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HIS BOOKLET IS DESIGNED FOR ANYONE IN THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COMMUNITY WHO HAS BEEN IMPACTED BY PARTNER VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT OR STALKING. THESE FORMS OF VIOLENCE ARE REFERRED TO AS “POWERBASED PERSONAL VIOLENCE.” WE BELIEVE EVERYONE HAS THE RIGHT TO LEARN, LIVE AND WORK IN AN ENVIRONMENT FREE OF THREATENING AND VIOLENT BEHAVIOR.

THE STAFF MEMBERS OF THE VIOLENCE INTERVENTION AND PREVENTION (VIP) CENTER ARE AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU NAVIGATE YOUR OPTIONS AND PROVIDE SUPPORT ALONG THE WAY.

The VIP Center is located in the lower level of Frazee Hall. Hours: M - F 8:30 - 5:00 PM Phone: 859 - 257 - 3574 Email: vipcenter@uky.edu www.uky.edu/studentaffairs/vipcenter


In this booklet you will find information to help you better understand your options and resources in order to make decisions that are right for you.

CONTENTS What is power-based personal violence? 2-3 Frequently Asked Questions

4-9

What are some of my options?

10-18

Resources 19-25 Campus & Community Resources Directory 26-29

Safety Planning

30-33

Self-Care 34-37


What is power-based personal violence?

BASIC DEFINITIONS We all have ideas of what we think partner violence, sexual assault and stalking look like, but in reality it can sometimes be much more difficult to label violent or abusive behaviors.

PARTNER VIOLENCE: Physical, sexual, or psychological harm, or threat of harm, by a current or former partner.

SEXUAL ASSAULT: Any form of unwanted sexual contact ranging from touching to sexual intercourse.

STALKING: Repeated behaviors and actions targeted at a specific person causing fear for one’s safety.

2 More resources about stalking can be found on pages 23 - 25.


HOW DO I KNOW IF I’M EXPERIENCING POWER-BASED PERSONAL VIOLENCE (PBPV)?

PBPV can also include any other use of force, threat, intimidation or harassment such as sexual harassment, street harassment and hate crimes. If you or others you are concerned about are experiencing any of these behaviors, stop by or call 859-257-3574 to receive further information. www.uky.edu/studentaffairs/vipcenter

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Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT IS THE VIOLENCE INTERVENTION AND PREVENTION (VIP) CENTER? The Violence Intervention and Prevention (VIP) Center works with students, staff, faculty, and community partners toward the mission of eliminating the perpetration of power-based personal violence including sexual assault, partner violence and stalking. We are committed to ensuring that victims of violence are met with the very best support, compassion and services that are humanly possible - our passion is reducing the number of individuals who ever become victims of violence to begin with.

HOW CAN THE VIP CENTER HELP ME? VIP is a space for support and connection in whatever way you find most helpful. If you or someone you care about has been directly impacted by power-based personal violence, we are here to support you.

A VIP staff person is available to talk with you Monday-Friday 8:30 - 5:00 pm. You can stop by the VIP Center in the lower level of Frazee Hall, or call us at (859) 257-3574. You don’t need to have an appointment!

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WHAT DO I DO IF I, OR SOMEONE I KNOW, NEED TO TALK ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED?

Come by VIP anytime 8:30 - 5:00, Monday - Friday to speak confidentially with a staff person. There is no cost. You can share as little or as much as you want. We will listen and help you explore options and resources.

If you need to speak to someone right away when we are not open, here are 24-hour phone numbers you could call:

BLUEGRASS RAPE CRISIS CENTER 1-800-656-HOPE (4673) GreenHouse17

(formerly The Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program)

1-800-544-2022

WHAT CAN I EXPECT WHEN WALKING IN TO THE VIP CENTER FOR THE FIRST TIME?

People come to the VIP Center for many reasons. Many are wanting to get involved or learn more about us, and others walk in because they or someone they care about has been hurt by power-based personal violence. No matter your reason for walking in, expect to be warmly greeted and immediately connected to the resources you are seeking.

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I’D LIKE TO TALK TO SOMEONE ABOUT WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO ME. WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT? Each person will be the guide to the services they receive. We won’t press for details, force you to make a police report or direct you towards any services you don’t want. We will do whatever is necessary to provide you with the support you need. All staff members are also trained, confidential advocates and are full-time staff members, not students.

DO I NEED AN APPOINTMENT? No appointments are necessary. If you would prefer to set up an appointment, call 257-3574.

IS VIP ONLY FOR STUDENTS? No, we are able to serve anyone in the university community including students, faculty and staff who have been impacted by power-based personal violence.

WHO CAN I SPEAK TO CONFIDENTIALLY? At UK, you can speak to staff at the VIP Center and the Counseling Center confidentially. Other members of the UK community such as a Resident Advisor, Professor or Academic Advisor can provide support and information as well but may be obligated to report some or all of what you share to campus authorities.

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In the community, you can speak with the Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program and the Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center confidentially. Victim Services Advocates based in other agencies such as the police department will have limited confidentiality. Resources are listed in the back of this booklet.


WE CAN PROVIDE ADVOCACY, SUPPORT AND INFORMATION IN A VARIETY OF AREAS INCLUDING:

• Academic arrangements with you and your professors • Housing options • Health resources • Financial issues connected to power-based personal violence • Legal options; talking with law enforcement, following up on the status of a case, even going to court with you • Campus judicial options including campus no contact orders • Counseling and mental health referrals

We are here to listen, to hear your truth and help you navigate options. WHAT ABOUT MY FAMILY AND FRIENDS? It is completely your decision as to whether or not you want to discuss this with your family or friends. Family and friends can be a wonderful source of support but they may also struggle with their own response to your trauma. Even well-meaning loved ones can, at times, want to take charge of the situation for you, blame you or others, or not know how to help.

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At the VIP Center, we provide information, support and advocacy to family and friends as well as those directly hurt by violence. We understand the fear, anger and helplessness they may feel when a loved one is hurt. We are able to help family members and other supporters manage these painful emotions and learn more about how to be supportive of their loved one.

X Even if you aren’t ready or interested in pursuing services at this time, your loved ones are welcome to talk about their own needs with a VIP staff member in person or by phone.

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ARE THERE OTHER WAYS I CAN BE INVOLVED WITH VIP? We have a wide variety of ways to connect with VIP. You can participate in programs at VIP including workshops, art projects, photojournaling groups, Green Dot trainings, and volunteer programs.

GREEN DOT: A green dot represents any behavior, choice, word, or attitude that promotes safety for all of us and communicates utter intolerance for any form of violence.

ACTION: Reducing sexual assault, partner violence and stalking in our community means no one has to do everything - but everyone can do something to shape a violence-free campus.

CONNECTION: Everyone has a connection to this issue. Explore yours by getting involved with the VIP Center.

EMPOWER: Green Dot Training equips you with the skills and knowledge to transform your influence into green dots. Check out our website for dates.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR EVENT DETAILS AND INVOLVEMENT:

WWW.UKY.EDU/STUDENTAFFAIRS/VIPCENTER

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COULD THIS BE MY FAULT?

NO. We believe that no matter the circumstances, you are not to blame for someone else’s abusive or hurtful behavior.

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WE VALUE EVERYONE’S PERSONAL BILL OF RIGHTS I HAVE THE RIGHT TO: ASK FOR WHAT I WANT. SAY “NO” TO REQUESTS OR DEMANDS I CAN’T MEET. EXPRESS ALL OF MY FEELINGS, BOTH POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE. CHANGE MY MIND. MAKE MISTAKES AND NOT BE PERFECT. FOLLOW MY OWN VALUES AND STANDARDS. SAY “NO” TO ANYTHING WHEN I FEEL I AM NOT READY, OR IT IS UNSAFE OR IT VIOLATES MY VALUES. DETERMINE MY OWN PRIORITIES. NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR OTHERS’ BEHAVIOR, ACTIONS, FEELINGS OR PROBLEMS. EXPECT HONESTY FROM OTHERS. BE ANGRY AT SOMEONE I LOVE. BE UNIQUELY MYSELF. FEEL SCARED AND SAY “I’M AFRAID.” SAY “I DON’T KNOW.” NOT GIVE EXCUSES OR REASONS FOR MY BEHAVIOR. MAKE DECISIONS BASED ON MY FEELINGS. MY OWN NEEDS FOR PERSONAL SPACE AND TIME. BE HEALTHIER THAN THOSE AROUND ME. BE IN AN ABUSIVE-FREE ENVIRONMENT. MAKE FRIENDS AND BE COMFORTABLE AROUND PEOPLE. CHANGE AND GROW. HAVE MY NEEDS AND WANTS RESPECTED BY OTHERS. BE TREATED WITH DIGNITY AND RESPECT. BE HAPPY.

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RECEIVING THE SUPPORT OF AN ADVOCATE:

You may seek the support services of an advocate regardless of whether you choose to seek medical attention or report to the police or campus authorities. Advocates are able to help provide information, support, and assistance to get your needs met.

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WHAT ARE SOME OF MY OPTIONS?

All staff at our center are trained advocates you can speak to confidentially.

Advocates are also available through the following community agencies: (Additional contact information can be found on page 26)

Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center (BRCC) www.bluegrassrapecrisis.org

GreenHouse17

(formerly The Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program)

beyondtheviolence.com

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WHAT ARE SOME OF MY OPTIONS?

REPORTING TO THE POLICE: You have the choice of reporting this crime to the police. You may speak to the University of Kentucky Police Department or local city police. The police determine whether there will be an investigation in the police jurisdiction where the crime occurred. Interviews can often be done at the hospital, at the police station or at an advocacy center such as the VIP Center, BRCC or BDVP. You have the right to have an advocate with you during this process. Advocates can also help provide support and information as the case moves forward.

There are also additional crime victim services available at the following offices: • Fayette County Attorney’s Office - 859-254-4941 • Fayette Commonwealth Attorney’s Office - 859-246-2060 • Lexington Police Department - 859-258-3636

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REPORTING TO OTHER CAMPUS AUTHORITIES:

In addition to campus police, you are able to report what has happened to other campus authorities such as the Dean of Student’s Office and the Office of Institutional Equity and Equal Opportunity.

VIP is not a campus authority for reporting. An official report would need to be made directly to law enforcement or campus authorities. There are a number of policies in place to promote safety on campus. Depending on whether the offender is a student, staff, faculty or non-UK affiliated person, there are a variety of protective options available. VIP staff can help you navigate this process or you can contact these offices directly. Contact info can be found on pages 26-28.

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WHAT ARE SOME OF MY OPTIONS?

SEEKING MEDICAL CARE: Whether or not you choose to report to the police, you may choose to seek medical attention for any type of physical assault. You may decide to go to your personal doctor, University Health Service or a hospital emergency department. This would allow you to be examined and treated for internal or external injuries, sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy.

If you have experienced a sexual assault, you may also choose to have “forensic rape evidence collection� done as part of the exam. This type of exam is performed at the hospital and allows a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) or doctor to collect evidence to be used toward criminal prosecution. If you are unsure if you want to report to the police, you can still have the evidence collected so that it is available if you choose to report to the police later. You would not be billed for the evidence collection, but could be billed for additional medical services such as x-rays, ambulance transportation, etc. These additional charges could be processed through your insurance. If you are going to seek evidence collection, do not bathe, shower or douche so that physical evidence may be preserved. If changed clothing or taking other materials for evidence - place in paper bag or something other than plastic.

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A Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) is available to perform exams at the University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital Emergency Department (1000 South Limestone Ave., Lexington KY). If you would prefer to go to a different facility, be aware that all hospital emergency rooms can provide an exam and medical treatment for victims of sexual assault even if a SANE does not exist at that facility. Hospitals are required by law to contact a local rape crisis center advocate to be available to you during the exam. An advocate from the Bluegrass Rape Crisis Program should be automatically called by the hospital to offer information and support services.

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SEEKING A PROTECTIVE ORDER: Kentucky courts can issue a short-term Emergency Protective Order (EPO) when there has been the threat or act of violence to a member of one of the following types of relationships: • Current or former spouse • Current or former partners who live(d) together • Partners who have a child together • Close relatives (defined in statute) For more information about available protections and how to apply for a protective order, you can speak with an advocate at VIP or visit the following web pages: Office of the Fayette County Sheriff at www.fayettesheriff.com/epo.html

Office of Kentucky’s Attorney General at www.ag.ky.gov/criminal/victims/Pages/domestic.aspx

MANDATORY REPORTING Reports involving abuse or neglect of children, married partners, and physically or mentally vulnterable adults will also automatically be investigated by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

www.chfs.ky.gov

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OTHER RESOURCES TO KNOW ABOUT

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REMOVAL FROM CAMPUS DIRECTORY Contact information for students is listed in the UK Directory at: http://www.uky.edu/Directory/ A variety of information may be listed, such as local and home addresses, email addresses and telephone numbers. This information is publically available to anyone who searches the website directory. To have your listing edited or removed, bring a photo ID in person to the Registrar’s Office, Room 210 Funkhouser Building and complete a “Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information” form. Staff at the VIP Center are also able to assist you in this process.

VINE (VICTIM INFORMATION AND NOTIFICATION EVERYDAY) If someone who hurt you was arrested, it is important to register to be notified of their release from jail. Also, if you applied for an emergency protective order (EPO), you can register to be notified when the order is served on the respondent. Timely notification in both of these situations is an important part of your safety plan. You can sign up for either of these notifications online or by phone without the offender knowing you registered. Full instructions and information: www.vinelink.com or call 800-511-1670. Staff at the VIP Center are also able to assist you in this process.

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WHAT KINDS OF POLICIES DOES THE UNIVERSITY HAVE ABOUT VIOLENCE?

There are a number of laws and campus policies that give the University the responsibility to help those hurt by violence and hold offenders accountable.

SOME OF THESE INCLUDE: • UK Residence Life policies • UK Student Code of Conduct • UK Human Resources Policy and Procedure 2.0: “Equal Opportunity, Discrimination and Harassment” • UK Administrative Regulation 6:2 “Policy on Sexual Assault, Stalking, and Relationship Violence” • UK Administrative Regulation 6:1 “Policy on Discrimination and Harassment” • Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 • The Michael Minger Act • The Jeanne Clery Act

UK Regulations & Policy Library: www.uky.edu/Regs Staff at the VIP Center are also able to help you learn more about these and how they may apply to your experience.

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CRIME VICTIMS COMPENSATION Anyone who is a victim of a criminal act and has suffered physical or mental injury can apply to the Crime Victims Compensation Board for assistance, such as: • Medical expenses or other services (including mental health counseling) necessary as a result of the injury upon which the claim is filed. • Limited reimbursement for loss of earnings. • Replacement of glasses or corrective lenses, provided they were broken or damaged during the crime. For a full description of Crime Victims Compensation benefits or to obtain a claim form, call 800-469-2120 or go to www.cvcb.ky.gov Staff at the VIP Center are also able to assist you in this process.

LEGAL REFERRAL There may be additional court remedies related to employment, divorce, property damage, etc. These may involve hiring a private attorney.

Central Kentucky Lawyer Referral Service: http://www.fcba.com/cklrs.html Staff at VIP are able to share more information with you.

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notes:

STALKING Stalking is an often misunderstood crime that involves a variety of actions that, when taken as a whole, cause a reasonable person to feel fear. This can include unwanted behavior such as repeated phone calls or texts, following someone, or waiting for them outside of their residence hall, class or work. This can also occur online through social media, email or searching for personal contact information that is available online. Below are some resources to learn more about stalking. On the next page is a log to track unwanted behavior you may be experiencing.

OutrageUS - Stalking Project and Resources http://outrageus.org/

Stalking Resource Center

http://www.victimsofcrime.org/our-programs/stalking-resource-center

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When documenting stalking behavior, keep track of as much evidence as you can - even if you don’t have answers to all these questions. Each case is unique, and there is no set list.

DESCRIPTION OF INCIDENT AND LOCATION: Note what occurred, where and any action you took in response. WITNESS NAME(S) CONTACT: Who else was there? Was there anyone in the area who could have seen what happened? EVIDENCE COLLECTION: Keep any text messages, emails, notes, photos of damage, etc. or any other items. POLICE/OTHER AGENCY NOTIFIED AND THEIR RESPONSE:

Report taken? Evidence collected? Advice?

HOW THE INCIDENT AFFECTED YOUR LIFE: Note specific changes you’ve made as a result of this problem. Changes in, work, class, or social life. SPECIFIC FEAR AND EMOTIONAL IMPACT: Note your specific reactions to the situation to help others more clearly understand your experience and feelings.

There is printable version of this table on our website. If you want, use something like your cell phone and set up a notes page to keep track of the information. Use whatever is most convenient to help you. The format you document this in isn’t as important as making sure that you document what’s happened and the impact it’s had on your daily life.

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DATE

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TIME

DESCRIPTION OF INCIDENT & LOCATION:

WITNESS NAME(S) CONTACT:

POLICE/OTHER AGENCY NOTIFIED & THEIR RESPONSE:

Stalking Documentation Log SPECIFIC FEAR & EMOTIONAL IMPACT:

Created by Stalking Resource Center and Dr. TK Logan.

HOW THE INCIDENT AFFECTED YOUR LIFE:


CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES DIRECTORY

For a full list, talk to a VIP staff person or visit our website www.uky.edu/StudentAffairs/VIPCenter

Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center (24/7) Crisis line: 800-656-4673 or 253-2511

Provides 24 hour crisis line as well as a variety of advocacy and therapy services for those impacted by sexual violence. Advocates accompany survivors seeking forensic rape evidence collection.

GreenHouse17 (formerly The Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program) (24/7) Crisis line: 800-544-2022 Provides emergency shelter, 24 hour crisis line, counseling, support groups, legal advocacy, casework, and children’s services for those impacted by domestic violence.

UK Counseling Center (M-F, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm) Phone number: 859-257-8701

www.uky.edu/studentaffairs/counseling Provides individual therapy and a wide variety of groups are available to students.

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UK Police Department (24/7) Phone number: 257-UKPD (8573) or #UKPD (from a cell phone) www.uky.edu/Police

Takes reports and investigates crimes that happen on UK property. Offers S.T.A.R.R.: Self Defense Tactics and Risk Reduction for women ages 13 and up. Call 257-5770 for more information.

Safe Cats Phone number: 859-257-7233

Sunday - Thursday from 8:30pm to 1:30am www.uky.edu/Police/escort.html This is a free safety escort service sponsored by UKPD and operated by the Flying Wildcats Booster Club, a student organization of the Air Force ROTC. Escorts have undergone UKPD training and criminal background checks.

Lexington Division of Police (24/7) Phone number: 911 or 859-258-3600 (non-emergency business line)

Takes reports and investigates crime in Lexington. In cases of domestic violence, they also provide victims with legal options and assist in referrals.

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University Health Service (hours vary) Behavioral Health: 859-323-5511 Nurse Line: 859-323-INFO (4636) General appointments: 859-323-2778

For more details call or visit: www.ukhealthcare.uky.edu/uhs Offers a variety of behavioral health as well as medical services and treatment.

Dean of Students (M-F, 8:30 am - 5 pm) Phone number: 859-257-3754

www.uky.edu/StudentAffairs/DeanofStudents/ Handles a variety of student complaint issues, enforces the Student Code of Conduct and issues, and monitors Campus No Contact orders.

UK Office of Institutional Equity and Equal Opportunity

(M-F, 8 am - 5 pm) Phone number: 859-257-8927 www.uky.edu/Diversity

Handles a variety of complaints regarding employee and student-faculty issues, takes reports and investigates harassment and discrimination issues. Responsible for upholding the University’s commitment to equal opportunity for all members of the University community in academic programs, research, service and employment.

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Notes for other resources:

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SAFETY

PLANNING After a traumatic experience, we often lose our sense of safety. While it is important to remember that you are not to blame for someone else’s abusive or violent behavior, you can take action to keep yourself as safe as possible.

I WILL CALL 911 IF I FEEL MY SAFETY IS AT RISK. I will remember that the abuse is not my fault and that I deserve to be safe and healthy. 25 30


THESE ARE THINGS I CAN DO TO HELP KEEP MYSELF SAFE EVERYDAY: • Carry my cell phone and pre-program important telephone numbers. • Keep in touch with someone I trust about where I am or what I am doing. • If possible, alert residence life or campus police about what is happening so the person who hurt me is not allowed in my building. • Avoid places where the person who hurt me or their friends and family are likely to be. • Avoid speaking to the person who hurt me. If it is unavoidable, I will make sure there are people around in case the situation becomes dangerous.

THESE ARE THINGS I CAN DO TO HELP KEEP MYSELF SAFE IN MY SOCIAL LIFE: • Ask my friends to keep their cell phones with them while they are with me in case we get separated and I need help. • If possible, go to different malls, bars, banks, parties, grocery stores, movie theaters, dining halls, etc. than the ones the person who hurt me goes to or knows about. • Be aware of how to leave safely in case of an emergency. • Leave if I feel uncomfortable in a situation, no matter what my friends are doing. • If I plan on drinking, be sure to have a sober friend to help in a volatile situation. • Spend time with people who make me feel safe, supported and good about myself.

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THESE ARE THINGS I CAN DO TO HELP STAY SAFE ONLINE AND WITH MY CELL PHONE: • Keep my cell phone charged and pre-program important numbers. • Set all online profiles to be as private as possible. • Save any abusive, threatening or harassing comments, posts, or texts. • Not share my passwords with anyone. • If the abuse and harassment does not stop, change my usernames, email addresses, and cell phone number. • Not answer calls from unknown, blocked or private numbers. • See if my phone company can block the number of the person who is bothering me. • Check the UK Directory www.uky.edu/Directory to see what information about me is publicly available and contact the Registrar if I need to limit ir remove my information from the directory. • For a more extensive safety plan, visit our website You can also call 257-3574 or stop by the Lower Level of Frazee Hall to speak to an advocate about safety concerns and possible resources.

For downloadable resources: www.uky.edu/studentaffairs/vipcenter

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S G N I H T E LP R E A H SE O TO . E E F H T A D S F N L A E S IC Y PM E E K

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SELF CARE Self care includes any intentional actions you take to care for your physical, mental and emotional health. Good self care is a challenge for many of us and it can be especially challenging for survivors of violence and abuse. There are some ideas on the following pages to get you started in developing your own self care plan (an example is listed in each category). Since it can be overwhelming to consider taking on many new things, it may be helpful to start with just a couple of goals.

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Food: It may not always be possible to get 3 square meals a day but it’s important to get adequate nutrition. Example: Even if it’s a small amount, I will eat healthy snacks or meals. Exercise: Even if it’s just a quick walk at lunchtime, exercise can help combat feelings of sadness or depression and prevent chronic health problems. Example: I will go for a walk Tuesday and Thursday after I get out of my morning class. Sleep: Although everyone has different needs, most people need between 7-10 hours of sleep per night. Example: I will go to bed by 11:00 p.m. during the week so that I can get enough sleep. Medical care: Sometimes we put off getting medical care until problems that might have been relatively easy to take care of have become more complicated. Example: I will set aside money in my budget (or seek financial help) so that I can get my prescriptions filled every month. Counseling: This could mean seeing a psychologist, a clinical social worker, or therapist. Example: I will find out more about the UK Counseling Center so that I can decide whether this might be helpful for me. The VIP Center can help refer you to a counselor. The UK Counseling Center provides free services to UK students.

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Leisure activities: Take time to do things you enjoy such as seeing a movie or reading a book for fun. Be aware of things that take up a lot of your time but don’t support your self-care such as too much time on the internet, watching TV, or even sleeping. These can all be relaxing, enjoyable activities in moderation but can become a way of retreating and isolating yourself. Example: I will call up a friend and go see a fun movie. Friends: It’s important to make sure that the people in your life are supportive. Nurture relationships with people that make you feel good about yourself! Make spending time with friends and family a priority. Be wary of friends who never have time for you or anyone who dismisses or belittles your experience as a survivor. Example: I will spend time with friends every Saturday. If you have trouble finding people who can support your experience, consider joining a support group or getting involved with the VIP Center.

For more self care information, visit our website: www.uky.edu/studentaffairs/vipcenter You can also call 257-3574 or stop by the lower level of Frazee Hall to speak to an advocate about developing a personalized self-care plan. Make your self-care a priority, not something that happens (or doesn’t happen) by accident.

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MY Self-Care Goals

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VIP resource booklet