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In This Issue: Chaplain’s Corner | Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration | COMPACFLT Message | Movie Schedule

Vol 03 No 10 | January 22, 2012

Vinson’s Sailor of the Year ABF1 (AW/SW) Robert STATAM STORY BY

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MC2 (SW) Byron C. Linder | Carl Vinson Staff Writer

arl Vinson’s 2011 Sailor of the Year (SOY), Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) 1st Class (AW/SW) Robert Statam, attributes his success to a simple three-step process he learned when he joined the Navy in 2000 and reported to his first command, the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7). “I came in as a young kid from the south side of Chicago, and I had a hard time adjusting to the Navy. My division officer was my first mentor, and he pulled me to the side and told me this was really, really easy,” Statam said. “He gave me three basic rules: come in to work on time, show up in a clean uniform, and do as you’re

told. You can go far in the Navy with that.” With that foundation laid, the 29-year-old Air Department V-4 Division night check supervisor reported to Carl Vinson in December, 2008 as a second class petty officer. He still adheres to his first mentor’s words of wisdom. “Without him, I probably wouldn’t even be in the Navy anymore. He put me on the right path. Everyone really needs a mentor,” he emphasized. “People tell you to get your qualifications and your warfare pins, but if you don’t have that end goal, then it’s just a lot of confusion without a mentor to help you figure out what to do to CONTINUE ‘SOY’ ON PAGE 2 Photo by: MC2 (SW) James R. Evans | Carl Vinson Staff Photographer


Vinson Voice

2 FROM ‘SOY’ ON PAGE 1

achieve that goal.” Statam’s path to SOY had a significant roadblock when he was denied a Perform to Serve (PTS) quota as a second class. “After I got my seven looks, they told me I had to go home. There’s no worse feeling than being told you have to go home before you want to. I had invested eight-and-a-half years of my life here, and I took the news hard,” Statam said. “Then I found out I made first class off the last cycle, and they put me back into the system.” Statam was selected for advancement to first class in 2010. A glitch in the PTS system didn’t properly load those chosen for advancement, and since Statam was on his last look for PTS, he received a final denial notice. The command career counselor notified the enlisted community manager (ECM) that Statam’s frocked status was not reflecting correctly on his PTS application. The ECM updated the system. At the time, an automatic PTS quota for making rank within 12 months of a Sailor’s soft end of active obligated service (SEAOS) date was not publicized. A memorandum was released shortly afterwards confirming an in-rate quota for Sailors advancing within 12 months of the SEAOS. Statam received his PTS approval the following month. Despite the hardship, Statam remained focused and maintained his tenacity and strong work ethic, which Master Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (AW/SW) Robert Everson, Air Department’s leading chief petty officer identified as key character traits. “He’s always following up. Not only does he task, but also he verifies all tasks are complete. He has a very deep passion for his Sailors. He’s always making sure he’s setting them up for success in getting their qualifications, and they work hard in the rate,” Everson said. Emerging from the shadow of PTS, Statam had one more hurdle to overcome – the enlisted review board (ERB), which included the ABF rating. “When the results came out, he was not selected for separation. So that shows what hard work, dedication and perseverance can do for you,” Everson observed. “The ERB was another nail-biter. I knew I’d worked my hardest, but any time you go before a board, you don’t know where the numbers are going to fall,” Statam added. “I was on leave, and someone called to tell me that no one in my division for E-6 and

ABF1 (AW/SW) Robert Statam, assigned to Air Department’s V-4 Division, monitors list control in console control room No. 2 aboard Vinson. Photo by MC3 (SW) Christopher K. Hwang.

above had been kicked out, and that was a big relief.” With a 3rd Quarter 2011 Sailor of the Quarter award in the books, Statam was in the running for SOY. But he did not take the competition lightly. “It was a shock just to be considered. When I went for the board, I was in awe of the whole process. I was really nervous with the command master chief sitting there,” Statam revealed. “But once they started asking me questions, I felt like I had a shot at this.” “The competition was so tight but I knew he had a strong chance because he had a strong SOY package,” Everson added. As V-4’s night check supervisor, Statam oversees the division’s maintenance and equipment pre-checks for the day shift’s flight operations. V-4’s work schedule, he said, does not ease with no-fly days. Incinerators, jet testing, and the forward and aft diesel spaces require fuel, and the ship’s catapults require lube oil. “With us, it never ends,” Statam laughed. “We constantly have to work.” In addition to in-rate proficiency, Statam makes mentoring and training his junior Sailors a priority. “It’s all about mentoring them and getting them to achieve some of the things I achieved. It’s on me to lay the path out,” he said. “We’re becoming a smaller Navy now, and I want my guys to be trained up as much as possible to do as much as they

can.” V-4 Division’s response to his leadership has been extremely successful, Everson observed. “He’s a superb leader. If you talk to the Sailors in V-4, you’ll see none of them have anything bad to say about Statam. They all know he has their best interests at heart,” he said. “V-4 has had little to no liberty incidents my entire time onboard. When they do get in trouble, they come to him almost in tears because they felt they let him down. That shows what type of leader he is.” Statam’s selection as Carl Vinson Sailor of the Year means an increased pressure to represent the carrier well. “At the Hong Kong reception, I was introduced to some Chinese police officers as the Sailor of the Year, the best Sailor on the ship,” Statam said. “It’s not just a title. It’s a day-to-day expectation to be the best Sailor. You have to be constantly squared away, and you have to be doing the right thing because you can’t be hypocritical. It’s a lot of pressure, but I welcome it. It’s not very often an ABF gets an accolade like that.” Statam said his next goal was to earn the rank of chief petty officer his first time up this year. His mentor gave Statam a strong endorsement. “I see a great chief petty officer in the making. I think he’ll represent the ABF community and the chief ’s mess well once he gets there,” Everson said.


January 22, 2012

A NOTE FROM

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Have A Healthy Marriage

Lt. Thomas Cook | CVW-17 Chaplain

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hat defines a healthy marriage is not the absence of conflict, but how you deal with the conflict.  Conflict is a natural part of relationships.  If two people never disagreed, what would be the need for the other?  The Christian concept for this comes the Jewish saying, “iron sharpens iron”.  The concept of yin and yang also echoes this truth. So how do we make conflict positive? Active Listening.  You have to listen if you are going to understand where the other person is coming from, and more importantly, what the issue is.  Rarely is the thing you are fighting about the issue.  You and your spouse are going at it with verbal knives, and somebody breaks out a handgun.  Then you escalate from small arms to crew serve weapons, then to light artillery, air-to-ground munitions, until finally someone picks up the red phone and takes the nuclear option.  When you both calm down, someone has the good sense to ask, “What were we fighting about?”  Active listening involves not just listening to the other person, but hearing what they are saying so as to repeat back to them what they said.  A good rule of thumb is to simply tradeoff paraphrasing what the other has said.  “So what I hear you saying is that if I leave my dirty socks on the floor one more time, you might build a bonfire out of them in the backyard.” Stop the chaos.  There is a concept called the circle of chaos, which is that amazing trap we find ourselves in when we refuse to love the other or honor them, because we ourselves are not getting what we want.  This is different than co-dependence.  We are talking about withholding love, not just sex, as punishment.  This will push you headlong into the nuclear option.  Agree to never withhold your love from one another, and stop the circle of chaos. Don’t escalate.  A part of stopping the chaos is not engaging in escalating the conflict.  Productive conflict yields issues and plans for how to deal with those issues, while escalation only makes the conflict more heated.  Escalation comes in many forms, among them is remembering past wrongs as well as exaggeration of those wrongs.  “You always…” and “You used too…” are forms of escalation.  Active listening forces you to address the issue instead of escalate, and it also deflates the anger because both of you feel listened to when it is done properly.  You have to avoid trying to win the argument, and focus on trying to solve the problem(s). When I marry people, one of the things I ask them is, “What would it take for the two of you to divorce?”  Most people head straight to the adultery clause of the contract, while some also mention physical abuse as a non-starter. In

my mind, if it’s important enough to get divorced over, don’t you think it should have been discussed before the marriage? So barring those issues, NEVER use divorce as a conflict resolution tool.  No one gets married to get divorced, but little decisions along the way open the door for people to say, “Maybe we were not meant to be together.”  That is self-fulfilling prophecy that you have just willed to happen by saying it. Now it is not my intention to poke anyone in the eye for getting divorced.  I have lived long enough to know it happens, and I have watched some really good people go through divorce.  Some of you are going through it right now.  You have worked at it and you experience a great deal of relief at finally letting go.  I will never advise people to get divorced. There are plenty of people available who will guide you that way.  I will advise separations, especially when someone is in danger.  What I want for people is the peace of knowing that they did everything they could to save their marriage. Let go of control.  Worry about what you can control.  It is hard working on your marriage so very far away from home, but you are not alone.  It will not be easy, and there is no guarantee you will save your marriage in the end.  Will it hurt less to cut ties now as opposed to later if you are unable to work things out?  You might lose some money, but you can always make more money.  Is the potential for resurrecting your marriage worth a few dollars and sleepless nights in the end?  I always tell people that when deployed the three nonnegotiables are the welfare of your family, the overall welfare of your finances, and your ability to do your job.  If you find any of these things in real jeopardy you may have to make choices that will push your spouse or you to end the marriage. Gain perspective.  You have been deployed a lot in the past three years, and you need to have a proper perspective on how that affects your marriage.  We know from countless years of deploying that there is an emotional cycle involved in the process.  Prior to deploying, couples begin to experience an emotional distance as the reality of an imminent physical separation sets in.  After deployment there is a honeymoon phase and then transition as you adjust to being back home.  In this deployment, and the one previous, many of you have not experienced the transition phase.  You have gone from honeymoon to distance phase on two occasions and stayed in the protective distance phase for most of that time.  Perspective like this will help you and your spouse, hopefully, to at least agree that this has not been an ideal situation and to make a point to work on yourselves while deployed, and your marriage when you are home again.


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Vinson Celebrates

Vinson Voice

Martin Luther Kin Martin Luther K

are a much better, stronger society, people and country today as a result of his tireless sacrifice. We consistently learn from each other and each other’s ideas. The larger the pool of ideas, he Foc’sle, with its retro paintings symbolizing the better people we become.” Vinson’s past, was a perfect setting for Vinson’s Dr. LaBranche said we owe it to Dr. King and our forefathers to, Martin Luther as Mahatma Gandhi King, Jr.’s birthday said, “become the “He gave us the ability to work celebration Jan. 20. change we want to and live in an environment free of The events, see in the world” and sponsored by CSG discrimination. I submit that we are a pay forward their 1 and Vinson’s much better, stronger society, people efforts and continue American Heritage work for a better and country today as a result of his to Obser vance society. tireless sacrifice. We consistently C o m m i t t e e According to Chief (AHOC), began Hospital Corpsman learn from each other and each with a cake-cutting other’s ideas. The larger the pool of (SW/AW) Webster ceremony on the Nicholson, Dental ideas, the better people we become.” ship’s mess decks Department’s leading and an evening chief petty officer and | Capt. Richard A. LaBranche, Commander, CVW-17 | the AHOC president, program in the ship’s forecastle celebrating Martin during which spirits were high as Vinson Sailors were Luther King, Jr.’s birthday seemed especially appropriate on afforded a chance to break from their responsibilities this deployed aircraft carrier because all Carl Vinson Sailors for a brief moment and celebrate the birth and life of an show the same courage Dr. King demonstrated. American hero. Vinson’s Commanding Officer, Capt. Kent “Dr. King stepped out and took a challenging and dangerous D. Whalen, addressed the small gathering that included the role to speak up when a lot of people were afraid,” Nicholson Commodore, Deputy Commodore, Executive Officer, and said. “The Gold Eagle, Quicksand Team is doing the same Command Master Chief. thing – we’re out here in harm’s way, promoting freedom and Whalen highlighted Dr. King’s respect for Mahatma setting the example for the world.” Gandhi and belief in non-violence, and the importance of As Dr. King said, “Human progress is neither automatic nor Martin Luther King, Jr. Day itself. inevitable … Every step toward the goal of justice requires “It was changed from a holiday to a day of service in sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,” Whalen said. “This passionate concern of dedicated individuals.” AHOC reminded is in keeping with one of his tenets, that in coming together Sailors to carry on the legacy of Dr. King, even thousands of we can more effectively serve one another. He was a big miles from home and loved ones. proponent of service in a joint community.” This tenet was continued in the evening’s program, themed “Remember, Celebrate, Act: A Day On, Not a Day Off ”. AHOC members performed a skit depicting the nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Ala. during the spring of 1963 and the eventual creation of the Civil Rights Act. The AHOC band performed “Mercy, Mercy Me” by Marvin Gaye and Sam Cooke’s “A Change is Gonna Come” a cappella. Capt. Richard A. LaBranche, commander of CVW-17 and the night’s keynote speaker, conveyed what Dr. King’s life and message meant to him. “He saw injustice and engaged, regardless of the cost to himself,” LaBranche said. “He was a man of enormous character and that’s what I revered most about him.” LaBranche noted diversity in the Navy would not be possible without Dr. King’s efforts. Sailors aboard Vinson share ice cream with CMDCM (AW/SW) April Beldo during the Martin Luther King, Jr. “He gave us the ability to work and live in an environment Day cake-cutting ceremony on the ship’s aft mess desks. free of discrimination,” LaBranche said. “I submit that we Photo by MC2 (SW/AW) Lori D. Bent.

STORY BY

MC3 (SW) Luke B. Meineke | Carl Vinson Staff Writer

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January 22, 2012

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ing, Jr. King, Jr. Top: The AHOC band sings during the Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration aboard Vinson. Photo by MC2 (SW) James R. Evans. Left: Rear Adm. Thomas K. Shannon and HMC (SW/AW) Webster Nicholson cut the cake at the Martin Luther King, Jr. cake cutting celebration aboard Vinson. Photo by MCSN Andrew K. Haller. Right: An AHOC member holds up a sign during a skit at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration aboard Vinson. Photo by MC2 (SW) James R. Evans.

Top: A sailor holds an event program for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration aboard Vinson. Photo by MC2 (SW) James R. Evans. Right: Capt. Richard A. LaBranche, CVW-17 commander and keynote speaker, gives a speech during the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration aboard Vinson. Photo by MC2 (SW) James R. Evans. Bottom: Sailors aboard Vinson observe a presentation during the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration. Photo by MCSN Andrew K. Haller.


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A Message From

Vinson Voice

Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet

Adm. Cecil D. Haney

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am grateful and exceptionally humbled to assume command of U.S. Pacific Fleet today. We have a rich history in Asia Pacific and under Admiral Walsh’s leadership, Pacific Fleet has advanced our enduring relationships throughout the region and furthered the principles of freedom, security, and prosperity. The momentum we have gained, the trust and confidence we have earned, and the relationships we have nurtured with our partners and allies, have directly enhanced our cooperative maritime strategy. I thank Admiral Walsh for his 34 years of honorable and dedicated service to our Navy and our nation and I wish both he, and the entire Walsh family, the best as they begin the next chapter of their lives. Our national leaders have stressed the importance of Asia Pacific and together with our allies and partners, we will continue our commitment to maritime security and freedom of the seas in this vital region. We tangibly demonstrate this commitment through credible, purposeful forward presence. Our presence must prioritize the current war-fighting readiness necessary to operate as an effective force across the full range of our maritime strategy. The readiness, resilience and sustainability of our fleet rely on the continuing innovation, determination, and focus of Sailors, Navy civilians, and our families. The unwavering support we provide them will be essential to meet the demands placed on them. Rest assured, in their capable hands, properly trained and equipped, the Pacific Fleet will be fully capable of decisive operations, ready for every mission. Thank you for your dedication and for the sacrifices you and your families make daily. I look forward to meeting the challenges ahead together. Keep charging! -Adm. Cecil D. Haney, Commander U.S. Pacific Fleet

Naval Missions and Heritage Naval Missions and Heritage

Taken from the 24th edition Blue Jackets’ Manual

Code of Conduct - Article 2

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“ will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist.” You must not surrender unless you have no other choice except senseless death. As long as you have the ability to resist being captured, either by engaging the enemy in combat or by evading, you must do so. If your continued resistance would result in your death and it would serve some useful purpose to the mission (such as delaying the enemy from taking an

important position or providing additional time for others to escape), then you should not surrender. But if your continued resistance would result in your death and have no effect on the outcome of the mission, then surrender is acceptable. This responsibility extends to anyone in command as well. The commander must not surrender the people in his or her command unless they can no longer fight or avoid capture and the only other choice is for them to die for no useful purpose.


NOW PLAYING CARL VINSON CINEMA

January 22, 2012

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CHANNEL 6

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ALL REQUEST Call J-6789

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PG&PG-13

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A request will only be taken when the previous movie’s credits start rolling. Requests are first come, first serve. Once a request has been made, no more requests will be taken until another movie is over. Make sure you request a movie rating appropriate to the channel. 0815 0840 1030 1230 1415 1645 1845 1915 2045 2245 0045 0230 0500

THE 70 SWEET HOME ALABAMA SUPER 8 TORPEDO RUN ANGELS AND DEMONS ROCKY THE 70 APOLLO 18 SWEET HOME ALABAMA SUPER 8 TORPEDO RUN ANGELS AND DEMONS ROCKY

THE 70 HORRIBLE BOSSES 500 DAYS OF SUMMER BURN AFTER READING BROTHERS THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW THE 70 DEATH AT A FUNERAL HORRIBLE BOSSES 500 DAYS OF SUMMER BURN AFTER READING BROTHERS THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW DEATH AT A FUNERAL

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THE 70 BAD TEACHER DEFINITELY MAYBE THE GHOST WRITER DEATH RACE UNITED 93 THE 70 TAKEN BAD TEACHER DEFINITELY MAYBE THE GHOST WRITER DEATH RACE UNITED 93 TAKEN

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THE 70 PATRIOT GAMES WEATHER GIRL IT’S COMPLICATED DEATH SENTENCE OCEAN’S THIRTEEN THE 70 HANNAH PATRIOT GAMES WEATHER GIRL IT’S COMPLICATED DEATH SENTENCE OCEAN’S THIRTEEN

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THE 70 THE HANGOVER 2 MARS ATTACKS! EASY A FORGETTING SARAH MARSHALL A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN RUN FAT BOY RUN THE 70 THE HANGOVER 2 MARS ATTACKS! EASY A FORGETTING SARAH MARSHALL A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN FINAL DESTINATION (2009)

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THE 70 INDIANA JONES: TEMPLE OF DOOM U-571 STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS BABYLON A.D. EVERYBODY’S FINE THE 70 FOOTLOOSE INDIANA JONES: TEMPLE OF DOOM U-571 STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS BABYLON A.D. EVERYBODY’S FINE FOOTLOOSE

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THE 70 PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES THE SOCIAL NETWORK THE SPIRIT THE GOLDEN COMPASS THE INVENTION OF LYING THE 70 LEATHERHEADS PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES THE SOCIAL NETWORK THE SPIRIT THE GOLDEN COMPASS THE INVENTION OF LYING

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THE 70 MADE OF HONOR TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON MEET DAVE THE PINK PANTHER 2 RUDY THE 70 THE WEDDING SINGER SPEED RACER TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON MEET DAVE THE PINK PANTHER 2 RUDY

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THE 70 PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN: DEAD MAN’S CHEST GREEN LANTERN AUSTIN POWERS 3: GOLDMEMBER AMELIA BIG MOMMAS HOUSE THE 70 ZOOKEEPER PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN: DEAD MAN’S CHEST GREEN LANTERN AUSTIN POWERS 3: GOLDMEMBER AMELIA BIG MOMMAS HOUSE

THE 70 A PERFECT GETAWAY LIONS FOR LAMBS WEDDING CRASHERS TABLE FOR THREE SURROGATES THE 70 SALT A PERFECT GETAWAY LIONS FOR LAMBS WEDDING CRASHERS TABLE FOR THREE SURROGATES SALT

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THE 70 ALICE IN WONDERLAND X-MEN AIRPLANE! CONTAGION DUPLICITY GUADALCANAL DIARY THE 70 ALICE IN WONDERLAND X-MEN AIRPLANE! CONTAGION DUPLICITY GUADALCANAL DIARY

THE 70 DECEPTION GRAN TORINO THE NANNY DIARIES SEX AND THE CITY THE 70 TRAITOR SCREAM 4 DECEPTION GRAN TORINO THE NANNY DIARIES SEX AND THE CITY

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Vinson Voice

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DIALOGUES D E C K P L A T E

| How much do you spend at the vending machines each week? | “Five dollars a week on sodas and candy bars.” IT2 (SW) K e r m i t M a y n a r d

“I spend about $25 a week on candy and soda.” ABF3 (AW) P a t r i c k G i l l

“I spend about $10 a week on sodas for me and my friends.” R y a n

CSSN C a n a d a

“I spend more than $30 on snacks and energy drinks.” E r i c k

AMAR S c h a f e r

STAFF

|PUBLISHER|

STAFF

CAPT. KENT D. WHALEN COMMANDING OFFICER

|EXECUTIVE EDITORS| LT. CMDR. ERIK REYNOLDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

LT. ERIK SCHNEIDER

ASSISTANT PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

|EDITOR IN CHIEF|

MCC (AW) MONICA R. NELSON

ESWS||EAWS

MEDIA ALCPO

|MANAGING EDITOR| MC2 (SW/AW) LORI D. BENT

|PHOTO EDITOR|

MC2 (SW) JAMES R. EVANS

|GRAPHICS/LAYOUT|

The stern dock’s primary use is for embarking and disembarking personnel from the ship to liberty launches while at anchor.

A barricade is a net that catches an aircraft when it is not possible to recover it normally or divert it to a shore base.

MC3 PHOENIX LEVIN

|STAFF WRITERS/PHOTOGRAPHERS| MC2 (SW) BYRON C. LINDER MC3 (SW/AW) ROSA A. ARZOLA MC3 (SW) CHRISTOPHER K. HWANG MC3 (SW) LUKE B. MEINEKE MCSN ANDREW K. HALLER


22 January 2012 Vinson Voice