the Carthusian nuns) links the 40 hectares of the Tudor Domain with the 98 hectares of the Beisbroek Domain. OPENING TIMES > Domain: daily from sunrise to sunset; Nature centre: every day 2.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m. (except Saturday), Sunday and public holidays 2.00 p.m.-6.00 p.m.; Herb Garden: daily from 1/5 to 15/10, 2.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m. (closed: Saturday). ADMISSION > Free INFORMATION > Zeeweg 96, SintAndries; Bus: nr. 52 Brugge/Gistel/ Oostende – nr. 53 Brugge/ Jabbeke. Stop: Zeeweg

SWIMMING POOLS JAN GUILINI

Keizer Karelstraat 41, bus: nr. 9, Stop: Visartpark INTERBAD

Veltemweg 35, Sint-Kruis, bus: nr. 11, Stop: Sint-Andreaslyceum BEISBROEK PUBLIC OBSERVATORY This public observatory zooms in on the sun, the stars and the planets. Its modern planetarium, interactive exhibition and well-equipped observatory unlock the secrets of the galaxies. The planet trail that starts at the castle is a clever scale model illustrating the distance between the various planets: each footstep corresponds to nine

OLYMPIA

Doornstraat 110, Sint-Andries, bus: nr. 25, Stop: Jan Breydel All opening times available at the information office at the Concertgebouw or at the railway station.

million space kilometres. OPENING TIMES > Information on foreign language presentations at the information office at the Concertgebouw and at the railway station. ADMISSION > € 5.00; youngsters under 18: € 4.00 INFORMATION > Zeeweg 96, SintAndries, www.beisbroek.be; bus: nr. 52 Brugge/Gistel/Oostende – nr. 53 Brugge/Jabbeke. Stop: Zeeweg




Bruges’ wet- and woodlands cal finds from the erstwhile Cistercian abbey of Ter Doest. At the Museum of Saints a unique collection of 121 antique statues of patron saints is on display.

Get Even More Out of Your Stay in Bruges Do you have any extra time on your hands? Why then don’t you set out and discover Bruges’ wide surroundings? While Bruges’ wet- and woodlands treats you to medieval areas of natural beauty, glorious castles and endless bike routes that crisscross all those enchanting places, the coast offers countless splendid beaches and an authentic seafaring ambiance. And if you’re looking for something more intense, then head for the tranquil Westhoek, still dominated by the Great War. Each experience will guarantee some unforgettable memories!



CHURCH OF OUR LADY VISITATION LISSEWEGE This impressive brick church was erected in an early Gothic style in the 13th century. The remarkable interior counts amongst its treasures a miraculous statue of the Virgin Mary (1625), a striking organ-case and an equally stunning rood loft and pulpit (1652). A truly great attraction is the monumental church tower. The top offers a magnificent panoramic view of the polders. OPENING TIMES > The church: daily, 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m. In summer 9.00 a.m.-8.00 p.m.; the tower: 1/7-15/9, 2.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m. ADMISSION > Church: free; tower: € 1.00; children under 12: € 0.50 INFORMATION > Stationstraat 23, Lissewege, tel. +32 (0)50 54 54 72, www.lissewege.be VISITORS CENTRE LISSEWEGE The visitors centre traces the one thousand-year-old history of this white village by way of unique photos, maps, models and a collection of archaeologi-

OPENING TIMES > 15/6-15/9: daily 2.00 p.m.-5.30 p.m. ADMISSION > € 1.00; Children aged to 11: € 0.50 INFORMATION > Oude Pastoriestraat 5, Lissewege, www.lissewege.be

TER DOEST ABBEY BARN The commanding early Gothic abbey barn (14th century) of this former 12th-century Cistercian abbey has only recently been completely restored. The dovecote (1651) and monumental gatehouse (1662) have also withstood the ravages of time brilliantly. OPENING TIMES > Daily 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m. INFORMATION > Ter Doeststraat 4, Lissewege, www.lissewege.be




BRUGES’ WET- AND WOODLANDS

BRUGES’ WET- AND WOODLANDS

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

are a pleasant stroll through medieval Damme and a visit to the Gothic abbey barn of Ter Doest at Lissewege. And what would this tour be without some delicious waffles, mouth-watering chocolate and a choice selection of Bel-

ticket: € 5.00; students: € 1.50; Brugge City Card: € 1.50 INFORMATION > Jacob van Maerlantstraat 3, Damme, tel. +32 (0)50 28 86

gian country ales?

10, www.toerismedamme.be

1/1 and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 2.50; family

> Excursions on Monday, Wednesday CITY CARD

LAMME GOEDZAK DAMME The nostalgic river boat Lamme Goedzak plies between Noorweegse Kaai in Bruges and the centre of Damme. A bus takes you from Bruges’ railway station or Markt to the river boat’s jetty and back. > 1/4-15/10: departures from Bruges to Damme: daily at 10.00 a.m., 12.00 a.m., 2.00 p.m., 4.00 p.m. and 6.00 p.m.; departures from Damme to Bruges: daily at 9.15 a.m., 11.00 a.m., 1.00 p.m., 3.00 p.m. and 5.20 p.m. FEE > € 6.00 (one-way ticket) or € 7.50 (return ticket); 65+: € 5.50 (one-way ticket) or € 6.50 (return ticket); children aged 3 to 11: € 4.50 (one-way ticket) or € 5.50 (return ticket); Brugge City Card (return ticket): € 5.50 INFORMATION > Noorweegse Kaai 31, Brugge, tel. +32 (0)9 233 84 69, www.bootdamme-brugge.be TRIPLE TREAT QUASIMODO TOUR: CHOCOLATE, WAFFLES AND BEER minibus tour, which takes you to a.o. illustrious Tilleghem Castle and unique Neo-Gothic Loppem Château. Included



and Friday from February to December. You are collected on ‘t Zand (Map:C9) at 9.15 a.m. and brought back at around 5.00 p.m. If requested, you can be collected from your own hotel. Booking essential. FEE > € 60.00; youngsters under 26: € 50.00; including lunch and entrance fees; a € 10.00 reduction when booking the Quasimodo WWI Flanders Fields Tour INFORMATION > tel. 0800 975 25 or +32(0)50 37 04 70, www.quasimodo.be

CITY TOUR DAMME Bruges’ market square and drop you off at Damme. Having sailed back to Bruges on Lamme Goedzak two hours later, you will be picked up by the bus at the jetty and transferred to Markt, Bruges’ central square. > Excursions: April-September, daily at 4.00 p.m., commentary in French, Italian, Dutch, English, German and Spanish. FEE > € 24.00; children aged 6 to 11: € 16.00 INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0) 50 35 50 24 or info@citytour.be, www.citytour.be

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

UILENSPIEGELMUSEUM DAMME

Would you like to know more about Tijl Uilenspiegel and his pranks and tomfooleries? And would you like to meet his clones from all over the world and understand the cultural-historical context of this capricious figure? Then Damme is your destination. Here you will not only shake hands with the famous Flemish Uilenspieghel from the 19th century, but also with his 16th-century German colleague and his various 20th-century brothers. OPENING TIMES > 16/4-15/10: weekdays 9.00-12.00 a.m. and 2.00-6.00 p.m.; Saturday, Sunday and public holidays 10.00-12.00 a.m. and 2.00-6.00 p.m.; 16/10-15/4: weekdays 9.00-12.00 a.m. and 2.00-5.00 p.m.; Saturday, Sunday and public holidays 2.00-5.00 p.m.

SAINT-JOHN’S HOSPITAL DAMME Thirteenth-century Saint-John’s Hospital possesses an impressive collection of liturgical objects and an interesting selection of unusual furniture, paintings and earthenware. The hospital’s chapel is open to visitors except during services. Why not kill two birds with one stone and discover not only this fine collection but also the special place where the objects belonged and where they were once used on a daily basis? OPENING TIMES > Easter to 30/9: 11.0012.00 a.m. and 2.00-6.00 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

Monday morning and Friday morning, annual closure from 1/10 to 31/3 ADMISSION > € 1.50; family ticket: € 3.00; 65+ and disabled persons: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: € 1.00 INFORMATION > Kerkstraat 33, Damme,




BRUGES’ WET- AND WOODLANDS

BRUGES’ WET- AND WOODLANDS

tel. +32 (0)50 46 10 80, www.ocmw-damme.be

CITY CARD

ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM OUDENBURG

CITY CARD

PERMEKEMUSEUM JABBEKE Constant Permeke, the most famous Flemish expressionist painter, lived and worked in Jabbeke for more than twenty years. His abode was the The Four Winds, a striking villa commissioned by the artist himself and built, for its time,

painstaking excavations and studies, Oudenburg today possesses a unique collection of archaeological artefacts from Roman times. The good news is that the visitor can pore over them at the modernised museum. The reconstructions, scale-models, archaeologi-

WIJNENDALE CASTLE A superb moated castle in the Torhout woods. Hours of walking pleasure guaranteed. There is more: at the castle museum the visitor makes a voyage through a thousand-year-old history by means of contemporary presentations, touchscreens and a portable video guide. Witness for example Mary of Burgundy’s fall from her horse and watch how King

in extremely modern design. Today it is the location of the Permeke Museum, where the visitor can wander around the artist’s living quarters as well as his garden and former studios. It is without a doubt the place par excellence to admire in total peace and quiet Permeke’s collection of his spellbinding works. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday 10.00-12.30 a.m. and 1.30-6.00 p.m. (till 5.30 p.m. from 1/10 to 31/3) ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1 and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 3.00; 55+: € 2.50; youngsters under 26: € 1.00; children under 13: free; Brugge City Card: € 2.25 INFORMATION > Gistelsesteenweg 341, Jabbeke, tel. +32 (0)59 50 81 18 (Mu.ZEE – Kunstmuseum aan zee), www.muzee.be

cal finds and computer simulations enable you to get to grips with the region’s rich Roman history in a professional way. The adjacent visitor centre brings you also up to date with the Abbey of Saint Peter’s, Saint Arnold and the other attractions of this region. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Saturday 10.00-12.30 a.m. and 1.30-5.30 p.m., Sunday 2.00-5.30 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > Annual closure: 1/1131/3 ADMISSION > Visitor Centre: free; museum: € 5.00; children and youngsters between 7 and 18: € 2.00; students: € 2.00; children under 6 (accompanied by an adult): free, disabled persons: € 3.00; Brugge City Card: € 3.00 INFORMATION > Weststraat 24, Oudenburg, tel. +32 (0)59 56 84 00

Leopold III of the Belgians surrenders to the Germans on 28 May 1940. And why don’t you drop in on the former porter’s lodge? It now houses a visitor’s centre where you can find everything you always wanted to know about Torhout, the Bruges wet- and woodlands, regional products, rambles, bicycle tours and so on and so forth. OPENING TIMES > 1/430/9: 10.00 a.m.-5.30 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > first Saturday of the month and Saturdays in September ADMISSION > € 5.00; children between 3 and 12: € 1.00; Brugge City Card: € 3.00 INFORMATION > Oostendestraat 390, Torhout, tel. +32 (0)50 22 07 70, www. toerismetorhout.be. Public transport: train Brugge – Kortrijk or bus route 62A (Oostende – Torhout)

CITY CARD



CITY CARD

TORHOUT POTTERY MUSEUM Pottery from Torhout used to be exported throughout the Western world until the Second World War. Unique pottery creations from the 16th to the 20th century highlight the rich tradition of this almost lost artistic craft. A splendid illustration of typical Flemish folk art influenced by a.o. Art Deco and Art Nouveau. OPENING TIMES > Monday to Friday: 9.30 a.m-12.30 p.m. and 1.30 p.m.-5.00 p.m., open from 15/6 to 15/9 during the weekends and on holidays. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

annual closure: 24/12-4/1 ADMISSION > € 1.25, children between 6 and 12: € 0.50; Brugge City Card: € 0.75 INFORMATION > Ravenhofstraat 5, Torhout, tel. +32 (0)50 22 07 70, www.toerismetorhout.be. Public transport: train Brugge-Kortrijk




A TRIP TO THE SEASIDE

A Trip To the Seaside THE BEACH AT ZEEBRUGGE In winter this is the place par excellence to get a breath of fresh air. In summer the townspeople of Bruges ďŹ&#x201A;ock to this wide and safe sandy strip to sunbathe, swim and potter about. And why not take a train to the beach? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a piece of cake! Adjacent to the beach is the summer railway station. CITY CARD

HARBOUR ROUND TRIP ZEEBRUGGE The round trip departs from the old ďŹ shing port and sails past the naval base, the Pierre Vandamme Lock (one of the largest in the world), the LNG terminal, the wind farm park, Stern Island and the cruise ships and dredgers. All the time gigantic container ships are being loaded and unloaded along the quays. An experience that offers a unique insight into the harbour and its manifold activities. OPENING TIMES > May, June and September: weekends and public holidays, 2.00 p.m.; July and August: daily at 2.00 p.m. and 4.00 p.m.. 1/8-21/8: daily extra round trip at 11.00 a.m. Dinner dance on Saturday night. ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 9.00; 60+: â&#x201A;Ź 8.50; children between 3 and 11: â&#x201A;Ź 6.80; Brugge City Card: â&#x201A;Ź 6.50; combination tickets Seafront/Harbour Round Trip: â&#x201A;Ź 17.50; children under 12: â&#x201A;Ź 15.30 INFORMATION > Tijdokstraat (Old Fishing Port), Zeebrugge, tel. 32 (0)59 70 62 94, www.havenrondvaarten.be, new: www.windmolencruise.be



CITY CARD

SEAFRONT ZEEBRUGGE This maritime theme park in the old ďŹ sh market plunges the visitor in the harsh world of the ďŹ shermen, the history of Zeebruggeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port and life below the sea. Children will enjoy the Russian submarine Foxtrot, the lightship West-Hinder and the brand-new piratesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; paradise. OPENING TIMES > Daily 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m.; July and August 10.00 a.m.-7.00 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1, 3/121/1 and 25/12 ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 10.50; children up to 1 metre (accompanied by parent): free; children under 12: â&#x201A;Ź 8.50; 60+: â&#x201A;Ź 10.00; Brugge City Card: â&#x201A;Ź 7.00 INFORMATION > Vismijnstraat 7, Zeebrugge, tel. +32 (0)50 55 14 15, www.seafront.be

CITY CARD

CITY CARD

MU.ZEE OSTEND Mu.ZEE, which houses a unique collection of Belgian art from 1830 onwards, is undoubtedly one of the jewels in the Flemish museum crown: work by James Ensor, LĂŠon Spilliaert, Constant Permeke, Jean Brusselmans, Raoul de Keyzer, Magritte, Roger Raveel, Panamarenko, Luc Tuymans and many more is permanently on view. The chil-

ENSORHOUSE OSTEND Oostende is your destination if you want to wander through the mind of James Ensor (1860-1949). This house was indeed the operating base of the world-famous painter from 1917 onwards. This is where he lived and worked. His aunt and uncleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shell and souvenir shop on the ground ďŹ&#x201A;oor has been carefully reconstructed. While

drenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s section allows your offspring to have a go at art in a playful way. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play, as a matter of fact! And why not drop in on one of the great, high-proďŹ led exhibitions? I bet you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where to look ďŹ rst! OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m.

the ďŹ rst ďŹ&#x201A;oor serves as a documentation centre, the second ďŹ&#x201A;oor displays the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salon studio. This space is so moving that you immediately forget that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at reproductions rather than original works. OPENING TIMES > Wednesday to Monday: 10.00-12.00 a.m. and 2.00-5.00 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1 and 25/12 ADMISSION > â&#x201A;Ź 2.00; 55+ and youngsters under 26: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; children under 12: free; Brugge City Card: â&#x201A;Ź 1.50 INFORMATION > Vlaanderenstraat 27, Oostende, tel. +32 (0)59 50 33 37 (reception) or +32 (0) 497 59 55 76, www. muzee.be. Public transport: Centrumbus (Stop at Vlaanderenstraat), coast tram (Stop at Marie-JosĂŠplein)

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

1/1 and 25/12 ADMISSION > Permanent collection: â&#x201A;Ź 5.00; 55+: â&#x201A;Ź 4.00; youngsters under 26: â&#x201A;Ź 1.00; children under 13: free; entrance fees are increased for exhibitions; Brugge City Card: â&#x201A;Ź 3.75 INFORMATION > Romestraat 11, Oostende, tel. +32 (0)59 50 81 18, www.muzee.be, public transport: Buses 6 and 14




BATTLEFIELDS: FLANDERS AND THE GREAT WAR

A TRIP TO THE SEASIDE CITY CARD

SEA LIFE MARINE PARK BLANKENBERGE Cute seals, dangerous-looking sharks, sluggish turtles: all these wonderful sea creatures await you at this top attraction in Blankenberge. You also get acquainted with the fauna and flora of the North Sea. See for yourself how the SOS-Rescue programme for seals is operating and gaze in awe and admiration at the tropical sharks in the underwater tunnel. Or do you prefer penguins, Japanese spider crabs and dwarf otters? Not to worry! No fewer than 2.500 underwater creatures will show you their best side. OPENING TIMES > Daily from 10.00 a.m.. Closing times may vary. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

1/1 (morning) and 25/12 ADMISSION > € 16.50; children from 3 to 11: € 13.00; Oap’s, students, disabled persons: € 15.50; Brugge City Card: € 8.25 INFORMATION > Koning Albert I-laan 116, Blankenberge, tel. +32 (0)50 42 43 00, www.sealife.be, public transport: the coast tram has a stop right in front of the Sea Life Marine Park



Battlefields: Flanders and the Great War

late, waffles and beer. INFORMATION > tel. 0800 975 25 or +32 (0)50 37 04 70, www.quasimodo.be FLANDERS FIELDS BATTLEFIELD DAYTOURS

QUASIMODO WWI FLANDERS FIELDS TOUR

Quasimodo takes you on a personalised and relaxing minibus tour to all the highlights: Passchendaele, Hill 60, several cemeteries, trenches and bunkers, the Menin Gate and various ANZAC, Canadian, British and Irish monuments. Our stories bring four years of terrible warfare in the Ypres Salient back to life. OPENING TIMES > February to the end of December: Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. April to October: daily except Monday. You are collected on ‘t Zand (Map: C9) at 9.15 a.m. and brought back at around 5.00 p.m. If requested, you can be collected at your own hotel. Booking essential. ADMISSION > English spoken: € 60.00; youngsters under 26: € 50.00; tour includes lunch and admission fees; a € 10.00 reduction when booking the Triple Treat Quasimodo Tour: choco-

request (tailor-made). The Last Post Tour is a short evening trip to Ypres and back to see the Last Post ceremony at the Menin Gate. Departure 6.15 p.m.. The tour finishes at 9.15 p.m.. Booking essential. English, Dutch and French commentary. ADMISSION > € 40.00 INFORMATION > tel. 0800 99 133 or +32 (0)50 34 60 60, www.visitbruges.org

Discover the tourist attractions of the Westhoek and the Great War. Visit the German cemetery at Langemark, Tyne Cot Cemetery and Passchendaele, the Passchendaele Museum with its ‘dugout tunnel experience’, the Menin Gate, Ypres with her magnificent clothmakers’ hall and the must see In Flanders Fields Museum. The trip also takes in Hill 62, Hill 60 with its craters and bunkers, Heuvelland and Mount Kemmel, Messines ridge, mine craters 1917, trenches and various

seum delving into the history of the Great War. Don’t expect a dry enumeration of facts and figures, but brace yourself for a fascinating display of modern techniques, sound effects and authentic film material that will make your heart

other monuments. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday-Sunday; Departure: 8.45 a.m.. The tour finishes at 5.15 p.m.. Booking essential. English, Dutch and French commentary. ADMISSION > € 65.00; youngsters under 26: € 60.00; includes lunch (no picnic); special Day Tour on

bleed. This is history in its most moving form: it’s as if you’re cowering down in the trenches yourself or witnessing the devastating destruction of the noble town of Ypres with your own eyes. In short, this is a museum that you have to experience in order to believe it. OPENING TIMES > 1/4 to 15/11: daily 10.00 a.m.-

CITY CARD

IN FLANDERS FIELDS MUSEUM YPRES




BATTLEFIELDS: FLANDERS AND THE GREAT WAR

Other Places of Interest

6.00 p.m.; 16/11 to 31/3: Tuesday to Sunday 10.00 a.m.-5.00 p.m.; last tickets 1 hour before closing time ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > Annual closure: first three weeks after the Christmas holidays. Due to renovation: closed from 1/1-31/1 and 19/9-31/12. ADMISSION > € 8.00; youngsters between 7 and 25: € 1.00; children under 7: free; Brugge City Card: € 5.50 INFORMATION > Grote Markt 34, Ieper, tel. +32 (0)57 23 92 20, www.inflandersfields.be CITY CARD

TALBOT HOUSE POPERINGHE Talbot House was the most famous soldier’s home of the British forces during the Great War. The house has remained in its authentic state until now. The large garden is still a haven of peace, and the restored Concert Hall is the place to watch Life Behind the Front, a life-size album of the soldiers’ existence behind the lines. The historic concert hall projects a 1917 Concert Party. It’s as if you step back into the turbulent times of the Great War. OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 9.30 a.m.-5.30 p.m.; 16/11-14/2: Tuesday to Sunday 1.00 p.m.-5.00 p.m.; last entry 4.30 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 21/12 till 4/1 ADMISSION > € 8.00; 65+: € 7.00; children under 7: free; youngsters under 19: € 5.00; Family ticket: € 19.50; Brugge City Card: € 6.00 INFORMATION > Gasthuisstraat 43, Poperinge, tel. +32 (0)57 33 32 28, www.talbothouse.be



CITY CARD

CANADA-POLAND WAR MUSEUM ADEGEM Flanders during the Second World War, then the Canada-Poland War Museum is the place to be. A number of reconstructed tableaux showing a.o. the Battle of the Leopold Canal and a vast collection of photographs, weapons and uniforms give an excellent insight into the war years. OPENING TIMES > April to September: Tuesday to Sunday, 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m.; October to March: Wednesday to Sunday, 12.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m. ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES > 1/1 ADMISSION > € 5.00; children under 6: free; Brugge City Card: € 4.00, picture postcard included INFORMATION > Heulendonk 21, Adegem, tel. +32 (0)50 71 06 66, www.canadamuseum.be

CITY CARD

TOUR OF FLANDERS CENTRE OUDENAARDE also multitalented: it is both a hands-on museum and an exhibition space, a film auditorium and a museum shop, and there is naturally a bicycle-themed brasserie as well. Plenty of multimedia techniques turn you into a protagonist in the legendary Tour of Flanders. Extensive information is provided at the counter, and if you’ve returned exhausted from a bike tour, then a nice, hot shower awaits you! OPENING TIMES > Tuesday to Sunday: 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m.

COLOPHON This is a publication of Toerisme Brugge. CONCEPT AND CO-ORDINATION > Bram De Vos, Uitgeverij Lannoo TEXTS > Sophie Allegaert, Willem Asaert, Jo Berten, Brugge Plus vzw, Rudi Collier, Pierre Darge, Carine Decroos, Laurens De Keyzer, Annelies Delchambre, Bram De Vos, Dieter Dewulf, Guido Elias, Noël Geirnaert, Kurt Götze, Bruno Gouwy, Geert Gruyaert, Evelien Vandenberghe, Ans Vanhoute, Geert Van der Speeten, Dirk Van Tieghem, Katelijne Vertongen TRANSLATION > Joseph Pearce DESIGN > Nele Reyniers, Uitgeverij Lannoo TYPESETTING > Keppie & Keppie WITH THANKS > West-Vlaamse Gidsenkring Brugge, Koninklijke Gidsenbond Brugge en West-Vlaanderen, S-wan vzw PHOTOGRAPHY > Layla Aerts , Cel fotografie Stad Brugge, Jens Compernolle, Jan Darthet, Steven Decroos, Mieke De Jonghe, Daniël de Kievith, Daniël Devoldere, Diamantmuseum Brugge, In Flanders Fields Museum, Sankai Juku, Joris Luyten, Hugo Maertens, Musea Brugge, Patrick Monney, Museum-Gallery Xpo Salvador Dalí, Tom Van Nuffel, Westtoer CARTOGRAPHY > Johan Mahieu and Tatjana Matysik December 2010. Toerisme Brugge can not be held responsible for any inaccuracies or change in prices. RESPONSIBLE EDITOR Dieter Dewulf, PO Box 744, B-8000 Brugge

ADDITIONAL CLOSING DATES >

25/12 and in January ADMISSION > € 7.00; 65+ and students: € 5.00; family ticket: € 15.00; Brugge City Card: € 5.00 INFORMATION > Markt 43, Oudenaarde, tel. +32 (0)55 33 99 33, www.crvv.be, public transport: a bus links Oudenaarde railway station (on the GhentSint-Pieters to Ronse line) with Markt

C I T Y MA P B R U G ES

Big city map for sale at the information office at the railway station or at the Concertgebouw.




35$&7,&$/,1)250$7,21 &$6+32,176 DE POST > Markt 5 | Map: E8 KBC > Steenstraat 38 | Map: D9 BNP PARIBAS FORTIS > Simon Stevinplein 3 | Map: D9 EUROPABANK > Vlamingstraat 13 | Map: E8 RAILWAY STATION > Stationsplein | Map: B13

&,1(0$6 » Programmes: [Concertgebouw], ’t Zand » All films are shown in their original language » See also www.cinebel.be LUMIÈRE > Sint-Jakobsstraat 36 www.lumiere.be | Map: D7 KINEPOLIS BRUGGE > Koning Albert I-laan 200 | www.kinepolis.com/brugge | Map: A14

&+85&+6(59,&(6 » BEGUINAGE > Monday-Friday: 7.15 a.m. | Sunday 9.30 a.m. » BASILICA OF THE HOLY BLOOD > daily (except Thursday) 11.00 a.m. » HOLY FAMILY > Saturday 5.30 p.m. » HOLY MAGDALENE > Sunday 11.30 a.m. » CHURCH OF OUR LADY > MondayFriday 9.00 a.m., Saturday 5.30 p.m., Sunday 11.00 a.m. » CAPUCHINS > Saturday 6.00 p.m., Sunday 7.00 a.m. & 10.30 a.m. » SAINT ANNE’S > Sunday 10.00 a.m. » SAINT GILES’S > Sunday 10.00 a.m. » SAINT JACOB’S > Saturday 6.30 p.m. » SAINT SAVIOUR’S > Monday-Friday 6.00 p.m., Saturday 4.00 p.m., Sunday 10.30 a.m. » SAINT WALBURGHA’S > Sunday 7.00 p.m. » ENGLISH CHURCH (ANGLICAN) / Saint Peter’s Chapel, Keersstraat 1 > Sunday 6.00 p.m. » UNITED PROTESTANT CHURCH / ’t Keerske, Keersstraat 1 > Sunday 10.00 a.m. » FREE EVANGELICAL CHURCH / Naaldenstraat 18 > Sunday 10.00 a.m. » ORTHODOX CHURCH / Ezelstraat 85 > Sunday 10.00 a.m.



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» SNUFFEL BACKPACKER HOSTEL CHARGE > € 1.00 per half hour | free Wifi ADRESS > Ezelstraat 47-49 INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)50 33 31 33 info@snuffel.be | www.snuffel.be | Map: D6 » BAUHAUS CHARGE > € 1.00 for the first 15 minutes, then € 0.05 per minute ADRESS > Langestraat 145 INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)50 34 10 93 | info@bauhaus.be | www.bauhaus.be | Map: I7 » BEAN AROUND THE WORLD CHARGE > € 1.00 for 15 minutes | free Wifi ADRESS > Genthof 5 INFORMATION > tel. +32 (0)50 70 35 72 | Map: F5

GOFFIN CHANGE > Steenstraat 2 | Map: E8 PILLEN R.W.J > Rozenhoedkaai 2 | Map: F9

3$5.,1*

0$5.(7'$<6

Bruges is a compact city. Most places of interest are within walking distance of your accommodation. In order to keep the historic city centre attractive and accessible, aboveground parking in the city centre is limited to a maximum of 4 hours in the Blue Zone and to 2 hours in the Pay&Display Zones. You can easily park your car in one of the underground car parks where you will pay a maximum of € 8.70 for 24hrs. The most inexpensive and largest car park is next to the railway station: the € 2.50 charge per day includes a bus transfer with De Lijn to the city centre. These buses leave every three minutes.

» WEDNESDAYS > 8.00 a.m.-1.00 p.m. | Markt | Food & Flowers » SATURDAYS > 8.00 a.m.-1.00 p.m. | ’t Zand & Beursplein | Miscellaneous » SUNDAYS > 8.00 a.m.-1.00 p.m. | Sint-Michiels | Miscellaneous » TUESDAYS TO SATURDAYS > 8.00 a.m.-1.00 p.m. | Vismarkt | Fish » SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND PUBLIC HOLIDAYS > 15 March to 15 November | 10.00 a.m.-6.00 p.m. | Dijver | Antiques and bibelots

» PARKING CENTRUM-ZAND CAPACITY > 1400 OPENING TIMES > Sunday-Thursday: 7.00 a.m.-1.00 a.m., Friday-Saturday: 24/24hrs RATES > day rate: maximum € 8.70/24hrs | evening rate: maximum € 2.50 (from 7.00 p.m. to closing time). » PARKING CENTRUM-STATION CAPACITY > 1500 OPENING TIMES > 24/7 RATES > € 0.50 per hour (maximum € 2.50/24hrs)

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» DOCTORS ON DUTY 7.00 p.m.-8.00 a.m. > tel. +32 (0)78 15 15 90 » PHARMACISTS ON DUTY tel. +32 (0)900 10 500 » DENTISTS ON DUTY tel. +32 (0)903 39 969 » S.O.S. EMERGENCY SERVICE > tel. 100 » HOSPITALS A.Z. St.-Jan > tel. +32 (0)50 45 21 11 St.-Lucas > tel. +32 (0)50 36 91 11 St.-Franciscus Xaveriuskliniek > tel. +32 (0)50 47 04 70 » POISONS ADVICE CENTRE tel. +32 (0)70 245 245

You can use public transport during your stay. De Lijn connects the railway station and the centre by a bus every three minutes. Furthermore, city line 12 “Centrum-Station-Bargeplein” is a continuous high-frequency shuttle between the most important city stops such as Markt (Map E8), Biekorf (Map E8), the railway station (Map C13) and the Katelijne car park (Map E13). The map at the back of this brochure contains a handy overview of all bus stops. TICKETS > ADVANCED BOOKING OFFICES > De Lijnwinkel, NMBS railway station concourse [Concertgebouw], ’t Zand

Various city centre book shops INFORMATION > www.delijn.be

7$;,6 TAXI RANKS > Markt: tel. +32 (0)50 33 44 44 Stationsplein: tel. +32 (0)50 38 46 60

*(77,1*7+(5( » BY TRAIN » London – Bruges by Eurostar in 2.54 hours, one transfer in Brussels (station Midi/Zuid). » Also one transfer at Brussels (Midi/Zuid) when coming from other European cities like Amsterdam, Paris, Rotterdam, Cologne and Luxembourg. Multiple direct connections each day from Brussels, Ghent and Antwerp, but also from other Belgian cities to Bruges. » BY CAR / COACH / FERRY » Dover (UK) – Dunkerque (F) with DFDS Seaways | Dunkerque (F) > Bruges (B) by car: 45 miles / 50 minutes. » Dover (UK)– Calais (F) with Seafrance or P&O ferries | Calais (F) > Bruges by car: 72 miles / 80 minutes. » Ramsgate (UK)– Ostend (B) with Transeuropaferries| Oostende > Bruges by car: 15 miles / 25 minutes. » Hull (UK)– Zeebrugge (B) with P&O ferries | Zeebrugge > Bruges by car: 10 miles / 20 minutes. » BY PLANE » Via Brussels Airport: daily flights from 200 destinations in 66 countries. Easy access to Bruges by train (one transfer in BrusselsMidi/Zuid). » Via Brussels-South-Charleroi-Airport: Multiple flights a week by low cost airlines from several European cities. Frequent train and bus connection between the airport and Bruges. More information on www.bruges.be/transport Detailed train, bus and ferry timetables can be obtained at the information office at the Concertgebouw or at the railway station.


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Boninvest

Mortierstraat

H14

Keersstraat

C8

E8

Krom Genthof

F6

Muntplein-Muntpoort

D8

Muur Der Doodgeschotenen* I8

F9

Hortensiastraat

C6

Houthulststraat

C4

Kegelschoolstraat

B9

Krommestraat

G2

Hugo Losschaertstraat

D6

Keizer Karelstraat

B6

Kroonstraat

B4 I12

D7

Driekroezenstraat

E11

D9

Hugo Verrieststraat

H7

Kelkstraat

F8

Kruisboogstraat*

F7

Driezwanenstraat

G7

Gloribusstraat

C10

Huidenvettersplein

F9

Kemelstraat

D9

Kruisvest

Dudzeelse Steenweg

G1

Goezeputstraat

D10

H8

Dweersstraat

C9

Gombertstraat (Nikolaas) D3

E7

E12 C9

Boudewijn Ravestraat

F11

Braambergstraat

F9

Brandstraat

B8

Breidelstraat

E8

E

Britse Kaai

F1

Edestraat

Brugse-Mettenstraat*

J7

Edward De Denestraat* G13

Buiten Begijnenvest

C13

Eekhoutpoort

Buiten Boeverievest*

B11

Eekhoutstraat

Buiten Boninvest

H11

Buiten de Dampoort*

H3

Eiermarkt Eiland

J4

F10 F9 E8 C12

Buiten de Smedenpoort* A10

Elf-Julistraat

D5

F5

Buiten Gentpoortvest

G12

Elisabeth Zorghestraat

G6

I8

Buiten Katelijnevest

F13

Emile Cousindok

F1

H7

Buiten Kazernevest

C10

I7

E13

Burg

Baron Jos. Ryelandtstraat A5 Baron Ruzettelaan

F14

Baron Ruzettepark*

E3

Beaupréstraat

J9 F10

J9

Buiten Kruisvest

Bargeweg

I6 A9 F8

Burgstraat*

F8

C Calvariebergstraat

F4

Christine D’Haenstraat

Emman. De Neckerstraat B5 Engelsestraat

F7

Engelstraat

G9

Esseboomstraat

I8

Eugeen Van Oyestraat

G14

E. van ‘t Padstraat

H12

Ezelpoort

C5

Ezelstraat

D6

I2 F

Camiel v/d Busschestraat J14

Filips De Goedelaan

B6

Begijnenvest

D12

H13

D11

C. v/d Walle de Ghelckestraat G14

Filips Wielantstraat

Begijnhof Bekeweg

B1

Carmersstraat

G6

Fonteinstraat

B10

Fort Lapin

H2

Freren Fonteinstraat

G9

Cesar Gezellestraat

H12

Bevrijdingslaan

A7

Chartreuseweg*

A14

Biddersstraat

E5

Colettijnenstraat

E12

Biezenstraat

D5

Collaert Mansionstraat

F5

Ganzenplein*

H9

Bilkske

H8

Cordoeaniersstraat

E8

Ganzenstraat

H9

Binnenweg*

G1

Coupure

G9

Gapaardstraat

G10

Biskajersplein

F7

Garenmarkt

F10

Garsoenstraat

C11

B10

Blankenbergse Steenweg A2 Blekerijstraat

I11

Blekersstraat

G7

Blinde-Ezelstraat

F9

Bloedput

B7 H13 D5 B10 C8



D Dampoortstraat Damse Vaart-Zuid Daverlostraat

J6 I3 H12

De Garre*

E8

Delaplacestraat (Julius)

J6

De Tuintjes

J4

Dhoorestraat Diamantslijpersstraat

I13 F10

E8

Geerolfstraat

F9

Geerwijnstraat

D8

Geldmuntstraat

D8

Generaal Lemanlaan

I12

Genthof Gentpoortstraat Gentpoortvest

Gotje

G5

Gouden-Boomstraat

B5

Gouden-Handrei

F6

Gouden-Handstraat

F6

Goudsmedenstraat Graaf Visartpark

F10 B6

Graaf De Mûelenaerelaan H2 Grauwwerkersstraat

D7

Greinschuurstraat

B9

Groenerei

G8

Groenestraat

C7

Groeninge

E10

Gruuthusestraat

E10

Guido Gezellelaan

B9

Guido Gezelleplein

E10

Guido Gezellewarande*

H7

Gulden-Peerdenstraat

I13

Gulden-Vlieslaan

C6

G. Vincke-Dujardinstraat* B4

C9

Haarakkerstraat

H4

Hadewijchstraat

F7 G11 F12

H13

Hallestraat

E9

Hans Memlinglaan

A7

Havenstraat Heilige-Geeststraat Helmstraat Hemelrijk

B10 G2 D10 D8 H5

Hendrik Consciencelaan B10 Hendrik Waelputstraat

A2

Hertsbergestraat

F8

Hoedenmakersstraat

E6

Hoefijzerlaan

B8

Hof Sebrechts Hoogste van Brugge Hoogstraat Hoogstuk

Kersenboomstraat* I E8

IJzerstraat

E3

Jagerstraat*

A14

Jakobijnessenstraat

F11

Jakob van Ooststraat

E7

James Wealestraat Jan Blockxstraat

C8 C10 F8 H10

E4 G12

Jan Boninstraat

D6

Jan Breydellaan

A8

Jan Miraelstraat

E6

Jan Moritoenstraat* Jan van Eyckplein

G13 F7

Jan van Ruusbroecstraat G13 Jasmijnstraat

H14

Jeruzalemstraat

G7

Joe Englishstraat

A4

Joost de Damhouderstr.

G7

Jozef Suvéestraat

Kruitenbergstraat

G9

Kuipersstraat

E8

Kipstraat

E7

Kwekersstraat

I8

Klaverstraat

D5

Kleine H. Geeststraat*

J

F9 A14

Julius Delaplacestraat

J6

Julius Dooghelaan

J5

Julius & M. Sabbestraat

F4

J. Van Praetstraat

J1

K

D10

Kleine Hertsbergestraat

G8

Kleine Hoedenmakersstr.* E6 Kleine Hoefijzerstraat*

C9

Kleine Kuipersstraat

C8

Kleine Nieuwstraat

F5

Kleine Sint-Amandsstr.*

E8

Kleine Sint-Jansstraat Klokstraat

B8 B10

Kloostermuur

J5

Koetelwijk

H2

Kolenkaai

C3

Komvest

E3

Konfijtstraat

I9

Koning Albert I-laan

A13

Koningin Astridpark

G10

Koningin Elisabethlaan

D4

Koningstraat Koolbrandersstraat

F7 D10

Koolkerkse Steenweg

I2

Koolstuk

J5

Koopmansstraat

I8

Kopstraat

D8

Korte Blekersstraat*

G7

Kalkovenstraat

D6

Korte Raamstraat*

F6

Kammakersstraat

B9

Korte Riddersstraat

F7

Kandelaarstraat

G8

Korte Rijkepijndersstraat*

Kantwerkersplein*

H7

Kapelstraat

E5

Kardinaal Mercierstraat

C4

Karel Defloustraat

A4

Karel de Stoutelaan

A6

Karel van Manderstraat

J5

Kartuizerinnenstraat

E9

Kartuizersstraat

J6

Kastanjeboomstraat Kasteelgeleed Katelijnestraat

E10 B1 E12

I6

C13

Ketsbruggestraat

Ieperstraat

Jozef Wautersstraat*

Haanstraat

Hauwerstraat

G

Geernaartstraat*

Giststraat

A10

H

C7

Bollaardstraat

Molenmeers

B9

Boudewijn Ostenstraat*

Buiten Smedenvest*

Boeveriestraat

E1

Kreupelenstraat

Boterhuis

E13

Blokstraat

Krakeleweg

D6 A10

Bargeplein

Bloemenstraat

I9

Gistelse Steenweg*

B

Beursplein

E12

Kazernevest

Gieterijstraat

E6

Beenhouwersstraat

Katelijnevest

G7

I1

D6

Beeldenmakersstraat

H9

Hoornstraat

J8

Azijnstraat*

Bapaumestraat

Gevangenisstraat

Hooistraat

Driekoningenweg*

Augustijnenrei

Balstraat

C4

I8

Dokwerkersstraat

J9

Balsemboomstraat

Dirk Boutsstraat

A4

G8

F5

Baliestraat

Gerechtshof

H11

Annuntiatenstraat

Bakkersstraat

Gerard Davidstraat

E3

Boomgaardstraat

Altebijstraat

Artoisstraat

E9

Diksmuidestraat

E7

Albrecht Rodenbachstraat* H7

Arsenaalstraat

Dijver

H6 Korte Ropeerdstraat*

H6

Korte Sint-Annastraat

G7

Korte Speelmansstraat*

H6

Korte Sportstraat Korte Vuldersstraat Kortewinkel Korte Zilverstraat Koudemarkt

J4 C10 E7 D8 F10

Kraanplein

E7

Kraanrei*

E7

L Lane

B9

Lange Raamstraat

F6

Langerei

G4

Langestraat

H8

Lange Vesting

A9

Lauwerstraat

A5

L. De Potterstraat

J1

Leemputstraat

B9

Leestenburg

H4

Leeuwstraat

D7

Leffingestraat

G8

Leliestraat

H14

Lendestraat

D10

Leo van Geluwestraat

A2

Leopold I-laan

A5

Leopold II-laan

C3

Loppemstraat

E9

Louis Coiseaukaai

G1

Luikstraat

D3

M Maagdendal Maagdenstraat Maalse Steenweg

E5 B10 J8

Magdalenastraat

A11

Mallebergplaats

F8

Marcus Laurinstraat Mariastraat

J6 E10

Maria van Bourgondiëlaan A6

G8

N Naaldenstraat Neststraat Nieuwe Gentweg

D7 C8 F10

Nieuwstraat

E9

Nijverheidsstraat

I10

Niklaas Desparsstraat

E8

Nikolaas Gombertstraat

D3

Noord-Gistelhof Noordstraat

E6 E11

Noordzandstraat

D9

Noorweegse Kaai

I3

O Oliebaan O.-L.- V.-kerkhof-Zuid*

H5 E10

Ontvangersstraat

D8

Oostendse Steenweg

A1

Oosterlingenplein

F7

Oost-Gistelhof Oostmeers Oost-Proosse Oranjeboomstraat* Oude Burg Oude Gentweg

F6 D11 H4 D10 E9 F11

Oude Zak

C7

Oude Zomerstraat*

E9

P Paalstraat

B9

Palmstraat

D8

’t Pand Pandreitje

F10 F9

Pannebekestraat

I1

Paradijsstraat

I4

Park

G9

Markt

E8

Meestraat

F8

Past. V. Haecke plantsoen* C6

Middelburgstraat*

F8

Pater Damiaanstraat

C7

Minderbroedersstraat

G9

Pathoekeweg

D1

G8

Paul Delvauxstraat

J1

Peerdenstraat

G8 H7

Minneboplein* Minnewater

E12

Moerkerkestraat

H9

Peperstraat

Moerkerkse Steenweg

J7

Peter Benoitlaan

A7

Moerstraat

D8

Peterseliestraat

H5




Philipstockstraat

E8

Sint-Brunostraat

Stijn Streuvelsstraat

I7

Wantestraat

Pieter Pourbusstraat

E7

Sint-Claradreef

E4

Stoelstraat

I7

Wapenmakersstraat

D10

Sint-Clarastraat

E5

Stokersstraat

Pijpersstraat

I8

Pleinstraat

B1

Sint-Gillisdorpstraat*

F5

Stoofstraat

Poitevinstraat

D6

Sint-Gilliskerkhof

F6

Strostraat

Potentestraat

A1

Sint-Gilliskerkstraat

F6

Sulferbergstraat

Pottenmakersstraat

D7

Sint-Gilliskoorstraat

F6

Potterierei

G4

Sint-Godelievedreef

J3

Predikherenrei

H9

Sint-Jakobsplein*

D7

Predikherenstraat

G8

Sint-Jakobsstraat

D8

Prinsenhof

D8

Sint-Jan in de Meers

Prins Albertstraat

J8

Sint-Jansdreef

A8

Prof. Dr. J. Sebrechtsstr. D12

Sint-Jansplein

F8

R Raamstraat

D6

Riddersstraat

F8

Rijkepijndersstraat

G6

Rijselstraat

A14

Robijnstraat

E7

Rode-Haanstraat

E7

Rodestraat

H7

Rolweg

H6

Rond den Heerdstraat

B1

Ronsaardbekestraat

H1

Roompotstraat

B7

Ropeerdstraat

G6

Rozemarijnstraat*

E8

Rozendal

C6

Rozenstraat Rozenhoedkaai Rubenslaan Rustenburgstraat

H14 F9 H13 A3

S Sasplein Schaarstraat Scheepsdalelaan

H3 G10 B4

Schottinnenstraat*

F6

Schouwvegersstraat

B8

Schrijnwerkersstraat*

F7

Schrijversstraat

E6

Schuttersstraat*

D6

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s-Gravenstraat

G3

Simon Stevinplein

D9

Singel Sint-Amandsstraat

A10 D8

Sint-Annakerkstraat

G7

Sint-Annaplein*

G7

Sint-Annarei

G7



C10

Sint-Jansstraat

F7

Sint-Jorisstraat

E6

Sint-Jozefsplein

H1

Sint-Katarinastraat

G14

Sint-Maartensbilk

B10

Sint-Maartensplein*

F7

Sint-Niklaasstraat

E9

Sint-Obrechtsstraat

C11

Sint-Pietersgroenestraat C1 Sint-Pieterskaai

C3

Sint-Pietersnoordstraat

B1

Sint-Pieterszuidstraat

C1

Sint-Salvatorskerkhof

D10

Sint-Salvatorskoorstraat D9 Sint-Walburgastraat

F8

Slachthuisstraat

B2

Sledestraat*

D6

Sluisstraat

F1

Smedenstraat

B9

Snaggaardstraat

H6

Spaanse Loskaai

E6

Spanjaardstraat

E7

Speelmansrei

C9

Speelmansstraat

H6

Speelpleinlaan Spiegelrei Spinolarei Spoorwegstraat Sportstraat

J10 F7 F7 B14 J5

G4

Weidestraat

E10

Werfplein

G7

Werfstraat

E12

Werkhuisstraat West-Gistelhof

T Ter Pannestraat Ter Lake

E3 G14

Ter Looigemweg

H1

Timmermansstraat

H8

Torenbrug*

F6

Torhoutse Steenweg* Tornooistraat* Tuiniersstraat Tuinstraat

A10 B5 J5 H14

Twijnstraat

F8

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Zand

C9

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Zweerd*

G9

V D2

Van Arteveldestraat

D1

Van Steenestraat

I13

Van Voldenstraat

B11

Veemarktstraat

C2

Veldmaarschalk Fochstr. D4 A14

Venkelstraat

H7

Verbrand Nieuwland

H8

Verversdijk

G7

Vestingstraat

F13

Violierstraat

G10

Vismarkt

Pedestrian/cyclist tunnel

A3

Wijngaardplein

D11

Wijngaardstraat

E11

H10

01

Conzett bridge

F8

01

C5

02

City gate-Ezelpoort

Administrative centre â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;t Brugse Vrije

G11

03

Bruggemuseum Gentpoort

B10

02

Exhibition centre College of Europe

G11

Willemijnplantsoen*

G11

Witteleertouwersstraat

G9

Woensdagmarkt

F7

Wollestraat

E9

Wulfhagestraat

C8

Wulpenstraat

H3

D7

Zevensterrestraat

C9

Zilverstraat

D9 D11

Zuidervaartje

J3

Zuidzandstraat

C9

Zeger Van Malestraat*

A6

Zuider Boomgaard

I14

Zwaluwenstraat

C3

04

F12

Vizierstraat

H10

E8

Vrijdagmarkt

C10

Vrijheidstraat

G14

Vuldersreitje

I7

Vuldersstraat

H8

Stalijzerstraat

G10

Stationslaan

A11

W

Stationsplein

C13

Waalsestraat

F9

Steenhouwersdijk

F9

Wagnerstraat

G12

Steenkaai

A3

Walplein

E11

Steenstraat

D9

Walstraat

E11

Sterstraat

F6

Walweinstraat

F3

I8

04

Courthouse

D10

07

Meeting Event & Congress Centre Oud Sint-Jan

D7

20

Bladelin Court

E9

22

Watervliet Court

F9

23

Perez de Malvenda

E7

11

Toll House

E7

24

House Ter beurze

F9

12

City hall

H4

25

BruggemuseumKoelewei mill

E8

13

City Halls

B6

15

Camper van overnight parking area

J7

26

City GateKruispoort

Swimming pool Jan Guilini

Railway station

D13

27

Gunpowder tower

Access road or entrance gates

E7

28

Burghersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lodge (State archives)

D11

01

Beguinage church

Bus stop De Lijn

D8

29

Princesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Court

D10

02

Episcopal Palace

Boats

E8

30

Deanery

H6

03

English convent

Horse-drawn cabs

E8

31

Provincial Palace

G4

04

Episcopal seminary

Sightseeing Line

I6

32

BruggemuseumSint-Janshuis mill

F9

05

Basilica of the Holy Blood

Two-way-trafďŹ c Parking area Coach park Camper van park

RELIGIOUS BUILDINGS

Zwarteleertouwersstraat G9 Zwijnstraat

B9

Cash machines

E5

Vlamingstraat

E9 Genoese Lodge (Saaihalle)

One-way-trafďŹ c

P A10

E7

03

No through trafďŹ c

F7

Willemijnendreef

Zonnekemeers

PUBLIC OR SEMIPUBLIC BUILDINGS

F9

Visspaanstraat

Vlamingdam

E6

D11

Zandstraat*

Pedestrian area or area with limited trafďŹ c

D4 F11

Wevershof*

Zakske

HISTORIC SITES AND PLACES OF INTEREST

D4

C11

Wijnzakstraat

Ring (road): two-way trafďŹ c

H14

Z

Vaartstraat

Veldstraat

F8

Westmeers

Wijnenburgstraat

KEY

G14

Boudewijn Seapark Brugge

B9

33

City gateSmedenpoort

G10

06

Church of the Holy Magdalena

Almshouses

C8

34

Minstrels Guildâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chapel

H7

07

Jerusalem church

E8

08

F9

35

Fish market

E13

36

Barge bridge

Saint Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chapel (Protestant Church & English Church)

F7

38

Old Toll house

B10

09

Capuchin monastery

B11

40

Dumery bell E9

10

Military chapel (Carthusian chapel)

Meeting point guides Bike Rental Public toilet Information ofďŹ ce

(*not indicated on the map)




C6

11

Oecuminical chapel

D6

12

Discalced Carmelites

G4

13

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12

Brewery ‘De Halve Maan’

I7

35

St George’s Archers Guild

C10

13

Concertgebouw (concert hall)

A11

36

Magdalena concert hall

Church of our Lady of the Pottery

A9

14

De Bond (cultural centre)

G4

37

Our Lady of the PotteryHospitaalmuseum

1

1

BruggemuseumCity Hall

2

2

A

E10

14

Church of our Lady

D7

16

Cinema Lumière

D6

15

Orthodox chapel (Saint Helen and Constantine)

D4

17

Art Centre De Werf (cultural centre)

Saint Anne’s church

E11

18

Diamond museum

G1

19

Entrepot (Youth and Cultural Centre)

G7

16

F6

17

Saint Giles’ church

B10

18

Saint Godelieve’s abbey

D7

D10

F7

F9

F7

E10

20

Saint Jacob’s church

E10

21

Bruggemuseum Gruuthuse

20

Saint Saviour’s cathedral

I6

22

Bruggemuseum Gezelle

Saint Walburgha’s church

D6

23

H7

24

Lace Centre

E10

25

Memling in Sint-Jan Hospitaalmuseum

E7

22

Free Evangelical church

B9

23

Chapel of our Lady of the Blind

39

41

Joseph Rylandt Concert Hall

BruggemuseumBelfry Choco-Story (chocolate museum)

C10

42

Klankentoren [Concertgebouw]

F7

43

Lumina Domestica

A14

44

Kinepolis Brugge

E7

45

Belgian Fries museum

Groeninge museum

19

21

E8

38

B

C

D

E

F

46

H

I

J

p.142/143

p.36

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

E8

G

6

p.26

p.144/145

p.16

7

7

Museum-Gallery Xpo Salvador Dalí 8

8

MARKT

9

9

P

1434 Centrum 't Zand

H7

27

D8

29

Organ hall (Music Academy)

I6

31

St Sebastian’s Archers Guild

F8

32

City Archives BruggemuseumLiberty of Bruges

CULTURE - MUSEUMS D10

01

E10

02

Arentshuis

D11

03

Beguine’s house

E8

04

Biekorf library

E7

06

Biekorf theatre (cultural centre)

E11

10

Bruggemuseum Archaeology

Bruggemuseum folklore

Wheelchair friendly

CITY CARD

10

10

11

11

12

12

Brugge City Card with free admission

STATION P

1500

13

E7

33

City theatre (cultural centre)

CITY CARD

13

Centrum Station + gratis bus

Brugge City Card discounts

N

Bogarden chapel

14

14 10mm = 100m

A



B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J


If you want to discover Bruges, this is the guidebook you can’t do without! • Three atmospheric walks past museums, monuments, famous locations and quaint corners • Fascinating interviews with well-known connoisseurs of Bruges on the city’s World Heritage, the Flemish Primitives and gastronomy, Bruges as a centre of culture and as a bike-friendly city • An overview of all places of interest, museums and attractions, including short descriptions and practical information • Everything you need to know about the Brugge City Card discount pass • A practical overall picture of Bruges’ culinary delights: restaurant addresses mentioned in the Michelin Guide, GaultMillau and Bib Gourmand • Suggestions for lovely souvenirs from Bruges that will enchant the home front • A list of the most charming and attractive cafés, restaurants and shops

Information Offices

More information

[Concertgebouw], ’t Zand Mon-Sun: 10.00 a.m.- 6.00 p.m.

Toerisme Brugge PO Box 744, B-8000 Brugge T +32(0)50 44 46 46 F +32(0)50 44 46 45 toerisme@brugge.be www.bruges.be/tourism

Railway Station, Stationsplein Mon-Fri: 10.00 a.m.- 5.00 p.m. Sat-Sun: 10.00 a.m.- 2.00 p.m.


Love Bruges 2011