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JUNE 12, 2013

USS CARL VINSON (CVN 70) VOL 4 ISSUE 08

Following Fathers

A Father’s Day Special

Barr Code

BROTHERS ABOARD

Midshipmen Summer Cruise

HOW

IT WORKS!

Catapults


FATHER’S DAY

Following Fathers by MCSN Hansel D. Pintos

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he U.S. Navy has a long-standing tradition of military power and dominance, passed on from one generation to the next. Its storied past and ongoing global service carries weight to those who choose to wear the uniform. Two Sailors aboard Carl Vinson will pass on to their children not only Navy traditions of the past and present, but also a family tradition of service to country. As Father’s Day fast approaches, Lt. Cmdr. Kyle Raines, Carl Vinson’s public affairs officer (PAO), and Chief Warrant Officer Brandon Hoppe, the ship’s gunner, have particular reason to be proud, as both will welcome their children into naval service. Raines enlisted in the Navy in February of 1994 and later completed Naval Nuclear Power Training and Nuclear Power Prototype, as a nuclear-qualified Machinist’s Mate. “I was looking for a new challenge,” said Raines. “I felt it could prepare me for other opportunities inside and outside the Navy, with education and a skill set, all while serving and giving back to my country.” During his time as an enlisted Sailor, Raines and his wife welcomed daughter Kiana into the family. “I was an E-4 and my wife was an E-3 when Kiana was born,” said Raines. “The financial impact and demand on my time were readily apparent. I was not prepared, but I learned along the way.” Part of the difficulty was learning to be disciplined with time and money, all while serving as an active-duty Sailor. It was the most challenging aspect of early parenthood. It was a new type of discipline because it meant planning all of our resources around the family so we could enjoy a balanced life, Raines said. Despite the incredible time, energy, and focus

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Banner Photo: Chief Warrant Officer Brandon Hoppe returns a salute to his son, Logistics Specialist Seaman Mason Hoppe, after his boot camp graduation. Above: Kiana Raines, daughter of Lt. Cmdr. Kyle Raines, poses in her junior ROTC uniform.


needed to create a balanced life, as well as learning about parenthood and family planning, Raines stayed focused on his career. In 1997 while on assignment aboard the USS California (CGN 36), lead ship of the California-class nuclearpowered guided missile cruisers, Raines applied for and was awarded a Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps scholarship. He was commissioned as a naval officer in 2000 upon graduation from the University of California, Berkeley. In 2003, he was selected and designated as a naval public affairs officer. As their household grew with the births of Leilani, Kyle Jr., and Lorelle, Raines learned how critical family support is to the career of any Sailor, and that to maintain that support, the Sailor must dedicate time to his family. He has been able to do this by prioritizing and balancing job and family responsibilities. “Family readiness is directly tied to operational readiness,” said Raines. “If the home and family environment is not good, that will spill over into work. I make sure that I work hard and finish my assignments, so when I am home I dedicate that time to my family. They understand the demands of the job, but at the same time you have to make sure that you are making time for the family.” Now, after more than 17 years of service, Raines prepares to welcome his eldest daughter Kiana into the fleet. “Kiana signed up to be a mass communication specialist (MC) in the Navy,” said Raines. “She is familiar with the work of MCs because I’ve always shared with my family and friends the work we do.” Kiana came to the decision on her own before sharing it with Raines, but he suspects that the decision to join came from watching his career, his accomplishments, and the relationships with fellow Sailors built through years of service. Still, he feels that the inspiration may have come from one specific moment, many years prior. “When Kiana was in eighth grade, I was invited to speak to her class on career day,” said Raines. “There were several folks there speaking about their jobs,

including a local reporter. I told the kids about my job as a PAO and the jobs of the Sailors in the media department.” Raines felt that his presentation stood out amongst the rest. The sharp contrast between the professions of Sailors – some straight out of high school – against the other professions, was one that could not be ignored. The exciting, multi-faceted careers of young Sailors serving their nation who were entrusted with equipment worth millions of dollars overshadowed all other presenters that day. It could have been the moment the seed was planted for Kiana, explained Raines. Kiana will be going to Recruit Training Command (RTC) as an enlisted recruit this September and Raines is confident she will excel in her service. Raines plans to visit his daughter during the graduation ceremony at RTC and hopes to participate in the other important milestones ahead for her. “I know that she is prepared for it,” said Raines, “and that she has the mentality to succeed. I’m honored that I have been an inspiration to her and she has chosen this profession. I look forward to seeing her in uniform and on her first ship.” Like Raines, Hoppe also raised a family while in the Navy. However, Hoppe was already a father when he enlisted. “I already had Mason when I came into the Navy,” said Hoppe, “so my entire career as a Sailor has also been as a father. I see that as a good thing because I became a Sailor as I was learning to be a father. I figured both out together.” Hoppe enlisted in 1992, attended boot camp at RTC in Orlando, Fla., and later completed personnelman “A” school, a rate known today as personnel specialist (PS). After four years as a PN, Hoppe decided for a rate conversion into the fire controlman (FC) field. Upon completion of FC “A” and “C” school, he was assigned to the guided missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). “I chose FC because it was a very technical job,” Hoppe said. “It seemed interesting and fun; I got to work in the weapons department integrating closely with combat Continued on Page 6

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by MCSA Matthew A. Carlyle

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n aircraft launching from the flight deck of Carl Vinson has less than 400 feet to take flight. That’s little more than a football field’s length to launch some of the world’s most powerful jets. In comparison, the lengths of the runways at Naval Air Station North Island are 7,500 and 8,000 feet. To make up for the loss of runway distance and to get aircraft up to the speed necessary to take flight, aircraft carriers employ the steam catapult system. “Without the catapults, you just have another ship,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 2nd Sailors conduct a no-load launch on the flight deck. Class (AW) George Edward Pownall III, Photo by MCSA Jacob G. Kaucher air department V-2 division’s catapult 4 captain. “You need the catapults to determined the Capacity Selector Valve actually shoot the aircraft and make setting which controls the rate at which up for the lack of space to launch. the launch valve opens to provide Otherwise, the aircraft would fall the proper acceleration based on the straight into the water.” aircraft’s parameters”, said Lieutenant The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers are Chad Tyler, air department V-5 division designed with four catapults built into officer and senior catapult officer. the flight deck, two located at the bow Once the cylinders are charged to the and two at the waist. Sophisticated appropriate levels, the shooter gives and complex in it’s engineering, the the pilot the “go ahead” signal, the catapult’s basic function is simple: to pilot blasts the engines, there’s a final launch airplanes off the flight deck check of the systems and when the using steam pressure and hydraulic pilot is ready to fly, the shooter sends power. the signal to release the pistons. The it from zero to 165 miles per hour in In order to generate that extraordinary force causes the holdback bar to release approximately two seconds. pressure and power, the catapult uses a and steam power kicks the shuttle and Considering the number of steps and multitude of moving parts – the most plane forward. The shuttle releases the the accuracy necessary for a successful important of which are two pistons, two tow bar and plane once it meets the end launch, the process of catapulting a gigantic cylinders and the shuttle. of the catapult track, propelling the cycle of aircraft onboard a forwardThe pistons move inside the cylinders plane off the flight deck after rocketing deployed carrier takes place in a which run parallel under the deck measuring 309 feet each. The pistons also connect to the shuttle above deck, which sits at the aftmost part of the catapult gap in the flight deck so it can launch forward with the aircraft. When the plane is moved into position at the rear of the catapult, the shuttle is then locked in with the nose gear, or front wheels of the aircraft, by the tow bar and the holdback bar. The holdback bar holds the aircraft to the deck prior to the catapult firing, and the tow bar allows the shuttle to drag the aircraft during launch. Sailors watch as a C-2A Greyhound, from the Providers of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30, launches from “The shooter has already the flight deck. Photo by MC3 Jacob G. Sisco

How it

Works

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most dangerous of all being a hang fire. Similar to a firearm hang fire where the detonation of gunpowder is delayed, a catapult hang fire occurs when the pistons fail to shift and release once the fire button is hit. In order to check the malfunction safely and accurately, the crew has to power the catapults down and ensure no planes are loaded onto the catapults. “When a hang fire happens, we cut off the catapult hydraulically, making sure that pistons do not move,” Pownall explained. “Then we have to verify what the problem is. Once we confirm the problem, we go through the necessary repairing procedures and call ‘no loads’ Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) Airman Raven Romero gives the weight of an F/A-18C Hornet, to make sure everything is right.” from the Mighty Shrikes of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 94, as it prepares to launch from the flight deck. Following the required steps after a Photo by MC3 (SW) George M. Bell Naval aviation has come a long way to hang fire occurs is crucial because the reach that level of proficiency, though. aircraft could potentially launch off the The idea of catapulting aircraft into the deck without the pilot’s knowledge and air has been around since the days of crash into the ocean, Anguiano added. the Wright Brothers who designed a With the frenetic pace of the flight catapult system for their early plane deck, there is great potential for models. hazards to personnel and equipment if The first catapults employed by a mistake is made. aircraft carriers were strictly hydraulic“Aircraft safety is the key,” Pownall powered, propelling an aircraft with said. “You have to watch the aircraft to several attachment hooks on a bridle make sure you don’t get hit by it. You connected to the shuttle. The steam- just have to watch what you’re doing powered catapult system wasn’t and look out for one another.” surprisingly short time. designed until the 1950’s and has Both Anguiano and Pownall agreed “For one catapult it usually takes two served as the mainstay catapult since their jobs on the flight deck make for a minutes,” Anguiano said. “You could the 1970’s. thrilling experience, despite the dangers launch an aircraft every 20 seconds, Despite proving its worth and of working around the catapults. though. If we had to, I think we could effectiveness for more than 40 years, When you see an aircraft take off and launch every aircraft onboard in less the multi-faceted system does suffer hit more than 100 miles per hour in two than 15 minutes.” from the occasional malfunction, the seconds, it’s an incredible rush for both the pilots and us, Anguiano said. Moving to advance its capabilities, the Navy began planning to improve the steam catapult at the turn of the century. The upcoming Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers are designed with electromagnetic catapults to eliminate the necessity for steam from the process and provide continuous control and acceleration of the aircraft as it leaves the flight deck. Until that time, though, Carl Vinson will continue to depend on the steam-powered catapults to launch birds into the Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) 2nd Class Joshua McNeese prepares to launch an F/A-18F Super Hornet sky. from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 25 on the flight deck. Photo by MC2 (SW/AW) Nicolas C. Lopez

FULL STEAM AHEAD

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Continued from Page 3

systems.” Hoppe knew each skill set he gained could be a valuable asset for a civilian career after the Navy, but his love for the Navy and the day-to-day work he did while serving motivated him to stay in. He advanced through the ranks and was selected for chief petty officer in 2005. In 2012, he was commissioned as a chief warrant officer onboard USS Hopper and shortly thereafter transferred to Carl Vinson. “I enjoy my job very much,” Hoppe said. “As a chief warrant officer I get to spend a lot of time with my Sailors and that is my favorite part of the job – that and shooting the .50 caliber and the small arms.” But his career was not always easy. Balancing home life and Navy life required careful attention. Hoppe said it is essential to have a structured family life. He credits his wife for taking care of the home and his children for staying out of trouble – most of the time. “Parenting while maintaining focus on the job is difficult,” said Hoppe. “You have to turn it on and off. When I step on the ship there is a switch I have to turn on as a Sailor. And even though I’m always a father, I have to focus on the job. For example, all my jobs as an FC have been inherently dangerous because they involve electronics, electricity, and ordnance, and that type of environment requires concentration and focus.” Now as Carl Vinson’s gunner, Hoppe will have the rare opportunity to be stationed with his son. Mason Hoppe, who recently graduated from Logistics Specialist “A” school, will report to Carl Vinson later this month. Hoppe said his son’s decision to join the Navy has created a new connection between them. After his graduation ceremony at RTC, to which he was fortunate enough to attend, Hoppe told Mason “not only are you my son, but now you are my shipmate!” “It has really brought us together,” said Hoppe. “Now

knowing that he is where I have been, we can sit and talk for hours, because we have so much in common.” Like Raines, Hoppe said he believes his career encouraged Mason to pursue similar goals. While growing up Mason witnessed firsthand how well his father excelled in the Navy, and he also got to see much of the country, as they lived in six different cities in 19 years. It gave him the opportunity to be part of diverse communities, explained Hoppe. “Those are valuable experiences that will assist and help him integrate into the diverse workforce of the Navy.” Now Hoppe looks forward to working aboard Carl Vinson alongside his son, both witnessing and playing a part in the progression of his son’s naval career. “It’s great to be close and I look forward to sharing and seeing him go through those key milestones over the next two years,” said Hoppe. “I will see him get frocked as a third class petty officer and see him put on his pins.” Hoppe feels proud of his son’s decision to follow in his footsteps and wants him to enjoy his time in the Navy as much as he has. “I hope he is happy and works hard and develops into the leader that I know he can be,” said Hoppe. “I hope that he has fun, because you have to enjoy what you do if you want to be good at it; I want him to enjoy success.” For both Raines and Hoppe the adventures of the Navy have navigated them through a life of challenges and growing points. The decision taken by their children to follow in their footsteps and serve is a gesture that speaks volumes of the positive influence and impression they have instilled in them. As their children evolve into experienced Sailors, Raines and Hoppe look forward to celebrating their accomplishments alongside them, just as they have been doing since birth.

VINSON

AROUND THE

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MENTAL WELLNESS CORNER By Lt. Cmdr. Robert Lippy

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Healthy Relationships

n important aspect of resilience is nurturing a healthy relationship with your significant other. Being gone from our significant others as much as we are involves sacrifice and tests even the healthiest relationships. However, there are some keys to healthy relationships that you can work on both underway and in port. The following information comes primarily from Dr. John Gottman, Ph.D., a psychologist who has studied couples’ relationships in his research lab for many years. Happy/healthy relationship couples aren’t smarter, richer, or more psychologically astute than others. But in their day-to-day lives they have hit upon a dynamic that keeps their negative thoughts and feelings about each other (which all couples have) from overwhelming their positive ones. They have what Gottman calls an “emotionally intelligent” relationship. Emotional intelligence has been shown to be an important predictor of a child’s success later in life. The more in touch with emotions and the better able a child is to understand and get along with others, the sunnier the child’s future, whatever his or her academic IQ. The same is true for relationships between spouses. The more emotionally intelligent a couple – the better able they are to understand, honor, and respect each other and their relationship – the more likely they will be happy in their relationship. At the heart of Gottman’s research on married couples is the simple truth that happy marriages are based on a deep friendship, which he defines as a mutual respect for and enjoyment of each other’s company. These couples tend to know each other intimately – they are well versed in each other’s likes, dislikes, personality quirks, hopes and dreams. They have an abiding regard for each other and express their fondness not just in big ways but in little ways day in and day out. A couple that keeps their friendship strong despite inevitable

disagreements and arguments experience what researchers call “positive sentimental override.” This means that their positive thoughts about each other and their relationship are so pervasive that they tend to supersede their negative feelings. An important step to strengthening your friendship is to know your partner. Dr. Gottman calls this having a detailed “love map,” – and that without such a love map, you can’t really know your partner, and that if you don’t really know your partner, it is difficult to truly love them. Challenge yourself to answer the following questions about your partner: - Who are your partner’s best friends? - What stressors is your partner currently facing? - What are some of your partner’s life dreams? - What are your partner’s three favorite movies? - What was the most stressful thing that happened to your partner as a child? - Who is your partner’s least favorite relative? - What would your partner want to do if he or she suddenly won the lottery? If you can answer all or most of these questions, chances are that you know your partner well and are well on your way to a happy/healthy relationship. If you do not know the answers to these questions, then use them as topics for future conversation to learn more about your partner. You might make this exercise even more interesting by sending these questions to your partner and having them answer them about you. Beyond having an intimate knowledge of your significant other, you can strengthen your relationship by simply spending quality time with your loved one. One of the things you might do is to plan activities together that give a pleasurable shared focus (e.g, movie, sports events, family cookout, weekly date night). Finally, find some way every day to communicate genuine affection and appreciation toward your significant other. You can do this even when we are out to sea via email, Facebook, or other social media. Remember that a healthy relationship takes time and commitment. But, if you work on your relationship a little at a time, chances are you can keep your relationship on a positive trajectory and remain a healthy and resilient couple.

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BARR CODE M

by MCSN Curtis D. Spencer

ost Sailors see their shipmates more often than their parents and siblings. Over the course of time, Sailors with diverse backgrounds forge bonds and become brothers-inarms. For two Carl Vinson Sailors that term can be taken much more literally. Aviation Electronics Technician (AW/SW) 1st Class Anthony Barr, aircraft intermediate maintenance department (AIMD) IM-1 division’s production controller and Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Kenneth Barr, a reactor nuclear electrician, are two brothers from Lansing, Mich. who find themselves tethered by more than blood. Their separate Navy careers have converged under one command, none other than that of Carl Vinson. Growing up they were both members of the swim team, played disc golf,

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watched sports, shared a similar sarcastic sense of humor and created a multitude of memories. Together with their father on cold Sundays they watched their beloved Detroit Lions play football from their home in Michigan. Though the Lions usually lost, they treasured the time spent together as a family. When Anthony joined a band, Kenneth would go with his brother on road trips. Kenneth was in awe, seeing his brother perform onstage. The brothers would be separated when Anthony, the elder by two years,

grew tired of the Michigan grind and felt an urge to see the world. Because of his heritage, he knew how he would make that dream a reality – by joining the military. “Our grandfather and father were both Navy veterans, so when I decided to enlist the Navy was the obvious choice,” said Anthony. While Anthony began his Navy career, Kenneth enrolled in college. He


attended Michigan Tech University for more than two-and-a-half years. As the years went by, though, studying would not hold his attention. He found his college courses unfulfilling and sought out a change. “It was a necessity for me to join,” Kenneth said. “I don’t know what I would have done if I didn’t join the Navy; I felt I had no other option.” Anthony completely supported

Kenneth’s decision to enlist. He also gave his brother guidance and insight from his experiences in the Navy. “Anthony gave me hints and advice on how to get through the different stages of boot camp and ‘A’ School,” said Kenneth. “Whenever I had a problem he talked me through it and gave me information, so I knew all my options.” As Kenneth neared the completion of six months of A-school, he set his focus on graduation. Like his brother before him, he would get orders to a command in the fleet. Anthony found out his brother would join him aboard Carl Vinson when his leading petty officer (LPO) told him an Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class that had his last name had orders to the ship. “I was so happy, and so excited to be at the same command as my brother,” Anthony said. “I couldn’t wait for him to get to the ship.” Both brothers were excited about the news that they would soon be reunited at the same command. “It was invaluable to have my brother onboard when I got to the ship,” Kenneth said. “I didn’t know where anything was. He showed me around, and he gave me his J-dial. I must have called him 10 times that night asking him questions.” Anthony was able to continue to mentor his brother. “If I am not sure what I need to do my brother has always been good at giving me the best possible advice,” Kenneth said. “We may have

different jobs, but we go through the same stuff at a command level,” Anthony said. “I can know to a point what he is experiencing and understand the qualifications he is trying to get and I can offer him advice.” Today, the Barr brothers’ relationship is as strong as it has ever been. Both Anthony and Kenneth are dedicated to their chosen careers in the Navy and aboard the ship. Their paths may not cross as often as they would like at work, but the opportunity exists for them to spend time together on liberty. Similar to when they were kids, they still create fantastic memories. “The time we spent together in Australia was awesome; we biked around all day and went scuba diving. That is one of my favorite memories,” Kenneth said. Now there is yet another reason for the brothers to get together in their free time. Both of the Barr brothers are now fathers a role they both treasure. “We play disc golf and have family get-togethers on weekends,” Anthony said. “Kenneth is an amazing uncle to my son Miles and my daughter Mia. They absolutely love him.”

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SUMM E

by MC3 Michael H. Lee

very summer, the Navy offers first-hand instruction to prospective officers – midshipmen – from some of the finest Sailors in the fleet. This program, held over summer months, creates invaluable learning experiences and prepares the participants for their future as commissioned naval officers. Midshipmen from across the country are participating in the Navy’s Summer Cruise program, spending more than three weeks in the fleet to receive hands-on training from junior officers and enlisted Sailors from sea and shore commands. The Summer Cruise program will advance a midshipman’s professional development, motivate the student’s decision to become a commissioned officer and provide guidance to one of many careers available to them. On board Carl Vinson, 36 midshipmen muster with a variety of departments before shadowing junior officers and enlisted personnel to learn what makes this warship function. “They are feeling out what they want to do with their

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careers,” said Lt. Sean Dougherty, air department V-2 division’s branch officer and midshipmen coordinator. “It gives them the opportunity to develop their basic leadership skills and learn what other Sailors do.” While Summer Cruise gives the most junior midshipmen a chance to explore their career opportunities, those who have already decided on career paths receive on-the-job training. Midshipman 3rd Class Ethan Ernst, a nursing student from Loyola University, Chicago, and reserve officers’ training corps (ROTC) midshipman, aspires to graduate with a nursing degree to accept a Navy commission. As a Midshipmen 3rd class, a sophomore in college, Ernst spends his time on the ship with the medical department. He participates in cleaning stations, stands watches and shadows corpsmen to learn and apply the skills he learned at school and during his time on the ship. “I’ve actually done a lot more on a ship than I thought I was going to do,” Ernst said. “I did not know what the environment was going to be like, so when I came in I was a little bit blind. It’s definitely been a really big learning experience for me. “As a rising sophomore, I haven’t gotten hands-on training,


MER CRUISE but here I’ve been able to perform hands-on patient care, draw blood and give shots,” added Ernst. “It’s definitely been a learning experience for me, and it’ll help me with my nursing career.” In addition to shadowing enlisted personnel, midshipmen tour different departments of the ship in order to see how Carl Vinson functions and gain an understanding of what each department can offer, Dougherty said. “Almost every day they try to give us a tour of different parts of the ship,” said Midshipman 3rd Class Meghan Kenny, a University of Florida student and ROTC midshipman. “We’ve gone to weapons spaces, engineering, the control room and to watch flight ops. Learning about the ship has been awesome; and they let us shoot the other day.” Carl Vinson Sailors have offered visiting midshipmen a rare perspective which will assist them in their understanding of the Navy as commissioned officers and future leaders. Their professionalism, knowledge and dedication have been appreciated, Dougherty said. “They have been very impressed with everything that the ship does,” Dougherty said. “They have been very thankful and gracious. They know that people are working more than

they would typically have, to be able to support what they are doing. They are getting opportunities that typical Sailors and officers on a ship don’t get to do on a daily basis.” For Ernst, the entire experience on a carrier was eyeopening, especially being able to experience an underway period. He found the 12-hour work day in medical department a surprise and a bit humbling. “I believe the opportunity the Navy and the ROTC program gave us will help us in the future when we get commissioned,” Ernst said. “Now that I know a little bit about what enlisted personnel do and how their role relates to the bigger scheme of things, this will definitely make me a better leader.” The positive feedback and excitement from midshipmen supports the goals of the Summer Cruise program – to teach the Navy’s future leaders firsthand about the hard work, dedication and knowledge that it takes for the crew to operate ships like Carl Vinson. “They are eager to learn and are appreciative of the experience we have given them,” Dougherty said. “They have definitely gone from zero to sixty in regards to what they know now about the ship and how to interact with the crew, and what life is like in the real Navy.”

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LSSN KYLE FERLAND

ABH3 (AW) Xavier Hefty

“WHATEVER YOU DO, BE SUCCESSFUL.”

“NEVER SETTLE FOR ANYTHING LESS THAN I DERSIVE.”

MCC (AW/SW) MONICA NELSON Media Leading Chief Petty Officer

GRAPHICS/LAYOUT

MEDIA DEPARTMENT

NOW PLAYING CARL VINSON CINEMA

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“TO STAY IN SCHOOL AND EXCEED IN ALL THINGS THAT COME IN MY PATH.”

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“YOU’LL HAVE TO ASK YOUR MOTHER.”

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MC2 (SW) MEGAN L. CATELLIER MC3 MICHAEL H. LEE MC3 PHOENIX LEVIN MCSA JACOB G. KAUCHER

AOAN GABRIELLE ARGANDA

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LCDR KYLE RAINES Public Affairs Officer

LTJG TREVOR DAVIDS Assistant Public Affairs Officer

MRFN NORRIS MAY

AO2 (AW) Jessica Baron

EXECUTIVE EDITORS

Sa

CAPT KENT WHALEN Commanding Officer

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“DON’T LEAVE YOUR FUTURE IN OTHER PEOPLE’S HANDS.”

PUBLISHER

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“IF YOU REALLY WANT SOMETHING, NOTHING IS GOING TO STOP YOU.”

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ABH3 (AW) SHANE BARTON

rit

SN QUMI KIMBLE

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“DON’T LIVE LIKE TOMORROW IS A GUARANTEE, BUT DON’T LIVE LIKE THERE IS NO TOMORROW.”

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“IF I WANT SOMETHING DONE RIGHT, I’VE GOT TO DO IT MYSELF.”

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BMSN JOSE BHAGWANDEEN

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MM3 DUKE DANSO

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“EVEN THOUGH YOU MAY NOT ENJOY SOMETHING, DO IT TO THE BEST OF YOUR ABILITY.”

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“WHEN YOU MAKE A MISTAKE, DON’T LET IT WEIGH YOU DOWN - LEARN FROM IT.”

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What is the best advice your father has given to you?

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D E C K P L A T E

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DIALOGUES

STAFF WRITERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS

ENFN James Hays

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CH 7 PG13-R

WEDNESDAY

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: GHOST PROTOCOL TWELVE MONKEYS TANGLED 500 DAYS OF SUMMER THE ABYSS THE LAST STAND ELF THE DEBT PLAYING FOR KEEPS IDENTITY THIEF

MC2 (SW/AW) NICOLAS C. LOPEZ MC2(SW/AW) TIMOTHY HAZEL MC3 GEORGE M. BELL MC3 JACOB G. SISCO MC3 MICHAEL H. LEE MCSN HANSEL D. PINTOS MCSN CURTIS D. SPENCER MCSA MATTHEW A. CARLYLE

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Vinson Voice, Vol. 4, Issue 8  

Carl Vinson Officers describe their pride when their children elect a career in the world's greatest Navy. Also inside, the Barr brothers ar...

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