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Sruffing PHOTO ALBUM Vipin Vijay Photography (derived from the Greek photos- for “light” and -graphos for “drawing”) is the art


vipin vijay.v in 1694.[15] The fiction book Giphantie, published in 1760, by French author Tiphaigne de la Roche, described what can be interpreted as photography.

About me

[14] The discovery of the camera obscura that provides an image of a scene dates back to ancient China. Leonardo da Vinci mentions natural cameras

Photography is the result of combining several technical discoveries.

obscura that are formed by dark caves on the edge of a sunlit valley. A hole

Long before the first photographs were made, Chinese philosopher Mo

in the cave wall will act as a pinhole camera and project a laterally reversed,

Di and Greek mathematicians Aristotle and Euclid described a pinhole

upside down image on a piece of paper. So the birth of photography was

camera in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE.[8][9] In the 6th century CE,

primarily concerned with developing a means to fix and retain the image

Byzantine mathematician Anthemius of Tralles used a type of camera

produced by the camera obscura.

obscura in his experiments,[10] Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen) (965–1040) studied the camera obscura and pinhole camera,[9][11] Albertus Magnus (1193–1280) discovered silver nitrate,[12] and Georg Fabricius (1516–71) discovered silver chloride.[13] Daniele Barbaro described a diaphragm in 1566.[14] Wilhelm Homberg described how light darkened some chemicals (photochemical effect)

The first success of reproducing images without a camera occurred when Thomas Wedgwood, from the famous family of potters, obtained copies of paintings on leather using silver salts. Since he had no way of permanently fixing these reproductions (stabilizing the image by washing out the nonexposed silver salts), they would turn completely black in the light and thus had to be kept in a dark room for viewing.


Surfing Surfing is a surface water sport in which the wave rider, referred to as a “surfer”, rides on the forward face of a moving wave which is usually carrying the surfer towards the shore. Waves suitable for surfing are primarily found in the ocean, but can also be found in lakes or in rivers in the form of a standing wave or tidal bore. However, surfers can also utilize man-made waves such as those from boat wakes and the waves created in artificial wave pools. The term “surfing” refers to the act of riding a wave, regardless of whether the wave is ridden with a board or without a board, and regardless of the stance used. For instance, the native peoples of the Pacific surfed waves on alaia, paipo, and other such crafts, and did so on their bellies, knees, and feet. However, the modern day definition of surfing most often refers to a surfer riding a wave standing up on a surfboard, and this is also referred to as stand-up surfing. One variety of stand-up surfing is paddleboarding. Another prominent form of surfing in the ocean today is bodyboarding, when a surfer rides a wave either on the belly, dropknee, or sometimes standing-up on a bodyboard. Other types of surfing include knee boarding, surfmatting (riding inflatable mats), foils. Bodysurfing, where the wave is surfed without a board, using the surfer’s own body to catch and ride the wave, is very common and is considered by some to be the purest form of surfing. Three ma jor subdivisions within standing-up surfing are longboarding, shortboarding, and stand up paddle surfing (SUP), and these three have several ma jor differences, including the board design and length, the riding style, and the kind of wave that is ridden. In tow-in surfing (most often, but not exclusively, associated with big wave surfing), a motorized water vehicle, such as a personal watercraft, tows the surfer into the wave front, helping the surfer match a large wave’s higher speed, which is generally a higher speed than a self-propelled surfer can obtain. Surfingrelated sports such as paddleboarding and sea kayaking do not require waves, and other derivative sports such as kitesurfing and windsurfing rely primarily on wind for power, yet all of these platforms may also be used to ride waves. Recently with the use of V-drive boats, wakesurfing, in which one surfs on the wake of a boat, has emerged. The Guinness Book of World Records recognized a 78 feet (23.8 m) wave ride by Garrett McNamara at Nazaré, Portugal as the largest wave ever surfed.[1]


Beautiful

Surf


Deep Occean

Surf

First camera photography Invented in the first decades of the 19th century, photography (by way of the camera) seemed able to capture more detail and information

than

traditional

media, such as painting and sculpting.[16] Photography as a usable process goes back to the 1820s with the development of camera obscura in 1826.


Swell is generated when wind blows consistently over a large area of open water, called the wind’s fetch. The size of a swell is determined by the strength of the wind and the length of its fetch and duration. Because of this, surf tends to be larger and more prevalent on coastlines exposed to large expanses of ocean traversed by intense low pressure systems. Local wind conditions affect wave quality, since the surface of a wave can become choppy in blustery conditions. Ideal conditions include a light to moderate “offshore” wind, because it blows into the front of the wave, making it a “barrel” or “tube” wave. Waves are Left handed and Right Handed depending upon the breaking formation of the wave. Waves are generally recognized by the surfaces over which they break.[5] For example, there are Beach breaks, Reef breaks and Point breaks.

First camera photography Invented in the first decades of the 19th century, photography (by way of the camera) seemed able to capture more detail and information than traditional media, such as painting and sculpting. [16] Photography as a usable process goes back to the 1820s with the development of camera obscura in 1826.

The most important influence on wave shape is the topography of the seabed directly behind and immediately beneath the breaking wave. The contours of the reef or bar front becomes stretched by diffraction. Each break is different, since each location’s underwater topography is unique. At beach breaks, sandbanks change shape from week to week. Surf forecasting is aided by advances in information technology. Mathematical modeling graphically depicts the size and direction of swells around the globe.


The value of good surf in attracting surf tourism has prompted the construction of artificial reefs and sand bars. Artificial surfing reefs can be built with durable sandbags or concrete, and resemble a submerged breakwater. These artificial reefs not only provide a surfing location, but also dissipate wave energy and shelter the coastline from erosion. Ships such as Seli 1 that have accidentally stranded on sandy bottoms, can create sandbanks that give rise to good waves. [6] An artificial reef known as Chevron Reef was constructed in El Segundo, California in hopes of creating a new surfing area. However, the reef failed to produce any quality waves and was removed in 2008. In Kovalam, South West India, an artificial reef has, however, successfully provided the local community with a quality lefthander, stabilized coastal soil erosion, and provided good habitat for marine life.[7] ASR Ltd., a New Zealand based company, constructed the Kovalam reef and is working on another reef in Boscombe, England. Even with artificial reefs in place, a tourist’s vacation time can sometimes coincide with a “flat spell”, such that there are no waves available. Completely artificial Wave pools aim to solve that problem by controlling all the elements

GREAT SURF

that go into creating perfect surf, however there are only a handful of wave pools that can simulate good surfing waves, owing primarily to construction and operation costs and potential liability. Most wave pools generate waves that

In tow-in surfing (most often, but not exclusively,

are too small and lack the proper power to actually surf. The Seagaia Ocean

associated with big wave surfing), a motorized

Dome, located in Miyazaki, Japan, was an example of a surfable wave pool. Able

water vehicle, such as a personal watercraft,

to generate waves with up to 10 foot faces, the specialized pump held water

tows the surfer into the wave front, helping the

in 20 vertical tanks positioned along the back edge of the pool. This allowed

surfer match a large wave’s higher speed, which

the waves to be directed as they approach the artificial sea floor. Lefts, Rights,

is generally a higher speed than a self-propelled

and A-frames could be directed from this pump design providing for rippable

surfer can obtain. Surfing-related sports such as

surf and barrel rides. The Ocean Dome cost about $2 billion to build and was

paddleboarding and sea kayaking do not require

expensive to maintain.[8] The Ocean Dome was closed in 2007.

waves, and other derivative sports


This is My Ocean

Surf


Cure

Surfing The value of good surf in attracting surf tourism has prompted the construction of artificial reefs and sand bars. Artificial surfing reefs can be built with durable sandbags or concrete, and resemble a submerged breakwater. These artificial reefs not only provide a surfing location, but also dissipate wave energy and shelter the coastline from erosion. Ships such as Seli 1 that have accidentally stranded on sandy bottoms, can create sandbanks that give rise to good waves.[6] An artificial reef known as Chevron Reef was constructed in El Segundo, California in hopes of creating a new surfing area. However, the reef failed to produce any quality waves and was removed in 2008. In Kovalam, South West India, an artificial reef has, however, successfully provided the local community with a quality lefthander, stabilized coastal soil erosion, and provided good habitat for marine life.[7] ASR Ltd., a New Zealand based company, constructed the Kovalam reef and is working on another reef in Boscombe, England. Even with artificial reefs in place, a tourist’s vacation time can sometimes coincide with a “flat spell”, such that there are no waves available. Completely artificial Wave pools aim to solve that problem by controlling all the elements that go into creating perfect surf, however there are only a handful of wave pools that can simulate good surfing waves, owing primarily to construction and operation costs and potential liability. Most wave pools generate waves that are too small and lack the proper power to actually surf. The Seagaia Ocean Dome, located in Miyazaki, Japan, was an example of a surfable wave pool. Able to generate waves with up to 10 foot faces, the specialized pump held water in 20 vertical tanks positioned along the back edge of the pool. This allowed the waves to be directed as they approach the artificial sea floor. Lefts, Rights, and A-frames could be directed from this pump design providing for rippable surf and barrel rides. The Ocean Dome cost about $2 billion to build and was expensive to maintain.[8] The Ocean Dome was closed in 2007.


We

Surfing The value of good surf in attracting surf tourism has prompted the construction of artificial reefs and sand bars. Artificial surfing reefs can be built with durable sandbags or concrete, and resemble a submerged breakwater. These artificial reefs not only provide a surfing location, but also dissipate wave energy and shelter the coastline from erosion. Ships such as Seli 1 that have accidentally stranded on sandy bottoms, can create sandbanks that give rise to good waves.[6] An artificial reef known as Chevron Reef was constructed in El Segundo, California in hopes of creating a new surfing area. However, the reef failed to produce any quality waves and was removed in 2008. In Kovalam, South West India, an artificial reef has, however, successfully provided the local community with a quality lefthander, stabilized coastal soil erosion, and provided good habitat for marine life.[7] ASR Ltd., a New Zealand based company, constructed the Kovalam reef and is working on another reef in Boscombe, England. Even with artificial reefs in place, a tourist’s vacation time can sometimes coincide with a “flat spell”, such that there are no waves available. Completely artificial Wave pools aim to solve that problem by controlling all the elements that go into creating perfect surf, however there are only a handful of wave pools that can simulate good surfing waves, owing primarily to construction and operation costs and potential liability. Most wave pools generate waves that are too small and lack the proper power to actually surf. The Seagaia Ocean Dome, located in Miyazaki, Japan, was an example of a surfable wave pool. Able to generate waves with up to 10 foot faces, the specialized pump held water in 20 vertical tanks positioned along the back edge of the pool. This allowed the waves to be directed as they approach the artificial sea floor. Lefts, Rights, and A-frames could be directed from this pump design providing for rippable surf and barrel rides. The Ocean Dome cost about $2 billion to build and was expensive to maintain.[8] The Ocean Dome was closed in 2007.


Surfing The value of good surf in attracting surf tourism has prompted the construction of artificial reefs and sand bars. Artificial surfing reefs can be built with durable sandbags or concrete, and resemble a submerged breakwater. These artificial reefs not only provide a surfing location, but also dissipate wave energy and shelter the coastline from erosion. Ships such as Seli 1 that have accidentally stranded on sandy bottoms, can create sandbanks that give rise to good waves.[6] An artificial reef known as Chevron Reef was constructed in El Segundo, California in hopes of creating a new surfing area. However, the reef failed to produce any quality waves and was removed in 2008. In Kovalam, South West India, an artificial reef has, however, successfully provided the local community with a quality lefthander, stabilized coastal soil erosion, and provided good habitat for marine life.[7] ASR Ltd., a New Zealand based company, constructed the Kovalam reef and is working on another reef in Boscombe, England. Even with artificial reefs in place, a tourist’s vacation time can sometimes coincide with a “flat spell”, such that there are no waves available. Completely artificial Wave pools aim to solve that problem by controlling all the elements that go into creating perfect surf, however there are only a handful of wave pools that can simulate good surfing waves, owing primarily to construction and operation costs and potential liability. Most wave pools generate waves that are too small and lack the proper power to actually surf. The Seagaia Ocean Dome, located in Miyazaki, Japan, was an example of a surfable wave pool. Able to generate waves with up to 10 foot faces, the specialized pump held water in 20 vertical tanks positioned along the back edge of the pool. This allowed the waves to be directed as they approach the artificial sea floor. Lefts, Rights, and A-frames could be directed from this pump design providing for rippable surf and barrel rides. The Ocean Dome cost about $2 billion to build and was expensive to maintain.[8] The Ocean Dome was closed in 2007.


Sruffing PHOTO ALBUM

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