Tenth Anniversary Photowalks, Volume 2

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VOLUME 2

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TENTH ANNIVERSARY

PHOTOWALKS

2010 - 2020

Photos from walks held on June 20th and 21st, 2020 Mon Repos Market Seaside Clock-Tower Canal #1 A

P R O D U C T I O N


GUYANA PHOTOGRAPHERS: Tenth Anniversary Photowalks, Volume 2 is compiled and edited by Fidal Bassier, Taijrani Rampersaud, and Michael C. Lam

Published by VISIONS Publication date: August 5, 2020

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GUYANA PHOTOGRAPHERS’ FACEBOOK GROUP All images are the copyright of the respective photographers. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission from the Publisher or the Photographer(s) whose works are portrayed. No image may be used without the permission of the respective photographer. Cover photograph by Dione Vanderhyden: Each day must end for a new one to begin.


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TENTH ANNIVERSARY

PHOTOWALKS VOLUME 2 - June 20th-21st, 2020

To commemorate the tenth Anniversary of the Guyana Photographers’ Facebook Group, we decided to hold a series of photowalks around Guyana. Photowalks are excellent because they enable photographers to meet in person, to share and learn from each other in real time, and, of course, to take photographs while participating in group activities. The resulting images usually convey differences in perspectives from photographer to photographer, even though many point their cameras at the same subjects. Furthermore, they serve to demonstrate the abilities of the photographers regardless of the device they use - whether they take pictures with a DSLR camera, a point-and-shoot camera, a mobile device, or some other instrument. This volume of Tenth Anniversary Photowalks contains self-curated images from the photographers who participated during the second weekend. It must be noted that all participants adhered strictly to national guidelines and safety measures regarding COVID-19. The organizers also helped to reinforce safety measures by planning simultaneous walks in different locations which resulted in smaller groups – this allowed for space (in open air) which ensured participants were scattered and social distancing was possible. On this second weekend, four walks were planned and executed. There were three walks on June 20, 2020: Mon Repos Market Walk led by Michael C. Lam, Seaside Walk led by Darrell Carpenay, and the Clock-Tower Walk led by Brian Gomes. On June 21, 2020, Tana Yussuff led the Canal #1 Walk. Following these walks on weekend two, the participants then selected a maximum of ten images from their haul to be published in this magazine. These pictures convey to others the experiences of each photographer on those walks. Even though they are being shared with the public through this publication, kindly remember that images remain the property of the respective photographers and should not be replicated in any form without their consent. We hope you enjoy these artistic insights into the lives of Guyanese and places in Guyana from these four unique locations!


Mon Repos Market Walk with Michael C. Lam

The Mon Repos Market, or if you prefer the correct name, the Mon Repos - La Reconnaisance N.D.C. Market, is situated at Mon Repos Village on the East Coast of Demerara, on the Rupert Craig Highway (at least, I think it is still called that at that point). The market consists of a few “portions.” There is the main building which houses a few hundred stalls (quite a nightmare to navigate during a pandemic). It also has a few stalls on the opposite side (northern) of the highway, several stalls to the east of the approach, and a tarmac going south that houses more stalls. As with many markets, it is a centre of commerce and trade, and also a meeting place. Although people (including the vendors) come from many places, from as far as Georgetown in the west to Mahaica, Mahaicony and Abary to the east, there is a sense of everyone being part of one “village.”

you can hear the sharing of stories between the vendors and buyers. Additionally, the semi-familial of how Guyanese people greet strangers are ever present: “aunty” or “uncle” and “pops” or “mods.” Although there were only two of us on this walk, we both approached it as a “street photography” outing, and concentrated on the people who made this place what it was. It is hard to walk through a market without seeing, identifying, and meeting various “characters.” This kind of environment can easily translate into powerful street photography images that transcend the usual and border on the sublime. We hope you enjoy what amounts to a brief but winding walk through a market in full swing on a Saturday morning - the different perspectives, the diversity of people, and the variety of scenes that we encountered.

Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Through the hustle and bustle of sales and bargains,

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Vendor, Mon Repos Market, E.C.D. © Darrell A. Carpenay


Mon Repos Market, ECD © Michael C. Lam

Heads a hundred © Michael C. Lam

Mon Repos Market Walk with Michael C. Lam

Distan Singh © Michael C. Lam

Eye Level, Mon Repos Market, E.C.D. © Darrell A. Carpenay

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2 4

Meat up © Michael C. Lam

The Butcher © Michael C. Lam

Duck Cartel, Mon Repos Market, E.C.D. © Darrell A. Carpenay


This Colour © Michael C. Lam

Mon Repos Market Walk with Michael C. Lam

Long Pig © Michael C. Lam

Street Corner Shoe Sale © Michael C. Lam

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Flaming the Bird © Michael C. Lam

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Unmasked Look © Michael C. Lam

Local Snacks, Mon Repos Market, E.C.D. © Darrell A. Carpenay

Darrell A. Carpenay and Michael C. Lam


Mon Repos Market Walk Two Images, specially from the leader of the photowalk

Michael C. Lam

Mon Repos Market Walk with Michael C. Lam

Walks of Life © Michael C. Lam

Handoff © Michael C. Lam

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Seaside Walk with Darrell Carpenay

The Seaside Walk took photographers on an afternoon walk along the seashore and seawall from the Seawall Bandstand to the Kingston Jetty in Georgetown - a popular stretch that’s known and loved by many Guyanese who frequent this area. Historically, this seawall was built to defend the coast against the Atlantic Ocean during the 1800’s, but it has also taken on another important role - providing a place for recreation and social gatherings for a multitude of Guyanese and tourists for generations.

Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

The Kingston Jetty and the Seawall Bandstand are connected through a beautiful stretch along the coast which, unfortunately, suffers from neglect and constant abuse by litterbugs. Regardless, Guyanese frequent the area for various reasons: exercise, relaxation, friendly gatherings, religious rituals, fishing, family outings, and romantic rendezvous. Also, it is a perfect location in Georgetown to witness stunning vistas during sunrise and sunset.

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Today, the bandstand is rarely used for its initial purpose, and, although it was adopted some years ago by the Guyana Police Force, it exists in disrepair.

Along the seawall tarmac, resilient benches proudly brandishing Guyana’s Coat of Arms survive in poor shape, faithfully providing seating for those who want to appreciate a view of the Atlantic Ocean and its vast horizon. Sea shells and smooth stones can sill be found on the beach for those who seek them out, and the jetties protrude into the ocean for anyone who wishes to risk a walk further out into the Atlantic. Children can still be seen playing with the waves as they rush in. People walk their dogs, or simply sit on the wall, enjoy the fresh air, and relax. For the second weekend of Anniversary Photowalks, organising and leading this walk was an easy choice. I believe we have a deep and important relationship with the seawall and the seashore - one that is many t i m e s t a k e n f o r g r a n t e d . F o r t u n a t e l y, a s photographers, we have the capability to record and portray the world in a way that can ignite new appreciation, and even change perspectives. Perhaps the following collection of images produced by the talents on this walk can do just that, and teach us to show a little more love to these remarkable spaces that provide us with so much.

Window of the Past, Seawall Round House, Kingston, Georgetown © Darrell A. Carpenay


Cyclists in the Sand, Kingston Beach, Georgetown © Darrell A. Carpenay

Guyana’s built heritage and cultural landscapes are changing. Regrettably © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

Seaside Walk with Darrell Carpenay

Past, Present and Future © Acacia Nobrega

the view most pay for is free for others © Dione Vanderhyden

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Kingston Beach © Acacia Nobrega

We want to be there and they want to be here © Dione Vanderhyden

Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Sailing into Harbour © Acacia Nobrega

Sunsets are nothing but cliches, juxtapose with the promise of tomorrow © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

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Life on the shore © Acacia Nobrega

Seascape with ship © Acacia Nobrega

Making a living © Acacia Nobrega

Front Row, Seawall Tarmac, Georgetown © Darrell A. Carpenay


....unwanted catch..useless bait © Dione Vanderhyden

Pelicans in the sea © Acacia Nobrega

Daniel 12:3 © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

Hinduism and the Environment: A conversation about responsibility and righteousness. © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

Seascape at Kingston Seaside © Acacia Nobrega

Seaside Walk with Darrell Carpenay

God is everywhere © Dione Vanderhyden

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Tight lines, warm breezes, good friends, good beer it doesn’t get any better© Tana Yussuff

Chanel © Dione Vanderhyden

Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Sunset at Marriott © Acacia Nobrega

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Bliss © Tana Yussuff

Stranded rope in the sand© Kenny Harrinaraine

Foot print of our group leader © Dione Vanderhyden


Trash supporting life forms.© Kenny Harrinaraine

Bird watching © Dione Vanderhyden

Seaside Walk with Darrell Carpenay

Discarded fishing net washed up at Kingston © Kenny Harrinaraine

Paradise © Dione Vanderhyden

Conversation, Seawall Tarmac, Georgetown © Darrell A. Carpenay

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

The horizon © Dione Vanderhyden

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Bandstand Sunset © Acacia Nobrega

(L-R) Darrell A. Carpenay, Tana Yussuff, Guneshwari Preiya Methuram, Kenny Harrinaraine, Dione Vanderhyden, Bryan Nobrega, Acacia Nobrega.


Seaside Walk Two Images, specially from the leader of the photowalk

Darrell Carpenay

Seaside Walk with Darrell Carpenay

Atlantic View - Seawall Tarmac, Georgetown © Darrell Carpenay

Human - Kingston Seawall, Georgetown © Darrell Carpenay

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Clock-Tower Walk with Brian Gomes

Stabroek Market, known to many locals as “Big Market”, is situated on the east bank of the mouth of the Demerara River in Georgetown, the capital city of our beautiful country, Guyana. Under the Dutch rule, Stabroek was the capital of the colony. The market has kept its’ Dutch name. Surprisingly, Stabroek was commissioned to be built while the country was under British rule and it was constructed by an American firm. The market area is a centre of commerce, not only serving as a place of sourcing produce, meat, linens, jewellery, and all manner of goods, but also as a main transportation hub in the city. In the vicinity, there are several minibus parks, car parks, and also a port for ferries and speed-boats to carry people, vehicles, and goods across the Demerara River.

Although I have done model shoots before, it was a great opportunity to get fellow photographers involved, and to see what they would make of the experience. From the market itself - with its many stalls “under the clock,” to the spiral climb within the tower itself, to the myriad views and the vistas seen from within the tower as well as from the top of the tower, it was quite an experience. We hope you enjoy the produce of our work, the images of a more than a century old structure, and the views from the clock-tower.

Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

One of the most notable features of the steel structure is the clock-tower. The clock-tower, with an on and off functioning clock, can be seen for quite a distance, making it a notable landmark.

Although regular tours are not arranged, it is possible to enter the clock-tower with permission from City Hall. With this permission in hand we ventured into the market and the clock-tower for a walk as part of the tenth anniversary celebrations for the Guyana Photographers’ Facebook Group.

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© Brian Gomes


Tower View, Stabroek Tower, Georgetown © Darrell A. Carpenay

A tale of beaten, burnt and damaged shields of war © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

© Brian Gomes

Clock peep hole © Tana Yussuff

Clock-Tower Walk with Brian Gomes

An ode to the light to end of the tunnel © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

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Hustle and bustle © Adrienne Gomes

Be humble. © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

'Big market side' © Adrienne Gomes

Umbrella Stores at Stabroek ©Troy AA Parboo

Panorama of Stabroek Square © Troy AA Parboo


Covid-19 Precautions © Tana Yussuff

Clock-Tower Walk with Brian Gomes

Pastry man © Tana Yussuff

Money gaffo mek © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

Under the Clock © Troy AA Parboo

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Linearity in Stabroek © Adrienne Gomes

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Bottom of the Bell POV © Troy AA Parboo

Demerara Offloading, Stabroek Tower © Darrell A Carpenay

Sexy Stabroek stairs © Adrienne Gomes

Stairs up To Stabroek Tower © Bianca R Campbell

Picturesque view of the surrounding landmarks around the Stabroek market area © Bryan Nobrega


Old Stairs But Still A Strong Stairs © Bianca R Campbell

St Georges Cathedral & City Hall among other buildings © Kenny Harrinaraine

Hustle and Bustle of the busy Stabroek market area © Bryan Nobrega

An Aerial view from Stabroek to the seawall © Bryan Nobrega

Stabroek Tower Bell © Bianca R Campbell

Parliament Building © Tana Yussuff

Clock-Tower Walk with Brian Gomes

Winding stairs; an unusual type of stairs © Bryan Nobrega

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

An Aerial view of the busy Demerara river hard at work © Bryan Nobrega

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St Georges Cathedral and City Hall among other buildings © Kenny Harrinaraine A speedboat making its way from Georgetown to Vreed-en-hoop © Bryan Nobrega

The view from the Stabroek clock tower looking west wards. © Kenny Harrinaraine

Parliament from Stabroek Tower ©Bianca R Campbell

The Stabroek Bell © Bryan Nobrega


A Landscape of The Parliament Building from above © Bryan Nobrega

A layout of the Georgetown skyline © Bryan Nobrega

Clock-Tower Walk with Brian Gomes

Demico to Durban park © Bryan Nobrega

City Hall from Stabroek Tower © Bianca R Campbell

The river and red © Adrienne Gomes

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

© Brian Gomes

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Capturing fatherhood © Adrienne Gomes

© Brian Gomes

The loner cloud © Adrienne Gomes

Circular Stair Case of Stabroek ©Troy AA Parboo

© Brian Gomes


(L-R) Standing : Acacia Nobrega, Bryan Nobrega, Bianca Campbell, Kenny Harrinaraine, Tana Yussu, Adrienne Gomes Kneeling: Darrell A. Carpenay, Guneshwari Preiya Methuram, Brian Gomes

Clock-Tower Walk with Brian Gomes

Š Brian Gomes

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Clock-Tower Walk Two Images, specially from the leader of the photowalk

Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Brian Gomes

© Brian Gomes

© Brian Gomes

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Canal #1 Walk with Tana Yussuff

The Canal #1 Conservancy Dam can be found about seven miles from the Bagotville Junction on the West Bank of Demerara. The Conservancy Dam is the last stop as you drive along the Canal #1 road. The participants arrived at the Dam at around 2:30pm and walked North along the Conservancy Dam. Little houses with their unique character line the right side of the dam. Although these houses along the dam had no electricity from the main grid, many had small solar panels on their roof and in their yards. Since the residents depend on the water from the conservancy for their daily activities, pipelines can be seen running from each house to the conservancy.

At the time of the photowalk there were many little stands along the road side selling pineapples and other fruits and vegetables; and some households were seen packing up tractors and trucks with pineapples to be transported to the markets.

Canal #1 Walk with Tana Yussuff

During the walk, the participants were greeted with friendly faces. Many children and youths were seen playing, swimming, and sitting along the dam -

enjoying the cool afternoon breeze. One of the residents invited us to visit her pineapple farm to take some pictures of the crop and wild owers. While chatting with her, she shared with the group a ripe pineapple from her farm and some fun facts about the way of life in Canal #1. She mentioned that many of the residents are farmers and that Canal #1 is the home of pineapples, jackfruit, and ground provisions. She also mentioned that pineapples are the preferred crop for this area because during the rainy season the land would be easily ooded; however, the pineapple plant can withstand water accumulation for about one week.

Resident Š Fidal Bassier

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Dragonfiles © Fidal Bassier

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White wing swallow © Tana Yussuff


Canal #1 © Troy AA Parboo

Cabbage palm tree by the Canal © Bianca R Campbell

The Girl & The Pup © Troy AA Parboo

Canal #1 Walk with Tana Yussuff

Blue skies & calm waters © Tana Yussuff

Boat ride © Fidal Bassier

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Heliconia Golden Torch © Troy AA Parboo

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Lonely Tree By the Canal © Bianca R Campbell


What’s in a name? © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

Canal #1 Walk with Tana Yussuff

Afternoon washdown © Fidal Bassier

Boats at canal number one © Kenny Harrinaraine

The Canal's Swallow © Troy AA Parboo

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

The in between © Troy AA Parboo

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Boat © Fidal Bassier

House By the Canal © Bianca R Campbell

Cottage © Fidal Bassier


Resident 2 © Fidal Bassier

A place to rest my head and call home © Guneshwari Preiya Methuram

Canal #1 Walk with Tana Yussuff

Riding on clouds © Fidal Bassier

Boys & bikes © Tana Yussuff

Afternoon meetings © Tana Yussuff

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Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Parked Boat on the Canal © Bianca R Campbell

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Life in the Country © Bianca R Campbell

Liming © Fidal Bassier

Canal #1 and Canal #2 both stretch from the Demerara River to the West Demerara Conservancy. Vibrant communities, comprising mostly farmers and rural housing, have flourished along these areas for many years. The older styled, wooden houses, which are dominant in the area, lend to a definite country-side feeling. The people tend to be very friendly, and a late afternoon trip to the ends of the Canals, at the edge of the Conservancy itself, can often avail you of a beautiful inland sunset.


(L-R) Standing : Kenny Harrinaraine, Fidal Bassier, Bianca Campbell, Darrell Carpenay, Tana Yussuff, Guneshwari Preiya Methuram Kneeling: Troy AA Parboo

Canal #1 Walk with Tana Yussuff

Joy ride © Fidal Bassier

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Canal #1 Walk Two Images, specially from the leader of the photowalk

Guyana Photographers’ Tenth Anniversary Photowalks VOLUME 2

Tana Yussuff

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Laundry Day © Tana Yussuff

Lonely Bench © Tana Yussuff


Our Walk Leaders Michael C. Lam Michael C. Lam is a Guyanese photographer. His influences include the work of Ansel Adams, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Darren Moore. The majority of his work tends to be high contrast black and white photographs, with a penchant for seascapes as evident in his Oniabo collection. In 2012, he co-exhibited with fellow photographer Nikhil Ramkarran in “Coastal Wanderings” at the National Gallery of Art, Castellani House. He was the Bronze medallist in the 2012 and 2017 Guyana Visual Arts Competition and Exhibition, short-listed in 2014. In 2014, he was the Chief judge for “Capture Guyana” photography competition. His work has been exhibited at Aljira, Newark, NJ; the Caribbean Cultural Centre African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI), New York; the Queens Central Library, New York; the Organisation of American States’ Twenty Fourth Inter-American Congress of Ministers & High-Level Authorities of Tourism (2018), Guyana Marriott Hotel. In 2016, he exhibited in VISIONS Exhibition 2016 and later helped to organise subsequent installments of the said exhibition.

Darrell Carpenay Darrell Carpenay is a part-time amateur photographer. He has lived most of my life in Georgetown, and began taking photography seriously in 2017. For the most part, his photos include street-photography, landscapes, and anything in between that captures his eye. His work was part of the VISIONS 2018 Exhibition.

Brian Gomes Brian Gomes is a Guyanese photographer. For many years, photography had been a hobby/side hustle for Brian. However, after losing his job in 2017, he made a decision to turn photography into his career, focusing on wedding photography/video. Over the years, he has ventured into many different genres of photography but is widely known for his work with nude art photography and the popular Made in Guyana nude calendar.

Tana Yussuff Tana Yussuff is an environmentalist by profession and has been lucky to travel to many remote parts of Guyana where her passion for photography developed. During her expeditions into the interior, she would use her camera phone to capture all of nature’s beauty. Her photographic eye has since grown to encompass Guyanese culture and environment while still taking pictures of the nature. She believes that we take pictures to record our personal view of the world.

Walk Leaders Biographies

Brian's work has been exhibited in the Organisation of American States (OAS) Indigenous Perspectives, twice in the Guyana Visual Arts Competition & Exhibition, Capture Guyana Photography Competition, and Visions Exhibition.

Tana has been an active member of Guyana Photographers’ Facebook Group for about one year now. 37


10 TENTH ANNIVERSARY

PHOTOWALKS VOLUME 2 - June 20th-21st, 2020

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P R O D U C T I O N