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St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. STATE COUNCIL State President

Syd Tutton

Deputy State President and Northern Central Council President

Peter Rigg

Vice President and Gippsland Central Council President

Sandra Walker

Vice President and Eastern Central Council President

Dennis Griffin

Vice President and Youth Representative

Teresa Wilson

Treasurer and Corporate Secretary

Jim Grealish

Southern Central Council President

Dennis Mirabella

Western Central Council President

Maurie Taylor

North Eastern Central Council President

Cecilia McCormick

North Western Central Council President

Tony Keaney

Youth Representative

Benita De Vincentiis

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Locked Bag 4800, Box Hill Vic 3128 43 Prospect Street, Box Hill Vic 3128 Phone: 03 9895 5800 Fax: 03 9895 5850 Email: info@svdp-vic.org.au Website: www.svdp-vic.org.au ABN: 28 911 702 061 RN: A0042727Y

The passion for justice continues

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Annual Report 2003-2004


T HE S T V INCENT

DE

PAUL S OCIETY

IS A GLOBAL ORGANISATION THAT OPERATES

E STABLISHED BY F REDERIC O ZANAM IN F RANCE 1833 , THE S T V INCENT DE PAUL S OCIETY WAS FOUNDED IN A USTRALIA BY F R G ERALD WARD AT S T F RANCIS ’ C HURCH M ELBOURNE ON 5 M ARCH 1854 . T HIS YEAR WE CELEBRATE 150 YEARS OF SERVICE TO PEOPLE IN A USTRALIA .

METRO/SUBURBS

IN 130 COUNTRIES AND HAS OVER 950,000 MEMBERS WORLDWIDE .

IN

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Beginnings

Services and Locations

FREDERIC OZANAM – FOUNDER The St Vincent de Paul Society was formed in 1833 by a 20-year-old youth named Frederic Ozanam. At the time, the people of France were experiencing tremendous political and social upheaval: changes of government, the Industrial Revolution and unjust employment practices. Ozanam gathered some colleagues and began to respond in practical ways to the poverty and hardship he saw in the lives of people around him. They visited people in their homes and offered friendship and support. This practice, known today as home visitation, remains a core activity for St Vincent de Paul Society members and volunteers. The group formed by Ozanam and his friends later became known as the first ‘conference’ of the St Vincent de Paul Society. They met together regularly as a group for prayer and mutual support, to learn and to share ideas about how they could best assist others. Ozanam died in 1853 at the age of 40. At the time of his death there were approximately 2,000 conferences operating throughout the world. Frederic Ozanam was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 1997. Today the St Vincent de Paul Society in Victoria has 289 conferences, 8,000 members and volunteers, and assists more than 600,000 people in need every year.

VICTORIA

ST VINCENT DE PAUL – PATRON

FR GERALD WARD – AUSTRALIAN FOUNDER

The Society was named after St Vincent de Paul. Vincent was ordained a priest in France in 1600 at the age of 19.

The first conference of the St Vincent de Paul Society in Australia met in Melbourne at St Francis’ Church on 5 March 1854. The Society’s first president was Fr Gerald Ward, an Englishman who had been recruited to work in the Melbourne mission by the pioneer priest Fr Patrick Geoghegan.

As a young man he ministered to the wealthy and powerful; however, an appointment as chaplain to a poor parish, and to galley prisoners, inspired a vocation to work with those most powerless and marginalised. Vincent urged his followers to bring God’s justice and love to people who were unable to live a full human life: “Deal with the most urgent needs. Organise charity so that it is more efficient...teach reading and writing, educate with the aim of giving each the means of self-support. Intervene with authorities to obtain reforms in structure...there is no charity without justice.” At age 80 Vincent de Paul died in Paris on 27 September 1660.

Fr Ward was later to suggest that the main reason why the conference was founded was for “the protection of male and female orphans”. With the discovery of gold in 1851 and the rush to the goldfields of Central Victoria the population doubled and homeless, deserted children roamed the streets. Fr Ward and the new St Vincent de Paul conference responded to this acute problem by establishing the St Vincent de Paul orphanage in South Melbourne. The foundation stone was laid in 1855 and the first children accepted in 1857. In 1855, in a submission to the government of the day, Fr Ward stated that the new conference aimed at “the relief of the destitute, in a manner as much as possible permanently beneficial and the visitation of poor families”. Gerald Ward died on 14 January 1858 aged 52. A newspaper noted that “he was one in whom many a widow and orphan had found a good friend”. His enduring legacy is founded in such friendship.

2 ANNUAL REPORT 2003-2004

Soup Vans The Society’s soup van services are based in Collingwood, Fitzroy, Footscray and Moe. Staffed by volunteers, the vans travel the streets of metropolitan Melbourne and Moe bringing food and friendship to thousands of people in need each year.

ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY VICTORIA INC. Conferences The Society’s members, known as Vincentians, and volunteers form local groups known as conferences. Conferences respond to calls from people in need within their local communities and provide assistance with food, material aid, budget advice, utility bills, advocacy issues, as well as a hand of friendship. Conference Initiatives Conference members provide a range of initiatives that address specific needs of the people they assist, such as holiday homes, emergency accommodation, a Friday night school, mobile conferences, visiting teams and assistance centres.

College Conferences and Young Adult Conferences The Society’s college conferences and young adult conferences provide a range of volunteer work in the community, including tutoring, fundraising, home visitation, organising Kids’ Camps, as well as manning soup vans.

ST VINCENT DE PAUL AGED CARE & COMMUNITY SERVICES Aged Care Services Elderly citizens are provided with care and accommodation through our aged care facilities, which include a nursing home, hostels, day therapy centre and independent living units.

Centres of Charity The Society’s Centres of Charity (opportunity shops) provide quality furniture, clothing and household items to people in need. Centre stocks are available to people being supported by conference members, as well as to the general public at a low cost. Profits raised from the sale of stock in the centres goes towards providing resources and support to people in need.

Community Services People who are marginalised, homeless and at risk within the Victorian community are offered a range of housing, homeless and disability services. 35

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St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Contents

Mission

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Overview of the Society in Victoria State President’s Report General Secretary’s Report Membership and Development Conference Highlights Eastern Central Council Northern Central Council Southern Central Council Western Central Council Gippsland Central Council North Eastern Central Council North Western Central Council Soup Vans Compeer 150th Celebrations Migrant and Refugee Overseas Development Centres of Charity Thank You

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 34

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services About Us Chairman’s Report Aged Care Community Services

24 25 26 28

Financial Statements

32

Services and Locations

35

The mission of the St Vincent de Paul Society in Australia is to deepen the Catholic faith of its members and to go out into our nation to heighten awareness of Jesus Christ. We do this by sharing ourselves – who we are, and what we have – with people in need on a person-to-person basis. We seek to cooperate in shaping a more just and compassionate Australian community, and to share our resources with our twinned countries. Our preferred option in this mission of service is to work with people in development by respecting their dignity, sharing our hope and encouraging them to take control of their own destiny.

MEANING OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY LOGO This logo is the symbol of the St Vincent de Paul Society in many countries. It represents the hand of Christ that blesses the cup, the hand of love that offers the cup, and the hand of suffering that receives the cup. PATRON OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY VICTORIA INC. His Excellency, Governor John Landy

The St Vincent de Paul Society’s Annual Report is divided into two sections: St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. which reflects the work of members through their conferences and conference initiatives on pages six to 23 and St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services which assists people with complex needs through professional services on pages 24 to 31. The combined financial statements for these two arms of the Society can be found on page 32 and 33.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Design: Ramesh Weereratne 03 9926 5759 Photography: Peter Casamento 0419 104 244 David Johns 0418 566 312 Fable Productions 0413 183 519 Printing: Doran Printing 03 9587 4333 Editor: Dianne Ballestrin St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. ABN: 28 911 702 061 RN: A0042727Y

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St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Overview of the Society in Victoria

4 ANNUAL REPORT 2003-2004


WELCOME TO OUR ANNUAL REPORT IN THIS THE 150TH YEAR OF OUR OPERATIONS AUSTRALIA. THIS IS A STEWARDSHIP REPORT OF OUR WORK TO PEOPLE IN NEED, THE LONELY, THE ALIENATED AND THE SOCIALLY EXCLUDED IN OUR COMMUNITY.

IN

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. State President’s Report Syd Tutton The reports of our seven central council presidents reflect the ‘bottom-up’ structure of our Society and give an insight into the dedication of our conference members and the invaluable backup provided by centre volunteers, generous donors and staff members. No work is foreign to the Society in assisting those in need, and we report on the many diverse services offered, as well as our core welfare activities. The celebratory events of our 150th were a rededication to our mission of service: “The passion for justice continues”. We are grateful to so many dignitaries from overseas and around Australia for sharing the events of those celebrations. I especially note the encouragement given to the Society by the Governor-General of Australia, the Premier of Victoria, the Archbishop of Melbourne and the Lord Mayor of Melbourne through their participation. The founder of the Society Frederic Ozanam said: “You must not be content with tending

the poor over the poverty crisis. You must study their condition and the injustices which brought about such poverty with the aim of long-term improvement.”

The three pillars of the Society are that: it is spiritually based, it is a volunteer organisation and it is democratic. The elected members of the State Council work tirelessly without any remuneration to set the policies for good governance and to conduct the business necessary for the good working of the Society in fulfilling its mission. I thank each one of them for their selflessness and devotion to the responsibilities of their important leadership roles.

The Society in Victoria in the past year answered this call of Ozanam through its dedicated committee for social justice, which is providing advocacy on behalf of the needy. Alone our local conferences may not change the whole world, but they can change the world for one person. In association with the Anglican and Uniting Churches and The Salvation Army, we have promoted a campaign against poverty and have pushed for a national forum to initiate a strategy to reduce the rich-poor gap.

The Society is well served by its competent staff and I thank them for providing so much of the material and preparation of this report. It was noted by the Audit Committee that the accounts this year comply with all Australian Accounting Standards; a considerable management achievement – well done.

To supplement our Annual Report, throughout the year we make available to members, volunteers, supporters, donors and the public at large our excellent quarterly magazine Viewpoint. If you would like to be placed on our mailing list for this publication, please contact us on 03 9895 5800.

I know our conference members, centre volunteers and generous donors do not look for thanks, in fact they shrink from it, but I thank them on behalf of myself and those they are privileged to assist. God bless you all. STATE COUNCIL – VICTORIA (Back row l to r) Spiritual Advisor, Monsignor Les Tomlinson; General Secretary, Brian Dalton; Southern Central Council President, Dennis Mirabella; Treasurer, Jim Grealish; Western Central Council President, Maurie Taylor; Youth Representative, Benita De Vincentiis; North Western Central Council President, Tony Keaney; Legal Advisor, Mitchell McKenzie

(Front row l to r) State Vice President, Teresa Wilson; Deputy State President, Peter Rigg; State President, Syd Tutton; State Vice President, Sandra Walker; Eastern Central Council President, Dennis Griffin; North Eastern Central Council President, Cecilia McCormick

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AFTER

MELBOURNE’S CBD, THE ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY TO BOX HILL ON 1 MARCH 2004. THE MOVE WAS

50 YEARS OF OPERATION IN

RELOCATED ITS CENTRAL OFFICE

CAREFULLY RESEARCHED AND PLANNED AND HAS BEEN A MAJOR MILESTONE IN THE LIFE OF THE

SOCIETY

IN

VICTORIA.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. General Secretary Brian Dalton

The official opening and blessing of the building occurred during the Society’s 150th celebrations in May. Naming the building Gerald Ward House was a fitting tribute to Fr Gerald Ward who founded the first conference in Australia. The first conference in Australia was established at St Francis’ Church, Melbourne on 5 March 1854, 21 years after the Society was founded in Paris. The ability to have all key administration services for both St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. and St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services under the one roof has resulted in more efficiencies, and the modern, open working conditions are appreciated by staff and all who visit the facility. Continual review of occupational health and safety practices in all our worksites has been an ongoing priority. Training has been paramount with the high numbers of volunteers, especially in the Centres of Charity. The organisation has continued to work closely with the Victorian WorkCover Authority and our insurers to ensure safe work practices throughout the Society. Following an independent report to State Council on the Society’s Conference Support function, this department was restructured and additional resources provided. The department has been renamed Membership and Development, a change which recognises that it is vital for the Society’s future to recruit and develop members to carry on the work of the Society. The additional resources will be effective during 2004-2005.

6 ANNUAL REPORT 2003-2004

The Society’s website continues to be developed for our many and varied users. We have been involved nationally to develop standard state-by-state links to the Society’s works. Updating of information regarding the Society’s work continues while special functions such as the 150th celebrations and our annual Ozanam Lecture have also been placed on the site. The Telstra Bill Assistance Program has continued throughout the year and the Society is appreciative of the service this provides to many of the people we assist. The financial and statistical data globally contained in this report highlight the number of people assisted was similar to the previous year, but the dollar value of assistance increased by over 10%.

This Annual Report highlights, on pages 32 and 33, the financial results of the aggregation of activity for the year ending 30 June 2004. The administration and fundraising costs represent 9.8% of the total net income. The St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. raises 83% of its income through independent fundraising activities and sale of goods from its centres. It receives 14.3% from government. These funds are used to support the core works of the Society, home visitation, emergency relief, soup vans, Kids’ Camps and overseas initiatives. We look forward to another year of service to Victoria’s people in need.

The Society Central Councils Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members Youth conferences Youth members College conferences Centres

7 35 289 3,214 1,226 17 204 48 94


CHRIST’S

COMMAND TO ‘LOVE ONE ANOTHER’ IS DEMONSTRATED IN A SIMPLE,

PRACTICAL WAY BY THE WORK OF THE

(OR

LOCAL GROUPS) ACROSS

ST VINCENT

DE

PAUL SOCIETY’S

289 CONFERENCES

VICTORIA.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Membership and Development Report Bernie Geary Manager The role of the newly constituted Memership and Development team – previously known as Conference Support – aims to assist with and resource the work of conferences and the 35 regional councils, helping them to identify needs and respond to them. Over the past year the Membership and Development team have been attending regional meetings, facilitating training and information sessions, offering home visitation workshops, running retreats, visiting schools, advising on the recruitment of new members, developing and distributing a range of resources, and simply sitting down with members from Mildura to Portland, from Wodonga to Bairnsdale.

For a few years now some metropolitan regional councils have recognised a need to free many Centres of Charity of the task of receiving welfare requests – an important task, but a burden in already busy centres. A 1300 phone number (1300 305 330) was first introduced to assist with this need and was later followed by a room at the Sunshine Centre set aside to take calls for a number of centres in the western area of Melbourne. This single room, staffed primarily by volunteers, was soon taking calls previously taken by nine centres.

Young Vinnies Conferences active in schools or universities and young adult conferences are known as Young Vinnies. College conferences use their own initiatives to raise funds for the St Vincent de Paul Society. Through activities such as concerts, carnivals, free dress days, fetes and sausage sizzles, Young Vinnies conferences raise funds to support families in need. Young Vinnies also collect donations of blankets and non-perishable food.

The Membership and Development team were also very active in organising the week-long events held in May 2004 to celebrate the St Vincent de Paul Society’s 150th anniversary in Australia. Events included a pilgrimage to the grave of the Society’s Australian founder, Fr Gerald Ward; the official opening of Gerald Ward House in Box Hill; the annual Ozanam Lecture; National Youth Day; a special day of celebration including a 150th Mass, parade to the Melbourne Town Hall and a performance of The Great 150th Show; and finally, the Future Directions Forum.

Young adult conference members are aged between 18 and 35 and undertake a range of volunteer work for the Society, such as assisting with the soup vans, running Kids’ Camps, home visitation, volunteering at Ozanam House and nursing homes, working in the centres, helping at the meals service, fundraising and tutoring.

One highlight of the events was seeing over 300 secondary students and young adults gathered at Marian College, Sunshine, for National Youth Day. Other highlights among younger members over the last 12 months have included their willingness to take on leadership roles in the Society, and the initiative they have shown in establishing exciting projects like Roadshow, which travels country Victoria working with local regional councils to provide a big day out for children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

A special event on the Young Vinnies calendar is the annual St Vincent de Ball. This event brings Young Vinnies members from throughout Victoria together to celebrate their work during the year, but also raises funds for the three Kids’ Camps held each year. The camps provide activities for 30-50 children aged six to 12 from disadvantaged backgrounds. For many, these five-day camps are their only chance for a holiday.

Over the next 12 months we look forward to working with conferences and regions in helping to create a future that does justice to us all.

With the move of central office to Box Hill in March 2004, the activities at Sunshine were subsequently relocated there. The improved facilities at Gerald Ward House enable other metropolitan regions to take advantage of the benefits of specialised call receiving, and this process will continue over the next 12 months.

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St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Conference Highlights

CONFERENCE STATISTICS FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR 2003-2004 No. of cases where material assistance given

No. of adults assisted

Eastern Central Council

16,482

Northern Central Council

No. of children assisted

Conference bread runs (or food runs)

No. of households assisted by bread runs

Monetary value of assistance provided by conferences

21,301

17,364

3,483

9,017

$922,404

3,377

57

587

370

15,973

21,210

14,063

163

4,486

$472,360

538

38

322

90

Southern Central Council

20,789

28,428

27,437

468

5,071

$1,228,259

2,936

47

633

253

Western Central Council

16,498

22,405

21,409

865

7,070

$657,223

2,144

52

492

199

Gippsland Central Council

9,688

11,504

11,677

386

1,676

$610,398

4,127

18

277

77

North Eastern Central Council

19,962

24,954

20,834

2,516

14,041

$678,968

10,857

36

469

113

North Western Central Council

12,691

16,636

15,317

3,171

16,591

$613,339

12,887

41

434

124

112,083

146,438

128,101

11,052

57,952

$5,182,951

36,866

289 *

3,214 †

VICTORIAN CONFERENCES (total)

Visits not involving No. of material assistance conferences

No. of No. of auxiliary members members

1,226

* In addition to these 289 conferences, the figures also include the work of eight non-conference entities (ie four visitation teams and four assistance centres) † Volunteers in the Society’s Centres of Charity number over 3,000

SOURCE OF REFERRAL OF PEOPLE ASSISTED

SOURCE OF INCOME OF PEOPLE ASSISTED

ANALYSIS OF THE MATERIAL ASSISTANCE GIVEN BY CONFERENCES

8 ANNUAL REPORT 2003-2004


DURING

2003-2004, THE

EASTERN CENTRAL COUNCIL'S

587 CONFERENCE MEMBERS

AND 370 AUXILIARY MEMBERS HAVE SEEN 16,482 FAMILIES AND PROVIDED ASSISTANCE VALUED AT $922,404.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Eastern Central Council Report Dennis Griffin President The Eastern Central Council farewells four hard working regional presidents, Phil Johnson (Knox/Sherbrooke), Austin Byrne (Waverley), Eileen Matthews (Ripponlea) and Tony Tome (Ringwood).

Wonderful work has been done and great challenges met across the Eastern Central Council by many as they strive to reach out to the poor and marginalised. Members from the eastern region have come to render assistance to the inner suburbs of Melbourne including the high-rise flats and boarding houses of some of Melbourne’s older areas. Fitzroy, North Richmond, South Melbourne, Port Melbourne and Collingwood are some of the places regularly visited, as there are no conferences to do the work in these areas.

The Waverley Region recently supplied a shed to enable a disadvantaged group to engage in a weaving concern.

The Yarra Valley Region continued to service in part those areas as far east as Warburton, and gave generously of time and funds.

The Knox/Sherbrooke Region opened a new Centre of Charity in Bayswater and also established a call centre. A large part of this region’s welfare has been to the South Melbourne area, and it has achieved great results. Over the period it has obtained wheelchairs, cars, housing, care, as well as providing friendship.

A number of regions were most interested in learning more about the Compeer Program, which matches trained volunteers with people diagnosed with a mental illness in the hope that a one-to-one friendship will develop. In summation, all Eastern Central Council regions have worked hard and given support and friendship to many. The Vincentian spirit continues to shine through time and time again as we move forward in the service of God. Our passion continues as we strive to listen and care for God’s people.

The Young Vinnies were sensational with their Roadshows, Kids’ Days Out and many other activities. They also shared in the responsibility of service to the poor through welfare visitation in South Melbourne and Port Melbourne.

We gratefully acknowledge the work of the Centres of Charity and the volunteers who work in them giving tirelessly of themselves. The Box Hill Region gave generously to the people of East Timor (Baucau) providing a new well, so locals do not have to walk miles to obtain fresh water.

Eastern Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members Youth conferences Youth members College conferences Centres Area covered

Our Ringwood Region opened a new Centre of Charity in Mitcham and it is doing well. They also aid home visitation in South Melbourne on a regular basis, and assisted in obtaining an electric wheelchair for a gentleman.

7 57 587 370 4 15 12 16 East Metro

The Camberwell Region continued its good work in visiting the high-rise flats of Fitzroy and similar areas. Its contribution to the coffers of the Eastern Central Council sustains the work of the Society in many areas of need.

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THE NORTHERN CENTRAL COUNCIL’S

412 MEMBERS AND AUXILIARY MEMBERS

HAVE PROVIDED ASSISTANCE TO 15,973 FAMILIES IN THE FORM OF FOOD, FOOD VOUCHERS, CLOTHING AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Northern Central Council Report Peter Rigg President The Northern Central Council covers both the oldest areas of inner city Melbourne and the outer north eastern suburbs of Melbourne. By socio-economic measures, the area includes many of the disadvantaged parts of Melbourne.

The Diamond Valley Region is actively involved in a program of reinvigorating a number of conferences and introducing new initiatives, especially in terms of education, suc as the Greensborough Conference’s ‘adopting a family’ program.

The Northern Central Council is encouraging conferences and regional councils to consider new initiatives to complement the old methods of operating and facilitating the recruitment of new members.

The central council consists of four regional councils – Melbourne, Brunswick, Preston and Diamond Valley. The level of assistance in year 2003-2004 provided by conference members was $472,360, which is less than the level of assistance provided in year 2002-2003. These figures do not include furniture, clothing or other household items provided from the seven Centres of Charity in the four regions.

The Preston Region, through the availability of upper level space at the Lalor Centre, is providing facilities for various groups of people experiencing similar circumstances to discuss their particular issues, with a view to facilitating self-empowerment. The City of Whittlesea is very impressed with the concept and is at the first stage of looking to construct a purpose-built facility for such activities as a means towards improving social cohesion.

We are grateful to our members and auxiliary members whose work continues to bring comfort to people in need.

Funding is provided by State Council and funds raised from the centres, although a substantial bequest has also helped over the past two years.

Northern As well as the traditional conference operations throughout all regions, there are a number of specific initiatives. In the Melbourne Region there are the Collingwood and Fitzroy soup vans, a tutoring program for children in the highrise flats in Richmond (run by Margaret Gurry who received an AO in June 2004 for her work in this area) and an Assist a Student program.

10 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members Youth conferences Youth members College conferences Centres Area covered

4 38 322 90 5 52 4 7 North Metro


THE SOUTHERN CENTRAL COUNCIL’S

47 CONFERENCES CONSISTING OF 633 MEMBERS

AND 253 AUXILIARY MEMBERS HAVE ASSISTED 20,789 FAMILIES DURING 2003-2004, VALUED AT $1,228,259.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Southern Central Council Report Dennis Mirabella President

Within the Victorian Vincentian family, conference members have a proud record of fulfilling the Society’s ethic of personally living the Gospel message through service to those in need. Their efforts on social justice issues and the plight of refugees are well known. They are also well known for being in the forefront of support for big Vincentian events. The Mornington Peninsula is well known as a playground for the people of Melbourne. However, it is not hard to find the two extremes of the very rich and the very poor existing side-by-side. The changing demographics within the council’s area were exemplified by a recent report showing that an average of 63 families a week are moving into the Berwick Region’s City of Casey. There are five regional councils in the Southern Central Council. These are: Hampton, Mentone, Dandenong, Berwick and Mornington. They provide a link for 47 conferences with a combined membership of more than 600 members. In the last year these hard working conference members made more than 19,000 home visits and distributed more than $1 million in welfare aid.

It was established that, in delivering food aid valued at just over $1,200 to 35 families, and taking into account members’ voluntary work in one centre, the member contribution in dollar terms was conservatively estimated to be worth more than $1,000. In addition, there were members’ cars and computer resources, valued at more than $200,000, applied to the task at no cost to the Society.

welfare commitments. This prompted a review of the centres to be undertaken and a Southern Central Council Centres Advisory Sub-Committee was established. The application of operational efficiencies and the relocation of the Frankston Centre have resulted in increased income generation. The Southern Central Council also has three Young Vinnies conferences operating within its area of responsibility. There are 28 enthusiastic Young Vinnies associated with these conferences and they provide a wonderful service for young people in the area with their Kids’ Days Out and other activities.

There are nine Centres of Charity operating within the Southern Central Council’s boundaries. These have more than 400 volunteers working to provide material aid to those in need and to generate income to be applied to the conference welfare work. The importance of the centres in generating funds for the distribution of welfare aid in the area is obvious. However, during the past year the Southern Central Council found it necessary to apply to State Council for shortfall funding to meet its

We look forward to another productive year of caring for people in our area who are in need of assistance.

Southern Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members Youth conferences Youth members College conferences Centres Area covered

The extent and value of member contribution in this massive undertaking can be typified by a recent quantification of the value of member effort in servicing the welfare demands made on one conference over a period of one week.

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5 47 633 253 3 28 9 9 South Metro

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THE WESTERN CENTRAL COUNCIL

HAS PROVIDED ASSISTANCE VALUED AT $657, 223 TO

16,498 FAMILIES IN NEED DURING THE PAST 12 MONTHS.

THIS CENTRAL COUNCIL CONSISTS OF SIX REGIONS: ALTONA, BROADMEADOWS, CENTRAL HIGHLANDS, ESSENDON, FOOTSCRAY AND GEELONG; 52 CONFERENCES, 15 CENTRES OF CHARITY AND FIVE YOUNG VINCENTIAN GROUPS.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Western Central Council Report Maurie Taylor President

The Footscray Region incorporates the special work of the Matthew Talbot Soup Van – Footscray which operates in the Footscray, Yarraville, Newport and Williamstown areas seven nights a week, 52 weeks of the year. The Essendon and Broadmeadows Regions have the special work of the St Anne’s Hostel in Westmeadows. The Geelong Region has the special works of the Queenscliff holiday house, Rosalie House and Vincentian House aged care facility. One of the conferences in the Essendon Region is the Vietnamese Conference, which looks after the needs of this particular ethnic group in the Kensington and Newmarket areas. The Western Central council conducted a retreat in February of this year, which was a great opportunity for all participants to enhance their own personal spirituality. Each region within the council conducted at least one Festival meeting over the last 12 months, all of which had excellent attendances. There were various functions conducted around the regions in conjunction with the Society’s 150th celebrations this year. The Western Central Council is organising a three-course dinner for families in need in the area as part of the 150th celebrations. Each conference in the area is nominating a family to attend. Two hundred people will be catered for at this ‘Christmas in July’.

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We are very fortunate in the Western Central Council to have five Young Vincentian conferences. These conferences consist of young people between the ages of 18 and 35. They are involved in various activities such as Kids’ Days Out, nursing home visitation, Kids’ Camps, assisting in home visitation, volunteering at Ozanam House and assisting on the soup van. These young people have a wonderful social conscience, and when they become aware of some injustice in the community they want to do something about addressing it.

The Western Central Council is providing ongoing assistance to the Sarnelli House Orphanage in Thailand, which caters for children suffering from AIDS or children who have been orphaned because of parents dying from the disease. Our financial assistance provides funds for the purchase of the necessary medication to treat the children, while our Centres of Charity warehouse also provides periodic shipments of clothing. We thank all those involved in assisting our mission to people in need.

The council is currently involved with other Catholic welfare agencies working under the chairmanship of Bishop Mark Coleridge to seek out the best ways of helping the large Sudanese community in the Western suburbs, especially in the St Albans area.

Western Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members Youth conferences Youth members College conferences Centres Area covered

6 52 492 199 5 86 11 15 West Metro


THE

GIPPSLAND CENTRAL COUNCIL ATTRACTS VISITORS ALL YEAR ROUND, WHETHER TO VISIT SPECIAL SITES LIKE PHILLIP ISLAND’S PENGUIN PARADE, TO ATTEND THE MOTORCYCLE GRAND PRIX, OR TO EXPLORE THE NATURAL BEAUTIES OF THE AREA, SUCH AS THE BUCHAN CAVES RESERVE. AREA COVERED BY THE

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Gippsland Central Council Report Sandra Walker President During the past 12 months the Gippsland Central Council’s 18 conferences provided assistance valued at $610,398 to 9,688 families in the form of food, food vouchers, furniture, clothing and financial assistance. Our conferences receive no government funding and rely heavily on donations to maintain this level of assistance. Soup Van The Frederic Ozanam Soup Van – Moe provided meals to over 10,500 people in need. In addition, the soup van volunteers, known as Vannies, have assisted people in the following situations: • Providing the ‘little extra’ needed to make ends meet; • Providing evening meals and lunches for students so they could attend school and have food to eat during their day; • Providing positive emotional support to families and the elderly; • Providing practical help for such things as changing light globes for the elderly; • Making referrals to conferences for further assistance with material and other aid as the need arose.

Tertiary Education Scholarship During 2003-2004, 34 Tertiary Sponsorships were offered to students completing year 12. The grants of $3,000 each are provided to students in the most isolated areas of Gippsland who wish to attend tertiary institutions. This program has provided opportunities to young people in the area, enabling dreams to become a reality while also forging relationships between the St Vincent de Paul Society, the student, and their families.

Roadshow The Young Vinnies Roadshow was an outstanding success, involving a week of day-long children’s activities from Sale to Traralgon and finishing in Warragul. Assisted by 16 local conferences, three regional secondary colleges, 40 senior students and three regional councils, it was ensured that 106 very excited children enjoyed Roadshow’s craft activities, various games and mini Olympics. A young satisfied Roadshow ‘customer’ remarked, “This is the bestest place I’ve ever been to!”

While interviewing for the 2005 grants, one student remarked: “I want to be a positive influence with the community. I want to practice psychology in Gippsland after I finish my degree. But most of all, I want to be doing something I know I will love for my entire professional career. I just need a little help to get started.”

The Society enables care and comfort to be provided to those less fortunate in a wide variety of ways. It is with a passion for justice that the members of the Gippsland Central Council continue to support the people in our wonderful community.

Gippsland Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members College conferences Centres Area covered

Client feedback has been positive, and many clients have contacted the St Vincent de Paul soup van service to say, ‘Thank you for your help but we are all right now’. This feedback reinforces that both the material support and emotional care provided by the soup van volunteers is essential to assist people to get through the difficult times and get back on their feet.

13

3 18 277 77 2 11 South East Victoria

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


UNTIL RECENTLY THE NORTH EASTERN CENTRAL COUNCIL WAS KNOWN AS THE SANDHURST DIOCESAN COUNCIL. THIS NAME CHANGE REFLECTS THE FAR-REACHING BOUNDARIES OF OUR LARGE AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY. IT COVERS THE AREA FROM MANSFIELD TO SWAN HILL, AS FAR NORTH AS CORRYONG AND SOUTH TO BENALLA, A LARGE PART OF NORTHERN VICTORIA.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

North Eastern Central Council Report Cecilia McCormick President

The North Eastern Central Council has five regions, 36 conferences and 18 Centres of Charity providing assistance valued at $678,968 to 19,962 families.

Our Centres of Charity have over 900 volunteers working to provide caring assistance and products in support of the work of our conferences and special works.

Bendigo, Goulburn Valley, Mid Murray, Wangaratta and Upper North East are the five regions that make up this large central council area, and the greatest challenge is the tyranny of distance that stretches between many of our north central and north eastern towns.

We are very fortunate in this central council area that all our centres are profitable. This year considerable funds have been passed up by this council to State Council to assist the needs of other councils and interests of the Society. The people in our centres are being encouraged not only to become more businesslike in addressing occupational health and safety requirements, but also to increase their revenue intake and professional status. No longer are our centres seen as backward little op shops, they are proud flagships of a 150-year-old organisation.

Our 469 members and 113 auxiliary members work in many ways to keep the Vincentian spirit alive. With over 30,000 interviews or visits to the poor and needy this past financial year, and a welfare bill of over $678,000 we have barely scratched the surface. Northern Victoria is still in the throes of a devastating drought, many of our farming communities are in terrible strife and there are so many injustices in our local communities involving not only our young but the elderly as well. Many of our conferences work in close relationship with their local Centre of Charity conducting interviews and providing food and material aid on request. The need to encourage conference members to develop a more positive role in home visitation, ‘sharing ourselves with the poor’ and ‘encouraging them to take control of their own destiny’, is becoming a very controversial point of our Mission Statement with the steady increase in welfare needs and fewer members to keep up with the demand.

14 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

The North Eastern Central Council encourages several small college conferences in the Bendigo, Swan Hill and Shepparton areas. They have our full support but they are limited in activities due to distance and study commitments of their members. Our 30 independent living units in Bendigo are still running very well and come under the management of St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services as does Marian Community in Shepparton, which continues to provide a very worthwhile service to women experiencing domestic violence. Our passion for justice continues as we persevere and strive to meet the needs of this very diverse central council area.

North Eastern Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members College conferences Centres Area covered

5 36 469 113 6 18 North East Victoria


THE NORTH WESTERN CENTRAL COUNCIL IS THE LARGEST OF THE SOCIETY’S COUNCILS EXTENDING FROM SUNRAYSIA IN VICTORIA’S FAR NORTH DOWN TO THE COAST IN VICTORIA’S WESTERN DISTRICT.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

North Western Central Council Report Tony Keaney President During the past 12 months, 41 conferences have provided $613,339 worth of assistance to 12,691 families in the form of food, food vouchers, furniture, clothing and financial assistance. The drought in the north west The drought in the North Western Central Council area continues, with many families and individuals struggling to make ends meet.

The farming communities are strong and often reluctant to seek assistance. It is well known that there is always someone worse off than themselves. The central council made available $30,000 to two regional councils, Sunraysia and Wimmera, to distribute to families and individuals needing a hand. Our support in times of need is greatly appreciated as this note shows: “Last year the Sunraysia Regional Council of St Vincent de Paul Society in Mildura kindly sent us a cheque for $300 to help us with expenses during the drought. We really appreciated the Society’s generosity and support at the time when things were bleak.”

Holiday homes The North Western Central Council operates two holiday homes that are situated in Mildura and Warrnambool. The homes provide an opportunity for lowincome families to enjoy a holiday in fully furnished premises that are available for one or two weeks at no charge. For many families who use the holiday homes this is the first time that they have had a true family holiday.

150th celebrations On Saturday 22 May 2004, members from Warrnambool, Hamilton and Colac Regional Councils, along with family and friends, representatives of The Salvation Army and Anglicare, gathered at St Pius’ Church, West Warrnambool at 10am to celebrate the 150th year of the Society in Australia. After a welcome and short summary of the life of Fr Gerald Ward, mass was celebrated. Vincentians from the three regions participated in the readings and offertory procession.

Situated only a short walk to shops and the beach, the four-bedroom Warrnambool home has disabled access and can comfortably accommodate eight people. The three-bedroom Mildura home can accommodate up to eight people easily and is within walking distance to local recreational facilities and shops. Bookings can be made by a referring conference that must accept responsibility for any transport arrangements.

The members of this council continue to provide assistance, support and friendship to people in need. Our commitment to people as well as to the work of St Vincent de Paul and Frederic Ozanam, continues today.

North Western Regions Conferences Members Auxiliary members Youth conferences Youth members College conferences Centres Area covered

Merging of two regions Since early 2004, the Warrnambool and Hamilton regions have discussed merging and on 26 June 2004, State Council agreed to the merger. The new region will be known as Glenelg, using the name of the river that flows through most of the area.

15

5 41 434 124 1 23 4 18 West Victoria

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


FOR

OVER 25 YEARS THE

ST VINCENT

DE

PAUL SOCIETY’S

SOUP VAN VOLUNTEERS HAVE

WORKED TIRELESSLY EVERY NIGHT OF THE YEAR TO PROVIDE FOOD AND OFFER FRIENDSHIP TO THE MANY HOMELESS PEOPLE THROUGHOUT INNER SUBURBAN

THE

MELBOURNE

AND

MOE.

VOLUNTEERS VISIT PEOPLE WHERE THEY LIVE IN ROOMING HOUSES AND PARKS,

PROVIDING BASIC MEALS AND, FOR MANY, THEIR ONLY LINK TO THE ‘NORMAL’ WORLD.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Soup Vans

There are currently four soup van services operated by the St Vincent de Paul Society in Victoria, three located in suburban Melbourne and one in Moe. The primary aim of the soup van services is to offer friendship, care and genuine concern for people in need. By accepting each individual and their lifestyle, we hope to inspire feelings of dignity, self-esteem and personal value. Acceptance is not dependent on a person’s actions but on simply accepting one another as we are. No one is asked to change, and giving is unconditional. In sharing a moment of each individual’s time, no more is expected of us than to listen. Referrals to client services such as transitional housing, health and substance abuse services, counselling and material aid providers have increased, and such referrals are becoming a more important part of the Vannies’ outreach work. Vannies also assist the people they meet by putting them in touch with other St Vincent de Paul Society services, including access to accommodation services, conferences and Centres of Charity.

16 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

Soup Vans in Action Margaret Oats Soup Van – Collingwood During the last 12 months, the Margaret Oats Soup Van – Collingwood, has delivered over 20,800 meals to people on the streets of Collingwood and Richmond five nights a week. The Vannies have held two barbeques in the past year and would like to increase that to 12 next year. Matthew Talbot Soup Van – Fitzroy Over the last 12 months, the Matthew Talbot Soup Van – Fitzroy has served 325 people on average every night of the week and around 118,300 meals this year. There are 150 soup van volunteers who make a regular ongoing commitment to assist.

Matthew Talbot Soup Van – Footscray The Matthew Talbot Soup Van – Footscray, assists people in Footscray, Yarraville, Newport and Williamstown areas. The van is based at St Monica’s Parish in Footscray and operates seven nights a week. Thanks to the 60 Vannies who visited people in need, and another 20 who routinely delivered stock, cooked and prepared the meals for delivery, during this past year, the van served approximately 40,040 meals. Frederic Ozanam Soup Van – Moe This has been a very busy and rewarding year for the Frederic Ozanam Soup Van – Moe, which has provided meals to over 10,500 people in need. Local Moe businesses and members of the community have provided much needed support and donations. There are 20 day and 20 evening Vannies, ranging in age from 16 to 70 years.


T HE S T V INCENT

PAUL S OCIETY INTRODUCED THE C OMPEER P ROGRAM TO THE EASTERN SUBURBS OF M ELBOURNE IN EARLY 2004 TO ASSIST PEOPLE EXPERIENCING ISOLATION DUE TO MENTAL ILLNESS . T HE C OMPEER NAME IS FORMED FROM THE WORDS ‘ COMPANION ’ AND ‘ PEER ’ AND MEANS A FRIENDSHIP OF EQUALS . DE

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Compeer

The Compeer Program is an international volunteer program that has earned the praise of mental health professionals and their clients over the past 30 years since its beginnings in the USA. The Society introduced the program to Sydney in 1995 and laid the groundwork in Melbourne during 2003. Friend to Friend Compeer volunteer, ‘Julie’ has been visiting ‘Denise’ each week for the past two months and their friendship is developing. Each Saturday afternoon they meet at Denise’s home to: sit and talk, walk the dog or stroll to the local music store in search of affordable CDs. Denise has few friends and looks forward to Julie’s company each week. Julie is pleased to develop this new friendship because it means so much to Denise who is isolated as a result of frequent episodes of mental illness. One in five adults in Australia will experience mental illness in their lifetime. It will impose major stress on their lives and their relationships with family and friends. In most cases, the support of

friends will greatly diminish and they will rely on a variety of professionals for care – care that is essential but in most cases cannot replace the bonds that only relatives and friends provide.

Not everyone is equipped with the temperament or talents to engage in this particular voluntary work, so one of the first tasks of Compeer staff is to assess each applicant and provide training for those who are suited and wish to proceed. With the assistance of a mental health professional, the volunteer is then matched with a client for a 12-month friendship, and Compeer staff provide regular counselling and support for each Compeer volunteer throughout this time. This counselling is a major work of Compeer staff and the major cost of the service.

As one of the largest volunteer organisations in Australia, the St Vincent de Paul Society has an interest in involving people who want to offer their time and talents to help others. Assistance that is face-to-face and personal is particularly prized as it follows the founding principles of the Society. The Compeer Program is based on this same person-to-person principle and provides a system of volunteer support and professional oversight – essential in times when people’s mental health is fragile.

For Compeer volunteer Julie and her friend Denise, and all who are joining the program, the focus is on developing friendships – and Denise is looking forward to her special lunch with Julie in a few weeks to celebrate her 40th birthday.

In its first four months to June 2004, Compeer Victoria has accredited 18 volunteers and already matched six with people who have a diagnosed mental illness. In line with the growth patterns of Compeer services around the world, the number of matched friendships may reach 30 by mid 2005, and 100 within three to four years.

Compeer is just one of the ways the Society can aim to improve the lives of people marginalised in our community. GEOFF BROWN Coordinator, Compeer

17

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


celebrati celebrations celebrati

celebrat celebratio

celebrations

18 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

celebration


ions onscelebrations

celebrations tions ons

ns

Regular annual events, the Ozanam Lecture and the Young Vinnies’ National Youth Day were also held during the celebrations this year. A mass was held at St Francis’ Church in Melbourne giving thanks for our members and volunteers, followed by the 150th Parade through Melbourne and the performance of The Great 150th Show at the Melbourne Town Hall.

de Paul S ent

150 150 years on, the work of the St Vincent de Paul Society still offers assistance to people experiencing difficulties in their lives. Our members and volunteers, numbering over 8,000, provide material aid, support and friendship to people in need. It is with pride that this work continues and that we are able to assist over 600,000 people each year.

St Vi nc

Further events included the opening of Gerald Ward House, the new administrative office for the Society located in Box Hill. The building was blessed by Archbishop of Melbourne, Most Reverend Denis Hart DD, and opened by the Honourable Steve Bracks MP, Premier of Victoria.

leb

ra

19

ti n

s tr

Ce

The Passion for Justice Continues 1854Ñ2004

a li a

150

The official celebrations for the 150th anniversary began on 19 May at the Melbourne General Cemetery, where the founder of the first Australian conference, Fr Gerald Ward, is buried. A mass was held in his honour and respects paid at his grave.

National and international guests at the various celebrations included the Archbishop of Fiji, International Vice President of the Society’s Council General, National President of the Society in England and Wales, National President of the Society in New Zealand, National President of the Society in Australia, Governor-General of Australia and Lord Mayor of Melbourne.

ety oci

As we celebrate our 150th year of service in Australia we look back at our journey, accomplishments and achievements along the way. From humble beginnings in Melbourne on 5 March 1854, the St Vincent de Paul Society has evolved to become one of the foremost spiritual and welfare organisations in the nation. As for the first Australian conference, home visitation and sharing of ourselves with those in need remain the cornerstones of the Society’s mission today.

g

years

in A

u

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


THE SOCIETY’S MIGRANT AND REFUGEE PROGRAM IS NOW IN ITS THIRD YEAR. COMMENCED AS A RESULT OF A DIRECT GOVERNMENT REQUEST, THE PROGRAM

PROVIDES

A RANGE OF SERVICES TO SUPPORT AND ASSIST REFUGEES TO REBUILD THEIR LIVES.

THE SOCIETY

ENSURES THAT ALL ENTRANTS RECEIVE THE BASIC MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS

SO THEY CAN ESTABLISH A HOME IN THEIR NEW COUNTRY.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Migrant and Refugee

This humanitarian program was authorised by the Department of Immigration and has serviced 872 households (2,897 persons) with basic household goods. In September 2003 the previous austere package of goods was enhanced significantly to enable new settlers to set up a home more comfortably. Currently 70% of participants arrive from Africa. A 20-year brutal war in the Sudan has resulted in one million people being killed or displaced. Thousands are fleeing religious persecution. Murder and rape are rampant. Young children are being forcibly removed into slavery. Children witness brutality. It is no wonder then that hundreds of Sudanese are leaving their homeland and relocating to countries such as Australia. The Sudanese who arrive in Victoria are relocated to homes in the western suburbs or Dandenong. Psychological scarring from such experiences could be long-term. Mothers whose husbands were killed in the war arrive with many children but are isolated at home during the day. To assist, some committee members become babysitters at the parish centre, offering their time while mothers attend English language classes. The transition from the African bush to

20 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

western civilisation can be daunting for people unfamiliar with shopping, handling electrical appliances, lacking language and financial skills, as well as needing an introduction to the Medicare, Centrelink and transport systems. Many Sudanese are Catholic, their faith continuing even though for 17 years some did not have access to a parish priest. Today 100 Sudanese families attend Sunday mass at Holy Eucharist Parish, St Albans. Parish Priest Fr Carrucan also accommodates three Sudanese families in parish premises. Volunteers are always required to provide tutoring in the English language. The Society subsidises the employment of a caseworker at St Albans and is considering a similar arrangement for the Dandenong area. Together with Bishop Mark Coleridge and five other Catholic agencies, the St Vincent de Paul Society is assessing the needs of Sudanese families settling into the Footscray and Sunshine areas, including a caseworker/pastoral worker, office and transport. East Timorese based in Melbourne for 10-12 years and fighting deportation were relegated to bridging visa status, which

denies them access to Medicare, Centrelink and employment. As a result, these East Timorese are totally dependent on charities. The Migrant and Refugee Committee has subsidised rental payments for 15 families. Many have since been granted permanent residency. Members continue to befriend asylum seekers incarcerated at Maribyrnong Detention Centre. One committee member teaches woodworking skills to senior Eritrean men. In conjunction with the recent College Conference Day, two workshops embracing refugee issues were presented to attentive audiences. At Christmas, with the assistance of Young Vinnies and college conferences, hampers and phone cards are provided for people separated from loved ones overseas. The Migrant and Refugee Committee is most grateful for the role played by parish conferences and Young Vinnies who quietly provide spontaneous assistance to hundreds of refugees throughout Victoria. JOHN McLEAN Migrant and Refugee Committee Chairman


THE SOCIETY

IN

VICTORIA

PROVIDES STRONG COMMITMENT AND SUPPORT TO PEOPLE IN

DEVELOPING COUNTRIES THROUGH AN ACTIVE

THESE

OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE.

LINKS ARE INTENDED TO FOSTER AND ENRICH CULTURAL EXCHANGE AND TO

PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR

SOCIETY

MEMBERS AROUND THE WORLD TO SHARE ONE

ANOTHER’S JOURNEY.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Overseas Development

The Overseas Development Committee, backed by strong support from all conferences and councils, has continued to increase its commitment to Twinning, Assist a Student and new projects. The Twinning Program promotes spirituality, deep friendship, solidarity and mutual help for developing countries. Currently we are twinned with 510 conferences throughout the Asia Pacific area, and with the assistance of modern technology there has been a vast improvement in communication with our twins. Whenever visits are made to developing countries we are constantly made aware that families see education as a way out of poverty. This rationale has led to an unprecedented demand on our Assist a Student program. An annual donation of $70 per student assists with education and training in one of our twinned partner countries.

Victoria supports 1,080 overseas students and has been active in promoting the program in Australia and the Asia Pacific region.

In Fiji we have been active in assisting to promote growth, financial support and structural changes in tandem with national and international members. At the request of the National Council, Victorian State President, Syd Tutton and myself visited Fiji to assess areas of need. Currently State Council has approved the purchase of a dedicated vehicle for the Fr Law Home for the Aged in Suva.

Self-help projects, such as the provision of sewing machines, have been readily adopted by our conferences and state committee. We recently provided $6,000 to St Elizabeth’s Hospital in Pakistan to assist with the training of nurses.

Over the past 12 months, aid to the value of $307,674 was provided to assist the poor in our twinned countries through conference grants, council-to-council grants, Assist a Student and supported projects.

National Vice President and Youth Representative, Danusia Kaska, has been actively working with AIDS afflicted orphans in Thailand.

The Overseas Development Committee is grateful to all conferences, volunteers and donors who support the work being developed overseas.

Victoria’s State Council has provided funding to allow the Society in Burma to rent an office for their National Council. Our Deputy State President, Peter Rigg accompanied Twinning Officer, Jim O’Shea to observe and assist with the ongoing development of the Society in Burma.

JOHN O’BRIEN Overseas Development Committee Chairman

21

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


FOR

MANY, THE

ST VINCENT

DE

PAUL SOCIETY’S CENTRES

THE FIRST POINT OF CONTACT FOR PEOPLE SEEKING

CHARITY ARE ASSISTANCE. THEY ARE PLACES OF

WHERE PEOPLE CAN BUY QUALITY CLOTHING, FURNITURE AND HOUSEHOLD ITEMS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES.

ST VINNIES

LOW

INCOME PEOPLE ARE NOT THE ONLY ONES WHO SHOP AT A

STORE; ANYONE LOOKING FOR A BARGAIN OFTEN BROWSE THROUGH THE ITEMS

AVAILABLE AT OUR CENTRES.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Centres of Charity

The 94 centres in Victoria have approximately 3,000 volunteers, ranging from people who come in every day to those who can only give their time once or twice a month. A variety of people assist our work in the centres, including unemployed people and work experience students. We also employ a small number of staff as professional managers and driver/jockeys to assist in our busy centres. During the past 12 months we have continued to improve the presentation of our centres, making them bright and cheerful while also bringing them in line with current retail standards and trends. Our established maintenance program continues to bring our centres to a standard that provides an up-to-date modern shopping environment for our clients and customers, and a safe and healthy workplace for our members, volunteers and staff. New innovative equipment specific to our requirements was introduced to make the work in our centres both safer and more efficient. Training programs are run regularly for all centre personnel on occupational health and safety, customer service, stock merchandising and presentation

22 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

techniques, communication and relevant telephone skills. Regular information days show the results of work carried out in centres and ensure that centre personnel are informed about the Society’s news. Policies and procedures for our centres are reviewed, revised and updated to ensure that we are in compliance with all regulations and laws relevant to the running of our centres. Any surplus funds raised by the sale of goods from the centres are passed up to the regional councils, which in turn distribute funds to conferences to assist people in their designated area. Much of this money is used to provide food for

families in need. The centres also deliver furniture to families visited by conference members. New initiative Our centres have always attracted people looking for a bargain or wanting the ‘retro’ look. As a result, St Vinnies has developed a new initiative called INNZONE, which offers youthful fashions of today and originals from the 60s, 70s and 80s. INNZONE fashions are currently offered in the Bayswater, Geelong and Hoppers Crossing centres. During the next 12 months it is anticipated that INNZONE fashions will feature in another 18 stores across the state, in areas with large populations of young people.

Assistance provided during 2003-2004 Clothing and household items Furniture items Value of assistance

– 5,128 families – 7,567 families $ 1,092,941

Centres Financial Overview during 2003-2004 Sales Expenses Funds available for distribution

$11,317,820 $ 5,428,902 $ 5,888,918


I N V ICTORIA

THE

S T V INCENT

DE

PAUL S OCIETY

HAS 94

C ENTRES

OF

C HARITY

PROVIDING QUALITY CLOTHING , FURNITURE AND OTHER AFFORDABLE HOUSEHOLD ITEMS TO THE PUBLIC .

Centres Three new centres were opened during the year in Briar Hill, Cowes and Mitcham. Trading at all centres is going well and assistance has been given to many people. Some centres have been relocated to higher profile areas; the results to date have been above expectations, with favourable comments coming from both clients and customers. Peak periods for the centres are Christmas, and more specifically winter when stocks of clothing such as jumpers and coats are in high demand. Calls for good quality clothing, furniture and household items have occurred during these peak times. This year’s wonderful results could not have been achieved without the dedication, and commitment from all our centres personnel. MARY HODSON State Manager, Centres

Centre locations Alfredton Ararat Ascot Vale Ashburton Bairnsdale Ballarat Bayswater Benalla Bendigo Briar Hill Brunswick Camperdown Casterton Castlemaine Clayton Cobram Coburg Colac Collingwood Corio Cowes Cranbourne Croydon Daylesford

Eaglehawk Echuca Edithvale Ferntree Gully Frankston Geelong Glenroy Hamilton Hampton Hastings Hawthorn Heidelberg Heights Heyfield Hoppers Crossing Horsham Kangaroo Flat Kerang Kew Korumburra Kyabram Kyneton Lalor Leongatha Lilydale

Malvern Mansfield Maryborough Melton Mildura Mitcham Moe Mont Albert Mooroopna Mornington Morwell Newport Norlane Numurkah Oakleigh Ocean Grove Ormond Ouyen Pinewood Portland Port Melbourne Preston Queenscliff Ringwood

23

Sale Seaford Sebastopol Seymour Shepparton Springvale St Albans St Arnaud Sunbury Sunshine Swan Hill Tatura Traralgon Wangaratta Warburton Warrnambool Warragul Wendouree Werribee Wodonga Wonthaggi Yarrawonga

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


ST VINCENT

PAUL AGED CARE & COMMUNITY SERVICES WAS ESTABLISHED AS A NEW COMPANY WITHIN THE ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY IN VICTORIA ON 1 AUGUST 2003. AT THE TIME OF ITS ESTABLISHMENT, THREE DISTINCT BUSINESSES WERE INVOLVED, NAMELY, AGED CARE, HOMELESS/HOUSING SERVICES AND SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT FOR PEOPLE WITH A DISABILITY. DE

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services About Us

The new company was a result of the Society’s desire to remove the major government funded ‘Special Works’ from the immediate control of State Council and place them under the control of a corporation specifically designed for the purpose of providing specialist and professional welfare services. The constitution under which St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services operates provides the Society with an overarching level of control, while empowering the Board of Directors with independent responsibility for the strategic direction and development of the organisation. This was achieved primarily by establishing St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services as a company limited by guarantee with a single member, being the St Vincent de Paul Society. Hence a partnership was formed whereby St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services benefits greatly from its links with the Society, and the Society is able to focus on its own core responsibilities based around charitable works.

24 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

With over 550 employees, St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services delivers services to an ever growing and demanding client base within aged care services, homeless/housing services and supported employment services for people with a disability. One of the unique aspects of our services is the collaboration between the professional and volunteer arms of the organisation. St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services is fortunate to have the support of the Society in Victoria in advancing our services. The dedication and professionalism of our employees, and the commitment of our volunteers who consistently give generously of their time and energy, often make a real difference to our work and the quality of life of those we aim to assist.

Mission To understand and advocate the needs of disadvantaged people and provide services and opportunities that enhance their quality of life. Vision Within the Christian mission of the St Vincent de Paul Society, Aged Care & Community Services works with and for people who are disadvantaged to provide them with support which reflects an understanding of their needs, respects their rights and dignity and encourages, wherever possible, a greater level of self-dependence. Board of Directors Neil Brown – Chairman of the Board Peter Rigg Bernie Geary OAM Rob Allum Adrian Cervetto Pamela Macklin Anne O’Shaughnessy Allen Pretty Tony Ryan


THE FISCAL YEAR 2003-2004 REPRESENTED THE FIRST YEAR THAT ST VINCENT DE PAUL AGED CARE & COMMUNITY SERVICES OPERATED AS A SEPARATE LEGAL ENTITY, FOLLOWING THE TRANSFER OF ASSETS AND ASSOCIATED BUSINESS OPERATIONS TO IT BY THE SOCIETY.

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services Chairman’s Report Neil Brown The establishment of St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services and the appointment of a Board of Directors reflected earlier decisions taken by the State Council of the St Vincent de Paul Society in the year 2000 to restructure the Society’s government funded special works in order to: • streamline and improve governance and management structures; • ensure the continuing relevance and excellence of services provided to dependent, disadvantaged and marginalised people; • provide full and meaningful compliance with all relevant statutory, legal and accreditation requirements; • provide higher levels of transparency and accountability for government provided and other funds. Consistent with the Society’s goals, the Board’s early work focused on the performance of programs and whether their sustainability and growth was being appropriately supported by the existing organisation’s structures and systems. On most counts the Board saw a need for change, particularly in relation to the organisation’s capacity to respond quickly and appropriately to the often changing needs of marginalised and dependent people. Throughout our aged care, homeless, disability and specialist services programs, the last 12 months have witnessed considerable change in the organisation’s structures, the management and use of resources and the systems which provide decision-making information and contribute to the record of stewardship.

Programs have been approved or feasibility work is in train to build a number of new aged care facilities which will increase the capacities of facilities on a reduced number of sites.

I would like to take the opportunity to sincerely thank my colleagues on the Board, all of whom lead busy private lives but have given freely of their time nevertheless to work through a number of difficult formative issues and to bring their collective expertise to bear on the development of a broad range of governance policies.

The Board expects the capital outlays will reduce the recurrent costs per resident and provide, as well, a capacity for the introduction of ‘ageing-in-place’.

Special thanks also goes to: the Chief Executive Officer, John Patone for his work in establishing the new company and giving operational effect to the Board’s policies; the Secretary of the Board, Graeme Wickenden; the Executive group and staff in the aged care and community service organisations; the Board’s solicitors, Tolhurst Druce and Emmerson, and Mallesons Stephen Jaques, Solicitors, for their generous support and work in setting up the new company.

A new master plan for the control of developments at Ozanam House in North Melbourne has also been canvassed with the Board by the Melbourne City Council. The Board’s forward strategies will address the need for more efficient capital structures at Ozanam, given that they offer prospects which will improve the range and quality of the accommodation and related services provided at the facility. Whilst much work remains to be done, the Board considers that during 2003-2004 there has been a positive response to the Society’s goals for an improved management focus and the delivery of cost-effective, quality-driven programs across aged care and community services.

My report would not be complete without a thank you to our generous volunteers and donors, to the State President of the Society, Syd Tutton, and the Victorian State Council for their support and cooperation throughout. It has been my privilege to serve as Chairman of the Board.

The Board also considers that the changes which have taken place in organisation and resources management will lead to a better balance between programs and provide a basis for sustainable growth which will benefit a wider range of people in need.

25

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


THE ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY HAS BEEN A SIGNIFICANT PARTICIPANT IN THE VICTORIAN AGED CARE SECTOR FOR OVER 30 YEARS. ST VINCENT DE PAUL AGED CARE & COMMUNITY SERVICES CONTINUES THIS TRADITION AND WE CONSIDER OURSELVES TO BE AT THE FOREFRONT OF SERVICE PROVISION INITIATIVES, WITH TOTAL COMMITMENT TO COMPLIANCE WITH ACCREDITATION STANDARDS AND INDUSTRY BEST PRACTICE.

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services Aged Care

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services provides care and accommodation for elderly citizens through a mix of hostels, nursing homes and independent living units.

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services also manages 53 independent living units located in Ballarat (three units), Bendigo (30 units), Maryborough (six units) and Mildura (14 units).

We have a commitment to social justice and allocate a substantial number of our available beds to the homeless and marginalised members of our communities.

Bailly House Over half of the residents at Bailly House are male and some residents are from the homeless sector. The average age of the residents is approximately 85 years. The oldest resident is a 97-year-old and has been at the facility since its opening 30 years ago.

Eight aged care facilities are operated across Victoria, including seven low-care facilities and one high-care nursing home, totalling 328 beds. Co-located with the Box Hill based nursing home is the Day Therapy Centre that treats an additional 90 people each week.

Facility/Location

26 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

41 34

May Noonan Hostel This year the hostel has introduced a new system called Equis, that is able to track our quality activities and produce graphs, charts and detailed information so that data can be used to make improvements.

30 49 32 30 53 59

A satellite Aged Care Channel has been installed onsite that provides staff education on current topics. These programs are interactive, involving the viewers, and can be taped for future viewing.

No of Beds

Bailly House – North Melbourne May Noonan Hostel – Terang St Vincent de Paul Nursing Home –ox Hill Box Hill O’Mara House – Traralgon Rosalie House – Geelong North St Anne’s Hostel – Westmeadows Vincenpaul Hostel – Mont Albert North Vincentian House – Geelong West

Bailly House has undergone a huge change in its management processes over the last year, resulting in many improvements.

Our submission for six new beds was successful and, due to high demand, a permanent bed will be converted into a respite bed. O’Mara House This year O’Mara House has achieved another three-year accreditation, passed the kitchen audit and had a spot check by the Accreditation Agency. In 2002, 11 new beds were approved by the Commonwealth Government. The staff are looking forward to the commencement of the new high-care facility and the upgrade of the old facility. Rosalie House Only one change of staff occurred during the year, creating a stable atmosphere for our residents. We look to the future, with a new facility to be built on a vacate site in Hamlyn Heights to house the 32 residents from Rosalie House and the 59 residents from Vincentian House. It is anticipated this 91 bed ‘ageing-inplace’ facility will be completed by 2005.


St Anne’s Hostel Approximately two-thirds of the residents are females and the majority come from Westmeadows, Tullamarine and Gladstone Park. This year has been very successful for St Anne’s, achieving a 100% resident occupancy to date including five new admissions. Due to a higher percentage of residents suffering from cognitive impairment and to improve the quality of resident care, several resident’s rooms have been installed with sentinels, computerised microwave beams which identify when the resident gets out of bed at night. These assist the residents to maintain independence and reduces the risk of resident falls with their high standard of overnight resident monitoring. Day Therapy Centre The Day Therapy Centre has provided maintenance and rehabilitation-allied health services to over 190 elderly clients during the past 12 months. Our physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology and podiatry programs aim to maximise clients’ quality of life, helping them to stay independent for as long as possible.

Over the past 12 months we have been fortunate to have the assistance of a number of volunteers who have helped us with various aspects of our therapy programs.

The hostel remains indebted to our local parish which provides weekly mass on Saturdays, and our local St Vinnies centre has been bringing a ‘travelling op shop’ to Vincenpaul which has proved very popular with the residents.

St Vincent de Paul Nursing Home In 2003-2004 there were 11 permanent admissions to the nursing home. Twentytwo admissions were also made to the planned respite program.

Vincentian House The diversional therapy area has focused on therapy programs this past year, especially utilising the morning for therapy. Resident bus trips are very popular and we are grateful to the staff who volunteer their time so that extra trips can be offered.

There are 74 permanent part-time staff employed at the nursing home, several of whom are undertaking the Certificate 2 in Business Administration course.

A men’s group operates monthly and a group of men, in a shared venture with Rosalie House, has enjoyed going to the pokies or having a pub lunch.

The Aged Care Advisory Committee, formerly the Board of Management, has been meeting on a semi-regular basis to discuss redevelopment and local issues, and has recently commenced conducting tours for prospective residents, which has been most helpful.

Residents continue to enjoy celebrating mass at the facility each week and are appreciative of the priests who facilitate this.

Vincenpaul Hostel In 2003-2004 there were 11 permanent admissions to the hostel. The retention of staff at Vincenpaul has been pleasing as they have received a lot of training in implementing and maintaining the new quality systems at the facility.

27

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


THE ST VINCENT

DE

PAUL SOCIETY

HAS BEEN MANAGING GOVERNMENT FUNDED

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS FOR OVER 50 YEARS.

COMMUNITY SERVICES

ST VINCENT

DE

PAUL AGED CARE &

CONTINUES THIS WORK WITH PEOPLE WHO ARE IN NEED THROUGH

VICTORIAN STATE GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT COMMONWEALTH GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.

NUMEROUS PROGRAMS FUNDED BY THE

HUMAN SERVICES

AND

OF

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services Community Services

Historically our services have tended to focus on the north western region of metropolitan Melbourne, growing out of locally identified needs within the community. A range of accommodation and support initiatives are operated for people who experience homelessness, providing help with issues such as general health concerns, drug and alcohol abuse, employment education and training options, and social exclusion and isolation. A domestic violence service in Shepparton and a supported employment service for people with a disability in Mornington reflect further diversity in our programs. Ozanam House Ozanam House provides short-term crisis accommodation for men. The facility has 63 beds: 60 are available for crisis accommodation, the other three are contracted to St Vincent’s Hospital to provide accommodation for homeless people exiting the hospital’s emergency department. Ozanam House also prepares meals which are served at the Ozanam Community Centre.

28 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

A group of very committed members of the legal and business community in Melbourne have been instrumental in establishing the Ozanam House Rehabilitation Scholarship Fund. The purpose of this fund is to provide the means for homeless people to receive education and skills training so that they can re-establish their lives, live independently and gain access to employment. Victorian Premier, the Honourable Steve Bracks, MP and the Attorney-General, Rob Hulls, attended a fundraising dinner in February 2004, to support the fund. We owe a great debt of gratitude to Margaret Coburn (Chair), Ian Dicker, Dr Michael Kozminsky, Robert Galbally, Paul Bravender-Coyle and Allistair Harkness MP, trustees of the fund, for this creative initiative. In early May, City of Melbourne Lord Mayor, John So, launched a CD produced by The Ozanams, a group formed from homeless men attending Ozanam House and the Ozanam Community Centre. We are grateful to the City of Melbourne for funding and support for this cultural development program.

Following the launch the Lord Mayor unveiled memorial plaques erected at Ozanam House commemorating homeless people who have died at or been associated with the house over the past 10 years. Ozanam Community Centre The community centre is a facility for homeless and low-income people needing some basic assistance, and provides lunchtime meals every weekday for about 70 people. Dental and medical services operate from the facility, along with a number of sundry programs including drug and alcohol counselling, housing and information referral, recreation, communal activity and a variety of educational activities. The centre is often the place where many service users are initially engaged for referral to other allied services, though sometimes it may take many months to establish a service user’s confidence before a referral is possible. Homeless Drug Dependency Program Ozanam House, in collaboration with The Salvation Army and Hanover, has developed an in-house response to homeless people with significant drug and alcohol issues. The program enables quick and timely access to detoxification facilities,


specialised drug and alcohol counselling, an exit to supported accommodation, community reintegration, and access to education and skills training. Following the recent successful completion of the trial stage, the Minister for Health, Bronwyn Pike, recently announced that this project will now be funded annually and funds will also be made available to engage a specialist mental health clinician at Ozanam House. This will occur through collaboration with the Western Homeless Outreach Psychiatry Services which already offers an out-posted service at Ozanam House and Ozanam Community Centre. The additional funding will enable a fuller and more integrated response to this need. Quin House Quin House has provided supported accommodation for 10 men recovering from alcohol and drug addiction. Clients are asked to contribute $125 per week, which includes accommodation and living expenses. Adult Outreach Adult Outreach provides support to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, and works with them to secure and maintain safe and affordable housing and achieve independence in the community. It meets program participants in

their own environment and provides support and assistance to those who may experience a range of issues including homelessness, drug and alcohol problems, gambling, depression and other medical illness.

In conjunction with the Brosnan Centre (Jesuit Social Services) we gained funding through the Department of Human Services to provide an integrated housing and support service response for young people aged 17 and over who are exiting the juvenile justice system and are in need of accommodation. The project commenced in August 2003 and currently manages six properties.

Ozlink Personal Support Program Ozlink Personal Support Program is approved by Centrelink and funded by the Commonwealth Government. The program enables us to work with people who are long-term unemployed and who experience significant barriers to employment. Addressing these barriers enables us to support these people in their current situation and can lead to entry to preemployment programs. This program has expanded and we are now contracted to engage 70 clients.

Youth Support Services Youth Support Services provides short to medium-term support to young people aged 15-25 who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Along with accommodation support, Youth Support Services also delivers a number of other programs, with a focus on early intervention and support.

Transitional Housing Management Transitional Housing manages about 150 public housing properties on behalf of the Office of Housing. It is responsible for rent collection and general maintenance of the houses. It also provides housing information and referral services for people seeking affordable housing.

Marian Community Marian Community is a service based in Shepparton for women experiencing domestic violence. It manages four refuge properties on behalf of the Office of Housing.

29

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services Community Services

Women’s Early Intervention Program This program provides vigorous intervention, support and advocacy for single women (without children and over the age of 25) at risk of housing loss, thereby reducing the incidence of homelessness.

Camperdown Resource Centre This centre is operated by volunteers and financially supported by the local St Vincent de Paul Society conference. The centre provides a ‘drop-in’ space for those in need of support and offers referral to professional agencies.

Equity & Access Program This consortium program, auspiced by St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services in the northern Department of Human Services region, is a three-year research and implementation project aimed at identifying and addressing issues of access and equity for various client groups within the Home and Community Care Service system.

Disability Employment Services Based at Mornington, Ozanam Enterprises provides supported employment for people with a disability. Over 55 people with a range of disabilities are involved in full and part-time supported employment and work skills training.

Community Connections Program The Community Connections Program works with people who are living in lowcost accommodation, such as public housing, rooming houses, private hostels, caravan parks and supported residential services. Often they have complex support needs and are finding it difficult coping alone. The aim of the program is to link these people into the services provided in their local area.

30 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4

After more than 10 years of service at Ozanam Enterprises, Jan Taylor retired as Manager in February 2004. We acknowledge Jan for her dedication to the service and to people with a disability, as well as for the way in which she progressed and consolidated the service. The service is now under the direction of the Executive Manager for Community Services. The task of integrating Ozanam Enterprises within our infrastructure is well under way and expected to be completed by early 2005.

A very significant challenge for the service, in terms of its financial viability, will be the introduction of Case Based Funding and pro-rata, award-based wages for supported employees. Striking a balance between supporting people with a disability in employment and running a competitive and sustainable business will be the challenge. Creating Pathways 2003-2004 The Community Services’ programs have continued to consolidate and expand throughout 2003-2004. Emphasis throughout the year has been on ‘creating pathways’ as outlined in the St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services Strategic Plan 2003-2005. This pathways theme has been addressed across all service areas with the intention of enabling service users to move easily from one program to another and, ultimately, to find a pathway out of homelessness. To this end, strong links have been forged between our services. Ozanam House and the Transitional Housing Service in Glenroy have established a closer working relationship, as have Ozanam Community Centre, Marian Community, Ozanam House, the various youth and adult outreach services, the Homeless Drug Dependency Program and Quin House post-


Community Services Achievements 2003-2004 12,268 3,398 59 61,353 57 733

rehabilitation supported accommodation service.

3,779 110

To enable easier movement between programs, some site relocation has occurred. These relocations have enabled us to integrate our service response more fully, especially with services for youth and women.

In August 2003, we were the aspiring body for a consortium of agencies undertaking a joint Equity & Access Project in the northern region of metropolitan Melbourne. The project involves research, developing an overview of the current Home and Community Care Service system, and preparing a report on strategies to address the shortcomings of the service system.

Apart from creating internal pathways for service users, emphasis has also been placed on creating viable and sustainable pathways out of homelessness. According to our mission, our task is not only to provide for people in their immediate need but also to assist them to achieve a ‘greater level of self-dependence’ – in other words, to assist people to live independently in the community.

Executive Officers, Micaela Cronin and Michael O’Kelly, have successfully organised the inaugural Homeless Services Conference which was held in November 2003. Staff members were able to showcase their service and model of operation. The Music and Arts Program at the Ozanam Community Centre presented three short films/documentaries on the experience of being homeless.

249

Addressing the causes of homelessness can effectively lead to an outcome which may provide a long-term solution. Much of the critical thinking within St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services suggests that we should further explore programs which address the causes, such as poverty, lack of education, employment, affordable housing, drug and alcohol issues, and mental health issues.

Over 360 volunteers have been involved in various capacities across the various Community Services’ programs throughout the year. We thank them for their ongoing commitment and, together with all staff members, look forward to continuous improvement in the services we offer throughout the coming year.

1,369 3,087 69

45 73 20,054 457 91

101 43 13,472 808 62

109 80

People assisted with information and referral People assisted with housing establishment Men supported in postdetoxification accommodation Meals served in crisis accommodation Men supported in postrehabilitation accommodation Homeless men placed in crisis accommodation Doctor consultations Men engaged in drug treatment program Men supported in drug dependency treatment program Homeless men exiting hospital supported accommodation Free meals served People linked to other support services Women at risk of becoming homeless assisted Men supported through outreach program Young people supported through outreach program Young people exiting prison housed General care for people who are homeless Volunteers involved People with disability in supported employment Dental appointments Episodes of nursing care Young men with high needs given intensive support Women and children escaping violence housed Long-term unemployed assisted in personal support program

Donations towards these programs are welcome, call 03 9895 5900.

31

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Financial Statements

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2004

2004 $

2003 $

REVENUE Fundraising Government grants Sale of goods Other income Proceeds on sale of fixed assets

4,997,028 16,266,890 13,429,185 5,670,197 2,419,661

6,762,020 13,724,561 12,915,743 5,893,933 821,053

TOTAL REVENUE

42,782,961

40,117,310

9,540,952 1,786,326

8,967,946 585,107

TOTAL EXPENSES

11,327,278

9,553,053

TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR OTHER ACTIVITIES

31,455,683

30,564,257

EXPENSES FROM OTHER ACTIVITIES Assistance Aged Care Services Homeless/Housing Services Support Services Fundraising/Public Relations Administration

7,438,651 11,665,100 7,391,017 1,347,253 511,986 2,568,085

5,560,042 10,132,734 8,418,355 1,340,244 500,353 2,118,997

TOTAL EXPENSES FROM OTHER ACTIVITIES

30,922,092

28,070,725

533,591

2,493,532

Decrease in retained earnings on adoption of AASB 1028 – Employee Benefit

(686,671)

TOTAL CHANGES IN EQUITY

(153,080)

2,493,532

EXPENSES Cost of sales Written down value of fixed assets sold

SURPLUS FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES

STATEMENT BY STATE COUNCIL In the opinion of the State Council the financial report as set out in the fully audited Financial Statements: 1. Presents a true and fair view of the financial position of St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. as at 30 June 2004 and its performance for the year ended on that date in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, mandatory professional reporting requirements and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Boards. 2. At the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due. This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the State Council, and is signed for and on behalf of the State Council by:

Syd Tutton State President

Jim Grealish Treasurer

Dated this 9th day of October 2004 Fully audited Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2004 are available upon request. 32 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4


St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Financial Statements

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2004

2004 $

2003 $

CURRENT ASSETS Cash assets Receivables Inventories Other financial assets Other assets

18,559,498 324,040 185,591 8,125,647 415,299

26,726,690 582,244 207,186 1,613,281 504,489

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

27,610,075

29,633,890

NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant & equipment Other financial assets TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

51,650,635 – 51,650,635

46,805,639 – 46,805,639

TOTAL ASSETS

79,260,710

76,439,529

880,194 77,148 3,101,557 9,390,780

1,743,138 157,447 1,830,563 6,725,443

13,449,679

10,456,591

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables Interest bearing liabilities Provisions

– – 525,721

34,635 76,988 432,925

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

525,721

544,548

TOTAL LIABILITIES

13,975,400

11,001,139

NET ASSETS

65,285,310

65,438,390

EQUITY Reserves Retained earnings

34,560,596 30,724,714

35,660,596 29,777,794

Total parent entity interest

65,285,310

65,438,390

TOTAL EQUITY

65,285,310

65,438,390

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables Interest bearing liabilities Provisions Other liabilities TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

33

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


THANK

YOU TO ALL THE INDIVIDUALS, CHURCHES, COMMUNITY GROUPS, CORPORATES,

TRUSTS AND VOLUNTEERS WHO SUPPORT THE

YOUR

ST VINCENT

DE

SUPPORT IS INVALUABLE AND GREATLY APPRECIATED BY

PAUL SOCIETY EACH YEAR. US, BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY

BY THE PEOPLE WE SERVE.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Thank You

The St Vincent de Paul Society relies heavily on the generosity of the wider community to support vital programs and services for people in need. Thank you to all the thousands of individual donors who have given generously over the past 12 months. The Society recognises that people give in a variety of ways: some give their time, their skills, their prayers or gifts in kind, whilst others give financially. We are very grateful to all who support the Society. Trusts and foundations Bell Charitable Fund Campbell Edwards Trust Carter Family Trust Estate of Leo Byrne Halpin Charitable Trust Kimberley Foundation Lord Mayor’s Charitable Fund Melbourne Newsboys Club Foundation Inc. PricewaterhouseCoopers Foundation The Michael & Andrew Buxton Foundation The William Angliss (Victoria) Charitable Fund The William Buckland Foundation

Business and community groups AGL Australian School Canteen Association Bulleen Village Pharmacy Cevol Industries Pty Ltd CitiPower and Powercor Australia City of Whittlesea City of Yarra Codan Ltd Coles Myer Limited Eaton Pty Ltd Edison Mission Energy Pty Ltd Fletcher Jones Australia Support Ford Motor Company of Australia Inergise Australia Pty Ltd – Kew Infineum Australia Pty Ltd MinterEllison Mitre 10 Ritchies IGA St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne Securities Institute Telstra Corporation Limited Victorian Mortgage Management Group Western Bulldogs Football Club Media Special thanks to all Victorian media outlets (newspapers, radio stations and television stations) for promoting the Society’s appeal advertisements free of charge.

YOU CAN HELP THE ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY HELP OTHERS BY: Making a Bequest Please consider remembering the St Vincent de Paul Society in your Will. The Society is able to assist thousands of people because of the generosity of those who have remembered us in their Will. For an information booklet or to speak to our Bequest Officer, please call the Society on 03 9895 5800. Making a financial donation Credit card donations can be made by phoning 13 18 12 or by visiting our website at www.sdvp-vic.org.au No donations or bequests are used for administration or any other non-direct assistance costs. Donating goods Donations of quality clothing, household goods and furniture can be made to any St Vincent de Paul Society centre (see page 23 for centre locations or call 1800 621 349). Volunteering your time If you are interested in volunteering your time to help people in any of the Society’s services, please call

Special thanks to the people associated with the St Vincent de Paul Society and St Vincent de Paul Aged Care & Community Services whose photographs feature throughout this Annual Report. Photographs are interspersed randomly and are not necessarily associated with the accompanying text.

34 A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4


T HE S T V INCENT

DE

PAUL S OCIETY

IS A GLOBAL ORGANISATION THAT OPERATES

E STABLISHED BY F REDERIC O ZANAM IN F RANCE 1833 , THE S T V INCENT DE PAUL S OCIETY WAS FOUNDED IN A USTRALIA BY F R G ERALD WARD AT S T F RANCIS ’ C HURCH M ELBOURNE ON 5 M ARCH 1854 . T HIS YEAR WE CELEBRATE 150 YEARS OF SERVICE TO PEOPLE IN A USTRALIA .

METRO/SUBURBS

IN 130 COUNTRIES AND HAS OVER 950,000 MEMBERS WORLDWIDE .

IN

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

Beginnings

Services and Locations

FREDERIC OZANAM – FOUNDER The St Vincent de Paul Society was formed in 1833 by a 20-year-old youth named Frederic Ozanam. At the time, the people of France were experiencing tremendous political and social upheaval: changes of government, the Industrial Revolution and unjust employment practices. Ozanam gathered some colleagues and began to respond in practical ways to the poverty and hardship he saw in the lives of people around him. They visited people in their homes and offered friendship and support. This practice, known today as home visitation, remains a core activity for St Vincent de Paul Society members and volunteers. The group formed by Ozanam and his friends later became known as the first ‘conference’ of the St Vincent de Paul Society. They met together regularly as a group for prayer and mutual support, to learn and to share ideas about how they could best assist others. Ozanam died in 1853 at the age of 40. At the time of his death there were approximately 2,000 conferences operating throughout the world. Frederic Ozanam was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 1997. Today the St Vincent de Paul Society in Victoria has 289 conferences, 8,000 members and volunteers, and assists more than 600,000 people in need every year.

VICTORIA

ST VINCENT DE PAUL – PATRON

FR GERALD WARD – AUSTRALIAN FOUNDER

The Society was named after St Vincent de Paul. Vincent was ordained a priest in France in 1600 at the age of 19.

The first conference of the St Vincent de Paul Society in Australia met in Melbourne at St Francis’ Church on 5 March 1854. The Society’s first president was Fr Gerald Ward, an Englishman who had been recruited to work in the Melbourne mission by the pioneer priest Fr Patrick Geoghegan.

As a young man he ministered to the wealthy and powerful; however, an appointment as chaplain to a poor parish, and to galley prisoners, inspired a vocation to work with those most powerless and marginalised. Vincent urged his followers to bring God’s justice and love to people who were unable to live a full human life: “Deal with the most urgent needs. Organise charity so that it is more efficient...teach reading and writing, educate with the aim of giving each the means of self-support. Intervene with authorities to obtain reforms in structure...there is no charity without justice.” At age 80 Vincent de Paul died in Paris on 27 September 1660.

Fr Ward was later to suggest that the main reason why the conference was founded was for “the protection of male and female orphans”. With the discovery of gold in 1851 and the rush to the goldfields of Central Victoria the population doubled and homeless, deserted children roamed the streets. Fr Ward and the new St Vincent de Paul conference responded to this acute problem by establishing the St Vincent de Paul orphanage in South Melbourne. The foundation stone was laid in 1855 and the first children accepted in 1857. In 1855, in a submission to the government of the day, Fr Ward stated that the new conference aimed at “the relief of the destitute, in a manner as much as possible permanently beneficial and the visitation of poor families”. Gerald Ward died on 14 January 1858 aged 52. A newspaper noted that “he was one in whom many a widow and orphan had found a good friend”. His enduring legacy is founded in such friendship.

2 ANNUAL REPORT 2003-2004

Soup Vans The Society’s soup van services are based in Collingwood, Fitzroy, Footscray and Moe. Staffed by volunteers, the vans travel the streets of metropolitan Melbourne and Moe bringing food and friendship to thousands of people in need each year.

ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY VICTORIA INC. Conferences The Society’s members, known as Vincentians, and volunteers form local groups known as conferences. Conferences respond to calls from people in need within their local communities and provide assistance with food, material aid, budget advice, utility bills, advocacy issues, as well as a hand of friendship. Conference Initiatives Conference members provide a range of initiatives that address specific needs of the people they assist, such as holiday homes, emergency accommodation, a Friday night school, mobile conferences, visiting teams and assistance centres.

College Conferences and Young Adult Conferences The Society’s college conferences and young adult conferences provide a range of volunteer work in the community, including tutoring, fundraising, home visitation, organising Kids’ Camps, as well as manning soup vans.

ST VINCENT DE PAUL AGED CARE & COMMUNITY SERVICES Aged Care Services Elderly citizens are provided with care and accommodation through our aged care facilities, which include a nursing home, hostels, day therapy centre and independent living units.

Centres of Charity The Society’s Centres of Charity (opportunity shops) provide quality furniture, clothing and household items to people in need. Centre stocks are available to people being supported by conference members, as well as to the general public at a low cost. Profits raised from the sale of stock in the centres goes towards providing resources and support to people in need.

Community Services People who are marginalised, homeless and at risk within the Victorian community are offered a range of housing, homeless and disability services. 35

T H E PA S S I O N F O R J U S T I C E C O N T I N U E S


St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. STATE COUNCIL State President

Syd Tutton

Deputy State President and Northern Central Council President

Peter Rigg

Vice President and Gippsland Central Council President

Sandra Walker

Vice President and Eastern Central Council President

Dennis Griffin

Vice President and Youth Representative

Teresa Wilson

Treasurer and Corporate Secretary

Jim Grealish

Southern Central Council President

Dennis Mirabella

Western Central Council President

Maurie Taylor

North Eastern Central Council President

Cecilia McCormick

North Western Central Council President

Tony Keaney

Youth Representative

Benita De Vincentiis

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Locked Bag 4800, Box Hill Vic 3128 43 Prospect Street, Box Hill Vic 3128 Phone: 03 9895 5800 Fax: 03 9895 5850 Email: info@svdp-vic.org.au Website: www.svdp-vic.org.au ABN: 28 911 702 061 RN: A0042727Y

The passion for justice continues

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Annual Report 2003-2004


2003-2004 Annual Report