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“Dripfeed” NEWSLETTER OF THE BANKS PENINSULA BRANCH OF THE VINTAGE CAR CLUB OF New Zealand (INC) VOLUME 42, No 7 august, 2019 Editor: Michael Williams 10 Selwyn Parade Lyttelton Ph 328 8043, email mimiandmichael@yahoo.co.nz

Chairman: Secretary:

Club Officers: Craig Keenan 322 1006 Ron Hasell 942 1105

Branch Address: 27 Showgate Ave, ChCh 8042 E-mail: bankspeninsula@vcc.org.nz Noggin & Natter: 2nd Thursday of the Month • •

Noggin 7.30 pm at the Papanui RSA. Upham Room – enter either from 55 Bellvue Ave or the first entrance on the left on Harewood Road (Papanui / Main North Road) Thursday 8th of August We look forward to seeing you there. Supper is provided.

From the Editor: Craig Keenan is recovering slowly and steadily from his major operation, but is still many weeks away from driving, so he’s catching up on his reading, and welcomes visitors. In last month’s issue I said that Ron Hasell needed help with aspects of speed events. Ron has asked me to point out that he’s quite capable of the paperwork side of things, and what we actually need as a branch is a speed steward. Training is available, travel expenses are paid, and Craig and Ron are very happy to help new people. If we want speed events to continue, we really do need a new speed steward, so please give this matter some serious thought. Another blunder from last month’s issue concerns the Ferguson Rolls Royce that participated in the Night Trial. John and Christine have a few of these great behemoths, and they are hard enough to identify in daylight, let alone at night. The Night Trial car was not a Phantom, but a 1935 25/30 HP Gurney Nutting Limousine, and I received an hilarious email from Chris Ferguson pointing out the error of my ways. I feel that my education is now complete. There was some interesting follow up to the assertion in last month’s issue that John Newell had in fact driven an Austin 7 at 100mph. Mike Crehan, who was in the vicinity at the time and thus knows


the car, thinks that Tim Jones was probably looking at the rev counter, and that the car was definitely going down hill, in more ways than one. And even John thinks it was more like 90mph. Gavin Bain recently took his Frazer Nash to the UK, France, and Italy for some serious motoring with about 20 other F N enthusiasts, and he and the lovely Sharon enjoyed a mostly trouble free run. In fact the only mechanical trouble encountered was when Gavin, in a spirit of intellectual curiosity, decided to see if the Frazer Nash might run better on diesel. It didn’t take long for him to discover that the experiment was a failure, and after a longish period on the side of a motorway, sucking and blowing to clear the triple SUs without swallowing, they were on their way rejoicing. Neither the car nor Gavin seem to have suffered any long term damage. Talking of France, I recently received some photos from David Oakley, from Ashburton. He’s been in France and was watching some car racing in Caen. It was a street race, with a field of MGs and Mini Coopers, and then a motorbike race, with older bikes, and best of all, a Velo Solex. And even better, there were hay bales at the end of the straight. Clearly, the EU isn’t as regulated as the Tories think. The late Ted Loversidge left behind a lot of great memories, one of which George Calder thought members might appreciate, as you will see below. Ted also left behind his MGs, and Gavin Bain has been asked to dispose of them. There is a1929 M type, and Ted’s first car, a 1924 PA. Both are partly restored, to put it tactfully. There is also a “kitset” J2, needing much work. And to go from the sublime to the ridiculous, in a startlingly new low point for Dripfeed, I have been asked to advertise Ted’s 1991 Nissan Sentra. It’s red, with grey interior, unmarked body, and a towbar. It’s a 5 door hatch, a 5 speed manual, has 3 months reg and a very recently expired wof. Eligible for Canterbury Branch runs in two years. Offers over $500 will be considered. MG people could get two for the price of one here. Buy the Nissan and use the towbar to tow home the MG of your choice. Or better still make an offer for the whole lot and you might get the Nissan for free. Or buy the Nissan and get a free MG. The possibilities are endless really, and I’m sure that Ted would find it most amusing to know that his old friend Gavin Bain, who has been asked to conduct negotiations, is being forced to wax lyrical about a Nissan. So if you are interested in any part of this eclectic offering, contact Gavin at 13 3299712. A letter from George Calder I was sorry to hear of the passing of Ted Loversidge who was a good friend over many years. We shared similar reading interests so regularly supplied each other with books on subjects which we could then debate. Ted had strong views on many subjects. I have a fun Ted story to share which I will always remember him by. I was invited to go on a ‘Grey Beards’ midweek run with Ted, in the MG NA, which I thought would be exciting and as it turned out to be. Ted was well kitted out in his usual tweed plus driving gloves even though it was a hot day. The noise level of the car was a combined racket of mechanical, supercharger, exhaust and the smell of hot oil. Ted’s driving style was very animated with elbows out wide which didn’t leave much room for me in the passenger seat. My top half was mostly out the side while I endeavoured to hear Ted’s continuous shouting commentary about what was going on and what he thought of other motorists driving! The Grey Beards outing concluded with a few noggins at a country pub and then we headed off to drive home only to run into a Booze bus check point. As we queued up Ted became even more animated doing huge throttle blips and waving his arms and shouting to get the attention of the Officers , where- upon one came running down the line to see what the problem was. Ted told the Cop, in no uncertain terms, that he couldn’t be in a queue because he didn’t have a fan and his engine would overheat and seize up and it would be their entire fault etc etc! So the somewhat anxious looking Cop said, “Well you better get going” and waved us through. Ted just took it all in has stride as he got what he wanted, i.e. no blow up of his engine or in the bag and he was still King of the road!


Coming Events. Canterbury Branch Daffodil Run, 25th of August. This starts from Cutler Park between 9 and 10 am. There are a variety of runs of about one hours duration, with one slightly longer touring run, and they all finish back at Cutler Park where lunch is available. Registration for the day is $10, and of course all money raised goes to the Cancer Society. For further information, contact Colin Hey at heywolseley699@gmail.co or at 3598737.

CMRC Brooklands, Levels, 31st of August, 10.30am. Garage Raid, Sunday 1st of September. Starting at Auto Restorations at 1.00pm. This is our Daffodil Run for the Cancer Society, so bring along some money for a generous donation to this worthy cause.

Opening Run, 29th of September. Waimate 50, 60th anniversary, 26th & 27th of October. Past Events, Awards Dinner, 12th of July. Held at the Tai Tapu Hotel, this entertaining evening was to present 50 year awards to Derek Upton and Len Rickard, and 60 year awards to Gavin Bain, Alan Meredith and Clive Dodds. Michael Lavender, the National Secretary/Treasurer was on hand for the presentations. Garry Moore was meant to get a 50 year award, and we sent his name off, but were told by head office that he had resigned from the VCC in 1981 for two years. Garry confirmed this, and explained that it followed a major disagreement with the late Rob Shand over the Springbok tour. Shand banned Garry from Strathconan, and since Irishman always ended up there, also said that if Garry set foot on the place he would ban the whole Irishman event from using his property. Garry resigned as a matter of principle, and rejoined three years later, thus his membership was not consecutive. Ramon Farmer was most disappointed when he heard this news, as like all of us, he was looking forward to Garry’s speech. However, the other speeches were very entertaining. Clive Dodds was unable to be present, but Len, Alan and Gavin spoke about various motoring experiences they had had over the years. Len started off with a Wolseley 8, Gavin with a 1924 Humber, and Alan with a veteran Humber. All emphasised the friendship and fun they had enjoyed over their many years of motoring. Derek Upton, the incurable motorcyclist, said he wasn’t any good at speeches, so sent me his in written form. “It all started legally in 1947 when at 16 I got a motorcycle licence and a 1936 250cc BSA. Bikes were my sole transport 365 days of the year, all weathers until I came here in 1958. This gave me a tally of ten lots of snow and ice, two of them being North German winters as a “Don R” thanks to the RAF Regiment and a nice new Triumph. As I am still getting out on a modern machine this gives me 72 years on two wheels. I’ve ridden in trials, rallied and raced, and pioneered trail riding with the Bob Burns group. I’ve ridden in thirteen countries, and fallen off in a few! The thing about motorbikes is that they are international


and inter generational, however old or young the rider is, there is ready contact, including breaking down language barriers. For instance I chatted in pidgin and hand waving in Djakarta with a group of locals and took a small Gilera for a gallop, leaving my wife as a deposit. I did tend to regard cars as a motorised raincoat. I did restore a car, a 1939 Ford 8 which in spite of my protests, all you experts believed to be a Ford Popular. It wasn’t. I agree it was pretty awful and could only be classified as grey porridge. At least it was reliable and kept the rain out, but it wasn’t much fun and as I liked being married it had to go and I spent more money on flying, a childhood dream that came true. I last flew an Alpha with an instructor in April this year, not bad for an 88 year old eh?” Derek writes “The Mutterings of a Mature Motorcyclist” in Beaded Wheels, AKA Big End Knocks. The picture is of him falling off again, but he got back on the bike, and got up the hill on the second attempt.

The Balcairn Trial. July is always a tense time for the doughty organisers of Balcairn. Sticky, muddy and slippery surfaces are needed, so the amount of rain that falls on the Flemings farm at Balcairn is crucial for a competitive event. With three days to go the farm was a parched wilderness, but the heavens opened on the day before the big day, and the organisers spent a suitably devious time in steady rain, setting up the course. Came the dawn however, and even steadier rain overnight had turned the parched wilderness into tropical swamp and continuing rain in the morning meant that many of the entrants decided to stay home by the fire, leaving a much smaller field than usual to battle for the Old Boot. There were the usual group of optimistic entrants, with Avon Hyde determined as always to defend the trophy. Dave Palmer in his rebuilt Hillman Special was quietly confident. The car did have a pre war Minx dashboard and a Minx motor but the rest of it was made of bits he found at work. Pothunter Peter Thwaites was feeling very positive because his Morris Special thing had finally qualified to be in the LWB class. Last year only one side was the required 90 inches long, but with the use of washers, wheel angles and low animal cunning, the other side stretched to the 90inch mark, meaning he could challenge the Dawber boys in their Pontiac Special for the Big Boys Trophy. Balcairn is a traditional event in that we usually do the same six courses, but after some constructive suggestions last year, we included two new ones, just to keep everyone on their toes. However we always start with Flemings Flanders, which generally sets the tone for the day. Dave Palmer and the Hillman Special scored 20, impressive given the conditions, and the gauntlet had been thrown down , with Damon Rose and Avon Hyde looking suitably peeved. The hardest thing about events two and three was getting there, as the overnight rain had turned the track up the hill to thick mud and some of the 4WD vehicles couldn’t manage it, particularly a fairly new V8 Jeep Cherokee. Sympathy was in short supply. Eventually everyone made it, with the aid of long tow ropes, and surveyed the new courses. Tension was palpable as Rhys Jones, in his much used and abused Austin Big 7 chugged off first into the unknown. The unknown was in fact a clay lined pond/dam which had been fairly dry when we set out the course, but was now wet and sticky. This was a technical course, more about navigation and car placement than lots of revs, so the high revs brigade had low scores because they hit or missed markers. Avon Hyde got 20 of course, by going very slowly, as did Brad Govan in the A7 Hawke. A popular course which will become a fixture.


Event three, Scotlands Joy had also changed overnight from a slightly boggy course to driving through a flowing stream, but the first few cars scored well as they crossed it numerous times, As the ruts became deeper, the mud got thicker, the scorers got lower and the crowd got noisier. The high point for many, considering that it was raining steadily, was when Kevin Tucker, in an A7, all the way from Greymouth and thus used to driving rain, got stuck in a particularly deep rut. The experienced SWB Land Rover driver attached a tow rope and began to pull. There was movement, but it was vertical as both vehicles sank even deeper. Another Land Rover, LWB this time was attached, but it too sank into the primeval ooze. The crowd was going wild. Finally a Range Rover, on firm ground, was attached to a very long tow rope and the combined might of approx 7,700cc managed to pull out 750cc from the mire, like a cork from a bottle. After lunch Jelfs Shelf was the challenge, but the historical ruts that have been there for years were deeper than the lines on Winston Peters’ face and were filled with so much water that once again, the sympathetic organisers took pity on the Austin 7s and found a new route which was challenging, and once again about navigation, not revs. It culminated in an ascent up a very steep bank which Avon Hyde cleared, but he had zigged instead of zagged en route to the summit and lost vital points. The top contenders scored well, so the scores were fairly even. Event five, Fendalton Road was partially under water. The markers, which are about 90cm high started on the edge of a dryish pond, and the course carried on through a swampy bit, and finished with a steep climb. But overnight the markers in the pond became submerged, so a new starting point was quickly set up, which became deceptively slippery very quickly and yet again favoured those who started early. The steep climb at the end kept scores reasonably low. The final event, Newells Nemesis, was particularly slippery, and even the hardened professionals could only manage 15 or 16 instead of the normal 20, As with all the events, starting order is vital, and is of course what makes Balcairn so wonderfully unfair. If you start in the first five or six you are mostly guaranteed to get a good score. Start in the last five or six and the opposite applies. A great leveller for all concerned. So one of the muddier Balcairns drew to a close, and everyone squelched off to the Anglers Arms at Sefton to dry out. The Spirit of the Day Award went to Alan Giles from Greymouth. Although he finished mid field in his very tidy A7, Alan was easily the best dressed competitor. Clad in an immaculate white shirt, bow tie and top hat with matching braces, he cut an impressive figure, at least initially, until everything turned a muddy grey. Peter Thwaites did indeed achieve his life long dream of winning the LWB class, after three years of trying. However, the overall winner was Dave Palmer from Nelson in his Hillman Special, with 109 points. Damon Ross, another Nelsonian was second with102, and Avon Hyde third with 96. So the Old Boot goes to Nelson for the year.


Balcairn 2019 Results

Class D Rank Number Name 1

Morris

Short

No

C

Class D Total Class Stage 1 12 0 6

Pontiac

Long

No

D

9

7

5

4

3

6

34

34

15

3

Ford 10 Special Austin Big 7 Austin 7 Austin 7 Austin 7 Austin 7 Morris 8 Hillman Special Austin Special Pontiac

Short

No

C

18

20

8

8

15

13

82

82

6

6

Short

No

C

9

6

5

3

5

3

31

31

16

13

Short

No

C

9

14

9

3

6

13

54

54

11

10

Short

No

C

17

15

8

11

5

14

70

70

8

8

Short

No

C

9

11

5

6

17

13

61

61

10

9

Short

No

C

19

14

20

17

18

14

102

102

2

2

Long

No

D

9

14

8

6

17

13

67

67

9

1

Short

No

C

20

17

20

19

19

14

109

109

1

1

Short

No

C

19

20

20

7

15

15

96

96

3

3

William Long No Dawber Jared Morris Short No Dacombe Jason Ford 10 Short No Roberts Special Ian Gilmour Austin Short Big 7 Brent Austin Short No Woodhouse 7 Neil Elder Morris Short No

D

6

6

6

3

5

13

39

39

13

2

C

9

17

6

16

17

7

72

72

7

7

C

18

17

12

6

18

13

84

84

5

5

No

C

4

Gordon Dacombe Harry Dawber Brad Govan

5

Rhys Jones

6 7

Kevin Tucker John Fowler

8

Allan Giles

9

Damon Rose Peter Thwaites Dave Palmer Avon Hyde

2

11 12 13 17 18 20 21 22 24 Classes A B C D

Photos courtesy of John MacDonald

Make

Class C Total Short/Long

Registered?

9

Stage 2 5

0

Overall Rank Class C Rank Stage Stage Stage Stage Total 3 4 5 6 5 9 37 37 14 12

4

13

13

17

14

C

9

14

20

16

16

14

89

89

4

4

C

9

11

8

6

5

14

53

53

12

11

Standard Car. Short wheelbase - 90 inches or less - with registration and WOF. Standard Car. Long wheelbase - Over 90 inches - with registration and WOF. Trials Car. Short wheelbase - 90 inches or less - These are strictly off-road vehicles. Trials Car. Long wheelbase - Over 90 inches - These are strictly off-road vehicles.


Profile for Vintage Car Club of New Zealand

Banks Peninsula VCC - August 2019  

Banks Peninsula VCC - August 2019