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-NIVCUIU -NI TNECHCRATNE I -EVTCETI -E CSALERUOCSA


VIN- UIUC CENTARCH VE- ITECT LASCOURE


YR1. PRE. ARCH

01 PRECEDENT STUDY 02 URBAN INFILL 03 MED HUT 04 URBAN RENENEWAL

MARIKA ALDERTON HOUSE YIRRKALA COMMUNITY EASTERN ARNHEM LAND NORTHERN TERRITORY 1991-1994

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THE ARCHITECT Glenn Murcutt is an Australian-born architect who won the Alvar Aalto Medal in 1992 and the Pritzker Prize in 2002. Born in London and raised in New Guinea and later, Australia, Glenn Murcutt’s direct life experience influence his architecture. Although not a famous “starchitect”, Glenn Murcutt has international renown from the craft that he is associated with. His one-man, regionally-based firm concentrates on the production of residential and institutional based projects. Murcutt was a student at the University of New South Wales from 1956-1961 and, in addition to his professional practice, he teaches master-level classes. Because Glenn Murcutt is the sole practitioner, his designs do not center on building massive edifices. His early paternal influence engaged him to follow a philosophy by Thoreau: that we should “live simply and in harmony in nature’s laws”. Murcutt’s early philosophy evolved into his personal motto, “touch the earth lightly”. A HOUSE FOR EXPERIMENTATION Building structures that are economical and multi-functional, Murcutt’s works integrate and interact with the surrounding Australian landscape. The client’s unique lifestyle was a drastic departure from his previous projects. Working with an aboriginal artist and family, Glenn Murcut was presented with a culture that he frankly did not understand. Treating his project as a “bridge” between modern and indigenous culture, Glenn Murcutt provided a program that fit the client’s needs while keeping enviornmental impact low. A passive air circulation system, combined with the absence of windows eliminated a need for active air conditioning, while a generous roof line provided adequate shade during the tropical, summer months. Finally, to uphold a sense of community within the aboriginees, Murcutt designed the living room as a long hallway, inviting visitors to congregate in the artist’s space.


01 PRECEDENT STUDY 02 URBAN INFILL 03 MED HUT 04 URBAN RENENEWAL

GLENN MURCUTT + VINCENT VELASCO MEDITATION HUT ADVISOR: CARL LEWIS PESCADERO STATE BEACH + PARK, CA 2008 A SCREEN FROM THE MENTAL; A SCREEN FROM THE PHYSICAL Glenn Murcutt’s buildings frequently involve the enviornment in the design process. In an attempt to adapt the architect’s principles, the meditation hut focuses on a concept of screens - what and how should something be screened. One’s meditation needs can be many - isolation from the real world, calm breezes, bright - or an absence of - light, or just a plain area to sit on. Two large loadbearing walls create the primary form of the structure, with a cantilevered, sloped roof to protect the hut from light rain. The materials are renewable and local, such as the reused timber in the meditation hut walls. To accomodate the user’s needs, the main meditation area is built with only two walls, both of which cantilever out to the shore. The user is welcome to utilize screens in the hut for privacy, or to keep the area completely open, with views looking out to the beach or the peninsula. Additionaly, the user may decide meditation is done on the beach - s/he can conveniently walk down the ramp. As human beings are diverse, they methods of meditation vary. A hut that adapts to the user, is essential.

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YR1. PRE. ARCH

01 PRECEDENT STUDY

URBAN INFILL PROJECT COMMON GROUNDS + RESIDENCES ON WALNUT ADVISOR: CARL LEWIS DOWNTOWN CHAMPAIGN, IL 2008

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GLASS BOX REVISITED to create a mixed-use, urban infill space while acknowledging the site’s historical context is a challenge to architects. this project is intended to create a contemporary market/coffee shop and residence building while still relating to the buildings surrounding it. floors are stacked organically, as if the structure undergone major renovations, similar to its adjacent counterparts. a somewhat organized grid - but never fully achieved - system is employed, relating back to champaign-urbana, illinois’ historical conflict with population growth. finally, this project employs contemporary green techniques to create a future-forward building, contrasting with structures found in downtown champaign. PROGRAM LAYOUT/NOTES

1ST FLOOR: MARKET/COFFEE SHOP 2ND FLOOR: LIVE/WORK: 2, STUDIO: 1, ONE BEDROOM: 1 3RD FLOOR: TWO BEDROOM: 1, STUDIO: 1 4TH FLOOR: TWO BEDROOM: 1, STUDIO: 1 5TH FLOOR: THREE BEDROOM: 1z ALL BALCONIES CONTAIN GARAGE DOOR TYPE OPENINGS PERMITTING VIEWS TO DOWNTOWN CHAMPAIGN UNDERGROUND PARKING AVAILABLE TO RESIDENTS

02 URBAN INFILL 03 MED HUT 04 URBAN RENENEWAL


01 PRECEDENT STUDY

02 URBAN INFILL 03 MED HUT 04 URBAN RENENEWAL

NORTH ELEVATION

SECTION A-A’ B BALCONY CLOSET

BEDROOM

BATH

BALCONY

INDOOR PLAZA

KITCHEN

EXISTING BUILDING UP

COFFEE SHOP

A

UPSTAIRS EATING AREA

COMMON GROUNDS MARKET

A’

CLOSET

STUDIO

OPEN TO BELOW

EXISTING BUILDING

BALCONY

UP

UP

BATH

BATH DN

DN

BATH

LIVE/ WORK

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

BALCONY

LIVE/WORK

UP

UP

DN

DN

MEZZANINE FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SHARED BALCONY BALCONY

BEDROOM 3

STUDIO

BATH KITCHEN BALCONY

LIVING SPACE

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

UP

BALCONY

BALCONY

THIRD + FOURTH FLOOR PLAN

GARDEN OPEN TO RESIDENTS 3RD FLOOR/ OPEN TO BELOW 4TH FLOOR

UP

BATH

OPEN TO BELOW

MASTER BEDROOM

DN

FIFTH FLOOR PLAN

SOUTH ELEVATION

WALK-IN CLOSET

CLOSET

BALCONY

MASTER BEDROOM

BATH

WEST ELEVATION

KITCHEN

DN

OPEN TO BELOW

SECTION B-B’

LIVING SPACE

BATH

KITCHEN

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

OFFICE SPACE/DEN

BATH

EXISTING BUILDING B’

BEDROOM 2

CLOSET

CLOSET

OUTDOOR PLAZA

CLOSET

BEDROOM 2

CLOSET

UP

OPEN TO BELOW

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YR1. PRE. ARCH

01 PRECEDENT STUDY 02 URBAN INFILL

03 MED HUT 04 URBAN RENENEWAL

THE PALLET HUT ADVISOR: LYNNE DEARBORN BUSEY WOODS, URBANA, IL 2009

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MATERIAL REUSE the pallet hut is designed to respond with the nature while reusing human waste and materials. the hut utilizes a non-load bearing, pallet enclosure system to provide shelter while being economical and enviornmentally friendly. reused steel columns provide adequate bearing for the hut and the butterfly roof. a rainwater collection system provides irrigation for crops and portable drinking water. finally, the building’s formal character mimicks dead an fallen trees in the surrounding site, reminding us to be good stewards with nature.

BUSEY WOODS PLAN

SITE PLAN - SCALE: 1” = 20’

Energy

Water

Photovoltaic Panels above vertical garden to store electricity below ground

Large, inclined surface area of roof to collect rainwater

On-Demand water heater to minimize energy costs

Purifcation via charcoal stones and minerals to potable water for use in cooking and showering

Single appliance center within the space simplifies construction costs

Collected greywater from shower and other sources purified underground

Blackwater and solid waste collected underground

Greywater stored for use in clotheswashing and irrigation

Solid waste is composted and utilized as fertilizer for soil

BUILDING SYSTEMS FLOWCHART

Waste

Sustenance Low-light vertical garden to harvest crops such as mushrooms and cabbage

Traditional, high-light garden to harvest small fruits and crops

Inedible scraps sent to compost container via chute in kitchen


01 PRECEDENT STUDY 02 URBAN INFILL

WEST ELEVATION SCALE: 1/4” = 1’

03 MED HUT 04 URBAN RENENEWAL

SECTION A SCALE: 1/4” = 1’

NORTH ELEVATION SCALE: 1/4” = 1’

SECTION B SCALE: 1/4” = 1’

03 R RAINWATER COLLECTION COMPOST ACCESS COMPOST TOILET

TRANSLUCENT GLASS RIGID INSULATION ANCHOR TIES

WALL DETAIL

BASEMENT PLAN SCALE: 1/4” = 1’

FIRST FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/4” = 1’

ROOF PLAN SCALE: 1/4” = 1’


YR1. PRE. ARCH

01 PRECEDENT STUDY 02 URBAN INFILL 03 MED HUT

04 URBAN RENENEWAL

URBAN RENEWAL PROJECT COUNTRY FAIR MARKET ADVISOR: LYNNE DEARBORN CHAMPAIGN, IL 2009

Circulation Patterns

Green and Water Spaces

NEW MIDWEST URBANISM this project was a large urban planning project that dealt with revitalizing an existing shopping area in champaign, IL. the program required a mixed use plan, with offices, residential and shopping in one large block. A requirement for this project included detailing the plans for the southwest corner commercial/ residential building. the most prominent feature of this project is the use of green pathways for bikes and pedestrians. intended to be bike and pedestrian safe area, speeding is controlled with energy generating speed bumps in the central thoroughfare. a movie theatre in the northwest building, shopping and residences surround the core of this plan - the intersection between curve and line. the site concludes with a lake open to the public.

04 site analysis boards below. L

Figure Ground

57 rsta

te

57 te rsta

Inte

S Country Fair Dr

S Duncan Rd

S Duncan Rd

North 1000 ft

W Springfield Ave / Illinois Route 10

North 1000 ft

2000 ft

2000 ft

Pedestrian/Bus Access

400 ft

Minor Frontage

Major Frontage

Site Frontages

North 200 ft Special Use Permit Multifamily High Density Two-Family Residential

Interstate 72 S Country Fair Dr

W Clark St

S Mattis Ave

W White St

400 ft

Commercial Industrial Commercial General

Building Masses

W University Ave S Victor St

Kenwood Rd

Country Fair Dr

Section 1 | Scale: 1”= 40’

W University Ave

400 ft

Automobile Access Routes

North 200 ft

W Church St

N Neil St

W Springfield Ave / Illinois Route 10

N Prospect Ave

Interstate 72

W University Ave

S Mattis Ave

Site Plan

W Church St

N Neil St

Interstate 72

W Bradley Ave N Prospect Ave

W Union St

W Springfield Ave / Illinois Route 10

North 200 ft

Interstate 74

W Bradley Ave S Mattis Ave

W White St

Interstate 74

W White St

S Country Fair Dr

W White St

Inte

S Country Fair Dr

W Clark St

S Mattis Ave

Country Fair Dr

W University Ave S Victor St

W White St

N Mattis Ave

N Mattis Ave

Interstate 72 Kenwood Rd

W White St

W White St

W White St

W Union St

W Springfield Ave / Illinois Route 10

North 200 ft Special Use Permit Multifamily High Density Two-Family Residential

Sun Path March 30 June 21 December 21

400 ft

Commercial Industrial Commercial General

Site Zoning Districts

North

Parking Lot/Street Masses

200 ft

Sunrise/Sunset Times Sunrise Sunset Sunshine

Master Plan

400 ft

0

20

40

60

80 feet

Residential

Commercial

Office

Green

North Elevation | Scale: 1”= 40’


01 PRECEDENT STUDY 02 URBAN INFILL 03 MED HUT

P1-P3 Floor Plan | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

04 URBAN RENENEWAL

Second Floor Plan | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

Third Floor Plan | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

Fourth Floor Plan | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

04 R North Elevation | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

West Elevation | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

Building Section 1 | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

Building Section 2 | Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”


YR2. PRE. ARCH

UP

UP

05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE 06 NOTATION 07 THEATRE 08 ANIMATION STUDIO AREA OF REFUGE

AREA O F REFUGE

AREA O F REFUGE

DN

AREA O F REFUGE

UP

VERTICAL C H A I S E

M A I D CLOSET

DN

DN

A RE A OF REFUGE

DN

M I N I MARKET MEN

WOMEN

F 1 FS CI RASLTE :F L1 /O8O”R=P1L’ 0A ”N

CHECK-IN

F2 BAR SEC T I O N B- B’

SECTION B-B’

S2

N

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

R D TO FI FTH FL O O R P LA N F 3 - 5 THI S CA L E: 1/ 8” = 1’0”

S2

KITCHEN PREP A REA

DN

S 1 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1A/-8A” ’ =

1’0”

S 2 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1B/-2B” ’ =

1’0”

S 3SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1C/-2C” ’ =

1’0”

P2

N

S1

P4

SECTION A-A’

RST FLOOR PLAN F1 FI SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0”

N

FLOOR PLAN F2SECOND SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

UP

P6

CURBSIDE SEATING S3

S3

P 1 CONTEXT

SEC T I O N C-C’

SEC T I O N A-A’

P3

F2

N

S 1 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1A/-8A” ’ = S 2 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1B/-2B” ’ =

TO FIFTH FLOOR PLAN F 3 - 5 THIRD SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0”

C T IO N A- A’ S 1 SE SC AL E � 1 /8 ” =

1 ’0”

C T IO N B - B ’ S 2 SE SC AL E � 1 /2 ” =

1 ’0”

C T IO N C - C ’ S 3SE SC AL E � 1 /2 ” =

1 ’0”

S 3SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1C/-2C” ’ =

U1

P 2 UN IT

P 1 CONTEXT

P 2UNIT

N

PE RSPE C T IVE

DIAG RAM

D 2 PL UM B IN G D8

USAGE DIAGRAM

D 2PLUMBING

P4

D 8LOBBY

PERSPECTIVE

S2

P8

N

COLUMN

F2

P 7 NIGHT

PERSPECTIVE

DIAG RAM

W AL L DIAG RAM

L O B B Y PE RSPE C T IVE

S 2 SS EC CA TL EI O N�

DIAGRAM

D 3STRUCTURAL D2

B-B’ 1/2” = 1’0”

SOUTH ELEVATION E F 12SSS CEC CAA OLL EEN:D�1 /F18L/ ”O8 ”O= =R1 ’ 0P1 ’L”0A” N

PERSPECTIVE

F 1 FS CI RASLTE :F L1 /O8O”R=P1L’ 0A ”N F2

N

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

R D TO FI FTH FLO O R P LA N F 3 - 5 THI S CA LE: 1/ 8” = 1’0”

N

E A S TT H EILREDV TAOT IFOI N FTH FLOOR E A LSEC A � L 1E/: 81”/ 8=” 1=’ 01”’ 0 ” F2 3S-C 5

DIAGRAM

PLUMBING WALL DIAGRAM

D 8LOBBY

F3 1 SSFECI RCASTLTEI O:FN�L1 /O1C8/O-”2RC”=’ P=1L’ 0A1 ’”N0 ” N S

P2 U NI T

N

1’0”

CTI ON B-B’ S 2 SS ECALE � 1/2” =

1’0”

CTI ON C-C’ S 3SS ECALE � 1/2” =

1’0”

PERSPECTIVE THFLOOR ELEVATI ON IRST PLAN E 1 FSSS OU F CALE �1/8” 1/8”==1’0” 1’0” N CALE:

ONTEX T PERSPECTI P 13C-5 T H IRD T O F IF T H FVE LOOR PLAN F SC ALE: 1/8 ” = 1’0 ”

1’0”

OOF GARDEN P 4 RS OU TH ELEVATI ON E 1 S CALE � 1/8” = 1’0” P 5 O UTDOOR SEATI NG EAST ELEVATI ON E 2S CALE � 1/8” = 1’0” P 6 Q UAD COLU MN P 1 C ONTEX T PERSPECTI VE P 7 N IGHT PERSPECTI VE U NI T PLAN U 1 KING S CALE: 1/2” = 1’0” N D 1 U SAGE DI AGRAM P 2 U NI T PERSPECTI VE D 3 S TRU CTU RAL DI AGRAM P 3 F RONTAGE D 2 PLU MBI NG W ALL DI AGRAM P 4 R OOF GARDEN D 8 LOBBY PERSPECTI VE P 5 O UTDOOR SEATI NG

1’0”

P 6 Q UAD

COLU MN

S 2 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1B/-2B” ’ =

1’0”

P 7 N IGHT

PERSPECTI VE

U 1 KSS CEI NCAGTL EIUO:NN1I/TB2-P”BL=’ A N1 ’ 0 ” S2 SCALE � 1/2” = 1’0”

S 3SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1C/-2C” ’ =

1’0”

D 1 U SAGE

N

DI AGRAM

P S2 3USS ECNCAI TTL EIPOEN�R1CS/P-2EC” C’ =T I1V’ 0E”

E 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V”A T= I O1 ’N0 ”

FRONTAGE P E3 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V ”A T= I O1 ’N0 ”

E 2ES CAAS TL EE �L E1V/A8 T” I=O N1 ’ 0 ”

D 2 PLU MBI NG

P 1 CONTEXT

D8

P 4 RE OA OS TF EGLAERVDAETNI O N E 2S C A L E � 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ” P 5OUTDOOR SEATING

CONTEXT PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

KING UNIT PLAN

D 3 S TRU CTU RAL

GARDEN

P5 OU TDOOR

CONTEXT PERSPECTIVE P S 11 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1A/-8A” ’ = 1 ’ 0 ”

N

N

PERSPECTI VE

P4 ROOF

CTI ON A-A’ S 1 SS ECALE � 1/8” =

S 1 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1A/-8A” ’ =

PLAN

PERSPECTI VE

KI NG U NI T PLAN SCALE: 1/2” = 1’0”

IRD T O F IF T H F LOOR PLAN P3 FRONTAGE F 3 -5 TSCH ALE: 1/8 ” = 1’0 ” N

P 3 FS ERONTAGE CTI ON C-C’ S 3S CALE � 1/2” =

N

SECTION A-A’ SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

F2

KING U NI T PLAN U CTI ON1/2” A-A’= 1’0” CALE: N S 11 SSS ECALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

SEATING

P 6QUAD

D 1 USAGE

WALL DIAGRAM

U1

S E COND FLOOR PLAN S CALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

ELEVATI S E COND FLOORONPLAN E2 2EAST F S 1/8”==1’0” 1’0” S CALE CALE: �1/8” N

GARDEN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N PLAN

DIAGRAM

F1

F IRST FLOOR PLAN S CALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

T PERSPECTI P 2 US ENICTI B-B’ VE S 2 S CALEON� 1/2” = 1’0”

FIRST FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

S1 SE AT IN G

D 3 ST RUC T URAL

SEC T I ON A-A’

PERSPECTIVE

D 3STRUCTURAL

1’0”

F1

F 3 - 5 TS CH AI RLDE :T O1 / 8F”I F=T H1 ’ 0F” L O O R

C O L UM N

D 1 USAG E

D1

PERSPECTIVE

P 5OUTDOOR

G ARDE N

P 7 N IG HT

S1

1’0”

S3

P 4R O O F

P 3 FRO N T AG E

P 6 Q UAD

P6

QUAD COLUMN

P2

P 3F R O N T A G E

PE RSPE C T IVE

P 5 O UT DO O R

P5

P 7 NIGHT

U 1 KS CI NAGL EU:N1I/T2P” L=A N1 ’ 0 ”

PE RSPE C T IVE

P 4 RO O F

P1 CONTEX T

GARDEN

OUTDOOR SEATING

1’0”

E 2ES CAAS TL EE �L E1V/A8 T” I=O N1 ’ 0 ”

E L E VAT IO N E 2ESCAST AL E � 1 /8 ” = 1 ’0”

K IN G UN IT PL AN SC AL E : 1 /2 ” = 1 ’0”

N

E 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V”A T= I O1 ’N0 ” N

UT H E L E VAT IO N E 1 SO SC AL E � 1 /8 ” = 1 ’0”

P 1 C O N T E XT

ELEVATI ON E 2EAST SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

N

C O N D FL O O R PL AN F 2SE SC AL E : 1 /8 ” = 1 ’0” N

TH ELEVATI ON E 1 SOU SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

PERSPECTIVE

P 4R O O F

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

R D TO FI FTH FLO O R P LA N F 3 - 5 THI S CA LE: 1/ 8” = 1’0”

FL O O R PL AN F 1 FIRST SC AL E : 1 /8 ” = 1 ’0”

S3

1’0”

SECTI ON C-C’ SCALE � 1/2” = 1’0”

N

P 3F R O N T A G E F 1 FS CI RASLTE :F L1 /O8O”R=P1L’ 0A ”N

as a boutique hotel, the structure resembles the order and rigidity of a plant cell, while maintaining a character of its own. a rectangular, grid pattern gives both a highly efficient program and building. the lounge and bar space is an ideal place to meet new friens or old acquaintances and have visitors have the option to eat outside at the curb or in a seculded backyard.

P 2UNIT

SECTION A-A’

S1

SECTI ON A-A’ SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

ON B-B’ S 2 SECTI SCALE � 1/2” =

PERSPECTIVE

U 1 KS CI NAGL EU:N1I/T2P” L=A N1 ’ 0 ”

BICYCLE PARKING S1

S1

E 2ES CAAS TL EE �L E1V/A8 T” I=O N1 ’ 0 ”

SECTION C-C’

P5 OUTDOOR P A T I O

IRD T O F IF T H F LOOR PLAN F3-5 TSCH ALE: 1/8 ” = 1’0 ”

E 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V”A T= I O1 ’N0 ”

LOUNGE SEATING ---

A CELL WALL MODEL the capstone studio is a comprehensive studio that focuses on the design of one building, integrating and incorportaing all systems of the design into one semester.

05 L

UP

UP

VERTICAL C H A I S E

M A I D CLOSET

DN

A RE A O F REFUGE

STORAGE

cHOTELCHICAGO ARCH 475 CAPSTONE PROJECT ADVISOR: JOHN STALLMEYER CHICAGO, IL 2009

cHOTELCHICAGO contains features that help make it an efficient and structurally sound building. these include: - greywater recycling system to reduce the amount of water required in a typical hotel setting - three vertical gardens, two on the west and east side of the building facade, and a third containing unique planters - solar pv cells above that reduce electricity usage of approximately 20-25 percent - green roof to keep the building cool while providing a pleasant environment - regular, 22’ x 22’ structural grid for easy assembly - structural and decorative columns in groups of 1-4 with skylights exposing the center of some of these groups - a waffle slab-like ceiling in the ground floor to provide both structural and aesthetic qualities to the space - a back-ventilated facade for the guest rooms to keep the room well-insulated and to provide shading during critical months

UP

UP

VERTICAL C H A I S E

S T A F F B R E A K R O O M

LAUNDRY

DN

UP

DN

UP

VERTICAL C H A I S E

M A I D CLOSET

DI AGRAM

W ALL DI AGRAM

LOBBY PERSPECTI VE

SEATI NG

P6 QU AD

COLU MN

P7 NI GHT

PERSPECTI VE

D 1 U SAGE

DI AGRAM

D 3 STRU CTU RAL D 2 PLU MBI NG

N

D8

DI AGRAM

W ALL DI AGRAM

LOBBY PERSPECTI VE

N


S 3SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1C/-2C” ’ =

F 1 FS CI RASLTE :F L1 /O8O”R=P1L’ 0A ”N

1’0”

N

05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE 06 NOTATION 07 THEATRE 08 ANIMATION STUDIO E1

SOUTH ELEVATION SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

F2

E 2ES CAAS TL EE �L E1V/A8 T” I=O N1 ’ 0 ” P 1 CONTEXT

F1

FIRST FLOO R PLAN SC AL E: 1/8” = 1’0” N

F2

SEC ON D FLO O R PLAN SC AL E: 1/8” = 1’0” N

IRD TO FIFTH FLOOR PLAN F3- 5 TH S CA L E : 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ”

P 2UNIT

M A I D CLOSET

P 3F R O N T A G E P 4R O O F

T ION B-B’ S2 SEC SC AL E � 1/2” =

1’0”

P 7 NIGHT

PERSPECTIVE

D 1 USAGE

U 1 KS CI NAGL EU:N1I/T2P” L=A N1 ’ 0 ”

N

PERSPECTIVE

P 3F R O N T A G E D 2PLUMBING W S

I N T U E R N

D 8LOBBY

ER MM SU U N S

P2 U N IT

PERSPECTIVE

DIAGRAM

D 3STRUCTURAL

PERSPECTIVE

G UNIT PLAN U 1 KIN SC AL E: 1/2” = 1’0”

E 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V”A T= I O1 ’N0 ”

P 2UNIT

E LEVATIO N E 2EAST SC AL E � 1/8” = 1’0”

P1 C ON TEXT

1’0”

AR E A OF REFUGE

DN

P 1 CONTEXT

COLUMN

E1

1’0”

S 3SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1C/-2C” ’ =

E 2ES CAAS TL EE �L E1V/A8 T” I=O N1 ’ 0 ”

P 6QUAD

SOU TH ELEVATION SC AL E � 1/8” = 1’0”

S 2 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1B/-2B” ’ =

SEATING

1’0”

S3

UP

VERTICAL C H A I S E

N

SECTION A-A’ SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

GARDEN

P 5OUTDOOR

N

S1

N

PERSPECTIVE

T ION A-A’ S1 SEC SC AL E � 1/8” =

SEC T ION C-C’ SC AL E � 1/2” = 1’0”

R D TO FI FTH FLO O R P LA N F 3 - 5 THI S CA LE: 1/ 8” = 1’0”

PERSPECTIVE

U 1 KS CI NAGL EU:N1I/T2P” L=A N1 ’ 0 ”

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

N

DIAGRAM

P 4R O O F

GARDEN

WALL DIAGRAM

P 5OUTDOOR

SEATING

PERSPECTIVE

P 6QUAD

COLUMN

P 7 NIGHT

PERSPECTIVE

P ERSPECTIVE

D 1 USAGE

DIAGRAM

P3 F RON T AGE D2

D 8LOBBY

SHOWER+SINKS>

N

T ION A-A’ S1 USEC AL EE �DIAGRAM 1/8” = 1’0” D 1 SCSAG

SHOWER+SINKS>

DIAGRAM

PLUMBING WALL DIAGRAM PERSPECTIVE

VERTICAL CHAISE

F35 TH I RLDE :T O1 / 8F”I F=T H1 ’ 0F” L O O R P L A N P7 N IG H TS CAPERSPECTIVE

D 3STRUCTURAL

SHOWER+SINKS>

GARDEN P4 ROOF FLOO R PLAN F 1 FIRST SC AL E: 1/8” = 1’0” N P5 OU T D OOR SEATING ON D FLO O R PLAN F 2SEC SC AL E: 1/8” = 1’0” N P6 QU AD COLUMN

F 1 FS CI RASLTE :F L1 /O8O”R=P1L’ 0A ”N

F 2SS EC CA OL EN:D 1 /F8L ”O O= R1 ’ 0P L” A N N R D TO FI FTH FL O O R PLAN F 3 - 5 THI S CA L E: 1/ 8” = 1’0”

T ION B-B’ S2 SEC � 1/2” =DIAGRAM 1’0” STAL RUEC TURAL D 3SC SEC T ION C-C’ SC � 1/2” = 1’0” P LAL U MEBING WALL DIAGRAM

S32 D

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RAINWATER>

SOU TH ELEVATION L OB SC ALBEY �PERSPECTIVE 1/8” = 1’0”

E 18 D

G UNIT PLAN U 1 KIN SC AL E: 1/2” = 1’0”

P2 U N IT

K I T C H E N >

N

KITCHEN CHAISE

PERSPECTIVE

<

SEWAGECOLLECTION GREYWATER TANK + FILTER

<IRRIGATION GREYWATER>

TOILETS> <GREYWATER

E 2ES CAAS TL EE �L E1V/A8 T” I=O N1 ’ 0 ” P 1 CONTEXT

HEATING+A/C U N I T

P 2UNIT

F 1PFS4CI RARSLOTEO:FFL1 /OG8OA”RR=DPE1L’N0A ”N

P6 P7

N IG H T PERSPECTIVE

D1

U SAG E DIAGRAM

FL O O R P L A N F 1 FIRST SC AL E : 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ”

F2

FIRST FLOO R PLAN SC 1/8” = DIAGRAM 1’0” N STAL RUE: C TURAL

F1 D3

D TO FIFTH FLOOR PLAN Y I RPERSPECTIVE D 8 L OB F35 BTH S CA L E : 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ”

1’0”

S1 N

F 2P 5

N

A DR DC OTO L UFI M FTH N FLO O R P LAN F 3P-65Q UTHI S CA LE: 1/ 8” = 1’0” NIGHT PERSPECTIVE S 1PSS7EC CA TL EI O N� 1A/-8A” ’ = 1 ’ 0 ”

THIR D TO FI FTH FL O O R P LA N SCALE: 1/ 8” = 1’0” N

USAGE DIAGRAM S 2DSS1EC CA TL EI O N� 1B/-2B” ’ = 1 ’ 0 ”

SE C T IO N A - A ’ SC AL E � 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ”

C T IO N B - B ’ S 2 SE SC AL E � 1 / 2 ” =

1’0”

ECTION C-C’ S 3DSS3 CALE � 1/2” =

C T IO N C - C ’ S 3SE SC AL E � 1 / 2 ” =

1’0”

D 2PLUMBING WALL E 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V”A T= I O1 ’N0 ”

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM 1’0”

T ION B-B’ S2 SEC SC AL E � 1/2” =

1’0”

UT H E L E V A T I O N E 1 SO SC AL E � 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ”

D8 E2

T ION C-C’ S3SEC SC AL E � 1/2” =

1’0”

E LE V A T I O N E 2ESCAST AL E � 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ”

P 1 CONTEXT

TH ELEVATION E 1 SOU SC AL E � 1/8” = 1’0”

P1 C ON TEXT U1

P ERSPECTIVE

GARDEN

P5 OU T D OOR P6 QU AD

N

P 2 UN IT

PE R S P E C T I V E

P 4 RO O F

SEATING

COLUMN

P6

GARDEN

SEATING

Q UAD C O L U M N

P 7 N IG HT

F 1 FS CI RASLTE :F L1 /O8O”R=P1L’ 0A ”N

PERSPECTIVE

USAG E D I A G R A M

F 2SS EC CA OL EN:D 1 /F8L ”O O= R1 ’ 0P L” A N N THI R D TO FI FTH FL O O R P LA N S CA L E: 1/ 8” = 1’0” N

P 2UNIT F 1 FS CI RASLTE :F L1 /O8O”R=P1L’ 0A ”N F2

N

P 3F R O N T A G E

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

P 4R O O F

GARDEN

S1

R D TO FI FTH FLO O R P LA N F 3 - 5 THI S CA LE: 1/ 8” = 1’0”

S2

SECTION B-B’ SCALE � 1/2” = 1’0”

S 1 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1A/-8A” ’ =

1’0”

P6

S3

SECTION C-C’ SCALE � 1/2” = 1’0”

S 2 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1B/-2B” ’ =

1’0”

P 7 NIGHT

E 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V”A T= I O1 ’N0 ”

S 3SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1C/-2C” ’ =

1’0”

D 1 USAGE

E 1 SOUTH

ELEVATION

N

PERSPECTIVE

SECTION A-A’ SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

EAST ELEVATION

PERSPECTIVE

U 1 KS CI NAGL EU:N1I/T2P” L=A N1 ’ 0 ” N

N

F3-5

P 3 FRO N T A G E

DIAGRAM

LOBBY PERSPECTIVE EAST ELEVATION SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

PERSPECTIVE

K IN G UNI T P L A N SC AL E : 1 / 2 ” = 1 ’ 0 ”

P 5 O UT DO OR

F RON T AGE

P4 ROOF

U1

PERSPECTIVE

KIN G UNIT PLAN SC AL E: 1/2” = 1’0”

P2 U N IT P3

P 1 C O N T E XT

EAST E LEVATIO N SC AL E � 1/8” = 1’0”

N

S E COOUNTD D OFOLRO OSRE APTLIANNG SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N

SE C O N D F L O O R P L A N SC AL E : 1 / 8 ” = 1 ’ 0 ” N

F3-5

ON D FLO O R PLAN F 2SEC P LAL U ME: BING D SC 1/8”WALL = 1’0”DIAGRAM N

E2

N

PERSPECTIVE

P 3F R O N T A G E

SEATING

QU AD COLUMN

T ION A-A’ S1 SEC SC AL E � 1/8” =

PERSPECTIVE

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GARDEN

P5 OU T D OOR

1’0”

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E 1 SS OC AULTEH �E L1 E/ 8V”A T= I O1 ’N0 ”

P U B L I C R E S T R O O M

P ERSPECTIVE

P3 F RON T AGE P4 ROOF

S3

N

SECTION A-A’ SCALE � 1/8” = 1’0”

S 2 SS EC CA TL EI O N� 1B/-2B” ’ =

<RETURN SUPPLY>

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P1 C ON TEXT

N

N

P 5OUTDOOR

SEATING

QUAD COLUMN

PERSPECTIVE

DIAGRAM

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

N

SHEARWALL REINFORCEMENT FLOORPLATES

05 R


YR2. PRE. ARCH

05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE

CRASH ADVISOR: THERESE TIERNEY CHAMPAIGN, IL 2010

VISUALISING INFORMATION contemporary architectural theory is increasingly looking to video and animation to describe new processes. using time-based artistic formats is now an indispensable tool for architects engage in an increasingly complex and multi-faceted world. this project asked to document the movie CRASH and translate into a notation familiar to the author. each panel is 12 in x 12 in and provides a documentation of the movie under three schemes: character, place and time/stress.

06 L

the panels can be rearranged in any order, resulting in a different way of reading this notation.

06 NOTATION 07 THEATRE 08 ANIMATION STUDIO


05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE

06 NOTATION 07 THEATRE 08 ANIMATION STUDIO

06 R


YR2. PRE. ARCH

05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE 06 NOTATION

theatreRAIL ADVISOR: THERESE TIERNEY CHAMPAIGN, IL 2010

07 THEATRE 08 ANIMATION STUDIO

siteanalysis

figureground

bnsfrail

NOTATION TRANSFORMATION a short design proposal for the university of illinois college of media, the theatreRAIL is intended for the residents of downtown champaign. as an experimental theatre space, theatreRAIL is a link between community and campus, enabling dialogue between audience and cast.

pedestrianpaths

+

+

this project is intended to strengthen conceptual thought and notation + diagramming skills and is a continuation from the previous project.

siteanalysis

restauranteurs park-lovers cafe-lovers university of ill users college of media experimental artists grads/undergrads faculty/staff/admin

performers fine artists performance artists experimental artists

incidentals

adjacencies compression shuffle

MEETING ROOMS

LOBBY

TOILETS

STORAGE

CLOAKROOMS

TOILETS

TELEPHONE MAIL BOONKINGS

RESTAURANT

ENTRANCE FOYER

FIRST AID

BOX OFFICE RECEPTION

OUTDOOR SPACES

EXHIBITION

VERTICAL ACCESSIBILITY CIRCULATION

CRECHE

CONTROL ROOM

KITCHEN

TOILETS + CLOAKROOMS

TOILETS

CANOPY

PERFORMANCE AREA

OUTDOOR SPACES

VERTICAL ACCESSIBILITY CIRCULATION

CLOAKROOMS

TOILETS

RESTAURANT

ENTRANCE FOYER

SHOP(S)

PUBLIC ENTRANCE

PERFORMANCE AREA

PLACES TO EAT AND DRINK

STORAGE

designintervention

HOUSE MANAGER

SOUND LOCK STORAGE

STORAGE

FOYER

TOILETS

park-lovers cafe-lovers restauranteurs college of media

PERFORMANCE AREA

CAR PARK

PUBLIC ENTRANCE

KITCHEN

SND LCK STORAGE CTRL RM TOILETS V CIRCUL ACCESS FOYER

OUTDR REST FOYER

SND LCK STORAGE CTRL RM TOILETS V CIRCUL ACCESS FOYER

CTRL RM AUDIT

RESTAURANT

OUTDOOR SPACES

AUDITORIUM

PERFORM REST FOYER

CONTROL ROOM

OUTDR KITCHEN

conceptnarrative

SOUND LOCK STORAGE

OUTDR

existing features planning

AUDIT PERFORM OUTDR V CIRCUL ACCESS CLOAK REST TOILETS SHOP ENTER

PERFORMANCE AREA

FOYER

performance artists

theatre-buffs grads/undergrads faculty/staff/admin

REST FOYER

siteanalysis CTRL RM

spectators

AUDIT

champaign-urbana, il residents

PERFORM REST FOYER

analysis

OUTDR KITCHEN

communitydemands

AUDITORIUM

AUDITORIUM

FOYER

communityusers

fine artists

07 L

AUDITORIUM

programmaticreorganisation ENTRANCE FOYER

projectworkflow theatre-buffs

functionalcompression

adjacencydiagram

designIntervention

AUDIT PERFORM OUTDR V CIRCUL ACCESS CLOAK REST TOILETS SHOP ENTER

conceptNarrative


05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE 06 NOTATION

07 THEATRE 08 ANIMATION STUDIO

urbanintervention

=

�st/�ndfloorplans - below LOADING RAMP + EMERGENCY EXIT

longitudinalsection - above

UP M M

W

DN

RECEPTION AREA

W

BLACK BOX THEATRE

D ROA

TICKET OFFICE

P

RAM

RAIL

OPEN TO BELOW

PROJECTOR STAGE STORAGE ROOM CHANGING ROOMS (M+W) CAFE

CAFE

OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE SPACE + PATIO

EMERGENCY EXIT

07 R

railroadperspective

sectionalperspective

entranceperspective

interiorperspective


YR2. PRE. ARCH

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

01Public Gallery 02Cafe

Second Floor Plan 03Kids’ Creative Workshop

05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE 06 NOTATION 07 THEATRE ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall North Elevation 06Theatre scale: no scale 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices South Elevation 10Screening Room scale: no scale 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms East Elevation 13Copy Room/Storage scale: no scale 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room West Elevation 16Projection Room scale: no scale 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

01Public Gallery 02Cafe 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

Longitudinal Section scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

First Floor Plan ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft Transverse Section Series scale: no scale

Second Floor Plan ^north + scale: 1 1/32in = 1ft Interior Perspective North Elevation scale: no scale 2 Interior Perspective South Elevation Exploded Axonometric scale: no scale

the CRE.ART ADVISOR: THERESE TIERNEY CHAMPAIGN, IL 2010

PerspectiveEast 1 Elevation scale: no scale Elevation PerspectiveWest 2

First Floor Plan

PerspectiveLongitudinal 3 Section

Second Floor Plan

PerspectiveTransverse 4 Section Series

North Elevation

Animation Sequence Interior Perspective 1 concept progression

South Elevation

Aerial ViewInterior Perspective 2

East Elevation

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

The central atrium houses the Render Farm/IT department, where the most important component of a digital animation studio is showcased on a raised platform. Ramps assist the business visitors around the campus, while a central circulation corridor with private thoroughfares and nooks provide movement and contemplation for the employees of the firm.

Perspective 4

DN

Animation Sequence

(open to below)

18

concept progression

(open to below)

First Floor Plan

Because of the unique building program, the cre.art uti- ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft lizes a design based on square footages needed and Second Floor Plan the use of voronoi “cells” to create the basic silhouette. ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft A relation to the surroundings and linkages within the North Elevation scale: no scale structural system carve the circulation shell.

Aerial View scale: no scale 02 01

UP UP

M

06

South Elevation 14

scale: no scale

01Public Gallery 02Cafe W 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 03 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 04 08Archive Room 05 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

01Public Gallery 10 M 02Cafe Gallery 01Public 08 East Elevation 07 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 02Cafe scale: no scale 09 04Restaurant 03Kids’ Creative Workshop M 07 W 09 09 07 12 05Climbing Wall 04Restaurant West Elevation 06Theatre Wall 05Climbing 11 scale: no scale 07PreProduction Offices 06Theatre 11 08Archive Room Offices 07PreProduction 13 Longitudinal Section 09Executive Offices 08Archive Room 11 scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft 10Screening Offices Room 09Executive 11PostProduction 10Screening RoomOffices 12Private MeetingOffices RoomsTransverse Section Series 11PostProduction 13Copy Room/Storage 12Private Meeting Roomsscale: no scale 14Loading Dock 13Copy Room/Storage First Floor Plan 15Conference Room 14Loading Dock ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft Interior Perspective 1 16Projection Room 15Conference Room 17Render Farm/IT 16Projection RoomOffice Second Floor Plan 18Private Outdoor Balcony 17Render Farm/IT Office Interior Perspective 2 ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft 18Private Outdoor Balcony W

UP

UP

01Public Gallery 02Cafe Exterior Renderings 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant top to bottom: north entry; south entry 05Climbing Wall Interior Rendering 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices public lobby 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices Interior Rendering 10Screening Room second floor private balcony 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms Exterior Rendering 13Copy Room/Storage view from neighboring office building 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

First Floor Plan

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

Second Floor Plan ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

North Elevation scale: no scale

01Public Gallery 02Cafe 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

First Floor Plan

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

Second Floor Plan ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

North Elevation scale: no scale

South Elevation scale: no scale

East Elevation scale: no scale

First Floor Plan Exploded Axonometric ^north scale: 1/32in = 1ft First+Floor Plan

North Elevation

South Elevation

West Elevation

Second Floor PlanPerspective 1 ^north + scale: 1/32in =Plan 1ft Second Floor

South Elevation

East Elevation

North Elevation Perspective 2 scale: no scale North Elevation

East Elevation

West Elevation

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

Interior Perspective 1

view from neighboring office building

DN

East Elevation

scale: no scale

Perspective 3 Exterior Rendering

15

(open to below)

scale: no scale

Transverse Section Series

second floor private balcony

08

South Elevation

scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

Perspective 2 Interior Rendering

DN

scale: no scale

Longitudinal Section

public lobby

17

North Elevation

scale: no scale

Perspective 1 Interior Rendering

UP

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

West Elevation

top to bottom: north entry; south entry

DN

Second Floor Plan

scale: no scale

Exterior Renderings Exploded Axonometric

16

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

DN

First Floor Plan

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

01Public Gallery 02Cafe 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 12 18Private Outdoor Balcony

01Public Gallery 02Cafe 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

scale: no scale

REANIMATING PROGRAM The cre.art is an animation studio + learning center located in the Chinatown District in Chicago. Designed to house a large scale animation firm, the cre.art has capability to grow across the railroad tracks. The public amenities this facility offers are a Children’s Creative Learning Center, Restaurant, Cafe and Gallery Space.

08 L

08 ANIMATION STUDIO

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

Interior Perspective 2 01Public Gallery Exploded Axonometric

Perspective 1 Perspective 2 Perspective 3 Perspective 4 Animation Sequence concept progression

Aerial View scale: no scale

Exterior Renderings

02Cafe 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

First Floor Plan

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

top to bottom: north entry; south entry

Interior Rendering public lobby

Interior Rendering second floor private balcony

Exterior Rendering

West Elevation scale: no scale

Longitudinal Section scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

Transverse Section S scale: no scale

Interior Perspective

Interior Perspective

Exploded Axonome Perspective 1 Perspective 2 Perspective 3 Perspective 4

Animation Sequence concept progression

Second Floor Plan

Aerial View

North Elevation

Exterior Renderings

South Elevation

Interior Rendering

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

view from neighboring office building

scale: no scale

top to bottom: north entry; south

public lobby

East Elevation

Interior Rendering

Longitudinal Section

West Elevation

Exterior Rendering

Transverse Section Series

Longitudinal Section

scale: no scale

scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

second floor private balcony

view from neighboring office build


n

Series

e1

e2

etric

e

s

h entry

ding

East Elevation scale: no scale

05 cHOTEL CAPSTONE 06 NOTATION 07 THEATRE

08 ANIMATION STUDIO

West Elevation scale: no scale

Longitudinal Section scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

Transverse Section Series scale: no scale

Interior Perspective 1 Interior Perspective 2 Exploded Axonometric Perspective 1 Perspective 2 01Public Gallery 02Cafe 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

Perspective 3 Perspective 4 Animation Sequence concept progression

Aerial View scale: no scale

Exterior Renderings

top to bottom: north entry; south entry

Interior Rendering public lobby

Interior Rendering First Floor Plan

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

Second Floor Plan ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

North Elevation scale: no scale

01Public Gallery 02Cafe 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

First Floor Plan

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

Second Floor Plan

South Elevation scale: no scale

East Elevation scale: no scale

West Elevation scale: no scale

Longitudinal Section scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

Transverse Section Series scale: no scale

Interior Perspective 1 Interior Perspective 2 Exploded Axonometric

second floor private balcony

01Public Gallery Exterior Rendering 02Cafe view from neighboring office building 03Kids’ Creative Workshop 04Restaurant 05Climbing Wall 06Theatre 07PreProduction Offices 08Archive Room 09Executive Offices 10Screening Room 11PostProduction Offices 12Private Meeting Rooms 13Copy Room/Storage 14Loading Dock 15Conference Room 16Projection Room 17Render Farm/IT Office 18Private Outdoor Balcony

First Floor Plan

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

Second Floor Plan ^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

North Elevation scale: no scale

South Elevation scale: no scale

Perspective 1

East Elevation

Perspective 2

West Elevation

South Elevation scale: no scale

Perspective 3

Longitudinal Section

East Elevation

Perspective 4

Transverse Section Series

West Elevation

Animation Sequence concept progression

Interior Perspective 1

Longitudinal Section

Aerial View

Interior Perspective 2

Transverse Section Series

Exterior Renderings

Exploded Axonometric

Interior Perspective 1

Interior Rendering

Perspective 1

Interior Perspective 2

Interior Rendering

Perspective 2

^north + scale: 1/32in = 1ft

North Elevation scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

scale: approx. 1/32in = 1ft

scale: no scale

scale: no scale

top to bottom: north entry; south entry

public lobby

second floor private balcony

08 R


YR3. PRE. ARCH

09 MARINA CITY MT 10 [REMOTE] MARINA CITY

MARINA CITY MIDTERM ADVISOR: ERIK HEMINGWAY CHAMPAIGN, IL 2010

mcre

13

13

13

12

12

12

11

11

10

10

10

9

9

9

8

8

CONSTRUCT-1

11

CONSTRUCT-1

CONSTRUCT 1

CONSTRUCT 1

CONSTRUCT 1

CONSTRUCT 1

CONSTRUCT 1

CONSTRUCT-2 CONSTRUCT 2

CONSTRUCT 2

CONSTRUCT 2

CONSTRUCT 2

CONSTRUCT 2

CONSTRUCT 2

8

CONSTRUCT-2 CONSTRUCT 2

5

p0

7

CONSTRUCT 1

7

>

7

-

4

=

p1

1

2

p2

6

INFORMATION LAYERING The Marina City materials studio project is a full semester group project that deals with retrofitting Marina City in Chicago with “upgrades” that keep the superstructure current with the urban fabric. In the midterm project, we constructed two discrete scales of Marina City, with its primary forms dealing either with positive and negative space, where each student attatched an intervention on it.

6 p3

5

p4

4

3

+ 1. point generation describing marina city 2. random point selection from set 3. voronoi division of space 4. polyline web 5. web subdivision/fibers

5

=

1

5 p5

MARINA CITY _ gr aft p6

5

M

2

ZONE OF TRANSITION

systems becoming other systems

4

4

4

CONSTRUCT-3 3

2

1

3

2

graft_marina city aims to change the viewer perception of marina city improving and updating its outward appearance. a skeletal “skin” wraps around the towers with the dual function of cleansing the existing concrete and creating visual interest by giving marina city a defined facade. what once was void has been grafted. the pattern itself is derived from a set of points generated by an algorithm that describe marina city’s outermost edges. a random sampling of these points serves as the anchor points for a pattern that mimics the natural division of cells with nuclei, or a section cut through many soap bubbles. this constitutes the new “life pattern” for marina city.

1

P6

CONSTRUCT 3

CONSTRUCT 3

M w

M

C m

m

M

1

CONSTRUCT-4

CONSTRUCT-4

CONSTRUCT 4

CONSTRUCT 4

CONSTRUCT 4

CONSTRUCT 4

CONSTRUCT 4

CONSTRUCT 4

CODE

CODE

CODE

CODE

CODE

CODE

CODE

CODE

to “the Screening Committee, or a designee”, in the event the designee is other than the Chair of the Screening Committee, the President of the Association shall be authorized to appoint such person. 2. Verification of Information in Lease Application. The Association reserves the right to verify the information set forth in the documents filed with the lease. 3. Limitation on Leasing--Terms--Subleases--Variances. The following limitations apply to leasing of units: a) No lease shall be for a term of less than one year. However, a lease may contain an option for a renewal for a period of less than a full additional year. b) No subleases will be permitted. c) No unit shall be rented to: (i) any tenant or tenants who have refused to be bound by the Association Declaration, By-laws, and Rules and Regulations, or (ii) where the tenant or tenants have previously been evicted (from a former tenancy) for a failure and/or refusal to comply with reasonable rules and regulations as required in a lease or by a residential building, cooperative, community association or condominium. Petitions for variances from the limitations on leasing set forth in Section II(C)(3) will be considered by the Screening Committee which will make a recommendation to the Board on whether the Committee finds extenuating circumstances to exist. 4. Lease Extensions. a) As an alternative to the filing of a new lease, a Unit Owner who intends to extend a current lease must notify the Association of his/her intention to extend a current lease and submit a copy of the lease extension at least five (5) working days before the lease extension is effective. b) The lease extension shall include the following: (i) an adequate description to identify the prior-existing lease, which was previously approved and is in the files of the Association, (ii) the beginning and ending dates of the lease extension; (iii) the names of each tenant covered by the original lease and the lease extension; and (iv) changes in the rent or other terms that differ from 10 the prior-existing lease; and (v) the form shall be executed by both the landlord or landlord’s agent and each tenant or tenants. c) Approved lease extension forms containing this information are available from the Management Office. d) Upon approval by the Screening Committee or its designee, the lease extension will be kept on file in the Management Office. 5. Leases and Lease Extensions-Filing. A copy of all executed leases and lease extensions shall be filed with the Management office. a) for those Unit Owners not having a current lease or lease extension on file, a letter shall be sent from the Management Office requesting a copy of the executed lease or lease extension. In the case of a lease extension, if the original lease, subject to the extension, is not on file with the Management Office, a copy of that lease shall be provided as well. b) a fine shall be levied on any Unit Owner who does not provide a copy of an executed lease or lease extension upon 10 days written notice. The Board may levy an additional fine for each month thereafter that the executed lease or lease extension is not on file. [See Summary of Fine Schedule in Section III(B) of these Rules and Regulations.] c) the Screening Committee or a designee shall review and approve all leases and lease extensions to determine compliance with the requirements of these rules and the Condominium Declaration and By-laws. 6. Requirements for Lease or Lease Extension--Association Recourse-Violation. The Screening Committee or a designee may bring directly to the Board a recommendation for the levying of a fine upon a Unit Owner and tenant(s), the bringing of an eviction action against tenant(s), or the exercise of both remedies for failure to obtain prior approval with respect to a lease or lease extension of a unit. D. Move-in and Move-out 1. Move-in and Move-out Fees. a) A move-in fee is payable at the time of application with the Management Office and prior to possession of the unit unless previously paid. The move-in fee shall be $150.00 for a studio unit, $175.00 for a one bedroom unit and $250.00 for a two bedroom unit. Any additional fee or any damage to the common elements incurred as a result of the move-in shall be subsequently billed to the Unit Owner. The move-in fee shall be used to reimburse the Association for up to two hours of use of the elevators, for a studio, three hours of use of the elevators, for a one bedroom and 11 four hours use of the elevators, for a two bedroom. The use of the elevators shall include services as are necessary from Association. The move-in fee shall be applicable for all move-ins (owners and tenants). No portion of the move-in fees shall be refundable. After the threshold time period has expired, an additional fee of $30 per hour shall be charged for move-in services for all hours beyond those stated above. (b) (i) A $100 move-out damage deposit is payable by the Unit Owner at the time any request is made for a paid assessment letter from the Association if the Unit Owner will be moving out. (ii) Unit owners shall be responsible for any damage to common elements resulting from a move out by any tenant or other resident. 2. Hours for Move-ins and Move-outs. Move-ins and move-outs shall only be scheduled through the Management Office. No move-in or move-out may start earlier than 8:00 a.m. nor completed later than 9:00 p.m., Sunday through Saturday. Move-ins and move-outs shall be conducted from the Marina level only. Except as approved by the Property Manager in writing where extenuating circumstances may exist, the bridge level shall not be used for full or partial move-ins or move-outs. 3. Approved Move-in--Security Fobs/Cards--Use of Elevators. a) Neither Unit Owners nor the Management Office may give security keys and/or unit keys to new tenants or certificate of occupancy holders until after the move-in is approved by the Screening Committee. Such approval shall be communicated to the Management Office by the Screening Committee or a designee. b) Until the Unit Owner, prospective tenant or holders of a certificate of occupancy fully comply with the requirements for the Sale and Purchase of Units [Section II(E)], the Leasing Rules [Section II(C)] or Certificates of Occupancy [Section II(A)], the Association shall not provide security fobs/cards, the elevator for move-in or other services E. Sale and Purchase of Units: 1. Notification to Management Office--Prior to Closing Date. a) On or after the effective date of the 2004 Amendments to these Rules and Regulations, prior to closing the current Unit Owner must provide the following to the Management Office: i) in writing, the name(s) and address, and home and office telephone numbers of the prospective purchaser(s), the proposed closing date and the address to which notices (including statements of monthly assessments) should be sent; 12 ii) the applicable move-in fee required under the Move-in Fee Section of these Rules and Regulations [Sec. II)(D)(1)(a)] and b) Once the information or documents required by this Section have been provided to the Management Office, i) requests for “paid assessment letters” or the preparation of any other information for a prospective purchaser regarding the condominium and the unit will be provided to the Unit Owner, including copies of the Declaration and By-laws, a statement of assessments, fees or other charges which are outstanding and unpaid on the unit, copies of the annual budget, any other information authorized by the Illinois Condominium Property Act, and information which the Association is required to disclose involving the condominium common elements pursuant to the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992. ii) Requests for such documents must be made to the Management Office at least five (5) business days in advance. The fee for such documents, including the Assessment Letter, Condo Declaration, By-Laws, and Rules of the association, shall be charged to the Unit Owner. 2. Notification to Management Office--Within Five Business Days After Closing. Within five (5) business days after the closing of a unit, the new Unit Owner(s) shall notify the Management Office of the change in ownership of the unit and provide the following: a) The date of the closing; b) The name(s), address, and home and office phone number of each new Unit Owner, and on an Association approved form: i) if the unit is held in trust, the name, address, and home and office phone number of each beneficiary and the designation of the beneficiary(s) authorized to communicate on behalf of the trust with the Association with respect to the requirements of the Declaration, Bylaws and these Rules and Regulations. ii) if the unit is held by a corporation, the name, address, and home and office phone number of the officer(s) authorized to communicate on behalf of the corporation with the Association with respect to the requirements of the Declaration, Bylaws and these Rules and Regulations. iii) if the unit is held by a partnership, the name, address, and home and office phone number of the partner(s) authorized to communicate on behalf of the partnership with the Association with respect to the requirements of the Declaration, Bylaws and these Rules and Regulations. 13 iv) The names requested under subsections II(E)(2)(b)(i)II(E)(2)(b)(iii) of this Section are not intended to include any person designated as an agent under subsection II(E)(2)(e) of these Rules and Regulations. c) A copy of the HUD-1 or HUD-1A (closing statement); d) Name and address of any mortgagee or lienholder of the unit. When the mortgagee or lienholder has not provided an address for notice purposes to the Association, then such notice may be sent to the mortgagees or lien holders which are named insureds on the master policy of insurance which exists on the common elements. e) Unit Owners-Agents. If statements of monthly assessments or notices of violations are to be sent to anyone other than the Unit Owner, or someone other than the Unit Owner is to have any authority to act as an agent of the Unit Owner for any purpose, a copy of the such authority must be filed. f) Mandatory Unit Owner Liability Insurance Coverage. All unit owners are required to obtain insurance covering the personal liability and compensatory (but not consequential) damages to another unit or to the common elements caused by the negligence of the owner or his or her guests, residents, or invitees, or regardless of any negligence originating from the unit in the amount of $500,000. The personal liability of a unit owner must include the deductible of the owner whose unit was damaged, any damage not covered by the insurance required by this subsection, as well as the decorating, painting, wall and floor coverings, trim, appliances, equipment, and other furnishings. In no event shall the Association be liable for the failure of any unit owner to maintain insurance. g) Receipt of Rules and Regulations. A receipt for the Rules and Regulations shall be signed by each new owner that he or she has obtained from the Management Office a current copy of the Rules and Regulations, has read and understands them, and agrees to be bound by them. The statement of receipt shall be kept in the unit file in the Management Office. The failure of such owner(s) to have a copy of the Rules shall not waive the application of such rules to that owner. 3. Notice to Association of Mortgagee or Other Lienholder. a) Within 10 days of the recording of a mortgage or trust deed against an existing Unit Ownership given by the owner of that unit to secure a debt, the owner shall also inform the Board of Directors of the Association of the identity of the lender together with a mailing address where the lender can receive notices from the Association. 14 If a Unit Owner fails or refuses to inform the Board in connection with the recording of a mortgage or trust deed either in connection with the purchase of a unit or as required under this subsection, then that Unit Owner shall be liable to the Association for all costs, expenses and reasonable attorney fees and such other damages, if any, incurred by the Association as a result of such failure or refusal. F. Residential Records: 1. Unit Owners-Contact Information. The current name(s), residential address, and home and office telephone numbers of all Unit Owners shall be maintained in the Management Office at all times. 2. Unit Owners and Occupants-Essential Information. In the event of a building emergency, (e.g., fire, flooding) or a medical or other emergency, it is essential that the following be on record in the Management Office and be kept updated: a) Current home and office telephone numbers of the Unit Owner(s); and b) Names of those other than the Unit Owners residing in the unit and home and office phone number(s). c) Names, phone numbers and addresses of others that may be contacted in case of any emergency. 3. Unit Owners and Occupants-Additional Voluntary Information. In addition, each Unit Owner is encouraged to provide the Following to the Management Office: a) Any information which may be helpful in dealing with a medical or personal emergency; and b) Duplicate keys to all locks on the apartment entry door. G. Public Areas: 1. Obstructions to Public Areas. The public corridors, elevators, and stairways shall not be obstructed or used for any other purpose than for ingress or egress to or from the apartments. Nothing shall be left in the corridors, including footwear, doormats, cartons, etc. 2. No Association Liability for Property Left with Association Employees. Neither the Board, Association Managing Agent shall be responsible for any article left with any employee or in the Package Room. 3. No Attachments to Exterior of Building. In order to protect the 15 safety of owners, residents and guests and those below, and provide a uniform appearance, nothing shall be attached which extends the edge of the building or balcony. 4. No drilling. No drilling into concrete or other balcony surfaces is permitted. 5. No Children Playing in the Common Areas. Unsupervised children under age 13 shall not be permitted to play or loiter in any of the common areas. 6. Theft or Vandalism of Association Property. No person shall take or vandalize any portion of the Association property or represent to any vendor that he has authority to charge the Association for the cost of any goods or services for which that person does not have express written authority. 7. Reward for Identifying Vandal of Association property. The Board of Directors shall have the authority to grant a reward to any person who brings forth information leading to the identification and apprehension of person(s) removing or otherwise vandalizing any portion of the Property. If the offender is a Unit Owner or resident, the Association shall have the authority to require that person to appear before a hearing panel of the Board. The amount levied against such person may include the cost of such reward in addition to the amount of any fine, legal expense and the cost of restoration of the Property. 8. Lobby. The Association has an easement in the lobby and has an obligation to pay for maintaining of that easement for the Unit Owners. In order to protect the health and safety of Unit Owners, occupants and guests and protect against damage to this easement and the improvements made to the lobby: a) No Unit Owner, occupant, guest or any other person may use skates, roller blades, recreational scooters, or similar apparatus, or ride a bicycle on any portion of the residential lobbies. The Management Office shall initially warn such Unit Owner, occupant, guest or other person. A person who, after initial warning subsequently violates this subsection shall be subject to a fine and shall be liable to the Association for such damage. b) Any Unit Owner, occupant or guest or any other person who carries food, an open beverage can or open bottle in such a manner as to damage any portion of the lobby shall be liable to the Association for such damage. 9. Common Elements. 16 (a) No Unit Owner, occupant, guest or any other person may use skates or roller blades, other similar apparatus, or ride a bicycle in the bridge level elevator area, or on any carpeted portions of the common elements, including all corridors, and the Sixty First Floor (roof) sun decks. Such Unit Owner, occupant, guest or other person shall be subject to a fine for each violation and shall be liable to the Association for any damage caused by such skating, roller blading, use of other similar apparatus, or bicycle riding. (b) Any Unit Owner, occupant, guest or any other person who carries food, beverages or other substances in such a manner as to damage any portion of the common elements shall be liable to the Association for such damage. No glass jars, glass bottles or other glass vessels shall be allowed on the Sixty First (61st) Floor sundecks. (c) No smoking shall be permitted in the Association lobbies, hallways, elevators, elevator lobbies, the Management Office, Meeting Room, laundry rooms or 61st Floor sundecks. 10. Plaza Level. No Unit Owner, occupant, guest or any other person may use the plaza elevator lobby for deliveries by vendors or to transport furniture, packages or other item, which are larger or heavier than could be or is transported by a single person without prior consent by the Management Office. 11. Unit Door-Fronting on Corridors. The following standards shall be applicable to all doors, and door frames fronting on the corridors: a) Each door shall set forth the number of the unit on an adhesive label on black face with white lettering and numbers. Such label shall be prepared and installed only by the Management Office. Non-confirming lettering and numbers are not permitted. To avoid confusion, it is also recommended that the label include the name of the unit resident. b) Each door shall contain a mechanical door bell, door knob and other door hardware, each of a type approved by the Association. c) Each door and door frame may be painted only by the Association. c) With the exception of reasonable holiday or religious objects or decorations, nothing else shall be placed on the exterior of any door or door frame. Door molding and other attachments are not permitted.

12. Distribution of Restaurant Circulators and Other Commercial owner or any third party in connection with the review. In Literature. In order to protect the security and safety of Unit addition, the board’s approval of any alterations shall not be Owners, occupants and guests, there shall be no distribution of construed as a warranty or as an acknowledgment of the 17 sufficiency of such alterations. Further, the Board’s approval restaurant and other commercial brochures, circulators and other shall not be construed as a waiver of any requirements herein. literature in and through the common elements. If the Board determines that outside engineers or architectural H. Non-Public Areas: consultation is necessary, the owner shall be responsible for any 1. No Use of Equipment for Purposes Other Than That Intended. Water cost incurred for such services. closets and other apparatus shall not be used for any purpose b. Once the Board, or its representative, has approved the other than those for which they were constructed, nor shall any application for construction. A construction permit will be sweepings, rubbish, rags or any other improper articles be thrown issued by the Management Office and must be posted on the front into the same. Any damages resulting from misuse of these areas door during the construction period. or apparatus shall be the responsibility of the unit owner in c. Should construction exceed the time period requested in the which the misuse occurs. original construction application, a written request for an 2. No Installation of Heating, Air Conditioning or Hazardous extension must be made to the Management Office. Such approval Materials. No resident shall install or operate in the building shall not be unreasonably withheld. any refrigerating, heating or air conditioning or other apparatus d. It is recommended that owners consult with the Management Office or equipment, or use any illumination other than electric light, before having plans prepared to ensure that the plans do not or use or permit to be brought into the building any inflammable include the following changes, which are prohibited: oils or fluids, such as gasoline, kerosene, naphtha or benzine, or 1. Cutting or channeling of any concrete columns other explosives or articles deemed extra hazardous to life, limb 2. Cutting or channeling of any floors or ceiling deeper or property, without in each case obtaining the written consent of than ¾ inch without prior approval the Board or managing agent, acting in accord with the Board’s 3. Changes to the water/waste risers. direction. 25 3. Electrical Wiring-Overloading. No Unit Owner shall overload the 4. Changes to the location of toilets electrical wiring in the building, or operate any machines, 5. Changes to the electric circuit breakers or T.V. appliances, accessories or equipment in such a manner as to cause, cables and equipment. in the judgment of the Board, an unreasonable disturbance to 6. Alterations to beam channel vents others, or connect any machines, appliances, accessories or 7. Alterations or removal of any exterior windows or equipment to the heating or plumbing system, without the prior exterior window assembly. There shall be no removal written consent of the Board or the prior written consent of the of any parts or screws to the window aluminum frame Managing Agent, given in accord with the Board’s direction. assembly. There shall be no drilling or attaching 4. Balconies--Installation of Carpeting. No carpeting on any balcony brackets to the horizontal metal cover plate that shall be installed without the prior written approval of the encloses the space between the window wall assembly Managing Agent acting in accord with the Board’s direction. and the concrete ceiling. (a)The Board of Directors will permit the installation of outdoor 8. Alterations to the existing heating and air carpeting on the balcony concrete. However, if the balcony has a conditioning system, other than the repair or gray membrane surface, carpet installation must be accomplished replacement of the existing units. using the procedure recommended by the Management Office. 9. Removal of balcony dividers without prior approval by (b) Any new carpeting which was not contracted for or installed on the Board of Directors. the balcony concrete prior to the effective date of the 2004 10. Removal or disabling of automatic door closers from amendments to these Rules must be either green or tan. In hallway entrance doors. addition, any new carpeting installed after the effective date of 11.Removal, disabling or bypassing of any hot water the 2004 amendments to these Rules and Regulations must be either heater safety valve. The hot water safety valve is the green or tan. small pipe that connects the hot water heater to the 18 sink. Hot water heater replacement or reconfiguration (c) Unit Owners wishing to install carpeting on any balcony must must include a safety relief valve hose connected to the notify the Management Office as to the carpeting they intend to sink, or disposal units. install on the balcony together with a statement that the 12.Connection between vertically adjacent units carpeting will be installed in conformity with the recommended 13.Modification or replacement of hallway entrance doors procedures. 4. Assessment of Costs or Fines: (d) A Unit Owner may be fined and charged for the cost of a. Any cost of reconforming any unapproved alterations, additions or restoring the balcony if he or she fails to obtain and sign a copy improvement to the common element or limited common elements of the carpeting procedures or if he or she installs the carpeting shall be charged to the unit owner. If the time of an in violation of those procedures. [Formerly II(H)(5)]. Association employee is used to reconform such alterations 5. Balconies--Items or Structures Maintained, Stored, Secured or additions or improvements, the time of such employee will be Thrown From. charged to the unit owner. The Board may elect to employ an a) Nothing shall be dropped or thrown from balconies, outside contractor to perform such work, in which case the cost specifically including but not limited to fire crackers, lighted of that contractor’s work will be charged to the unit owner. matches, cigarettes, and hot coals. b. Unit owners will be subject to fines for any unauthorized or b) No dirt, debris, dust, snow ice or water shall be swept off the unapproved work. The fines schedule can be found in the MTCA edge of the balconies. Rules & Regulations. 5. Floor Covering Requirements: c) No items other than outdoor furniture, grills, decorative a. As of the effective date of the 2004 Amendments to these Rules foliage and bicycles shall be placed or stored on balconies. This and Regulations, Unit Owners may not install hard floor covering includes, but is not limited to cardboard boxes, refrigerators and without adequate sound deadening insulation between the covering trash/junk, etc. and the concrete. All flooring, except in unit entryway foyer, d) A Unit owner should put his or her hot coals in a fire proof kitchens and bathrooms, must conform to the specifications listed container as required by the City of Chicago ordinance when below. finished using the grill. b. Carpeting must be placed over at least 31 ounce 3/8’’ foam e) No structure or item for which there is otherwise authority rubber, or 80 ounce sponge rubber, or equivalent sound resistance under these Rules and Regulations may be attached to any portion padding. of the balcony or any support column in any way that extends above c. Floating laminated flooring (Pergo or equivalent) must be the top of a balcony railing or overhangs a balcony railing or installed over sound conditioned felt or foam padding. column. Because of the possibility that structures or other 26 items may be blown or fall off of the balcony, the unit owner d. Engineered glue down tongue and groove wood flooring must be shall be responsible for ensuring that all structures or other installed over a minimum of ¼’’ of dense corkboard adhered to the items are securely attached. concrete. f) A unit owner may display lights on his or her balcony provided e. Hardwood and parquet flooring, or similar materials must be that such lights are small, of limited illumination or intensity. installed over a minimum of ¾’’ plywood properly applied with Under no circumstances may halogen, neon, laser, strobe, or fiber either a sound conditioned felt or foam sound resistance padding optics, or other lights of high intensity or illumination be on both top and bottom, or over a minimum of ¼’’ dense corkboard displayed or maintained on any balcony. To ensure the comfort of adhered to the concrete. Raising the floor level preventing air all residents, balcony lights must be turned off by 12:00 A.M. circulation to the bottom of the floor heater could cause nightly. permanent damage to the heating element. g) Any damage resulting from the improper storage, use or f. In rooms other than the entryway foyer, kitchen and bathroom, attachment of any item on a balcony or the failure to follow any natural marble, flagstone, ceramic tile, granite and similar municipal safety requirements shall be the responsibility of the materials shall be installed over a minimum of 1/4” dense unit owner. corkboard adhered to the concrete. 19 6. Balcony alterations: Balcony alterations are limited to the 6. Balconies and Other Portions of the Common Elements--Alternations. following: a) No alteration of any portion of the common elements or limited a. The balcony railings may only be painted gloss black common elements, including the balconies, or any additions or b. The exterior of any original balcony door may only be painted improvements thereto shall be made by any Unit Owners without the black prior written approval of the Board of Directors. c. Balcony doors may only be replaced with MTCA approved glass doors b) With respect to changes to the balconies, the Board has as * set forth in Section 6(b)(iii) of Article II of these Rules applied the following standards: and Regulations. i) The balcony railings and dividers shall be painted d. Balcony dividers may not be removed or otherwise modified without with black gloss enamel. prior approval by the Board of Directors. Balcony dividers may ii) The exterior of any balcony door installed or only be painted gloss black unless otherwise approved by the painted after the effective date of the 2004 amendments Board. to these Rules and Regulations shall be black and any e. Balcony ceilings may only be painted beige (see management office screen or storm door installed or painted after the for specifications) effective date of the 2004 amendments to these Rules and f. Balcony floor may only be painted with MTCA approved coatings. Regulations shall be black or silver. g. Alteration, removal, or replacement of any part of the balcony iii) Balcony doors may have glass inserts so long as railings is prohibited. dimensions of the doors are the same as the original h. Balconies may not be covered with any materials other than Board doors, the doors have brushed aluminum frames, the approved carpets and paints. Decks or any other type of floor aluminum frames are clear and anodized, and the glass coverings are strictly prohibited. inserts are tempered and clear. 7. Plumbing Requirements: iv) Balcony dividers shall not be removed or a. All plumbing work is to be completed by a licensed plumber in a otherwise modified without prior Board approval. safe and workman like manner and in accordance with all code c) Any cost of reconforming any alterations, additions or requirements. improvements to the common element or limited common elements b. The Chief Engineer or Assistant Chief Engineer for the building shall be charged to the Unit Owner. If the time of an Association must be present when the actual work begins. employee is used to reconform such alterations, additions or c. The relocation of any water risers, waste lines, or venting improvements, the time of such employee may be charged to the Unit stacks is strictly prohibited. Owner. The Board, in its discretion, may employ an outside d. All connections made to the building venting or plumbing system contractor to perform such work, in which case the cost of that must be pre-approved. contractor’s work shall be charged to the Unit Owner. e. Individual shut off valves are required for newly installed 7. Balcony Door repair or Replacement. fixtures a) Where a balcony door has been damaged or deteriorated so that it f. High Pressure shut-off valves specifically designed for high rise may cause damage or injury to the Common Elements or any other unit usage must be installed and a qualified person has determined the balcony door should be 27 repaired or replaced, the Association is authorized to require the Unit Owner of the unit to which the balcony door is attached to repair g. Any drain line that exceeds a five-foot run from the fixture to or replace that balcony door at the unit owner’s expense. the main waste line is required to be properly vented, and should b) The balcony door shall following requirements: include a clean out. i) The color, material and dimensions shall conform to the 8. Water Riser Shut off Procedures: requirements of sections 6(b)(ii) or 6 (b)(iii) of Article II a. Water riser shut off fee is $75.00 for the first ½ hour plus of these Rules and Regulations; $75.00 for each additional ½ hour and will be billed to the unit ii)The door shall be fire rated and made of materials conforming owner. 20 b. Water riser shut offs are scheduled on Tuesday, Wednesday, and to the requirements of the City of Chicago Building Code; and Thursday between the hours of 10:00 am and noon. There are no iii)The style of the door shall conform with requirements set by the exceptions. Board to achieve uniformity of appearance and shall be c. Requests for water riser shut off should be submitted to the consistent with other existing balcony doors. Management office for scheduling with the Chief Engineer or c) The Association shall give the unit owner thirty days written Assistant Engineer, with a minimum of 48 hours prior notice. notice to repair the balcony door or to replace it with a new Request must include the reason for the water shut off. This door, in each case conforming with the requirements of this will determine if a construction application is required for Section. Should the unit owner fail or refuse to comply within approval. the thirty day period or such extensions of time as the Association d. Owner should inform plumber that they must be on site by 9:00 am. shall reasonably grant the unit owner, the Association shall have If the plumber is not on site by 10:00 am, the management will the authority following notice to access the unit for the purpose cancel the shut off for that day. of repairing or replacing the balcony door and charging the unit e. Plumber must have all materials and tools on site and ready prior owner for all costs incurred by the Association in repairing or to the water shut off. For liability reasons, the building staff replacing the balcony door, including materials and labor. If the will not supply any materials, nor will they assist plumber with time of any Association employee is used to repair or install the any plumbing work. door, the time of such employee may be charged to the unit owner. f. Only one riser will be turned off or scheduled per work day. The Board, in it’s discretion, may employ an outside contractor to 9. Washer/Dryer Installation: In-unit laundry facilities may only be perform such work, in which case the cost of that contractor’s work installed with the express approval of the board of Directors. shall be charged to the unit owner. a. Washer: The main concern regarding washers is utility drain 8. Balconies – Approval for Removal of Balcony Dividers. overload, which can cause leaks and permanent plumbing system a.) Where a unit owner owns two adjoining units and seeks Board damage. It is essential to ensure that the washer water approval for the removal of the balcony divider between his or her two evacuation can be drained without overloading the drainpipes with units, such approval shall be conditioned on the following: excess water, suds or lint. i.) The unit owner shall be solely liable for all costs related b. Washers may be installed provided that the waste water hose to the removal of the balcony divider, including but not limited evacuates into either a utility sink that can hold at least the to that of the contractor, permits, and insurance. The unit entire water load of the machine, or the bathtub. All evacuation owner shall agree to hold the Condominium Association harmless hoses must be equipped with a proper lint trap. Direct from any and all liability with respect to the action. connection of any evacuation lines to kitchen or bathroom drain ii.) Pursuant to Section 31 of the Condominium Property Act, an lines is strictly prohibited. Washers cannot be installed amendment to the Condominium Declaration shall be filed with the concurrently with dishwashers, or any other water appliances to Recorder of Deeds memorializing the Board approval to remove the the same drain line. balcony divider and the conditions attached to that approval. c. Washer model and specifications must be included in the The amendment to the Declaration shall be prepared by the construction application for board approval. Association, and all legal costs related to the preparation and d. Accessible gate shut-off valves for the water lines must be Filing of the amendment shall be born by the Unit Owner. installed. b.) If the adjoining units (that were combined)are later subdivided, e. Improper evacuation of washer waste water or improper lint either as result of the separate sale or transfer of ownership of prevention can cause sludge build up in the building plumbing the units to different purchasers or owners, or as a result of the system leading to serious damages to the building as well as to unit owner re-subdividing the units, by selling or the plumbing in other units. Unit owners will be subject to transferring one to a new owner or purchaser while maintaining fines for improper or unauthorized washer installations. ownership of the other, the unit owner shall be responsible at his or 28 her own cost for reinstalling the divider. When the balcony divider 10. Dryers is going to be reinstalled then the following conditions or standards f. An electric dryer should use the electric supply originally must be met: intended for the stove or oven, and may not exceed the presently 21 available load capacity. Connections must meet all applicable i.) When the unit owner intends to replace or reinstall balcony code requirements. Interior vented dryers must be equipped with divider(s), the unit owner must reinstall the original balcony adequate lint filtering and moisture controls for the square divider (s) or install new balcony divider(s) that match the footage of the apartment. Vented dryers must be connected to the original balcony divider(s) that match the original Marina City column vent lines. balcony divider. g. Dryer model and specifications must be included in the ii.) All original dividers to be re-installed must be anchored construction application for board approval. to the balcony floor and ceiling in accordance with the J. Reserved specifications and drawings approved by the Condominium K. Noise: Association. 1. Noise--Prohibition. No unit resident shall make or permit any iii.) All new replacement balcony dividers must be fabricated disturbing noises in the building by himself, his family, friends, and anchored to the balcony floor and ceiling in accordance with servants, contractors, subcontractors, or do or permit anything to the specifications and drawings approved by the Condominium be done by such persons that will unreasonably interfere with the Association. All new dividers must be approved by the rights, comforts, or convenience of other Unit Owners and Condominium Association prior to installation. occupants of the building. Such disturbing noises include but are iv.) Specifications and drawings of the approved Marina City not limited to noises from radios, televisions, stereos and other balcony divider are available in the Office of the sources in condominium units, on the balconies, on the sun decks Building. The color shall be black. (61st Floors), and elsewhere on the common elements. EXCEPTION: c.) The requirement to replace the balcony divider at the time of a) Association approved home improvement projects separation of ownership of the adjoining units may be waived at undertaken personally by the Unit Owner(s) that create the time the installation of the balcony divider would otherwise excessive noise are allowed seven days per week between the be required if the prospective owners of both units previously hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. only; and combined, consent in writing to the waiver and the waiver is not b) Approved projects undertaken by contractors in Units objected to by the Board of Directors. that create excessive noise are allowed during the hours d.) Nothing in Section II (H)(9-C) shall preclude the owner of either approved for that contractor’s work. effected unit within one year of the time of any subsequent 2. Musical Instruments. No unit resident shall play any musical change in the ownership of either effected unit from requesting instrument, or permit same to be played within the premises the Board to require the balcony divider to be reinstalled. Any between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and the following 10:00 a.m. such approval shall be at the Board’s sole discretion. If such a 3. Noise Violations--Notice. subsequent request is made and approved by the Board, the unit a) Where a Unit Owner, or tenant receives notice of a first owner making the request shall be solely responsible for all violation of the Noise Provisions of these Rules [Subsections costs related to the reinstallation of the balcony divider, as II(K)(1)-(3)], the Manager shall apprise such person that the well as for agreeing to hold the Association harmless with Rules provide that a second violation will result in the levying respect to any and all liability. In addition that unit owner of a fine against the Unit Owner and tenant. shall agree to follow the standards for reinstallation provided b) The Manager shall include in any such warning letter under this for elsewhere in this rule. subsection, a statement of the fines to be levied for future 9. Association Access to Units. violations. a) The Association shall be entitled to reasonable access to c) When a second or subsequent complaint regarding Subsections individual units and the Limited Common Elements as may be necessary II(K)(1)-(3) of these Rules is made against the Unit Owner, tenant for the maintenance, repair or replacement of any portion of the 29 Common Elements, Limited Common Elements or individual units or for or occupant within one year of a previous warning, the Manager making emergency repairs necessary to prevent damage to the Common shall have the authority to send out a notice of violation and Elements, Limited Common Elements or individual Units or for purposes fine to the person if such complaint is supported by a witness or of enforcement of these Rules and Regulations. evidence. If more than one year has passed since the previous 22 warning with no complaint having been made, for purposes of this b) Where possible, in the absence of an emergency, the Association subsection, the fine record shall be deemed to have been cleared. shall provide the resident of the unit reasonable notice prior to such L. Pets: entry. In the absence of an emergency, accurate advance notice shall 1. Pets-Limitations. No animals whatsoever shall be raised, or kept be given to the resident when entry is desired. If notification is in any unit, except for household cats, fish and small birds owned not effected, additional notice should be given for a subsequent as household pets by a Unit Owner, tenant or occupant, provided appointment. that such pet is not kept for any commercial purposes and provided c) Any Unit Owner, tenant or other occupant of a unit shall be that such pet entitled to request identification from any agent or employee of the Association or any cable television or other contractor prior to permitting them access to the Unit. d) The Association reserves the right in the event that the failure or refusal to reasonably provide access to a unit results in damage or injury to the Common Elements or any other Unit or in any other expense to assess the amount of the damage or injury to the Unit Owner. e) In the event emergency entrance to a Unit is required where keys to the unit have not been provided to the Management Office for purposes of access, the Association reserves the right to hold the Unit Owner responsible for the cost of damage to any door or other portion of the Unit, Common Elements or Limited Common Elements in order to secure entry. 10. Smoke/Heat Detector a.) No unit owner or tenant shall remove or disable any smoke/heat detector installed in his unit as a part of the Association installed alarm system, required by the City of Chicago. In the event that the smoke or heart detector sounds an alarm, the resident should notify security as to whether there is an emergency or whether this was a false alarm. In either event, the resident should not tamper with the devise but rather allow an Association employee enter the unit to reset the device. b.) No unit owner shall attempt to relocate the smoke/heat detector Installed in their unit during remodeling without the written permission on a applicable Building Permit. These devices have special non-spliced data wires and relocation, if permitted, must be accomplished by a qualified contractor. I. Changes in Unit Configuration By The Unit Owner Or A Contractor. Any changes in unit configuration shall be made in accordance with MTCA Construction Rules. 1. Contractor work in the units shall only be conducted between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00pm Monday through Friday. Work may be conducted on 23 Saturdays from 10am until 5 p.m. with prior approval. No contractor work may be conducted on Sundays or National holidays. Owners are permitted to conduct work on Saturdays, Sundays and National Holidays between the hours of 10:00 am and 5:00pm a. The owner must provide authorization for workmen to enter the unit if the office is to provide a building entry key card to them. Contractors must report to the management office to obtain an escort to the Contractor Parking Lot. Prior to parking their vehicle, Contractors must either pay a $10 fee or receive approval from the unit owner to have the fee billed to the unit. A $35 deposit will be required for each building-entry key card issued. Only authorized contractors will be admitted into the building – as provided by the list of contractors included in the application for construction. Owner must schedule the service elevator through the Management Office for the delivery of large materials. Service elevator availability is on a first come basis. b. In order to prevent damage to the common areas, appropriate protective floor covering must be laid neatly down the corridors and in the elevators while construction items are being transported through the building. Interior walls and doors must also be protected from potential scratches or damage. All protective floor covering must be removed at the end of each working day and all debris vacuumed nightly by the contractor. A charge will be assessed to the unit owner if any clean-up has to be completed by the building personnel. c. Contractors must deliver all materials in the loading area at Marina Level then proceed to park their vehicle in either the designated contractor parking of the Marina Level or on the street. Contractor parking passes to the designated contractor parking area can be purchased from the management office. No vehicles shall be permitted to park in the loading dock area. No contractor shall be permitted to walk through the lobby with any tools or material at any time. Contractors shall only be permitted to use the service elevator d. All construction waste and debris must be placed heavy-duty garbage bags and placed in the garbage dumpsters at the marina level or hauled away. Carpeting and pads must be removed from the building. Management Office should be contacted for instructions on disposing of old cabinets, appliances and fixtures.. The use of the garbage chute for disposal of construction materials and carpeting is strictly prohibited. No construction waste or decorating materials may be disposed of through unit plumbing or janitor drains. e. Any damage whatsoever that is caused to the building or to any other units as a result of work performed in the unit being remodeled, shall be repaired at the owner’s expense. f. The owner is responsible for securing all required permits. g. All work performed shall be in accordance with City of Chicago codes for high rise residential buildings. h. All work is subject to inspection by the building personnel or its agent. The building Management reserves the right to stop or cause to delay any work which has not been approved or which deviates from 24 the approved plans. All open walls where electrical or plumbing work was conducted must be inspected by the management office prior to closing. i. Owners must complete and submit an application for construction which must include the following: 2. Required submissions: a. Drawing or plans of the proposed work together with a narrative description of each modification b. Proof that contractors that are being employed carry the proper licenses for the work they are performing. c. A certificate of liability insurance naming Marina Towers Condominium Association and the managing agent as additional insured. d. A completed indemnification agreement signed by the owner and the contractor indemnifying the MTCA from any damage or liability or any action brought by any governmental authority alleging violation of any applicable building, zoning, environmental, licensing or other laws or ordinances e. Copies of all required/pertinent city permits. The owner and or contractor shall be required to investigate whether any city permits are required for the proposed work. 3. Board Action Required: a. The Board of Directors or its designee shall review and approve all construction applications and such approval shall not be unreasonably withheld. The Board shall not be liable to the

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The construct studies the transitions of the mechanical deformation of kinematic surfaces. The translation and rotation that the plates undergo is in response to movement deformation acting on the surface.

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responsive_parasite : future anticipation of smart architecture creating an architectural interface that interacts to human density and movement patterns; The floor plates would harness energy from vibrations. A futuristic response to Bertrand Goldberg’s Chicago ‘Marina City’ - ‘City within a city’. 3 phases of physicality: 1. floor plate 2. transitions 3. capsule that taps into energized floor system (energy taken from vibration of movement)

[REMOTE] MARINA CITY

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[REMOTE] MARINA CITY

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My armature did not deal with a physical construct. Rather, I performed a virtual and code intervention wherein I combed through building code to find a loophole that would make the other students’ projects work. As such, My task in this construction was to curate and create a set of translucent, wayfinding panels that changed in width, according to the negative space created from Marina City. Each panel is detailed on the right.

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09 MARINA CITY MT 10 [REMOTE] MARINA CITY

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R This architectural periscope reflects and multiplies looking at several parallel processes that sight lines. It exposes and delivers scenes not usu- may seem disparate at first. An overriding process that will almost always influence a ally visible to visitors. Unlike the cinematic gaze, project is the use of building codes. the relationship between the viewer and the observed is reversible: the observed An attempt was made to understand how codes are con can look back at the viewer. It structed through a covert implementation on the overall proj R ect, while recontextualizing this understanding into different changes the way we look, the way modes of thinking. This creates layers of information that exist we relate to their environments and both in the physical and virtual realm, and finally relates back s u r r o u n d i n g s . t o t h e v i eV w e r

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Considered a luxury amenity at the time of Marina MaCity’s conception in the 1960’s, the distribution of the electrical power through the grid has fallen into disrepair in the subsequent decades, as hundreds of additional power lines are added to the system per year to keep up with demand. Through the introduction of technology, “smart grid” systems have allowed for an emphasis to be placed on quality, rather than quantity. As a result, individual apartment units are able to monitor their consumption on an hourly basis, adjusting to avoid peak hours and reduce the overall load, while also Ma responding to lower prices. In the introverted relationship of the high rise tower, supply and demand allows for electrical power to become a tangible commodity, capable of being sold and traded between the residents. Using the stock trade in New York as a model, the Marina City Resource Exchange will become a means for residents to sell the power generated within their unit to other users across the city without placing any additional load on the established power grid.

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The solar wall is located within the parking decksresponsive_parasite : future anticipation of smart architecture creating an architectural interface that interacts to human density and move moveof the towers. Parking spaces become tempo-ment patterns; The floor plates would harness energy from vibrations. rary work/rest areas for visitors to park andA futuristic response to Bertrand Goldberg’s Chicago ‘Marina City’ within a city’. recharge their electric car batteries, laptops, cell‘City 3 phases of physicality: phones, and various electronic anticipates the devices. The wall’s energy is stored1. floor plate 2. transitions through audio, into a battery within the station for3. capsule that taps into energized floor system (energy taken from visitors to simply plug, charge, andvibration of movement) d e p a r t .

C

OBJECTIVE_input is the initial phase of automated architecture that future of the built environment. The input of information is obtained

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Photon Scale

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R This architectural periscope reflects and multiplies looking at several parallel processes that sight lines. It exposes and delivers scenes not usu- may seem disparate at first. An overriding process that will almost always influence a ally visible to visitors. Unlike the cinematic gaze, project is the use of building codes. the relationship between the viewer and the observed is reversible: the observed An attempt was made to understand how codes are con can look back at the viewer. It structed through a covert implementation on the overall proj R ect, while recontextualizing this understanding into different changes the way we look, the way modes of thinking. This creates layers of information that exist we relate to their environments and both in the physical and virtual realm, and finally relates back s u r r o u n d i n g s . t o t h e v i eV w e r

Model Scale

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project challenges the current state of technology, society, and commodity. We the present, temporary renewal is a flexible and self self- My we dwell comfortably in a purgatorial state of mind. How can we learn from the previous deploying solar cell wall that responds to natural purgatory, to brew an heaven-ist or evolutionary design culture? How might my, or your, totalitarian voice influence a new standard of living? Using Marina City as a universal thesis, I daylight. During periods of daylight, Marina propose an environmental open system. City’s floor plates expand vertically to increase The idea is to understand how an open system works. This concept relates to how matter or the area of the solar cell wall to collect more energy can flow into and out of a system. Which can be very similar to human-environmental relationships. This open system allows for the collaboration of smaller systems to fuel, filter, and energy. At night, the plates collapse to return supply the immediate environment through small tidal stream generators, pyroelectricity, and biomass collections. In this evolutionary design culture recyclability will be an everyday fabric. This the cell wall to its condensed state. open system idea has been knighted as the re-gurigator.

URBANIST/DOMESTIC

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OBJECTIVE_input is the initial phase of automated architecture that anticipates the future of the built environment. The input of information is obtained through audio, visual, and tactile triggers that create a memory record within the archiMo This record then goes through CRITICAL_analysis in which it is ana- T h i s p r Ko j e c t w a s tecture. i n t e n d e d t o p r o v i d e t lyzed for commonalities, occupant habits, and user preferences. Based e x p e r i e n c e o f t h e M a a C i y Kt on the analyzed record an AUTOMATED_response is delivered in which n T o w e r b y c r e a t i n g i t s n the architecture transforms itself to better suit the complex interaction be- t i v e v o l u m e o n a h u m a n s Mo a l e tween itself and the human condition. The system Mo then repeats itself c V City requires until overall variance approaches zero. Reconstructing Marina

SCALES ARE SINGULAR POINTS OF REFERENCE; META-SCALE GIVES CONTINUITY

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This architectural periscope reflects and multiplies looking at several parallel processes that R sight lines. It exposes and delivers scenes not usu- may seem disparate at first. An overriding process that will almost always influence a ally visible to visitors. Unlike the cinematic gaze, project is the use of building codes. the relationship between the viewer and the observed is reversible: the observed An attempt was made to understand how codes are con can look back at the viewer. It structed through a covert implementation on the overall proj R ect, while recontextualizing this understanding into different changes the way we look, the way modes of thinking. This creates layers of information that exist we relate to their environments and both in the physical and virtual realm, and finally relates back s u r r o u n d i n g s . t o t h e v i eV w e r

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OBJECTIVE_input is the initial phase of automated architecture that anticipates the future of the built environment. The input of information is obtained through audio, visual, and tactile triggers that create a memory record within the archiMo This record then goes through CRITICAL_analysis in which it is ana- T h i s p r Ko j e c t w a s tecture. i n t e n d e d t o p r o v i d e t lyzed for commonalities, occupant habits, and user preferences. Based e x p e r i e n c e o f t h e M a a C i y on the analyzed record an AUTOMATED_response is delivered in which n Kt T o w e r b y c r e a t i n g i t s n the architecture transforms itself to better suit the complex interaction be- t i v e v o l u m e o n a h u m a n s Mo condition. The system then repeats itself c a l e tween itself and the human Mo until overall variance approaches zero. Reconstructing Marina V City requires

h e r i e

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h i s p r o j e c t w a s - The construct studies the transitions of the mechanical deformation of n t e n d e d t o p r o v i d e t h e kinematic surfaces. The translation and rotation that the plates undergo is in x p e r i e n c e o f t h e M a r i response to movement deformation a C i t y acting on the surface. o w e r b y c r e a t i n g i t s n e g a i v e v o l u m e o n a h u m a n s a l e graft_marina city aims to change the viewer

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Considered a luxury amenity at the time of Marina MaCity’s conception in the 1960’s, the distribution of the electrical power through the grid has fallen into disrepair in the subsequent decades, as hundreds of additional power lines are added to the system per year to keep up with demand. Through the introduction of technology, “smart grid” systems have allowed for an emphasis to be placed on quality, rather than quantity. As a result, individual apartment units are able to monitor their consumption on an hourly basis, adjusting to avoid peak hours and reduce the overall load, while also responding to Ma lower prices. In the introverted relationship of the high rise tower, supply and demand allows for electrical power to become a tangible commodity, capable of being sold and traded between the residents. Using the stock trade in New York as a model, the Marina City Resource Exchange will become a means for residents to sell the power generated within their unit to other users across the city without placing any additional load on the established power grid.

COVERT~RECURSION

N

OBJECTIVE_input is the initial phase of automated architecture that anticipates the future of the built environment. The input of information is obtained through audio, visual, and tactile triggers that create a memory record within the archiMo This record then goes through CRITICAL_analysis in which it is ana- T h i s p r Ko j e c t w a s tecture. i n t e n d e d t o p r o v i d e t lyzed for commonalities, occupant habits, and user preferences. Based e x p e r i e n c e o f t h e M a n a C i y Kt on the analyzed record DRAWINGS an AUTOMATED_rBREATHE; esponse is delivered in which CODES DENY.T oLET’S w e BREAK r b y c THE r e aCYCLE. t i n g i t s n the architecture transforms itself to better suit the complex interaction be- t i v e v o l u m e o n a h u m a n s Mo a l e tween itself and the human condition. The system Mo then repeats itself c V City requires until overall variance approaches zero. Reconstructing Marina

PROJECTING SCALE The Marina City materials studio project is a full semester group project that deals with retrofitting Marina City in Chicago with “upgrades” that keep the superstructure current with the urban fabric. In the final project, a single construct was produced, with all scales simlutaneously contained within it.

perception of marinaA city improving and

V City requires updating its outward appearance. a skeletal Reconstructing Marina looking at several parallel processes that “skin” wraps around the towers with the dual function of cleansing the existing concrete and may seem disparate at first. An overriding creating visual interest by giving marina A city a process that will almost always influence a defined facade. what once was void has grafted. project is the use of building codes. been

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An attempt was made to understand how codes are con- points generated by an algorithm that describe marina city’s outermost edges. a structed through a covert implementation on the overall proj- random sampling of these points serves as the ect, while recontextualizing this understanding into different anchor points for a pattern that mimics the natural division of cells with nuclei, or a modes of thinking. This creates layers of information that exist section cut through many soap bubbles. this both in the physical and virtual realm, and finally relates back constitutes the new “life pattern” for marina i t y . t o t h e v i eV w e rc

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Ma

N

N

Ma C

Ma

N

N Ma

URBANIST DOMESTIC

Rather than merely stating where loopholes could be sought in building codes, my final intervention introduced users to participate in changing manipulating such codes to their advantage. Situated on the “virtual” 1/4 scale, I handcrafted an optical system that lit onto the 1/8 scale model and onto a “1:1” scale projection on the wall. Small slides explaining each project’s work were placed into a holder, and people were invited to write their own intervention, similar to the game of “mad libs”. This strategy enables designers to be cognizant of the ultimate determinant of their design, the public sphere and to design according to their needs.

N

S

COVERT~INVERT

ES TIC

[REMOTE] MARINA CITY ADVISOR: ERIK HEMINGWAY CHAMPAIGN, IL 2010

MaCity’s conception in the 1960’s, the distribution Considered a luxury amenity at the time of Marina of the electrical power through the grid has fallen into disrepair in the subsequent decades, as hunhun dreds of additional power lines are added to the system per year to keep up with demand. Through the introduction of technology, “smart grid” systems have allowed for an emphasis to be placed on quality, rather than quantity. As a result, individual apartment units are able to monitor their concon sumption on anMa hourly basis, adjusting to avoid peak hours and reduce the overall load, while also responding to lower prices. In the introverted relationship of the high rise tower, supply and demand allows for electrical power to become a tangible commodity, capable of being sold and traded between the residents. Using the stock trade in New York as a model, the Marina City Resource Exchange will become a means for residents to sell the power generated within their unit to other users across the city without placing any additional load on the established power grid.

DO M

YR3. PRE. ARCH

10 [REMOTE] MARINA CITY

09 MARINA CITY MT

S

R

R

R

R

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Mo

Mo

Mo

Mo

Mo

Mo

Mo

Mo

V

V

V

V

V

V

00011011110110011101111001001011000010000010010011011100110110110101100001011100100111

1011001 1100100101 10000100000 10111101 10111001 110111100100101 10000100000 0100001000000110011101110010011010010110010010010100001000000111001101111001011100 010000110110111101101110011100110110100101100100011001010111001001100101011001000010000 0001101110001 11001101 10101 1100100111001001 1 1001001 101101 11001 10110000101 1011010110000101 11 1101110100011001010110110101110011001000000110100001100001011101100110010100100000 00110000100100000011011000111010101111000011101010111001001111001001000000110000101101 1001001101 01100001011011000110110000110111101100111011110010010110000100000100100110111001101101 1001110111001 1001001 100 01000010000001 1101110100101 100100110100101 100 10101100001011100100111010000100000011001110111001001101001011001001001010000100 1010110010101101110011010010111010001111001001000000110000101110100001000000111010001 01000010000001 11001101111001011100110111010001100101011011010111001100100000011010000110000101 100100101000010000001 11001101111001 100101 100100101000010000001 10111100 11001011100 100001 10110011001010010000001100001011011000110110000110111101100111011110010010110000100 101000011001010010000001110100010000110110111101101110011100110110100101100100011001010 110111010001 101101011101 1001 100100000 1101110010101 101000110010101 10101 11001100100000 000100100100011011110110011101111001001011000010000010010011011100110110110101100001 0111001001110100001000000110011101110010011010010110010010010100001000000111001101 1110010011001010110010000100000011000010010000001101100011101010111100001110101011100 0110100001 10000101 1101100110010100100000 0110100001 10000101 1101100110010100100000 1110010111001101110100011001010110110101110011001000000110100001100001011101100110010 10011110010010000001100001011011010110010101101110011010010111010001111001001000001100 0110000101 1001000000110000101101100011011000011011110110011101111001001011000010000010010011 1011000110110001 100001 101 111011001 1 110111 01 0110000101 101 100001 10111101 10111001 1100110110110101100001011100100111010000100000011001110111001001101001011001001001 00101110100001000000111010001101000011001010010000001110100010000110110111101101110011 100100101 100001000001001001 10111001101 100100101 100001000001001001 101101 11001101101 01000010000001110011011110010111001101110100011001010110110101110011001000000110100 10011011010010110010001100101011100100110010101100100001000000110000100100000011011 1010110000101 1100100111001001 101000010000001 100 1010110000101 1101000010000001 1000001101111011001110111100100101100001000001001001101110011011011 0101100001011100100111010000100000011001110111001001101001011 00011101010111100001110101011100100111100100100000011000010110110101100101011011100110100 1110111001001 10010010010100001000 11101110100101 100100110100101 100100100101000010000010010010100001000000111001101111001011100110111010001100101 1011101000111100100100000011000010111010000100000011101000110100001100101001000000 000111001 101111001 100101 101111010001 1 0001 101111001 1100101 1001101110010101 101000110010101 10110110101110011001000000110100001100001011101100110010100100 10010000001 10100001 10000101 11 0110101 1100110010000001 10100001 10000101 11 000011000010110110001101100001101111011001110111100100101100001 11101000100001101101111011011100111001101101001011001000110010101110010011001010110010000 011010111001

CODE INVERSION

0110011001010010000001 10000101 0110011001010010000001 100001010000010010011011100110110110001101111011001110111100100101100001

Ma

N

S

N

Ma

C

Mo

C

K

K

9 8 7

N

N

6 5 3

N

C

N

RU AB IN TS

4

C

C

N

2 1

S K

6P S

1P

aM

N

2P

R

3P

A

A

A

A

4P

C

5P

S

S

S

C

V

G

C

K

K A

A

A

R

S N A

V

K

V

K

K

V

oM

V

aM

aM

aM

aM

V

V

V

K

S

oM

aM

N C

C

aM

aM

aM

R

oM

A

oM

oM

R

R

R

A

R

R

oM

oM

oM

oM

R

V

21 11 01 9 8 7

N

N

N

6 5 4 3

N 2 1

RU AB IN TS

C

C

N

N

C

C

D

S

O EM TS CI

K

6P S

1P

aM

N

2P

R

3P

A

A

A

A

4P

C

5P

S

S

S

C

A

A

V

G

C

K

K

K

A

A

A

R

S N A

V

K

V

K

V

K

oM

V

aM

aM

aM

aM

V

V

V

K

S

oM

aM

N C

aM

aM

aM

C

K

oM

oM

oM

R

oM

A

oM

oM

If the landlord makes a good-faith effort to re-rent the dwelling unit at a fair rental and is unsuccessful, the tenant shall be _______ for the rent due for the period of the rental agreement. The tenant shall also be liable for ________________________ _______________________in seeking to re-rent the dwelling unit.

K

oM

oM

oM

If the landlord makes a good-faith effort to re-rent the dwelling unit at a fair rental and is unsuccessful, the tenant shall be liable for the rent due for the period of the rental agreement. The tenant shall also be liable for the r e a s o n a b l e advertising costs incurred by the landlord in seeking to re-rent the dwelling unit.

D

O EM TS CI

K

R

R

R

A

R

oM

oM

R

R

oM

oM

V

10100101 11011001 10100101 1001010010 010110010010010100001000000111001101111 0010001 10100101 1101 100110100101 001101001011011100110010101110011001000000110 0010001 001011100110111010001100101011011010111001 10000101 1011000010000001 00111010101 10000101 101100001000000110010000001101000011000010111011001100 000101110010011001010010000001100001011001 00111010101 10000101 11000001 10000101 11001001 1101 1101 10100100000011000010110110001101100001 10000101 11000001 10000101 11001001 0001100100011001010110010000100000011101 0001101 1110110011101111001001011000010000010 10101 10111001 0001 10110010101 1010110010101 101111010000100 100111010000100 101 010011011100110110110101100001011100100111 00011011110010000001110100011010000110010 0000100001 11010101 10111001 11010001 1100 1100 010000100000011001110111001001101001011 11010101 10110100101 1100110100101 11010001 10000101 11001001 1001010010000001 10000 110010000001 10000101 11001001 1001010010000001 1000000100100101000010000001110011011110010 100100000011100110111100101110011110010000001 111001101110100011001010110110101110011001 10110001 1001010010000001 1101011100001000 10110001001 10110001 1001010010000001 10101100001000 00000011010000110000101110110011001010 0111010001100101011011010010000 10110001001 000110100101 10111001 10100101 11011001 10100101 10 10 010000001100001011011000110110000110111 000110100101 10110010001 1100110010001 10100101 1101 100110100101 101100111011110010010110000100000100100 001110000011001010111001000100 010001 11010101 10000101 1011000010000001 10000101 1100 1100 11011100110110110101100001011100100111010 010001 11010101 10000101 1011000010000001 10000101 00001111001011001010110000101110 000110000101 11001001 11010001 10110101 10111001 000110000101 11001001 11010001 10110010101 1010110010101 1011110 1001110000100000011001110111001001101001011001 1100110111100101110 11010101 10111001 11010001 11001100 1000010000001 11010101 10110100101 1100110100101 11010001 1100110000100101000010000001 0100010000001110100011011110010 1000010000001 01101110100011001010110110101110011001000

C

A

V

01

V

A

R

If the landlord succeeds in re-renting the dwelling unit at a fair rental, the tenant shall be ________ for the amount by which the rent due from the date of premature termination to the termination of the initial rental agreement _______ the fair rental subsequently received by the landlord from the date of premature _________ to the termination of the initial rental agreement.

N

R

A

The landlord shall _____________ a reasonable sublease proposed by the _________ without an assessment of additional fees or charges.

11

Mo

If the landlord succeeds in re-renting the dwelling unit at a fair rental, the tenant shall be liable for the amount by which the rent due from the date of premature termination to the termination of the initial rental agreement exceeds the fair rental subsequently received by the landlord from the date of premature termination to the termination of the initial rental agreement.

OVERT~INTERVENTION

21

Mo

The landlord shall accept a reasonable sublease proposed by the tenant without an assessment of additional fees or charges.

If the tenant ____________ the rental agreement prior to its expiration date, except for cause authorized by this chapter, the landlord shall make a good faith effort to _____________________, which shall be the rent charged for comparable dwelling units in the premises or in the same neighborhood.

A

0100011100100110100101100010011101010111010001101001011011110110111000100000 1011000110110001 100001 101 111011001 101 100001 10111101 1011100111011000001001001101110011011011010110000101110010011101000010000 00110011101110010011010010110010010010100001000000111001101111 100001000001001001 1 1100100101 100001000001001001 100101110011011101000110010101101101011100110010000001101000011 0110111101100110001000000111010001101000011001010010000001100101011011000 1100100101 0111001101 10101 110010 110010 0000101110110011001010010000001100001011011000110110000110111 01101 11001 10110000101 1011010110000101 1100101011000110111010001110010011010010110001101100001011011000 011101000010000001 1001110111001 10011011100 10110011101111001001011000010000010010011011100110110110101100 011101000010000001 010000001110000011011110111011101100101011100100010000001110100 1 0 11 00 11 1 0 0 1 11 1 0 0 1 11 00 11 1 0 1 1 1 1 0010111001001110100001000000110011101110010011010010110010010 0 0 00 00 00 10 1 0 0 1 11 00 01 00 00 10 1 0 0 1 01 00 00 10 00 1 0 0101000010000001110011011110010111 100011100100110100101100010011101010111010001101001011011110110111 1 1 1 1 0 1 01 10 1 0 0 1 11 1 0 0 1 11 00 01 10 00 11 1 0 1 1 0 1 01 10 0 1 001101110100011001010110110101110011 1 0 01 10 0 0 01 00 00 00 00 10 1 01 10 1 1 1 0 0 01 00 10 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 00100000011010000110000101110110 111011001100010000001 1101000110100001 100101001 INTERVENTIONS00010000001 ARE OUR101 LOOPHOLES TO NATURE. EXPLOIT IT. 1 1 1 1 0 1 01 10 00 01 00 00 00 00 10 1 0 0 1 01 00 10 00 01 10 0 1 01100101001000000110000101101100 011011000011011110110011101111001001 000000110010101101100011001010110001101110100011100100110100101 1 0 01 10 00 11 00 01 10 00 01 00 00 00 00 10 1 0 1 1 1 1 10001101100001011011000010000001110000011011110111011101100101 0 0 00 00 00 10 1 0 0 1 11 1 0 0 1 01 00 10 1 0 0 1 01 0 0 0001101111011001110111100100101100001000 00100100110111001101101101011000010111001 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 01011000010000001 10100101 10111001 01011000010000001 10100101 1011110011 001110100001000000110011101110010011010

If the tenant terminates the rental agreement prior to its expiration date, except for cause authorized by this chapter, the landlord shall make a good faith effort to re-rent the tenant’s dwelling unit at a fair rental, which shall be the rent charged for comparable dwelling units in the premises or in the same neighborhood.

A

10 L

My role also included curating and designing the large format, wayfinding poster to graphically describe our projects onto a two-dimensional plane. Describing my intervention, I designed the background as text describing that particular building in Chicago. Viewing this text further away reveals the skyline Marina City is situated in. Each number corresponded to the studio individual’s portion in our book. The drawings on this page refer to my section in the studio book.


09 MARINA CITY MT

10 [REMOTE] MARINA CITY

10 R


YRx. PRE. ARCH

11 NON-STUDIO WORK CITY_FLOW Martin Luther King Drive

SITE PLAN

PERSPECTIVE 1

NORTH

L5

Symbol

Type

F1

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceililng mounted

F2

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

F3

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

Bedroom

F4

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

Corridor

F5

Flourescent

2-lamp, indirect, cool light, ceiling mounted

Parking

L1

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

L2

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

L3

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

L4

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

F1 L2 L6

L3

F5

L5

LED

L7

L4

H6 H8

LED

SAMPLE RETAIL PLAN

NORTH

Bathroom, bedroom

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store, parking

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

Recessed downlight, general lighting

Kitchen

In designing these spaces, a layering of lighting is implemented to create interesting spaces while highlighting a particular function.

LED Halogen

H2

Halogen

Downlight, pendant, narrow

Kitchen

H3

Halogen

Spotlight

Kitchen

H4

Halogen

Accent wall, wash, uplight/downlight

Kitchen

Halogen

Downlight

Living room, dinging room

Halogen

H7

L8

Store

H1

H6

H1 - H4

CITY_FLOW is a mixed-use development in Chicago, Illinois. In lighting the project, our group focused on different spaces for the building: eating, sleeping, shopping, and parking. Each of these functions require a discrete lighting program to facilitate its use.

Location

L8

H5

I1 H5

Description

LED

L6

PARKING STRUCTURE PLAN

NORTH

Halogen

H8

Halogen

I1

Incandescent

I2 I3 I4

Reading light, medium

Living Room

Reading light, medium

Bedroom

Dim, warm light

Bedroom, lounge

Wall wash

Dining Room

Incandescent

Mirror evaluation Light

Bathroom

Incandescent

Reading light

Bedroom

Incandescent

Downlight

Parking

The result is a lighting system for CITY_FLOW that highlights its architectural elements without dominating the space.

FIRST FLOOR RESIDENTIAL PLAN

NORTH

I3 F2 H7 H8

F2 F2

I4

I2

SECOND FLOOR RESIDENTIAL PLAN

RESIDENTIAL UNIT PERSPECTIVE

NORTH

RESIDENTIAL UNIT SECTION 1

RESIDENTIAL UNIT SECTION 2

RETAIL PERSPECTIVE

SAMPLE RETAIL SECTION

PARKING STRUCTURE SECTION

Schedule

HAND-DRAWN RENDERING ARCH 231 - ANATOMY OF BUILDINGS. FALL 2009. graphite on paper

LIGHTING GROUP PROJECT INTERVENTION ARCH 341 - LIGHTING + ACOUSTICS. FALL 2010.

Symbol

Type

F1

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceililng mounted

F2

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

F3

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

Bedroom

F4

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

Corridor

F5

Flourescent

2-lamp, indirect, cool light, ceiling mounted

Parking

L1

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

L2

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

L3

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

L4

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

Store

L5

LED

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store, parking

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

L6

LED

L7

THE YELLOW BUILDING

THE YELLOW BUILDING

Notting HIll, London, 2007 Architect: Alford Hall Monaghan Morris SE Consultant: Adams Kara Taylor Client: Hogue Limited

LOADING PATHS

2

5

LED Halogen

H2

Halogen

H3

Halogen

H4

Halogen

H5

Halogen

Downlight

Living room, dinging room

H6

Halogen

Reading light, medium

Living Room

H7

Halogen

Reading light, medium

Bedroom

H8

Halogen

I1

Incandescent

I2

Incandescent

I3

Incandescent

I4

Incandescent

In order to simulate the climate of London, England, the selection of Seattle, Washington was used for the loading analysis, as it similarly constitutes a temperate maritime climate experienced in London.

6

Fifth Floor

8

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

Recessed downlight, general lighting

Kitchen

Downlight, pendant, narrow

Kitchen

Spotlight

Kitchen

Accent wall, wash, uplight/downlight

Kitchen

Dim, warm light

Bedroom, lounge

Wall wash

Dining Room

Mirror evaluation Light

Bathroom

Reading light

Bedroom

Downlight

Parking

Schedule

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS Notting HIll, London, 2007 Architect: Alford Hall Monaghan Morris SE Consultant: Adams Kara Taylor Client: Hogue Limited

Case 1

69% LL REDUCTION

6

13.43

90

13.26

80

12.94

70

12.51

60

12.08

50

11.65

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

40

11.12

30

10.48

windward pressure, psf

9 11

-8.25 leeward pressure, psf

53% LL REDUCTION

windward pressure, psf

R/C Floor Plates Multispan Gable Roof R/C Diagrid Columns Aluminum Louvres Curtainwall

25

10.05

12.08 11.65 11.12 10.48

9.62

15

9.09

12.51

10.05

20

9.62 8

12.94

9.09

height, ft

98.4 90 80 70 60 50

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

40 30

-8.40 leeward pressure, psf

98.4

13.26

Roof Plan

25 20 15

height, ft

Case 2

a

a

a a 3 2

Office Floor

aa

3 3

2

2’2’

1

1

a 3 2 a

3 3

-0.8 -0.8 -0.8 -0.8

qhGCp -15.808 08 -15.808 08 -15.808 08 -15.808 08

2

BALANCED + SLIDING LOADS 21psf max, 5.25 psf min

UNBALANCED LOADING

3

1 2 2' 3

effective area GCp 546.58 11.58 424.8 9

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure a = 3 ft

-1.1 -2.5 -1.7 -2.6

qhGCp 6 -21.736 -49.4 4 -33.592 2 -51.376 6

+/- 3369.87

15

+/- 2059.78

height, ft

moment, lbft

98.4 90 80 70

9.06

60

8.74

50

8.34

40

7.86

30

6.82

ROOF PROFILE

8.74 8.34 7.86 7.54 7.22 6.82

98.4

+/- 13467.77

90

+/- 12981.95

80

+/- 12124.62

70

+/- 10981.52

60

+/- 9838.41

50

+/- 8695.31

40

+/- 7266.42

30

+/- 5551.76

25

+/- 4408.66

20

+/- 3265.55

15

+/- 1836.67

height, ft

moment, lbft

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

-6.30 leeward pressure, psf

9.06

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

25

10.08

98.4

9.94

90

9.70

80

9.38

70

9.06

60

8.74

50

8.34

40

7.86

30

7.54

20

7.22

15

6.82

height, ft

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

25 20 15

height, ft

Case 4 7.57 7.46 7.28 7.04 6.80 6.56 6.26

5.42

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS CASE STUDY ARCH 551 - STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. FALL 2010 hand calculation, Adobe Illustrator, RISA-3D

+/- 4417.94

20

9.38

5.66

Longitudinal Section

25

9.70

5.90

Longitudinal Elevation

+/- 5466.01

9.94

7.22

zone

+/- 7038.12

30

10.08

7.54

3

2’

40

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

Case 3

a

Wall Section

2’

effective area GCp 12457.66 1500.65 11812.72 1476.59

+/- 2.79 psi internal pressure a = 3.57 ft

a

Roof Wind Load

Construction of Structural Diagrid

4 5 4' 5'

5’

2m

+/- 8348.21

9.38

-6.30 leeward pressure, psf

4’

5 5’

1

+/- 9396.28

50

9.70

5.12

98.4

+/- 14072.00

90

+/- 13372.94

80

+/- 12139.31

70

+/- 10494.46

60

+/- 8849.62

50

+/- 7204.77

40

+/- 5148.72

30

+/- 2681.45

25

+/- 1036.61

20

-/+ 608.23

15

-/+ 2664.29

height, ft

moment, lbft

7.57 7.46

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

7.28 7.04 6.80 6.56 6.26 5.90 5.66 5.42 5.12

98.4

+/- 14072.00

90

+/- 13372.94

80

+/- 12139.31

70

+/- 10494.46

60

+/- 8849.62

50

+/- 7204.77

40

+/- 5148.72

30

+/- 2681.45

25

+/- 1036.61

20

-/+ 608.23

15

-/+ 2664.29

height, ft

moment, lbft

+/- 3.57 psi internal pressure

-4.73 leeward pressure, psf

zone

4

a

6.82

0

60

-6.19 leeward pressure, psf

10.5psf + 31.00 plf sliding

Curtain Wall Wind Load

5

10

+/- 10444.35

9.94

windward pressure, psf

ROOF SNOW LOADS

windward pressure, psf

(top to bottom): Atrium Space. Store Mock-Up. View from West Cross Route (SW Perspective)

windward pressure, psf

Site Plan

70

10.08

windward pressure, psf

3

53% LL REDUCTION

+/- 11492.42

-4.64 leeward pressure, psf

9

+/- 12278.48

80

windward pressure, psf

windward pressure, psf

69% LL REDUCTION

+/- 12723.91

90

-6.19 leeward pressure, psf

98.4

KEY 9.94 1. Roof Single ply membrane, Insulation and VB, Steel profiled 9.70 decking Acoustic Liner 2. Lattice roof truss 9.38 3. Entrance door 4. Services distribution and 9.06 lighting support frame 5. Fabricated steel support 8.74 frames 6. In-situ RC8.34 frame 7. Full height glass smoke containment to atrium 7.86 8. Perimeter heating 9.Air supply ducts 7.54 10. Services and air distribution through raised floor 7.22 11. In-situ RC slab

Type

F1

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceililng mounted

F2

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

F3

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

Bedroom

F4

Flourescent

3-lamp, indirect, warm light, ceiling mounted

Corridor

F5

Flourescent

2-lamp, indirect, cool light, ceiling mounted

L1

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

L2

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

L3

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

L4

LED

12-lamp, low voltage, direct wall washer

LED

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store, parking

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

Twel ve load cases were used L6 for building analysis. Purple indicates L7 linear distributed load, while green L8 indicates distributed load along an H1 area.

Y ( in) 0 -0 .4 6 5 -0 .4 2 -0 .3 5 8 -0 .15 3 -0 .0 26 -0 .0 3 8 -0 .0 5 4 -0 .0 5 5 -0 .0 28 -0 .13 4 -0 .3 3 9 -0 .4 78 -0 .24 2 -0 .18 9 -0 .0 9 8 -0 .1 -0 .0 9 7 -0 .0 25 -0 .0 76 -0 .0 9 9 -0 .11 -0 .177 -0 .4 0 6 -0 .228 -0 .4 6 7 -0 .4 5 4 0 0 0 0 -0 .19 1 -0 .16 2 -0 .13 8 -0 .10 4 -0 .0 9 9 -0 .0 75 -0 .0 8 8 -0 .0 77 -0 .10 5 -0 .111 -0 .14 8 -0 .20 9 -0 .117 -0 .118 -0 .0 6 8 -0 .0 76 -0 .0 4 8 -0 .0 6 4 -0 .0 4 9 -0 .0 8 -0 .0 72 -0 .126 -0 .175 -0 .125 -0 .224 -0 .20 5 0 0 0 -0 .17 -0 .16 5 -0 .0 8 6 -0 .0 9 2 -0 .28 2 -0 .274 -0 .13 3 -0 .14 2 -0 .3 7 -0 .3 6 1 -0 .16 9 -0 .18 1 -0 .4 3 6 -0 .4 25 -0 .19 6 -0 .21 -0 .5 -0 .4 8 9 -0 .223 -0 .23 8 -0 .4 6 7 -0 .4 5 6 -0 .19 2 -0 .20 7

Z ( in) 0 -0 .6 0 5 -0 .5 4 -0 .5 79 -0 .5 29 -0 .5 -0 .5 -0 .4 8 6 -0 .4 8 6 -0 .4 78 -0 .5 0 1 -0 .5 3 4 -0 .3 3 1 -0 .16 3 -0 .3 8 1 -0 .20 7 -0 .4 27 -0 .226 -0 .4 2 -0 .221 -0 .4 11 -0 .19 7 -0 .3 5 8 -0 .4 9 1 -0 .14 6 -0 .29 3 -0 .5 4 1 0 0 0 0 -0 .6 0 5 -0 .5 4 -0 .5 79 -0 .5 29 -0 .5 -0 .5 0 1 -0 .4 8 7 -0 .4 8 7 -0 .4 79 -0 .5 0 2 -0 .5 3 4 -0 .3 3 1 -0 .13 9 -0 .3 4 9 -0 .16 4 -0 .3 72 -0 .18 4 -0 .3 79 -0 .18 1 -0 .3 6 -0 .15 7 -0 .3 25 -0 .4 9 1 -0 .125 -0 .29 2 -0 .5 4 0 0 0 -0 .0 22 -0 .0 19 -0 .0 21 -0 .0 17 -0 .0 7 -0 .0 6 -0 .0 6 9 -0 .0 5 9 -0 .14 1 -0 .123 -0 .14 1 -0 .122 -0 .23 -0 .20 2 -0 .229 -0 .20 1 -0 .4 4 -0 .3 9 1 -0 .4 3 9 -0 .3 9 -0 .5 5 4 -0 .4 9 5 -0 .5 4 6 -0 .4 8 7

X Rota tion ( r a d) Y Rota tion ( r a d) Z Rota tion ( r a d) 0 0 0 -3 .78 E -0 4 -1.19 E -0 4 1.0 7E -0 3 -7.6 1E -0 4 -6 .6 2E -0 4 -2.3 4 E -0 4 -8 .9 5 E -0 4 -4 .5 3 E -0 4 1.3 9 E -0 3 7.71E -0 5 -3 .20 E -0 4 2.4 0 E -0 3 4 .3 5 E -0 4 -8 .0 6 E -0 5 -4 .4 1E -0 5 2.0 6 E -0 4 -2.0 0 E -0 4 -1.73 E -0 4 1.79 E -0 5 -3 .71E -0 5 -1.3 3 E -0 4 9 .79 E -0 5 7.9 5 E -0 5 1.18 E -0 4 4 .3 4 E -0 4 -6 .6 8 E -0 5 3 .9 0 E -0 4 1.9 4 E -0 4 1.9 7E -0 4 -2.3 6 E -0 3 -8 .0 7E -0 4 3 .77E -0 4 -1.4 3 E -0 3 -7.6 7E -0 4 1.6 6 E -0 5 5 .6 9 E -0 5 -6 .27E -0 4 1.3 5 E -0 4 9 .3 9 E -0 4 -6 .0 9 E -0 4 3 .12E -0 5 7.25 E -0 4 -7.24 E -0 4 1.21E -0 5 -3 .6 5 E -0 4 -6 .0 0 E -0 4 -6 .4 1E -0 5 2.5 9 E -0 4 -7.4 4 E -0 4 2.5 2E -0 5 1.6 4 E -0 4 -5 .10 E -0 4 -6 .28 E -0 5 2.17E -0 5 -7.19 E -0 4 -7.8 1E -0 5 -2.6 4 E -0 4 -5 .74 E -0 4 2.77E -0 5 -2.10 E -0 4 -6 .9 6 E -0 4 -4 .9 8 E -0 5 2.79 E -0 4 -5 .75 E -0 4 -1.11E -0 4 -6 .9 9 E -0 4 -6 .8 7E -0 4 5 .6 8 E -0 4 1.8 2E -0 4 -5 .6 1E -0 4 -1.5 3 E -0 4 -1.0 2E -0 3 -6 .9 6 E -0 4 2.6 1E -0 5 -4 .0 1E -0 5 -3 .5 1E -0 4 1.4 1E -0 4 -1.0 8 E -0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -1.0 4 E -0 3 9 .9 1E -0 5 1.24 E -0 3 -6 .70 E -0 4 4 .17E -0 4 -7.13 E -0 4 -3 .27E -0 4 3 .4 9 E -0 4 1.18 E -0 3 -3 .5 1E -0 4 -4 .0 8 E -0 4 -5 .6 2E -0 4 -2.9 0 E -0 5 -1.8 8 E -0 4 6 .5 8 E -0 4 7.4 2E -0 5 -2.24 E -0 4 1.24 E -0 6 1.70 E -0 4 -9 .0 4 E -0 5 1.73 E -0 7 2.5 1E -0 5 -1.5 3 E -0 4 1.8 3 E -0 4 -7.15 E -0 6 2.0 6 E -0 4 -6 .75 E -0 4 -3 .22E -0 4 3 .19 E -0 4 5 .4 5 E -0 4 -2.5 0 E -0 4 -4 .72E -0 4 -1.23 E -0 3 -7.24 E -0 4 3 .9 3 E -0 5 1.9 7E -0 4 -5 .74 E -0 4 8 .12E -0 5 2.5 7E -0 5 -7.4 5 E -0 4 1.3 7E -0 4 7.13 E -0 5 -6 .16 E -0 4 1.21E -0 4 1.6 9 E -0 5 -6 .6 7E -0 4 7.6 4 E -0 5 3 .0 8 E -0 5 -6 .3 8 E -0 4 4 .70 E -0 5 -1.3 9 E -0 5 -6 .4 2E -0 4 -3 .0 3 E -0 5 -2.15 E -0 5 -6 .27E -0 4 -7.19 E -0 5 -3 .9 3 E -0 5 -6 .3 9 E -0 4 -1.28 E -0 4 -7.3 6 E -0 5 -5 .8 6 E -0 4 -1.4 7E -0 4 -7.4 1E -0 5 -6 .9 8 E -0 4 -1.9 7E -0 4 -1.14 E -0 4 -5 .9 7E -0 4 -5 .11E -0 4 7.3 2E -0 4 -5 .21E -0 4 -1.17E -0 4 -8 .3 0 E -0 5 -6 .5 3 E -0 4 -8 .5 7E -0 5 -2.20 E -0 4 -9 .78 E -0 4 -2.3 2E -0 4 -1.3 0 E -0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -2.72E -0 4 4 .0 8 E -0 5 9 .3 2E -0 6 -2.4 4 E -0 4 3 .8 4 E -0 5 -2.6 3 E -0 6 -1.9 5 E -0 4 -4 .0 6 E -0 6 9 .3 0 E -0 5 -1.6 6 E -0 4 2.5 5 E -0 5 -1.0 2E -0 4 -4 .3 7E -0 4 4 .3 3 E -0 5 1.5 4 E -0 5 -3 .9 0 E -0 4 3 .3 6 E -0 5 -4 .0 6 E -0 6 -3 .9 2E -0 4 -1.18 E -0 5 8 .5 5 E -0 5 -3 .4 4 E -0 4 1.9 2E -0 5 -1.0 0 E -0 4 -5 .75 E -0 4 4 .18 E -0 5 1.8 9 E -0 5 -5 .15 E -0 4 2.6 3 E -0 5 -4 .5 6 E -0 6 -5 .4 2E -0 4 -2.24 E -0 5 7.4 4 E -0 5 -4 .8 2E -0 4 1.70 E -0 5 -9 .3 1E -0 5 -6 .79 E -0 4 3 .8 4 E -0 5 2.12E -0 5 -6 .11E -0 4 1.8 1E -0 5 -5 .0 3 E -0 6 -6 .5 2E -0 4 -5 .3 8 E -0 6 7.6 7E -0 5 -5 .8 5 E -0 4 -1.5 6 E -0 5 -9 .77E -0 5 -8 .3 8 E -0 4 2.6 0 E -0 5 2.0 2E -0 5 -7.6 6 E -0 4 8 .0 8 E -0 5 -3 .21E -0 6 -7.0 2E -0 4 1.8 9 E -0 4 2.20 E -0 4 -6 .3 1E -0 4 -2.4 0 E -0 4 -2.4 2E -0 4 -7.3 8 E -0 4 -3 .22E -0 4 3 .0 9 E -0 4 -6 .6 6 E -0 4 3 .19 E -0 6 -1.0 2E -0 4 1.5 2E -0 4 -7.9 3 E -0 4 -1.16 E -0 4 -7.22E -0 4 -5 .0 1E -0 6 -1.6 6 E -0 4

Bathroom, bedroom

Parking

THE YELLOW BUILDING Store

Store

Store

Store

1-lamp, low voltage, dimmable downlight

Store

Recessed downlight, general lighting

Kitchen

Downlight, pendant, narrow Occupancy Live Load

Kitchen

Combined Snow Live Load

Halogen

Spotlight

Kitchen

Halogen

Accent wall, wash, uplight/downlight

Kitchen

H5

Halogen

Downlight

Living room, dinging room

H6

Halogen

Reading light, medium

Living Room

H7

Based on the analysis data, Load Combination Case 2 (1.2D + 1.6S + 0.8W) was the most significant. Raw data for each member and a deflection diagram will be displayed below.

0 0 .0 0 9 0 .0 3 9 -0 .0 0 2 0 .13 4 0 .0 4 9 0 .0 4 1 0 .0 5 1 0 .0 5 0 .0 3 1 -0 .0 4 0 .0 9 6 0 .0 3 7 0 .6 3 8 0 .3 6 4 0 .3 16 0 .26 5 0 .26 3 0 .0 2 -0 .172 -0 .121 -0 .20 4 -0 .29 3 0 .0 5 2 -0 .5 71 0 .0 3 6 0 .0 8 4 0 0 0 0 -0 .0 24 -0 .0 0 5 -0 .0 21 0 .0 0 2 0 0 .0 18 0 .0 28 0 .0 3 7 0 .0 5 6 0 .0 5 3 0 .0 79 0 .0 25 0 .0 25 0 .0 2 0 .0 23 0 .0 2 0 .0 18 0 .0 21 0 .0 1 0 .0 24 0 .0 0 7 0 .0 27 0 .0 6 2 0 .0 0 8 0 .0 27 0 .0 8 3 0 0 0 0 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 7 0 .0 16 0 .0 15 0 .0 13 0 .0 12 0 .0 23 0 .0 23 0 .0 18 0 .0 17 0 .0 3 0 .0 3 0 .0 22 0 .0 22 0 .0 4 1 0 .0 4 4 0 .0 24 0 .0 3 4 0 .0 5 1 0 .0 6 8 -0 .0 1 0 .0 6 8

LED

Location Store

H4

H8

X ( in)

LED

Description

H3

The assumed load path from the Loading Analysis board is correct. Surprisingly, however, were some members acting in tension, especially near the top corners of the diagrid structure, which may require extra reinforcing. Overall, load distribution is quite predictable in all cases.

joint d e fle c t ions ( b y c om b ina t ion) L oa d C ombo 2: 1.2D + 1.6 S + 0 .8 W N1 N2 N3 N4 N5 N6 N7 N8 N9 N 10 N 11 N 12 N 14 N 15 N 16 N 17 N 18 N 19 N 20 N 21 N 22 N 23 N 24 N 24 A N 25 N 26 N 27 N 28 N 29 N 30 N 31 N 32 N 33 N 34 N 35 N 36 N 37 N 38 N 39 N 40 N 41 N 42 N 43 N 44 N 45 N 46 N 47 N 48 N 49 N 50 N 51 N 52 N 53 N 54 N 55 N 56 N 57 N 58 N 59 N 60 N 61 N 62 N 63 N 64 N 65 N 66 N 67 N 68 N 69 N 70 N 71 N 72 N 73 N 74 N 75 N 76 N 113 N 114 N 115 N 116 N 13 3 N 13 4 N 13 5 N 13 6

LED

Halogen

H2 Dead Load Halogen

Several assumptions were made in creating a structural analysis model in RISA. Analysis was performed on one bay length along the transverse axis. A concrete rectangular section of 8x8 sqin. was used for the structural members, with 10 in. thick concrete floorplates.

9

13.43

Typical Floor

Symbol

Building Load Cases L5

11

10

Ground Plan With Context

Bathroom, bedroom

7

4

Mezzanine Level

Location Store

H1

Notting HIll, London, 2007 Architect: Alford Hall Monaghan Morris SE Consultant: Adams Kara Taylor Client: Hogue Limited

Lateral Load Path Axial Load Path

1

Built as a first phase for the fashion company Monsoon Accessorize, the Yellow Building is comprised of a complex of offices and studios in the higher floors and a full-size mockup of a Monsoon Store within the first floor. An atrium comprises the core of the building, while the structural diagrid system enables unrestricted, open plans on each floor plate, while handling axial and lateral loads simultaneously.

LED

Description

L8

LOADING ANALYSIS

10.08

11 L

PERSPECTIVE 2 Schedule

L7

L1 L5

I4

Wall & Entrance detail.

the following page is an exercise of executing construction documents of a large scale building using Autodesk Revit. throughout the semester, the class was synchronised with the project so that students could directly apply knowledge taught in the class and into workable documents.

Kendra Grant_Kwonsoo Kim_Marlo Messer_vincent velasco

35th Street

the following is work not done in any studio course but demonstrates drawing and technical skill.

this page displays a hand drawn, photorealistic detail of a building detail and a group lighting project, including hand calculations and selections for an appropriate electric lighting scheme based on primary functions of the space. A presentation on an analysis of a diagrid, reinforced concrete structure is shown below.

ELECTRIC LIGHTING PROJECT - TEAM SUNSHINE

I1

Halogen Halogen

Reading light, medium

Bedroom

Dim, warm light

Bedroom, lounge Wind Load Case 1 - Transverse Dining Room

WindIncandescent Load Case 1 - Longitudinal Wall wash

I2

Incandescent

Mirror evaluation Light

Bathroom

I3

Incandescent

Reading light

Bedroom

I4

Incandescent

Downlight

Parking

Wind Load Case 3 - Longitudinal

Roof Wind Live Load

Wind Load Case 3 - Transverse

Wind Load Case 2 - Longitudinal

Wind Load Case 2 - Transverse

Wind Load Case 4 - Longitudinal

Wind Load Case 4 - Transverse

Load Combinations

Four load combinations were used for building analysis. Load Combinations are expressed on the Left images, while the Right image indicates Load Path and magnitude.

1.4D Load Combination

1.4D Load Combination Axial Load

1.2D + 1.6S + 0.8W Load Combination

1.2D + 1.6S + 0.8W Load Combination Axial Load

1.2D + 1.6L + 0.5S Load Combination

1.2D + 1.6L + 0.5S Load Combination Axial Load

1.2D + 1.6W + 0.5L + 0.5S Load Combination

1.2D + 1.6W + 0.5L + 0.5S Load Combination Axial Load

1.2D + 1.6S + 0.8W Load Combination Deflection Diagram (Controls)


11 NON-STUDIO WORK

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION + RENDERINGS ENTERPRISE WORKS, CHAMPAIGN, IL ARCH 232 - BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. FALL 2009. AUTODESK REVIT

11 R


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VIN- VINC CENT ENT VEL VELA ASCOSCO

EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

Master of Architecture Candidate - Limited Standing; Expected Graduation: Spring 2012 Concurrent Grade Point Average: 3.79 Chicago Prize Nominee, Fall 2010; Earl Prize Winner, Fall 2008

Urbana-Champaign, IL

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

Bachelor of Arts, Studio Art; Biological Sciences Minor, August 2007 Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List Recipient, 2 Years School of the Arts Grade Point Average: 3.45

Irvine, CA

LEADERSHIP EXPERIENCE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS, UC IRVINE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, FINE ARTS REPRESENTATIVE

Irvine, CA

CROSS CULTURAL CENTER, UC IRVINE UMBRELLA COUNCIL, ALYANSA NG MGA KABABAYN CO-CHAIR

Irvine, CA

Drafted and approved new legislation affecting the University Advocated for Fine Arts constituents and issues

Main Contact Person for all Filipino American Organizations at UC Irvine Advocated Filipino/Filipino American issues pertinent to UC Irvine and outlying communities

September 2006 - June 2007

September 2006 - June 2007

LOGISTICS CO-COORDINATOR: PCN COMMERCIALS, KABABAYAN AT UC IRVINE

Irvine, CA

ACADEMIC CO-DIRECTOR, PILIPINO PRE-HEALTH UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Irvine, CA

Assisted in the production of the Pilipino Cultural Night, a 200 cast, 3,000 audience show Co-wrote, directed and edited short films that were shown throughout the production

Expanded the Annual Academic Pre-Health Conference, including allocating a $1200 budget Enriched academic activity within organzation through innovative programs

September 2006 - June 2007

May 2002 - June 2003

WORK EXPERIENCE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN TEACHER ASSISTANT/RESEARCH ASSISTANT

Urbana-Champaign, IL

CATALYST ART EXHIBITION, UC IRVINE VOLUNTEER/PARTICIPANT

Irvine, CA

NOGALES HIGH SCHOOL TUTOR/MENTOR

La Puente, CA

IKEA MARKETPLACE TEXTILES

Costa Mesa, CA

August 2010 - May 2011 Performed Design Teacher Assistant duties for a fourth-year Undergraduate Studio, administering critiques and discussion Sought critical research on networked-enabled, interactive subway kiosks centered on an interdisciplinary approach to design

Assisted in organizing and advertising Catalyst, a student-run, student-led exhibition space

Taught weekly classes at Nogales High School, an underperforming school in Los Angeles County Provided a mentoring service to selected students, guiding them to pursue higher learning

Maintained a clean and welcoming store environment; Coordinated stock and inventory deliveries Provided suggestions for customer home redecoration

Fall 2006 - Spring 2007

June 2005 - June 2006

April 2004 - February 2005

SKILLS PROFICIENT IN:

AutoCAD 2010, Revit Architecture 2010, Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, InDesign/Quark, Google SketchUp, Kerkythea, HTML/CSS, Final Cut Pro, Microsoft Office, Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, 3D Studio Max

ACQUAINTED WITH: Javascript, C++, RISA-3D

SOME KNOWLEDGE IN: Maya, PHP


portfolio 2005-11 web  

portfolio 2005-11 | vincent velasco

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