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St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. Annual Report 2002-2003

Love in Action


Victorian Locations ST

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Metro/Suburbs

Victoria

ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY VICTORIA INC. Conferences The Society’s members, known as Vincentians, and volunteers form local groups known as ‘conferences’. Conferences respond to calls from people in need within their local communities and provide assistance with food, material aid, budget advice, utility bills and advocacy issues as well as a hand of friendship. College Conferences and Young Adult Groups The Society’s college conferences and young adult groups provide a range of volunteer work in the community, including tutoring, fundraising and organising Kids’ Camps as well as manning soup vans.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

Centres of Charity The Society’s centres of charity (opportunity shops) provide quality furniture, clothing and household items to people in need. Centre stocks are available to people being supported by conference members as well as to the general public at a low cost. Profits raised from the sale of stock in the centres goes towards providing resources and support to people in need. Soup Vans The Society’s soup van services are based in Collingwood, Fitzroy, Footscray and Moe. Staffed by volunteers, each year the vans travel the streets of metropolitan Melbourne and Moe bringing food and friendship to thousands of people in need.

ST VINCENT DE PAUL AGED CARE AND COMMUNITY SERVICES Aged Care Services Elderly citizens are provided with care and accommodation through our aged care facilities, which include: a nursing home, hostels, day therapy centre and independent living units. Homeless Services The Society provides a range of accommodation and support services to people who are marginalised, homeless and at risk within the Victorian community. Disability Services Supported full or part-time employment, including social and recreational workplace skills training, is provided to over 60 people with a range of disabilities through our centre in Mornington.


Annual Report 2002-2003 ST

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We do this by sharing ourselves – who we are, and what we have – with people in need on a person-to-person basis. We seek to co-operate in shaping a more just and compassionate Australian community, and to share our resources with our twinned countries. Our preferred option in this mission of service is to work with people in development by respecting their dignity, sharing our hope and encouraging them to take control of their own destiny. MEANING OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY LOGO This logo is the symbol of the St Vincent de Paul Society in many countries. It represents the hand of Christ that blesses the cup, the hand of love that offers the cup, and the hand of suffering that receives the cup. PATRON OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY VICTORIA INC. His Excellency, Governor John Landy ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Design: Daniel Cordner 0407 869 373 Photography: Fable Productions 0413 183 519 Printing: Doran Printing 03 9587 4333 Editor: Dianne Ballestrin St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

VICTORIA

INC.

CONTENTS Victorian Locations

2

Mission Statement

3

Beginnings

4

State President St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

5

General Secretary St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.

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Chief Executive Officer St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services

7

St Vincent de Paul Society Conferences and Centres

9

Conference and Conference Initiatives

10

Soup Vans

16

Centres of Charity

18

Financial Statements

20

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services

23

Aged Care Services

24

Homeless Services

26

Disability Services

33

Thank you

34

contents

MISSION The mission of the St Vincent de Paul Society in Australia is to deepen the Catholic faith of its members and to go out into our nation to heighten awareness of Jesus Christ.

SOCIET Y

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. ABN: 28 911 702 061 RN: A004272Y Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Beginnings ST

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Ozanam died in 1853 at the age of 40. At the time of his death there were approximately 2,000 conferences operating throughout the world.

The St Vincent de Paul Society is a global organisation operating in 130 countries and has over 950,000 members worldwide. Founded by Frederic Ozanam in France in 1833, the St Vincent de Paul Society commenced in Australia at St Francis’ Church in Melbourne in 1854.

Today in Victoria, the St Vincent de Paul Society has 300 conferences with more than 8,000 members and volunteers assisting over 400,000 people in need every year. Pope John Paul II beatified Frederic Ozanam in 1997.

FREDERIC OZANAM: FOUNDER The St Vincent de Paul Society was formed in 1833 by a 20 year-old youth named Frederic Ozanam and his colleagues. At the time, the people of France were experiencing tremendous political and social upheaval: changes of government, the Industrial Revolution and unjust employment practices. Ozanam gathered some colleagues and began to respond in practical ways to the poverty and hardship that he saw in the lives of people around him. They visited people in their homes and offered friendship and support. This practice, known today as ‘home visitation’, remains a core activity for St Vincent de Paul Society members and volunteers. The group formed by Ozanam and his friends later became known as the first ‘conference’ of the St Vincent de Paul Society. They met together regularly as a group for prayer and mutual support, to learn and to share ideas about how they could best assist others.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

ST VINCENT DE PAUL: PATRON The Society was named after St Vincent de Paul. Vincent de Paul was ordained a priest in France in 1600, at the age of 19. As a young man he ministered to the wealthy and powerful; however an appointment as chaplain to a poor parish, and to galley prisoners, inspired a vocation to work with those most powerless and marginalised. Vincent urged his followers to bring God’s justice and love to people who were unable to live a full human life: “Deal with the most urgent needs. Organise charity so that it is more efficient…teach reading and writing, educate with the aim of giving each the means of self-support. Intervene with authorities to obtain reforms in structure…there is no charity without justice.” At age 80 Vincent de Paul died in Paris in 1663, 170 years before the foundation of the St Vincent de Paul Society.


State President ST

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Syd Tutton, State President (right), with regional council president, Jack Duffy and volunteers from the Warrnambool store. Reprinted with kind permission of The Standard, photographer Damian White

As the elected representative of Conference members, I am privileged to provide this overview of the Society's activities for 2002-2003. This Annual Report should provide a transparent window into our activities and an accounting of our financial management to members, auxiliaries, centres of charity volunteers and the general public, who provide generous financial support.

I am pleased that the report gives an excellent insight into our many works by dedicated workers. The financial figures provide a clear picture of our financial stewardship. My special thanks to Treasurer, Jim Grealish, and the financial team for the timeliness of having the accounts available so promptly. The home visits by our conference members are central to all our activities they are the 'heart and soul' of our Society. However, our founder, Frederic Ozanam, urged us to advocate for social justice so others might understand that poverty was not inevitable. This year, the Society has provided a vision of practical and effective social justice advocacy through its submission to the 'Senate Inquiry into Poverty in Australia'. We attended Senate Committee hearings in Melbourne and Bendigo. In another Social Justice project we collaborated with the Brotherhood of St Laurence and Centre for Public Policy, University of Melbourne, to produce a report on disadvantaged job seekers' experiences of the mutual obligation regime entitled 'Much Obliged'.

During the second half of 2002 a feasibility study was undertaken into a program of assistance to those suffering from mental illness. The program is called 'Compeer'. Its aim is to bring people together who can share part of themselves with people in need in a person-to-person approach. Professor Allan Fels has kindly consented to be the Patron of this project. In June 2003, Geoff Brown took on the position of Co-ordinator.

report

In February 2003, the Society on the initiative of our Chaplain, Fr Ernie Smith, established a Vincentian Community of five young persons in Collingwood. Its mission is to foster the spiritual development and encourage outreach activities of the community members.

It was our ambition to have a Family Resource Centre operational in an economically deprived region of rural Victoria this year. A combination of factors has stunted those ambitions but not our ardour to succeed in the coming year. The work of the Society has been managed by a dedicated and hard working State Council. I wish to acknowledge their dedication and the amount of time given to their responsibilities. I especially note our three country representatives, Bill Antonie, Cecilia McCormick and Sandra Walker, for the great amount of travelling they have to contend with in fulfilling their duties. I also wish to thank all conference members, volunteers and our dedicated staff members for their work in providing assistance and support to all persons and families in need.

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General Secretary ST

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The St Vincent de Paul Society in Victoria has in excess of 3,200 members and a further 5,000 auxiliary members and volunteers who work together providing assistance to over 400,000 people experiencing difficulties in their lives. Whilst the core work of members is visitation to people in their homes, programs such as the Household Formation Support Program (assisting migrants and refugees) continue to operate and are growing. The initial year the program ran for 10 months to June 2002 and 391 families were assisted. In the year completed to 30 June 2003, 726 families were assisted, involving 2,538 individuals. Training and development of members and volunteers is critical to the organisation. During the year a number of programs have been offered throughout Victoria. A specific training focus has been in the area of Occupational Healthy and Safety. This is particularly relevant to centres of charity and soup vans. State Council, late in 2002, convened to develop a forward plan that would identify strategic goals of the organisation. The plan was disseminated within the organisation and consultation undertaken on proposals. Participation was encouraged at all levels with members and volunteers of the organisation. The six strategic goals were: • Effective conferences: to redefine and diversify the work of conferences. • Satisfied members and volunteers: to attract, train, utilise and celebrate their skills and abilities. • Empowerment of those served: to creatively support those who are alienated from full community participation.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

• Undertake specific community targeted research and advocacy; • Liaise with the St Vincent de Paul Society National Research and Advocacy Committee and provide a Victorian aspect; • Raise the profile of St Vincent de Paul Society in the wider community and with other welfare agencies; • Liaise and be involved with other welfare agencies on major projects.

Brian Dalton – General Secretary

• Organisational reform: to restructure the organisation in ways that focus on the Society’s mission. • Nurture youth: to fully and actively integrate youth into the structures of the Society and the services it provides. • Planning and development: to make full use of what the Society has to share now and potentially. During the year the Society was one of many welfare agencies involved in the Telstra Bill Assistance Program. The purpose of the program is to help customers who are experiencing a financial crisis, and who are in need of assistance, to pay the Telstra fixed home telephone bill with a Telstra Bill Assistance certificate. Such certificates have been distributed for and used by a number of conferences to assist people in need. Throughout the year a Policy and Research Officer has been employed to assist in the work of the Social Justice Committee at both state and national level. The core functions of the Policy and Research area are to: • Listen and learn from members as to the important issues of social welfare concerning them; • Gather, monitor and maintain an information structure of data material which will be available to the wider community;

A major focus during the year was the committee charged with the responsibility of finding suitable new premises for the organisation to accommodate the total administration operation. The Society’s current Head Office has served the organisation for almost 50 years. At the time of writing this report members, volunteers and staff are quite excited that suitable premises in Box Hill have been located and are expected to be operational early next year. This Annual Report highlights, on pages 20 and 21, the financial results of the aggregation of activity for the year ending 30 June 2003. The administration and fundraising costs represent 8.57% of the total net income. This arm of the Society raises 94.5% of its income through independent fundraising activities and sale of goods from its centres. It receives 5.5% from government. These funds are used to support the core works of the Society, home visitation, emergency relief, soup vans, kids camps and overseas initiatives (see reports on pages 8 to 19). In conclusion, I would like to congratulate Society staff at centres and Head Office for their continued excellent performance, and to thank members and volunteers for the outstanding work they perform. Sincere thanks to all who support the work of the Society.


Chief Executive Officer S T V IN C E N T D E PA UL A G E D C A R E & C O M M U N I T Y S E R V I C E S

Importantly, the resources of the aged care sector have been centralised under the control of the CEO and are available for the funding of new and upgraded facilities with an estimated end cost of $25 million.

It has been progressed in two stages: • The restructure of Community Services, involving all the homeless, housing and disability services, was implemented by 23 September 2002; and • The restructure of Aged Care Services commenced in early 2003. The underlying purpose of the restructure within Community Services was not simply to create some economic efficiencies (which have been achieved) but more to create links and pathways between the various programs and services. Working parties have been established between the various services so that pathways from one service to another are ensured, and that capacity will be enhanced in the future. The aim is to ensure a continuum of services that will enable pathways out of homelessness. At this stage Ozanam Enterprises in Mornington stands alone as a service, though sharing centralised administrative services. Major replanning, achievement of determined economies of scale, pathways from other St Vincent de Paul services and suitability of buildings for ‘ageingin-place’ are all currently being addressed within Aged Care Services. It is proposed that six of the Geelong and metropolitan facilities be combined into three to achieve economies of scale, and that the rural facilities be expanded so that they become viable in the long-term.

John Patone – Chief Executive Officer

The establishment of the administrative infrastructure for St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services has also taken place. Administrative offices have been centralised and are now located at 36 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, while information technology systems are being developed which will link all services to the Fitzroy office. The Board has approved a raft of changes during 2002-2003 aimed at producing an organisational structure which will effectively position the St Vincent de Paul Society as a major and efficient provider of welfare services in the decades ahead. Chiefly, the changes have involved: • an integrated organisational structure to improve welfare outcomes; • a clearer definition of operational and support services; • an alignment of structures to accord with key goals; • greater attention to the responsibility of managers for achieving outcomes; • employment of managers with the required experience and skills to deliver outputs and outcomes consistent with the strategic directions of the Board; • improved budgetary and financial management; • streamlined overheads based on shared services and improvements in office systems; and • improved liaison with government agencies and other welfare providers.

This new ‘arm’ of St Vincent de Paul has a turnover of more than $20 million and employs in excess of 500 people. It will undergo incorporation in the second half of 2003 with the ‘owners’ being St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. and will be known as St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services (see reports on pages 23 to 33).

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The restructure of St Vincent de Paul ‘Special Works’, includes Aged Care, Homeless and Disability Services and has now been in process since late 2001.

Firstly I wish to thank the generosity of the following people who left bequests to Ozanam House: Bettine Alice Vivian Cocks, Rose Jean Thompson, Mary Magdelan O’Connor, Joyce Agnes Hehir, Louis Foster Smith, PK Morris and Bernice Marie Therese O’Donovan. My thanks also go to the staff of Aged Care and Community Services; they have been tolerant and co-operative during an intense period of change. Finally my thanks to the directors of the new arm of St Vincent de Paul: Neil Brown (Chair), Allen Pretty, Bernie Geary, Anne O’Shaughnessy, Adrian Cervetto, Rob Allum, Tony Ryan, Peter Rigg and Pamela Macklin for their advice and assistance.

Neil Brown – Chair St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Commuity Services

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John Cannon AN

ACTIVE

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FOR

MORE

INSPIRED BY HIS FATHER – A LIFE COMMITMENT TO SHARING As a young boy, John Cannon would see his father leave the house to do volunteer work with the St Vincent de Paul Society. At the age of 20, John followed in his father’s footsteps and became a volunteer working to assist people in need. Fifty years have now passed and John was recently awarded a gold medal for his outstanding service and commitment to the Society.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

THAN

50

YEARS

John is happy to admit that he has seen many changes. Growing up in the Depression, his father taught John the concept of sharing what you have with others and the strength of a caring community. "Back then, one neighbour might have had more potatoes and we had more of something else, so we would share these and make the most of it. It was a great community spirit." John still works at the Brunswick Centre and enjoys visiting families. He strongly believes our ability to listen is a great gift.


St Vincent de Paul Society ST

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CONFERENCES In Victoria more than 8,000 members and volunteers assist over 400,000 people. Much of the Society’s work is carried out through conferences that assist people in need in their local area by visiting them in their own homes, providing material assistance, support and friendship. Members and volunteers of the Society outreach to the most vulnerable in our community through the following activities: HOME VISITATION Conference members undertake home visitation to people in need, extending the hand of friendship and offering practical support. These members, known as Vincentians, and volunteers visit people in their homes, hospitals or prisons assisting individuals and families to remain in the ‘mainstream’ community. In the 2002-2003 financial year, the Society provided assistance to the value of nearly $5 million to people in Victoria through conference works alone. The Society’s good works to assist over 270,000 people through home visitation was carried out by 3,211 members and 1,234 auxiliary members who volunteered their time statewide. SOUP VANS The Society has four soup van services travelling the streets of metropolitan Melbourne and Moe providing soup, sandwiches, tea and coffee to people they meet. The vans visit people not only on the streets, but also in boarding houses, refuges, squats and hospitals. ‘Vannies’, as they are known, are volunteers of the Society.

CENTRES OF CHARITY Centres of charity are managed by volunteer staff and provide secondhand clothing and furniture for sale. The main role of the centres is to resource the local conference activities by providing clothing and/or furniture free of charge to assist a struggling family or individual through the home visitation process. In order to provide this material aid, 4,000 volunteers work in the Society’s 91 Victorian centres of charity assisting with the provision of furniture, clothing and household goods, as well as raising funds to support the conference activities. Stock remaining is sold to the public, providing people on a tight budget with the opportunity to afford clothing, household goods and furniture, while also generating revenue for the Society’s conference work. KIDS CAMPS The Society’s young adult conference groups run Kids Camps three times a year. The camps operate for a period of five days each – for children aged 6-12 years. Between 30 and 50 children from disadvantaged families, who are assisted by the Society’s conference members, are invited to attend each camp.

conferences and centres

The St Vincent de Paul Society is a lay Catholic organisation made up of members and volunteers as well as a small number of professional staff. A State Council Board consisting of elected and appointed members oversees the Society’s direction and strategic guidance, while the Society’s work is funded through donations, enterprises such as our centres of charity, and a small amount of government funding.

SOCIET Y

The Young Vinnies volunteers also run six Teenage Bush Camps each year, providing an opportunity for teenagers from disadvantaged backgrounds (aged 12-16 years) to have a break from their regular environment and underprivileged circumstances.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Conferences ST

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The St Vincent de Paul Society is foremost an association of volunteers. It has a presence in over 130 countries and volunteers are known as Society members or Vincentians (named after St Vincent de Paul, the Society’s patron).

SOCIET Y

VICTORIA

Members of the Society belong to local conferences or groups. Most of these conferences are based in the local Catholic parish, although sometimes they are based in other locations such as workplaces, universities and schools. It is the local conference that provides the organisation for charitable work and the support for its members. Members respond to calls for assistance in their local communities, visiting people in their homes, hospitals, prisons or aged care facilities. HOME VISITATION One of the unique aspects of conference work is the custom of visiting people in their own homes. This helps find the most appropriate response to the person’s or family’s needs. Conference members provide support such as assistance with food or utility bills, material aid from the Society’s centres of charity, budget advice or help with advocacy issues. This practice is known as home visitation. Conference members feel privileged to be invited into the homes of people in need. Healing often begins in the home environment as people realise that they are not alone, that there are others who are willing to listen, be friends and offer practical assistance and advice. Often people are most in need of friendship. The Society’s founder, Frederic Ozanam, said that financial poverty was often easy to see, but members must be sensitive to seeing other concerns, such as loneliness and health issues, where they may offer support. This takes training, time, trust and the building of relationships.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

INC.

CONFERENCE MEMBERS People of all ages and walks of life join conferences. They include retired men and women, pensioners and self-funded retirees, full-time workers, parents with children at school and young adults starting their working life. Local conferences are a cross-section of Australians brought together by a belief in God and a commitment to help their neighbours. When you see the Society in action you will see volunteers such as: “Jim”– a man in his 70s who has volunteered with the Society for over 50 years, first as a young married man and now as a grandfather and retiree. “It is where we see God’s face.” “Jessica” – a young university graduate working full-time in business. She joined St Vinnies three years ago to give back a little of what she has received in her upbringing. “Life is more than work, money and holidays.” “Bob” – a full-time nurse in his 40s. Following in his father’s footsteps, he has now been with us for 15 years. “I was raised to know that you share what you have.” “Meg” – a retired police officer who took up volunteering five years ago. “Sometimes people’s lives are in turmoil. All they have is the kind words or listening ear we provide.”


Home Visitation ST

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conferences

HOME VISITATION One of the unique aspects about the Society's conference work is the custom of visiting people in their own homes. Known as home visitation, this helps find the most appropriate response to the person’s or family's needs.

St Vinnies members provide support, such as assistance with food or utility bills, and material aid from the Society's centres of charity.

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Conferences ST

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WHO DO WE MEET? In this volunteer work, conference members encounter people whose lives are a struggle:

WHAT IS DONE FOR PEOPLE? Conference members follow a pattern in their response to those experiencing difficulties:

donations of blankets and non-perishable food, as well as volunteer at Ozanam House, local nursing homes and on the soup vans.

• the lonely man, wheelchair bound for over 30 years, unable to move beyond the front gate, spending his entire day without human company; • the girl in her 20s curled up in a foetal position on a settee, alone, surrounded by mess, trying to shake off her drug dependency; • the mother stricken with diabetes, cancer and migraine with medication costs so high that she cannot afford food for herself and her young daughter, and must rely on constant charity to survive; and • the extended family of four adults and five children living in a small cottage mostly sleeping on the floor for lack of space.

• Firstly, they meet with the person(s) after some referral or invitation. This usually occurs in the person’s home; • Secondly, the members assess what assistance might be needed and what they are able to provide; and • Thirdly, assistance with groceries, clothing and furniture can be arranged through the Society’s outlets or local shops. Sometimes other agencies or resources can be accessed to provide a variety of assistance.

Members of Young Adult Groups are aged between 18 to 30 and undertake a range of volunteer work for the Society, such as assisting with the soup vans, running the Kids Camps, home visitation, youth camps, working in the centres, helping at the meals service, fundraising and tutoring.

The intention is not to make people dependent on the local conference but to provide support to enable their independence. Primarily, the Society is not an emergency relief agency but rather a group of people who offer friendship and support. While members have financial resources available to them, their voluntary work is done in between their other commitments and on a neighbour-helping-neighbour basis. YOUNG VINNIES ACTIVITIES Conferences active in schools and universities, involving college conferences and young adult groups, are known as ‘Young Vinnies’. College conferences use their own initiatives to raise funds for the St Vincent de Paul Society, through concerts, carnivals, free dress days, fetes and sausage sizzles, to support families in need. Young Vinnies also collect

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

KIDS’ CAMPS Held three times a year, the five-day Kids’ Camps involve 30 to 50 children from disadvantaged families being assisted by the Society. For many of the children aged 6-12 years, these camps are their only chance for a holiday Liana is a student at Latrobe University and is in her second year of studying Social Work. Her involvement with the Society began in 2001 and since then she has become a regular with the Young Vinnies Kids’ Camp. Liana’s experiences have all been positive. She has met fantastic people and made heaps of new friends but, more importantly, “It made me realise just how fortunate I was growing up,“ she said. “Becoming involved in the St Vincent de Paul Kids’ Camps was one of the most rewarding things I have ever done. The children that we take on camp come from disadvantaged backgrounds and our role isn’t to counsel them or change their life, it is just to give them a week of fun in a carefree environment. Seeing a smile on a child’s face, or knowing that because of you they are having a fantastic holiday is enough to make you want to just keep coming back.”


Conferences ST

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No. of cases where material assistance given

No. of adults assisted

No. of children assisted

Conference No. of Monetary value Bread households of assistance Runs (or assisted by provided by food runs) Bread Runs conferences

Visits not No. of involving No. of material conferences members assistance

No. of auxiliary members

Western Central Council

17,330

22,763

22,820

1,073

7,822

645,571

2,510

54

509

177

Southern Central Council

19,346

27,014

27,838

689

8,040

1,098,996

3,302

46

613

283

Northern Central Council

17,025

22,180

14,534

452

2,755

547,858

986

38

314

45

Eastern Central Council

17,578

21,339

18,529

2,047

12,575

981,752

3,617

61

605

327

Ballarat Diocesan Council

11,666

15,296

14,664

3,061

25,502

502,725

13,782

43

448

142

Sandhurst Diocesan Council

20,481

25,446

22,682

2,196

18,022

690,845

11,731

40

455

173

Sale Diocesan Council VICTORIAN CONFERENCES (total)

9,158

11,433

11,379

488

1,904

523,682

4,437

18

267

87

112,584

145,471

132,446

10,006

76,620

4,991,429

40,365

300

3,211

1,234

conferences

CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR 2002–2003

SOURCE OF REFERRAL OF PEOPLE ASSISTED IN 2002–2003 Government department Church or similar Non-government agencies Self-referral/friend Previous caller

5.41% 6.05% 3.28% 28.19% 57.07%

2

8.4

%5

5.6

%0 ANALYSIS OF THE MATERIAL ASSISTANCE GIVEN BY CONFERENCES .1 8 %8 3 %3 %

%

Food vouchers Cash Accommodation Prescriptions/medicine Donated food Other Utilities bills Whitegoods Transport Purchased food

43.97% 1.03% 1.70% 0.69% 22.07% 4.83% 3.10% 1.73% 2.27% 18.61%

SOURCE OF INCOME OF PEOPLE ASSISTED IN 2002–2003 Parenting payment Age pension WorkCover Salary and wages Other/not determined Sickness/disability Youth/Study Allowance None Other government payment Newstart/unemployment

32.37% 4.47% 0.60% 2.29% 2.39% 26.25% 1.63% 1.41% 4.15% 24.44%

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Conference Initiatives ST

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Poverty and hardship have many faces. The St Vincent de Paul Society reaches out to people from beyond our nation's borders by providing local overseas development projects and assisting those who travel to Australia seeking refuge. The Society also assists many people serving prison sentences.

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OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT Jim O’Shea All conferences in Victoria are encouraged to develop partnerships with their Vincentian brothers and sisters in developing countries through the Twinning program. These partnerships promote spirituality, deep friendship, solidarity and mutual help. Funds are provided to enable a conference to help disadvantaged families in these countries as well as assisting projects encouraging self-sufficiency. During 2002-2003 aid to the value of $329,514 was provided to assist the poor in our twinned countries through: Conference Grants, Council-to-Council Grants, Christmas/Easter Grants, Assist a Student Sponsorships and SelfSufficiency Projects. The Overseas Development Committee thank all the committee members who attend to their responsibilities, the sponsors of the Assist a Student Program and all the members and public who care about the poor in our Twinned countries. MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES John McLean Worldwide, 20 million refugees seek asylum after experiencing war and persecution. Hundreds languish in detention centres in the Pacific Islands and Australia. Although vilified, harshly treated and largely unwelcomed, these innocent people have much in common with our suffering Saviour. Each is deserving of our love.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

During the year, the Society has been advocating for migrants and refugees. A Vincentian delegation met with the Immigration Minister, The Honourable Philip Ruddock MP, seeking a softer stance towards detained women and children. Two other groups also met with the Minister seeking a reversal of the government’s decision to send home 1,600 East Timorese who have been resident in Australia for 10-12 years. In October 2002, Victoria hosted a National Committee meeting, raising issues such as: detention of unaccompanied minors, interest-free loans to defray air passage costs and the plight of Temporary Protection Visa holders whose permits will soon expire. Refugee needs were met through contributions by conferences and centres. Young Vincentians are tutoring refugee children in English, while four families live in Society accommodation units and members continue to visit asylum seekers at Maribyrnong Detention Centre. The Government sponsored Household Formation Support Program provided basic household goods to 726 families 2,538 persons. PRISON VISITATION Ian Baulch As a thank you to the St Vincent de Paul Society’s prison visitors in the region, several inmates at Barwon’s maximumsecurity prison are knitting rugs, beanies and scarves for people we assist. The Society’s work of offering a hand of friendship continues in many ways, with rehabilitation and educational programs, liaison with our network of conferences across the state and nation, and assistance to families.


Educational Sponsorship ST

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conferences TERTIARY EDUCATIONAL SPONSORSHIP In 2001 the Sale Diocesan Council formed an Education Committee to address the issue of assisting young people from rural families to continue studying in their chosen field. This assistance was to consist of providing practical help to young people who faced the pressures of course selection, limited finances, finding suitable accommodation, as well as moving away from home to further their studies. As a result, the Tertiary Educational Sponsorship was established and each year, 15 selected students who are remote from university campuses, are provided with a $3,000 one-off grant to assist them with accommodation or tertiary related costs.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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S o u p Va n s ST

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Each night of every year, the St Vincent de Paul Society’s four soup van services travel the streets of inner Melbourne and Moe, providing food and friendship to people in need. For over 25 years the soup van volunteers, known affectionately as ‘Vannies’, have striven to bring some comfort to people who are homeless, attempting to alleviate their sense of loneliness and isolation. The Vannies come from diverse backgrounds but come together with an absolute commitment to helping others.

SOCIET Y

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FREDERIC OZANAM SOUP VAN MOE Annette O’Dowd 'Love in Action' is what we the volunteers of the Frederic Ozanam Soup Van, Moe, convey to our clients, as well as to ourselves. We enjoy each other's company while preparing the food and when we go out on the bus. All volunteer groups struggle for helpers, but with our regular band of 20 daytime and 30 evening volunteers from all walks of life, aged between 16 to 70 years, we are able to continue to assist people who need a little extra to make ends meet. This includes lunches for students, evening meals and giving positive emotional support to many families and the elderly through our presence. During the last financial year, the Frederic Ozanam Soup Van visited approximately 10,280 people, delivering 21,000 sandwiches, 11,000 cakes, 2,400 litres of soup and 1,000 litres of cordial. We look forward to moving on together in the spirit of 'Love in Action', offering not only food but also friendship and support, empowering our clients to retain a positive outlook for the future. MARGARET OATS SOUP VAN - COLLINGWOOD Samantha Ratnam December 2003 will mark the fifth year of operation of the Margaret Oats Soup Van, Collingwood, which began with 21 volunteers responding to approximately 200 requests per week. We now respond to over 400 requests for assistance per week, with the help of over 45 volunteers, servicing the streets and homes in Collingwood and Richmond over five nights.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

The needs of this community have changed in many ways and we are compelled to reflect on how we can best respond to and support their changing needs. As we attempt to understand how these changes will shape the nature of our work, we also reflect and celebrate its value and the generosity of the volunteers. Vannies continue to experience how the social contact, care and concern they offer can positively affect another person's experience of social isolation. In the coming year we look forward to continuing this work, while supporting the changing needs of our community in the best way that we can. MATTHEW TALBOT SOUP VAN FOOTSCRAY Greg Mullins It has been an eventful year for the Matthew Talbot Soup Van, Footscray. The van was stolen, and while this caused some significant inconvenience, it did have a silver lining, with positive publicity being received for the service, and the public’s concern was heartening. We are grateful to the Matthew Talbot Soup Van, Fitzroy, for the loan of an available van that allowed us to continue our nightly work. The stolen van was recovered 10 days later. Despite periodic struggles to maintain volunteer numbers, the van continues to go out every night, providing food and friendship to more than 80 people in Footscray, Yarraville and Williamstown. The people we assist are young and old, men and women (mostly men), new clients and regulars. In reaching out to others we receive so much in return.


S o u p Va n s ST

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conferences

MATTHEW TALBOT SOUP VAN - FITZROY Nathan Bell Love is what fuels the van; it is what The Matthew Talbot Soup Van, which inspires the volunteers to join. operates in Fitzroy and the inner city, continues to reach out with love to the Over 150 volunteers come from very people it serves. diverse backgrounds, all are inspired with the same love, which transcends Love is a key word here. It echoes the normal and transforms both the silently down the lanes and streets that glad giver and the grateful receiver. are dimly lit by the time the van begins its mission each evening, which is to bring those same quiet places to life. An The van sees up to 400 people every empty, grimy, rain-washed car park night of the year, without exception. springs into life and becomes a bustle Like the mail, the van never stops its of laughter, conversation and happiness, work, both acknowledging and steeling a place where both the heart and the itself for the truth of Jesus’ insight that body are warmed with the dual gifts of ‘the poor will always be with you’ – a friendship and food. statement which calls one both to love and to act, to employ one’s faith in one’s works.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Centres of Charity ST

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The St Vincent de Paul Society’s centres of charity are the first point of contact for many people in need or on a low income. The shops, often known as opportunity shops, give people from all backgrounds the chance to buy quality clothing, furniture and other household items at an affordable price.

SOCIET Y

VICTORIA

INC.

Victoria’s 91 centres employ over 80 staff and have the assistance of more than 4,000 members and volunteers who give their time. In all, employee numbers equate to only 2% of the total number of people who work together and keep our centres moving forward to secure our place in the future. During 2002-2003, three new centres in Hoppers Crossing, Bayswater and Ashburton were opened; three more centres were relocated and 17 have undergone minor or major refurbishments. This has assisted in giving our centres a much higher profile, as well as making them more userfriendly, which has resulted in increased turnover. Work completed on the centres has raised the standards and assisted with Occupational Health and Safety, providing better conditions and helping to make the centres more attractive to our customers. At the warehouse a new conveyor belt has been implemented to assist with productivity, cost efficiencies and reduce the risks related to manhandling. The centres regularly provide furniture, clothing and household items to people in need, as well as funds to buy food and other needs. They also offer companionship to many of the volunteers who live alone, by way of making new friends and having social contact within the community. This year approximately 17,600 families in need have been assisted with furniture, clothing and household items.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

The Refugee Migrant Program has recently been implemented to meet the needs of those who in many cases arrive in Australia without even the barest of necessities. To date, 700 migrant and refugee families have been assisted by the provision of items from our centres of charity. Training in customer service, merchandising and presentation skills has been provided for volunteers and employees. Occupational Health and Safety continues to be a priority, with a focus on manual handling techniques. We have worked on training in the area of communication and relevant skills, hosted information and training days for our volunteers, and continued to train on the sorting procedures. The ongoing work in this area leads us toward stocking the best quality products, as well as upholding high customer service and personnel standards. This combination presents the Society to the best advantage for clients, customers and those in need alike. Specific Occupational Health and Safety policy and procedures for both centres and the warehouse have been developed, while we continue to review, revise, update, renew and train on the policies and procedures for our centres. This will ensure our best efforts in running our centres and that they are compliant with all regulations, and legislations. It also reinforces the system with every member of the team, giving them confidence to work within the system, as well as the knowledge of what is required of them. On behalf of our clients and customers, thank you for the wonderful work this year. It has been a worthy and most appreciated team effort from all our centres, volunteers and staff who have assisted in the Society’s valuable work.


Centres of Charity ST

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centres In Victoria, the St Vincent de Paul Society has 91 centres of charity providing quality clothing, furniture and other affordable household items to the public. Goods are readily accepted Alfredton Ararat Ascot Vale Ashburton Bairnsdale Ballarat Bayswater Benalla Bendigo Brunswick Camperdown Casterton

Castlemaine Clayton Cobram Coburg Colac Collingwood Corio Cranbourne Croydon Daylesford Eaglehawk Echuca

Edithvale Ferntree Gully Frankston Geelong Glenroy Hamilton Hampton Hastings Hawthorn Heidelberg Heights

Heyfield Hoppers Crossing Horsham Kangaroo Flat Kerang Kew Korumburra Kyabram Kyneton Lalor Leongatha

Lilydale Malvern Mansfield Maryborough Melton Mildura Moe Mont Albert Mooroopna Mornington Morwell Newport

Norlane Numurkah Oakleigh Ocean Grove Ormond Ouyen Pinewood Portland Port Melbourne Preston Queenscliff

Ringwood Sale Seaford Sebastopol Seymour Shepparton Springvale St Albans St Arnaud Sunbury Sunshine Swan Hill

Tatura Traralgon Wangaratta Warburton Warrnambool Warragul Wendouree Werribee Wodonga Wonthaggi Yarrawonga

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Financial Statements ST

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SOCIET Y

VICTORIA

INC.

Statement of Financial Performance for the year ended 30 June 2003. 2003

2002

$

$

REVENUE FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Fundraising

6,762,020

6,393,843

Government grants

13,724,561

13,591,917

Sale of goods

12,915,743

11,693,864

821,053

1,084,248

5,893,933

5,015,531

40,117,310

37,779,403

8,967,946

7,740,201

Proceeds on sale of fixed assets Other income Total revenue from operating activities EXPENSES FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Sale of goods Written down value of fixed assets sold

585,107

1,048,617

Total expenses from operating activities

9,553,053

8,788,818

30,564,257

28,990,585

TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR OTHER ACTIVITIES EXPENSES FROM OTHER ACTIVITIES Assistance

5,560,042

5,053,421

10,132,734

9,402,419

Homeless services

8,418,355

7,635,059

Support services

1,340,244

1,516,763

Aged Care services

Fundraising/Public relations Administration Total expenses from other activities Surplus from ordinary activities

500,353

459,638

2,118,997

1,975,946

28,070,725

26,043,246

2,493,532

2,947,339

ST VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY VICTORIA INC. STATEMENT BY STATE COUNCIL The State Council has determined that the Association is not a reporting entity and that this special purpose financial report is prepared in accordance with the accounting policies outlined in the Financial Statements. In the opinion of the State Council: 1 The financial report as set out in the fully audited Financial Statements presents a true and fair view of the financial position of St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. as at 30 June 2003 and its performance for the year ended on that date, in accordance with the accounting polices described in the Financial Statements, and complies with the provisions of the Associations Incorporation Act (Victoria) 1981. 2 At the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due. This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the State Council, and is signed for and on behalf of the State Council by:

Syd Tutton State President

Jim Grealish Treasurer

Dated this 16th day of October 2003 Fully audited Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2003 are available upon request.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action


Financial Statements ST

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SOCIET Y

VICTORIA

INC.

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2003. 2002

$

$

CURRENT ASSETS Cash assets

28,339,971

25,265,857

Receivables

582,244

458,578

Inventory assets

207,186

165,328

Other assets

504,489

413,972

29,633,890

26,303,735

Property, plant and equipment

46,805,639

46,679,004

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

46,805,639

46,679,004

76,439,529

72,982,739

1,743,138

1,434,263

157,447

139,697

Provisions

1,830,563

1,926,691

Other liabilities

6,725,443

5,860,711

10,456,591

9,361,362

Payables

34,635

56,274

Interest bearing liabilities

76,988

238,534

Provisions

432,925

381,711

TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

544,548

676,519

11,001,139

10,037,881

65,438,390

62,944,858

Reserves

35,660,596

35,660,596

Retained earnings

29,777,794

27,284,262

65,438,390

62,944,858

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

NON-CURRENT ASSETS

TOTAL ASSETS

financials

2003

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables Interest bearing liabilities

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS

EQUITY

TOTAL EQUITY

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

21


Micaela Cronin EXECUTIVE

OFFICER

HOMELESS

SUPPORT

SERVICES

A COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE Inspired by her mother and grandmother Micaela is a third generation social worker. Like her mother and grandmother before her she has a passion and commitment to Social Justice principles and practice. Micaela began working with St Vincent de Paul in 2001, with the Access Youth Support Services. She is now the executive officer for Homeless Support Services which incorporates: Adult Support Services, Youth Support Services, the Homeless Drug Dependency Trial, Ozanam House Support team and the Equity and Access Research Project.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

"Working with St Vincent de Paul provides me with a role where I can combine my professional skills with my passion for Social Justice." For the past 15 years Micaela has worked in the community sector at all levels in housing, mental health and women's services. She believes strongly in the work of St Vincent de Paul with homeless and marginalised people, and in the role of research and development within the St Vincent de Paul Society in bringing together the organisation's wealth of knowledge and experience from both our professional and volunteer arms.


Aged Care & Community Ser vices ST

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The core business of St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services is: To understand and advocate the needs of disadvantaged people and provide services and opportunities that enhance their quality of life. Aged Care and Community Services’ core business is delivered in:

SERVICES

Across a broad and interlinked range of services, St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services is all about ‘love in action’ for a specific group of people – those who are disadvantaged. ‘Love in Action’ is demonstrated as we seek to:

AGED CARE SERVICES

• understand the needs of disadvantaged people;

Providing elderly citizens with care and

• advocate on their behalf; and

accommodation through our aged care facilities, which include a nursing home,

• provide services and opportunities that enhance their quality of life.

hostels, day therapy centre and independent living units. HOMELESS SERVICES Providing a range of accommodation and support services to people who are marginalised, homeless and at risk within the Victorian community. DISABILITY SERVICES Providing supported full or part-time employment, including social and recreational workplace skills training to over 60 people with a range of disabilities through our centre in Mornington.

MISSION Within the Christian mission of St Vincent de Paul Society, Aged Care and Community Services works with and for people who are disadvantaged to provide them with support which reflects an understanding of their needs, respects their rights and dignity, and encourages, wherever possible, a greater level of self dependence.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

aged care, homeless & disability ser vices

St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services is known as the professional arm of the organisation, growing out of initiatives and responses from local conference groups as they worked to assist Victorians in need. Aged Care and Community Services is largely government funded and staffed by professionals who have the required expertise to address the complex needs of clients.

AGED

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Aged Care Ser vices ST

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As the baby boomer generation moves into older age groups in coming decades, there will be a growing number of older people both in absolute terms and as a proportion of the population. It is for this reason that the Society recognises that there will be a large number of people who will be financially and socially disadvantaged in their later years.

AGED

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For some time the Society has recognised the growing demand for aged care, particularly for people who are poor and disadvantaged. Our Strategic Plan reflects this priority. Plans include developing pathways from other St Vincent de Paul services and improving the suitability of buildings for ‘ageing-in-place’. Also, in the 2002 funding round, St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services was allocated an additional 43 beds. It has been proposed that six of the Geelong and metropolitan facilities be combined into three to achieve economies of scale, and that rural facilities be expanded so that they remain viable in the long-term. • The beds at Rosalie House and Vincentian House in Geelong would be amalgamated. • The St Vincent de Paul Nursing Home and Vincenpaul Hostel beds in Box Hill would be amalgamated on the current site. • Beds at Bailly House in North Melbourne would move in with St Anne’s in Westmeadows, creating a facility which would achieve the appropriate standards and economies. • Both O’Mara House in Traralgon and May Noonan Hostel in Terang would need to be expanded as beds become available from the Commonwealth Government. So far this financial year, seven of our eight aged care facilities have been audited for accreditation and all seven complied with all 44 standards, resulting in a further three years accreditation.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

SERVICES

O’Mara House in Traralgon is to be audited in September 2003 and the Society is confident that this facility will also meet accreditation. The Society also operates a number of independent living units for older people who are financially disadvantaged or at risk of being homeless, located at: • Bendigo (30 units) • Ballarat (3 units) • Maryborough (6 units), and • Mildura (14 units) Aged Care and Community Services recognises the growing need for this type of accommodation and is planning accordingly as the population ages. A FRIENDSHIP THAT BLOSSOMED Robin and Molly met at Vincentian House (Geelong) 18 months ago, both describing it as a ‘friendship that blossomed’. Robin knew what he wanted and knocked at Molly’s door at 5 am with a diamond solitaire safely tucked in his pocket. Molly opened the door and was surprised to see a smartly dressed and cologned Robin standing there. Quickly, he produced the ring and confidently awaited a favourable answer. But Molly needed time to think so she closed the door and went back to bed, leaving Robin standing on the other side. That afternoon, as Robin stood beside Molly, he saw the grin on her face and the ring on her finger. His proposal had been successful! Unfortunately, prior to a date being set, Robin passed away peacefully in his sleep. But the life and love that Robin and Molly showed over those precious months together proved that when the opportunity for love comes your way, take it, savour it and live it every day.


Vincentian House ST

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aged care

A FRIENDSHIP THAT BLOSSOMED Robin met Molly at Vincentian House (Geelong) 18 months ago, both describing it as a ‘friendship that blossomed’. Robin asked Molly to marry him but, unfortunately, prior to a date being set, Robin passed away peacefully in his sleep. But the life and love that Robin and Molly showed over those precious months together proved that when the opportunity of love comes your way, take it, savour it and live it. Photo reprinted with kind permission of Geelong Advertiser

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Homeless Ser vices ST

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On 3 May 2003, Ozanam House celebrated its 50th Jubilee as a crisis accommodation centre for homeless men. The celebration was attended by the Minister for Community Services, The Honourable Sherryl Garbutt, and Bishop Mark Coleridge representing the Archdiocese of Melbourne.

AGED

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At the Jubilee Bishop Mark Coleridge remarked, “The work of St Vinnies and Ozanam House are at the heart of what the church and Frederic Ozanam himself represent – caring for the poor, and caring for the poor takes us straight to the heart of Jesus Christ.” OZANAM HOUSE Ozanam House is a specialised work of the St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services that reconnects broken lives by providing emergency accommodation and outreach support to homeless men in Melbourne. During the past year, Ozanam House has assisted over 750 homeless men.

(Left to right) John Patone, CEO Aged Care and Community Services, The Hon. Sherryl Garbutt, Syd Tutton, State President St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria, Bishop Mark Coleridge, Tony McCosker Executive Manager Homeless Services

The Homeless Drug Dependency Trial, a three-year project aimed at addressing significant drug and alcohol issues of homeless men, completed its first year of operation. The trial's major achievements included: • 27 health promotion activities; • 20 men involved in employment training; • 44 facility-based recreation activities; • 70 men case managed for drug/alcohol issues; and • 24 nursing clinics Additionally, the trial’s volunteer fundraising group has provided funding to acquire a mini-bus, which will enable participants to be transported to educational, training and recreational activities.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

SERVICES

OZANAM COMMUNITY CENTRE The Ozanam Community Centre provides a range of programs and activities addressing the immediate needs of people who are homeless and marginalised in our community. This includes case management as well as opportunities for skill development focusing on enhancing their quality of community life. Material assistance is provided in the form of washing facilities, storage for belongings, as well as holding their mail. A daily meal provides both sustenance as well as an opportunity for people to share it in a communal setting. During the first six months of 2003 nearly 20,000 meals were provided through the centre. A wide range of primary health care service providers visit the Ozanam Community Centre, including doctors, dentists and nurses. Other visiting services include legal services and Centrelink. The centre’s staff provide alcohol and drug counselling, housing information and referral, computer training, as well as regular activities including a chess club, a filmmaking project, yoga and music programs. In the past six months, 15,143 episodes of care have been achieved; and volunteers have given 1,723 hours of service in varying forms. The centre is actively fostering the increasing participation of women through the Women’s Program, as well as encouraging all those who attend to become involved with the Client Volunteer Program.


Ozanam House ST

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homeless

OZANAM HOUSE 50th JUBILEE Celebrating Ozanam House’s 50th Jubilee, residents with the assistance of artist Jessica Neath and designer Andrew Uhrmacher constructed the Tree of Life mosaic that now proudly adorns the exterior of Ozanam House.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Homeless Ser vices ST

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QUIN HOUSE Quin House provided supported accommodation to 81 men recovering from drug and alcohol addiction. Working closely with the Melbourne Magistrate's Court, Quin House also offered non-custodial treatment options for drug offenders; 31 referrals were accepted and participated in the Quin House program. Justin’s Story When Justin entered Quin House after completing detox at De Paul House, it was the first time in over three years that he had had any sort of stable accommodation.

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Justin was to stay in Quin House for four months and then remain as an outreach client for a further four months. During this time he succeeded in effecting dramatic changes to his lifestyle and living circumstances, and reconnecting with his family. A heroin user for 10 years, Justin lost his employment and, subsequently, his accommodation in 1997. Since that time he has lived on the streets, spending the last year and a half sleeping under a bridge in the city, and had been living in squats for several years before that. Understandably, Justin needed some time to adjust to living in a communal environment; it would be fair to say that he suffered a degree of culture shock, for while his basic needs were now provided for, he also had a degree of responsibility to others that he hadn’t experienced for many years. During this settling-in period, his case manager concentrated on ensuring that Justin wasn’t suffering from any underlying physical problems by linking him into the North Yarra Community Health Centre for a thorough medical check up, and to the Ozanam Community Centre for an appointment with a dentist. After several weeks, Justin began to develop a level of trust with the Quin House staff and residents and, in partnership with his case manager, started to set some long-term goals. The most important of these goals was to remain free from alcohol and other drugs, so Justin was referred to St Vincent’s Department of Drug and Alcohol Studies for counselling.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

SERVICES

He also agreed to attend meetings of Narcotics Anonymous with the other residents where he could gain some peer support. Justin’s second goal was to obtain safe and secure accommodation and, to this end, he completed a priority application for an Office of Housing property. He was also referred to the St Vincent de Paul’s Transitional Housing Program to provide accommodation until his Office of Housing property became available. Through the work he was undertaking with his case manager, and at his counselling sessions, it became clear to Justin that he had lacked a clear direction and purpose in his life, and that had contributed to his drug use. Justin explained that he had had a series of unsatisfying jobs in offices which also had contributed to his using drugs in an attempt to break the boredom. He had, however, a real interest in the environment and, together with his case manager, began researching possible courses of study that might lead to employment in this area. Justin decided that he would apply for a diploma course in Natural Resource Management at Swinburne TAFE. Justin also had some legal issues which he was able to deal with during his stay. A series of unpaid transit fines had resulted in a warrant being issued and Justin had to appear in the Magistrate’s Court. He was referred to a solicitor and, together with his case manager, they presented a case to the magistrate that resulted in Justin being able to complete some community service hours in lieu of paying the fine.


Homeless Ser vices ST

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Justin had decided to move to country Victoria to live and had been fortunate enough to find a suitable tertiary institution and also secure housing in a medium sized regional centre. His case manager had referred him to local welfare agencies that arranged to help him furnish his new flat.

CARE

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ADULT SUPPORT SERVICES Adult Support Services provides assistance to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The goal of the service is twofold: firstly, to assist people in securing and maintaining affordable housing; and secondly, to achieve a greater level of independence in the community. This is achieved through a key worker case management model that focuses on assisting people through the final transition stage from homelessness to stable accommodation or maintenance of long-term accommodation options.

Although not in regular contact with staff at Quin House, Justin has dropped in on several occasions when he has been in the city and is still enjoying his study and living in his flat.

Achievements in the past year included:

GLENROY TRANSITIONAL HOUSING The Glenroy Transitional Housing service provided housing assistance to 9,524 people who were in housing crisis throughout the past year.

• Women’s Early Intervention Program, also based in North Melbourne, provided 59 episodes of short-term intensive support to single women over the age of 25 in the inner western region.

This achievement represents a 42% increase above the Office of Housing contract target of 6,680.

• Community Connections Program, located in Glenroy, provided 169 episodes of support to people who were identified as: • in low cost accommodation; • with complex needs; and • isolated from the community

The service currently manages 160 properties in the Moreland and Hume areas of metropolitan Melbourne. The properties are allocated to those most in need. The people who are in ‘housing crisis’ and seek assistance are often confronting circumstances such as drug and alcohol dependence, legal issues, escape from sexual abuse, mental health issues and domestic upheaval. It is the work of this service to successfully engage specialist agencies to assist with these circumstances.

• Outreach Support, based in North Melbourne, provided 235 episodes of long-term outreach support to adults who were at risk of losing their housing.

The goal of the Community Connections Program is to create linkages to appropriate services and, where necessary, deliver support services to people targeted by the program in the Cities of Moreland and Hume.

SERVICES

Pathways have been established between the three programs to create a more efficient and streamlined approach in relation to referrals and service delivery. Peter’s Story A concerned neighbour who had previously been a client of the program referred a 60 year-old man ‘Peter’ to the Community Connections Program. Peter, who was living in an Office of Housing property, presented with concerns about his bills and general budgeting. Upon further exploration, he disclosed that he suffered from chronic health related problems which impacted on his daily living and access to the community. Peter had very little social support and no family to assist him to manage his health. He had a heart condition, limiting his exercise tolerance and restricting mobility.

homeless

After almost nine months of working with Justin the news came through that he had not only been accepted into his preferred course of study, but that an Office of Housing property had become available.

AGED

The Community Connection Program linked Peter into a range of community services, including Meals on Wheels, planned activity groups, the Royal District Nursing Service, Melbourne Extended Care and Rehabilitation for completion of an Aged Care Assessment, and the Broadmeadows Rehabilitation Centre for Hydrotherapy sessions. The program also assisted with purchasing home help for a short period and provided financial assistance with the purchase of a fridge, fan, medication, bedding and payment of his utility bills. The Community Connection Program conducted weekly home visits with Peter. Following advocacy by the Community Connections Program, he was granted a Community Aged Care Package through the Salvation Army. Peter is now well supported and linked into his community.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Homeless Ser vices ST

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Personal Support Program (OzLink) OzLink is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Family and Community Services to work with up to 64 clients at any one time. In fact, the program is designed to provide assistance and support to people with multiple barriers to employment so that they can achieve goals and outcomes that are appropriate to their situation.

Ozanam Community’s Meal Service

AGED

CARE

&

COMMUNITY

The most common issues that our clients present with include homelessness, depression, anger management, family breakdown, domestic violence and mental illness. Clients are referred directly from Centrelink and are able to stay in the program for up to two years. The program offers general and vocational counselling, housing information and referral, advocacy and support, financial services, assistance with employment matters such as developing resumes and applications, and assessment and referral to specialist services. YOUTH SUPPORT SERVICES Youth Support Services have locations at Richmond and North Melbourne. A range of programs are provided through Youth Support Services, including Transitional Housing Support Services, Juvenile Justice Pathways Program, Fund a Future and Intensive Youth Support. Through these programs Youth Support Services are actively engaged with approximately 80 young people at any one time. • Transitional Housing Support Services located at Richmond covers the cities of Darebin and Yarra, providing supported accommodation to young women and young men aged 15 to 25 years. Generally these young people are housed on a shared basis with the type of support matched to individual needs, such as budgeting, emotional and practical support or referral to a specialist agency. We are also funded to allow the agency to provide specific support to South East Asian young people, with a particular focus on young women.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

SERVICES

• Juvenile Justice Pathways Program is delivered in partnership with Transitional Housing Managers and the Department of Human Services Northern Region Juvenile Justice Unit. The program provides intensive support and housing to young people involved with juvenile justice who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. • Fund a Future aims to address the difficulties experienced by young people seeking to enter the private rental market. Under the auspice of St Vincent de Paul, Youth Support Services leases private rental properties and houses for formerly homeless young people who are working or studying. The program provides an opportunity for young people to develop the confidence and rental references required to undertake their own lease. The scheme is funded entirely from donations and corporate sponsorships. • Intensive Youth Support is a statewide program designed to engage young men who are unable to access other community resources, or for whom other community services are not available. The aim of the program is to provide flexible support to homeless young men who display extreme and difficult behaviours and whose needs are unable to be met by existing services. This year, 26 young people have been assisted throughout the year.


Marian Community ST

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SERVICES

homeless

MARIAN COMMUNITY Marian Community provides a range of accommodation and support services in a safe and secure environment for women experiencing domestic violence. The service is committed to upholding the rights of women and children to determine their own future with a focus on providing them with real opportunities to make their own pathway out of violent relationships. The services offered include high security support and accommodation to women and children, outreach support, information and referral regarding housing options, counselling, material and financial assistance, as well as assessment and referral to specialist services, including legal representation. During the past year, Marian Community has assisted 249 women and children.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Homeless Ser vices ST

VINCENT

DE

PAUL

NEW INITIATIVES To more adequately address the issue of homelessness, St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services is continually looking at ways of expanding its services to those in need. We are currently doing this in partnership and collaboration with other agencies. Three projects have been established this year.

AGED

CARE

&

COMMUNITY

St Vincent’s Hospital/Ozanam House Project Ozanam House entered into a partnership with St Vincent’s Hospital to provide a two-bed accommodation facility for homeless men exiting the hospital emergency department. The project accommodates men at Ozanam until they are fully recovered and then transferred to suitable accommodation or the generic accommodation service offered at Ozanam House. A total of 27 men have used this facility since its inception in December 2002. Glenroy Housing Service/Juvenile Justice Project St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services, in conjunction with the Brosnan Centre (Jesuit Social Services), was awarded funding from the Department of Human Services to provide an integrated housing and support service response for juveniles exiting the justice system. The objectives of this initiative are to: • reduce the incidence of homelessness amongst people exiting prison; • improve the transition experience; • reduce the re-offending rate of those exiting the justice system; and • improve the effectiveness of housing assistance and outreach services to this target group.

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Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

SERVICES

Equity and Access Project St Vincent de Paul Aged Care and Community Services is the auspicing body for a consortium of agencies undertaking a joint ‘Equity and Access Project’ in the northern region of metropolitan Melbourne. Our partner in this project is the Merri Housing Outreach Service. The primary aim of this project is to enhance the capacity of the Health and Community Care (HACC) service system to respond to the needs of people who are homeless, or living in unsuitable and/or insecure housing with a disability, specifically a cognitive, psychiatric and acquired brain injury disability, who are eligible to receive HACC services. The project has been divided into two phases. The first is primarily a research phase, with the aim of developing a comprehensive overview of the current service system and reporting on strategies to address the shortcomings of the system to the target group. The second phase will implement the strategies emerging from the research. In light of the need to be flexible we are taking an action research approach and will adapt the emerging needs.


Disability Services ST

VINCENT

DE

PAUL

CARE

&

COMMUNITY

For most people work is an important way of gaining income, increasing selfesteem and enhancing the quality of life. Work benefits include community integration and participation, greater financial independence, enhanced selfesteem, satisfaction from achievements and extended opportunities for social interaction and friendships. Over the past 20 years, significant changes to social policies, attitudes and government programs have occurred in relation to the employment of people with disabilities. There is an increasing recognition of the capacity of people with disabilities to demonstrate valued work skills and to contribute to, and participate in, varied employment settings. Ozanam Enterprises has been operating a supported employment work program since local conference members set up the service in 1976 at our worksite in Mornington.

Lance (left) and Jamie construct hamper crates for customers of Ozanam Enterprises.

Currently the Commonwealth Government provides some funding called a ‘block grant’ to assist Ozanam Enterprises meet the support needs of employees with a disability. The Commonwealth Government, together with service providers and people with disabilities, has embarked on an ambitious and challenging program of reform in the Disability Employment sector. Funding will change from a block grant amount to be more directly targeted to meet the various individual levels of support needs for employees. Also a productivity-based wage will be implemented in all services based on a competency and productivity assessment which will better reflect the contribution of each employee to business operations. These changes are under the umbrella of the implementation of a quality

SERVICES

accreditation system where all employment services that receive funding will need to achieve certification to continue operating. The quality system is based on 12 disability service standards that reflect the valued position of employees with disabilities and the standards of service, which must be provided to assist and support them in employment. Ozanam Enterprises looks forward to achieving certification in early 2004. The continuation of the 'Linked Hands' program with students and staff at Padua College in after-work learning activities and special weekends away has provided an additional and positive integration and development aspect to our program.

disability

Our service is named after Frederic Ozanam and, as he searched for justice and compassion in his journey with people in need, we also seek to work forward in this way. Over 60 people with a range of disabilities are involved in full and part-time employment as well as work skills training at Ozanam Enterprises.

AGED

Our support to employees, the quality of our work for customers, the financial result, the increased work skills and participation of all of our employees have combined to provide a vibrant sense of achievement and pride for everyone at Ozanam Enterprises during 2002-2003. People with disabilities are often marginalised in our society. Ozanam Enterprises strives to support our employees to participate fully in all aspects of work achievement and in the fun and enjoyment of being part of our wider community with workmates and friends. We welcome Vincentians and friends of the Society to arrange a visit to Ozanam Enterprises to see our special work in operation or to make inquiries of the excellent services that our business can provide in the packaging, assembly and woodwork areas.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

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Thank you ST

VINCENT

DE

PAUL

The St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. relies heavily on the generosity of the wider community to support vital programs and services for people in need. Thank you to all the thousands of individual donors who have given generously over the past 12 months. The Society recognises that people give in a variety of ways, some give their time, their skills, their prayers, gifts in kind, whilst others give financially. We are very grateful to all who support the Society.

SOCIET Y

VICTORIA

INC.

Special thanks to the following organisations who have generously assisted the St Vincent de Paul Society financially during 2002-2003: Trusts and foundations Bell Charitable Fund Carter Family Trust Cecilia Kilkeary Foundation Collier Charitable Fund Dibbs and Massie Foundation Estate of the Late Frances Barry Arnoldt Gajalomawa Foundation Inc. Ian Rollo Currie Estate Foundation Invergowrie Foundation Ivy Hamilton Thomas Trust Fund Landau Charitable Trust Lord Mayor's Charitable Trust Melbourne Newsboys Club Foundation Inc. The Father Leo Hartnett Charitable Trust The Leo & Mary Loughnan Charitable Trust The Mary Carmel Condon Charitable Trust The Michael Francis Hynes Trust The R E Ross Trust The William Angliss (Victoria) Charitable Fund Business and community donors Bulleen Village Pharmacy Cistercian Monks of Tarrawarra Abbey Delta Group Australia Edison Mission Fletcher Jones Support Australia Infineum Australia Melbourne City Council Telstra Victorian Mortgage Management Group Washers and Stamped Components Aust. Pty Ltd Media Special thanks to all Victorian media outlets (newspapers, radio stations, and television stations) for playing and printing the Society's Appeal advertisements free of charge.

Gifts in kind supporters Thank you to the following businesses and communities who have supported the Society through gifts in kind during 2002-2003: Altona Gate Shopping Centre ANZ Abbottsford Bayside Shopping Centre Brimbank Shopping Centre Broadmeadows Town Centre Chadstone Shopping Centre Christian Community Freehills Gold 104.3 FM Mix 101.1 FM Northland Shopping Centre Plan Power Rio Tinto Ltd. Telstra Australia Yarra Trams YOU CAN HELP ST VINNIES HELP OTHERS BY: • Making a Bequest Consider remembering the St Vincent de Paul Society in your Will. The Society is able to assist thousands of people because of the generosity of those who have remembered us in their Will. For an information booklet or to speak to our bequest officer call the Society on 03 9629 7152. • Donating pre-loved goods to Centres Donations of pre-loved clothing, household goods and furniture can be made to any St Vincent de Paul Society Centre (see page 19 for locations or call 1800 621 349). • Making a financial donation Credit card donations can be made by phoning 13 18 12. • Volunteering your time If you are interested in helping people through any of the Society's services by volunteering your time, please contact the Society for further information phone 03 9629 7152.

Special thanks to the people associated with St Vinnies whose photographs are featured in this Annual Report. Photographs are interspersed randomly and are not necessarily associated with the accompanying text. 34

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action


Danusia Kaska MAKING

HER

DREAM

A

REALITY

YOUNG PEOPLE HAVE A VITAL ROLE TO PLAY For the last six years, Danusia Kaska has been working as a Forensic Scientist for the police. But it was in December 1992, when she finished year 12 and was a member of the local parish conference, that she and a collection of her friends formed a new group of St Vincent de Paul Society to assist others. This group eventually became the Western Region Youth Team and was involved in many activities including visiting Ozanam House, meeting with prisoners, befriending the elderly and Multiple Sclerosis sufferers in nursing homes, supporting single mothers, entertaining children on day outings, volunteering with soup vans and visiting people in the neighbourhood. "One dream I had was to see disadvantaged children receive gifts from Santa on Christmas morning. So, armed with a small team, a large red truck, a jolly Santa and a list of children's names, we made a racket on Christmas morning 1992 distributing toys to families. We were greeted with smiles and looks of disbelief both from children and parents."

overseas development committee and, more recently, joined the Society's Strategic Planning Committee. She was recently appointed as Junior National Vice-President and her main focus will be on bridging the gap between Young Vinnies and senior conferences. She is extremely honoured to hold these positions and will continue to use her energy and enthusiasm to serve those in need through the Society.

Danusia has always nurtured a great passion to help those in need overseas, perhaps because she had witnessed her own family assist the poor in their homeland of Poland. For the last four years Danusia has been on the national

Photograph reprinted with kind permission of Australian Catholics magazine.

Annual Report 2002 / 2003 – Love in Action

35


St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. STATE COUNCIL VICTORIA State President:

Syd Tutton

Deputy State President and Northern Central Council President:

Peter Rigg

Vice President and Sale Diocesan Council President:

Sandra Walker

Vice President:

Tony Keaney

Treasurer:

Jim Grealish

Eastern Central Council President:

Dennis Griffin

Southern Central Council President:

Dennis Mirabella

Western Central Council President:

Maurie Taylor

Ballarat Diocesan Council President:

Bill Antonie

Sandhurst Diocesan Council President:

Cecilia McCormick

Youth Representatives:

Nick Pearce Teresa Wilson

St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc. PO Box 14005, Melbourne Vic 8001 585 Little Collins Street, Melbourne Vic 3000 Phone: Fax:

03 9629 7152 03 9620 1950

Email: info@svdp-vic.org.au Website: www.svdp-vic.org.au ABN: 28 911 702 061

2002-2003 Annual Report  

The St Vincent de Paul Society Victoria Inc.'s Annual Report for 2002-2003

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