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VCC CLASSIFICATION VETERAN Vehicles constructed prior to 31stDecember1918 VINTAGE Vehicles constructed between1st January 1919 and 31st December 1931. POST VINTAGE Vehicles constructed between 1st January 1932 and 31st December 1945. POST WAR Vehicles constructed between 1st January 1946 and 31st December 1960 POST 60 Vehicles constructed after 1st January1961 provided that no vehicle is accepted for this class untilJanuary1st of the year that is thirty years after its original year of construction. FACTORY BUILT & HISTORIC RACING VEHICLES: As described in the club By-laws. PERIOD SPECIAL As described in the club By-laws

KING PIN

Official Publication of the King Country Branch of the Vintage Car Club of New Zealand Inc.

Insurance When you insure through Vero the insurance company which supports the Vintage Car Club of New Zealand through the International Rally, you are financial assisting your branch. Vero awards discount to the branches on a monthly basis. By ringing Vero on their 0800 658411 and quoting the Branch Number 300138 (This is also listed in the front of this Magazine.)

Leyland P 76

March 2019


KING COUNTRY BRANCH

Of THE VINTAGE CAR CLUB OF NEW ZEALAND. BRANCH OFFICERS 2018 -2019 PHONE NUMBERS CHAIRPERSON CAMPBELL WRIGHT VICE CHAIRPERSON STEVE MAUNDER SECRETARY NORMA DOUGHERTY TREASURER JULIE GILBERT CLUB CAPTAIN IVAN STEVENS KING PIN EDITOR NORMA DOUGHERTY VCC CERTIFIER WAYNE GILBERT LIBRARIAN COLIN MANNING CUSTODIANS STEVE MAUNDER ROB WHEELER NIC WATSON

896 6065 896 6828 896 8777 896 6942 896 8379 896 8777 8966942 895 8227 896 6828 895 8633

BRANCH POSTAL ADDRESS CLUBROOMS C/o Secretary, 176 Taringamotu Rd 34 House Ave, TAUMARUNUI Taumarunui 3920 E-Mail kingcountry@vcc.org.nz MEETINGS VERO INSURANCE Last SUNDAY of Month Branch Number 300138 at 2 P.M. Phone: 0800 658 411

Secretary Snippet’s Well, what a terrible few days we are having, with all the problems in Christchurch. This time I have prepared an article on the Leyland vehicles. Recently I sent you out information on the visit of Leyland group to Taumarunui and Ohura for the weekend. So there is a Meeting at 1p.m. Norma Hi, I have been talking to Wayne and there is a slight change to what he organised this month. The museum we were going to visit isn't available on that day, so I have arranged to visit a private garden at Ngakonui. We would like the meeting to be at 1.00 and then head to Ngakonui for a look around and afternoon tea of homemade Danish baking. I have said we will provide Tea, Coffee, Sugar and milk. Can you please put this in the bulletin please. Thanks Ivan.

Programme March 15th to 17th March Campbell Wright Leyland P 76 Visit to Taumarunui and Ohura

• Taranaki Branch Inc Invites participants, old and new, to their

1929 Dodge DA Five Window Coupe. By kind permission Johnston Collections.

The rally route this year will take all around the big hill in the middle of the province.


Rules, and featured front discs as standard on all models, recessed door handles and full-length side intrusion reinforcements on all doors. Transmissions for the car were all bought in from Borg-Warner Australia who were already also supplying transmissions to Ford and Chrysler.[2] Notwithstanding the advertising slogan ("Anything but average")[4][5] the P76's engineering followed conventional lines. It did offer a combination of features which were advanced in this category in Australia at the time: rack and pinion steering, power-assisted disc brakes, MacPherson strut front suspension, front hinged bonnet, glued-in windscreen and concealed windscreen wipers, as well as the familiar Australian-made Borg Warner gearboxes (including 3 speed column shift) and a live rear axle. Particular attention was paid to structural rigidity, a British Leyland engineering strength. This goal was aided by a conscious effort to reduce the number of panels needed to build the car's body — a remarkably low 215, reportedly only 5 more than for a Mini At the time P76 production ceased, Leyland was developing a V6 version to replace the E6 variant. The V6 was derived from the 4.4-litre P76 V8, with the two rear cylinders chopped off. Hello Fellow VCC Members. My son Alec and I are doing up a couple of Dodges, Alec’s 1925 has just wrecked a 20 inch steel disc rim, so we are desperately trying to locate at least one to get the vehicle back on the road. An extra 1 or 2 would be great so as to have a spare. As for my 1928 Fast Four sedan, I am currently looking for at least 2 x 19 inch split rims to fit onto the wooden spoke wheels.We would be keen to hear of any other spare Parts to suit the 1928 fast four and both 1924 and 1925 cars. If you would be so kind as to forward this message to your members at your next club meeting, we would be grateful. Kind regards, Simon O’Hara VCC member23/259 36 Ranfurly Street, Ph: 063708844 Solway Mob: 0211412332 Masterton

Leyland P76 P76 today The P76 continues to have a loyal following of owners who have great enthusiasm for the car. There are at least seven P76 owners clubs in Australia and New Zealand. The New Zealand P76 Owners' Club was founded in 1983. After production of the P76 ceased, Leyland Australia limited its local production to the Mini and Mini Moke, both produced at Enfield, along with commercial vehicles and buses.The Leyland P76 is a large car that was produced by Leyland Australia, the Australian subsidiary of British Leyland. Featuring what was described at the time as the "standard Australian wheelbase of 111 inches", it was intended to provide the company with a genuine rival to large local models like the Ford Falcon, the Holden Kingswood, and the Chrysler Valiant. But, due to the first real fuel crisis and demand far exceeding the supply, Leyland rushed the assembly process with the first of the P76s to come off the assembly line, resulting in poor build quality and some reliability problems. The combination of the rushed assembly, fuel crisis and strikes at the component manufacturers' factories, resulted in the Leyland P76 being labelled a lemon, despite receiving the Wheels magazine Car of the Year in 1973. By 1974, sales of the P76 had slumped and BMC decided to end the production of the P76. Although the P76 has been labelled a lemon in Australian motoring history, it has become an iconic Aussie car and has a loyal following. In 1969, Leyland Australia was given the goahead to build a large car for Australia. At the time of the car's launch, it was reported that Leyland Australia had an accumulated deficit equivalent to £8.6 million, and had borrowed the same amount. In 1969, Leyland Australia was given the go-ahead to build a large car for Australia.


At the time of the car's launch, it was reported that Leyland Australia had an accumulated deficit equivalent to £8.6 million, and had borrowed the same amount again in order to fund the development of the P76. The P76 was designed and built from scratch with a fund of only A$20m. This was also a decade of serious financial and operational challenges for the parent company back in Britain. Commercial success for this car was therefore seen as crucial to the survival of Leyland in Australia.[2] Launched in 1973, the P76 was nicknamed "the wedge", on account of its shape, with a large boot, able to easily hold a 44 gallon drum. Although station wagon and "Force 7" coupé versions were designed, these never went into mass production. The base model P76 Deluxe was differentiated from the higher specification models by the use of two rather than four headlights. Naming the P76The name of the P76 derived from the car's codename while in development (Project 76). The official line was that the P76 was an original Australian designed and built Large Family Car, with no overseas counterpart and that P76 stood for "Project 1976". The Rover SD1 (released in 1976) shared several engineering features with the P76 — including MacPherson strut front suspension, the aluminium V8 engine and a live rear axle. The P76 itself was, however, out of production by 1976. An alternative theory is that P76 were simply the first three digits of Lord Stokes' National Service number (Donald Stokes was Chairman of British Leyland at the time). Automotive forebears Before the P76, Leyland Australia and its corporate predecessor BMC (Australia) had not fielded a direct competitor in large-car sector, which then dominated the Australian car market. The P76 was intended to provide that competitor. Previously, BMC and Leyland had tried to compete in this market segment with the 1958 Morris Marshal (a rebadged Austin A95); the 1962 Austin Freeway and Wolseley 24/80 (the Freeway was an Austin A60 with Riley 4/72 tail lights, a unique full width grille and a 2.4-litre 6-cylinder

version of the 1622 cc B-series engine; the Wolseley was a 6cylinder version of the Wolseley 16/60); and the 1971 Austin "X6" Tasman and Kimberley(facelifted Austin 1800s with the 6-cylinder 2.2-litre E-series engine). Each of these cars was a compromise, and the motoring public largely rejected as challengers to the dominant local models. Nonetheless, the Freeway, 24/80 and the X6 each developed a loyal following. receiving the Wheels magazine Car of the Year in 1973. By 1974, sales of the P76 had slumped and BMC decided to end the production of the P76. Although the P76 has been labelled a lemon in Australian motoring history, it has become an iconic Aussie car and has a loyal following. therefore seen as crucial to the survival of Leyland in Australia.[2] Launched in 1973, the P76 was nicknamed "the wedge", on account of its shape, with a large boot, able to easily hold a 44 gallon drum. Although station wagon and "Force 7" coupé versions were designed, these never went into mass production. The base model P76 Deluxe was differentiated from the higher specification models by the use of two rather than four headlights Design and engineering. The shape was penned by Giovanni Michelotti.[3] The entry-level P76 featured an enlarged 2623 cc version of the 6-cylinder engine from the smaller Austin Kimberley and Austin Tasman. The top-of-the-line aluminium alloy 4416 cc V8 unit was unique to the P76, and was a derivative of the ex-Buick V8 that was powering the Rover 3500. Leyland Australia cited a weight advantage approaching 500 lb (230 kg) for the P76, most of which was attributed to the lighter weight of the aluminium engine block when compared to the cast iron blocks (with bigger displacements) of the V8s from Chrysler, Holden and Ford.[2] It was hoped that the weight advantage would feed through into superior fuel economy and extended tyre life.[2] Nevertheless, the car was a full-size car in Australian terms, for which class leading boot/trunk capacity.

Profile for Vintage Car Club of New Zealand

King Country VCC - March 2019  

King Country VCC - March 2019