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VINCIT [latin] - conquer.overcome.master.win.surpass.excel.

THE OFFICIAL MIXED MARTIAL ARTS MAGAZINE

MMA WORLD

RANKING

is the power in the powder?

vincit girl h

kristie brie lawner

+

power of the medicine ball

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011 $3.99 US

UFC Welterweight

Contender

Jon

Fitch >strikeforce diaz vs. cyborg >Central coast throwdown


UPCOMING >MMA EVENTS DATE

NAME

TITLE

LOCATION

2.3.2011

KOTC

Empire

Highland, CA

2.4.2011

Las Vegas MMA

Hawaii vs. Mainland

Las Vegas, NV

2.5.2011

UFC 126

Silva vs. Belfort

Las Vegas, NV

2.11.2011

Tuff-N-Uff

Xtreme Couture vs. Team Quest 2

Las Vegas, NV

2.12.2011

Strikeforce

Fedor vs. Silva

East Rutherford, NJ

2.18.2011

TPF 8

All or Nothing

Lemoore, CA

2.18.2011

Strikeforce

Strikeforce Challengers 14

Austin, TX

2.18.2011

Combat Fight League

Mayhem

Woodland Hills, CA

2.19.2011

KOTC

Northern Meltdown

Walker, MN

2.25.2011

MFC 28

Supremacy

Alberta, Canada

2.27.2011

UFC 127

Penn vs. Fitch

Sydney, Australia

3.3.2011

UFC Live 3

Sanchez vs. Kampmann

Louisville, KY

3.5.2011

Strikeforce

Columbus

Columbus, OH

3.5.2011

M-1 Challenge 23

Guram vs. Grishin

Moscow, Russia

3.5.2011

Bellator

BFC 35

Lemoore, CA

3.5.2011

KOTC

Future Legends

Las Vegas, NV

3.19.2011

UFC 128

Shogun vs. Evans

Newmark, NJ

3.26.2011

UFC

Fight Night 24

Seattle, WA

For more SCHEDULED UPCOMING EVENTS go to VINCIT M AGA Z INE . C O M


CONTENT FEBRUARY.MARCH 2011

04. mma world ranking 06. Monterey Bay Fightclub Coastal collision

07. Central coast throwdown fightin on the faultline

08. strikeforce: diaz vs. cyborg 10. is the power in the powder? 12. Jon fitch 18. power of the medicine ball side throw

22. vincit girl kristie brie lawner 24. meal menu 26. a blast from the past

NEXT ISSUE COMING OUT APRIL.2011 VINCIT® LLC, publisher, does not take responsibility or liability for opinions expressed or views of articles, advertisements, endorse, make representation warranty or guarantee concerning the safety or effectiveness of either the products and services advertised in this magazine or martial arts ads or other techniques discussed or illustrated in this magazine. The purchase of or use of some of the products, services or techniques advertised or discussed in this may be illegal in some areas of the United States or other countries. Therefore, you should check federal, state and local laws prior to your purchase or use of these products, services or techniques. Because of the nature of some of the services, products and techniques advertised or discussed in Vincit magazine, readers should consult a physician before applying these techniques or using these products or services. The publisher expressly disclaims any and all liability relating to the manufacture, sale or use of such products and services and the application of the techniques discussed or illustrated in this magazine. VINCIT® magazine is a registered trademark owned by VINCIT, LLC © Copyrights 2011, All rights reserved.


VINCIT

®

a note from the editor–in–chief Jon Fitch was chosen for this issue as he is amongst the best welterweights in mixed martial arts and a very articulate man who can help put mma in a positive light. His work ethics go beyond most mma fighters and his love for life is admirable. Fitch is a positive role model for all.

Contact Directory creativeart@vincitmagazine.com editor@vincitmagazine.com media@vincitmagazine.com ads@vincitmagazine.com

Vincit Team Sharon Sanghera, Editor-in-Chief Sunny Sahota, Art/Creative Director Ernesto Maestas, Managing Director Dr. Abdollah Nejad, Public Relations Jeff Spirer, Director of Mobile Operations Jonathan Klieman, Advertising Sales Chester Aleman, Advertising Sales Sven Larson, Advertising Sales Erin Julian, Advertising Sales Luis Miranda, Advertising Sales Andrew Moy, Journalist/Writer Edge Brown, Journalist/Writer Carey Rockland, Journalist/Writer Cody Fielding, Journalist/Writer Anthony Hardin Sr., Journalist/Writer Wesley Buckingham, Photographer Brycen Guerrero, Photographer Conrad Melendez, Photographer

Contributors Ernesto Maestas, Writer Dr. Melissa Ponce, D.C., Writer Timothy Chau, Writer Tommy Ruiz, Writer Steve Dominquez, Writer Janet Dominquez, Writer Sundeep Sidhu, Creative Art Designer Justin Price, Photographer Jeff Spirer, Photographer Steve Dominquez, Photographer Janet Dominquez, Photographer Daniel Nolan, Photograper


MMA Ranking

MMA WORLD RANKING UPDATED 2.2011

POUND FOR POUND

WELTERWEIGHT (170)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Georges St. Pierre CAN Anderson Silva BRA Jose Aldo BRA Cain Velasquez USA Fedor Emelianenko RUS Mauricio Rua BRA Brock Lesnar USA Frankie Edgar USA Jon Fitch USA Jake Shields USA

V HEAVYWEIGHT (265)

LIGHTWEIGHT (155)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Cain Velasquez USA Fedor Emelianenko RUS Fabricio Werdum BRA Brock Lesnar USA Junior Dos Santos BRA Alistair Overeem NLD Shane Carwin USA Frank Mir USA Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira BRA Antonio Silva BRA

Frankie Edgar USA Gilbert Melendez USA Gray Maynard USA B.J. Penn USA Shinya Aoki JPN Eddie Alvarez USA Kenny Florian USA Tatsuya Kawajiri JPN Ben Henderson USA Jim Miller USA

LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT (205)

FEATHERWEIGHT (145)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Mauricio Rua BRA Rashad Evans USA Quinton Jackson USA Lyoto Machida BRA Forrest Griffin USA Jon Jones USA Ryan Bader USA Antonio Rogerio Nogueira BRA Thiago Silva BRA Randy Couture USA

Jose Aldo BRA Manny Gamburyan ARM Josh Grispi USA Marlon Sandro BRA Chad Mendes USA Hatsu Hioki JPN Diego Nunes BRA Mike Brown USA Michihiro Omigawa JPN Joe Warren USA

MIDDLEWEIGHT (185)

BANTAMWEIGHT (135)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Anderson Silva BRA Yushin Okami JPN Chael Sonnen USA Nate Marquardt USA Demian Maia BRA Dan Henderson USA Ronaldo Souza BRA Robbie Lawler USA Jorge Santiago BRA Vitor Belfort BRA

V 4

Georges St. Pierre CAN Jon Fitch USA Nick Diaz USA Jake Shields USA Josh Koscheck USA Thiago Alves BRA Martin Kampmann DEN Paul Daley GBR Paulo Thiago BRA Carlos Condit USA

VINCIT MMA world ranking is based on fighter’s recent professional performances and overall career results.

VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011

Dominick Cruz USA Joseph Benavidez USA Brian Bowles USA Scott Jorgensen USA Urijah Faber USA Miguel Torres USA Brad Pickett GRB Takeya Mizugaki JPN Rani Yahya BRA Masakatsu Ueda JPN

For daily up to date MMA world ranking go to VINCITmagazine.com


MMA EVENT

Monterey Bay Fightclub Coastal Collision Watsonville, CA - Saturday, December 11, 2010

FIGHT

6

METHOD

ROUND

TIME

Marco Del Real def. Donasabe Mohammed

Split Decision

3

2:00

Gabriel Haro def. Vincent Viruet

Unanimous Decision

3

2:00

AJ Versaw def. Dryden Wilson

Split Decision

3

2:00

Manuel Diaz def. Efrain Cintron

Submission (Anaconda Choke)

1

1:13

Tanner Marlow def. Guillermo Rocha

TKO (Strikes)

1

1:41

Eduardo Carillo def. Brian Schatz

Split Decision

3

2:00

Sasha Montgomery def. Juan Ortiz

Unanimous Decision

3

2:00

Andrew Rynhard def. Brian Holqin

Submission (Armbar)

1

1:19

VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011


MMA EVENT

Central Coast throwdown Fightin on the Faultline Hollister, CA - Saturday, January 8, 2011

by Steve Dominquez / Janet Dominquez

Promoter Michael MacNeil put on a MMA Event to remember at the Hollister Veterans Memorial Building. A sold out crowd witnessed CAMO MMA at it’s best. With a total of 9 fights, the enthusiastic crowd enjoyed the next generation of MMA Fighters display their skills and put on an awesome show.

FIGHT

METHOD

Sergio Machado def. Jared Hess

Submission (Armbar)

ROUND 3

1:20

TIME

Cristian Barber def. Chris Beeby

Unanimous Decision

3

3:00

Richard Parra def. Benjamin Amezquita

Unanimous Decision

3

3:00

Justin Bronson def. Mike Morales

Unanimous Decision

3

3:00

Ericka Letrice Newsome def. Natasha Sandoval

TKO (Referee Stoppage)

1

1:19

John Donaldson def. Joe Heaton

Unanimous Decision

3

3:00

Trevor Porter def. Jacob Lamanto

Unanimous Decision

3

3:00

Jonathan Chaplin def. Thomas Ballard

Unanimous Decision

3

3:00

Santino Stagi def. Isaac Castaneda

KO

1

1:05

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011 | VINCITmagazine.com

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MMA EVENT

strikeforce - diaz vs. cyborg San Jose, CA - Saturday, January 29, 2011

FIGHT

8

METHOD

ROUND

TIME

Nick Diaz def. Evangelista ‘Cyborg’ Santos

Submission (Arm Bar)

2

4:50

Ronaldo ‘Jacare’ Souza def. Robbie Lawler

Submission (Rear Naked Choke)

3

2:00

Herschel Walker def. Scott Carson

TKO (Strikes)

1

3:13

Roger Gracie def. Trevor Prangley

Submission (Rear Naked Choke)

1

4:19

Nate Moore def. Nathan Coy

TKO (Strikes)

1

0:25

Isaiah Hill def. Bobby Stack

Submission (Triangle Choke)

2

1:02

Ron Keslar def. Eric Lawson

Submission (Arm Bar)

1

1:57

Germaine De Randamie def. Stephanie Webber

KO (Knee)

2

4:25

James Terry def. Lucas Gamaza

TKO (Strikes)

1

3:26

Jenna Castillo def. Charlene Gellner

KO (Knee)

2

3:57

Anthony Dariano def. Alan Perez

Unanimous Decision

3

5:00

Ricky Jackson def. Niko Jackson

Unanimous Decision

3

5:00

Armin Safiari def. Sam Bracamonte

Unanimous Decision

3

5:00

VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011


Nutrition

is the power in the powder? Protein Powder has become a staple in most gym bags. From the ring to the cage, one thing remains consistent among vigorous athletes: a desire to be the best. Athletes today are looking for ways outside the gym to enhance performance, to clinch the competitive edge. Many are turning to protein powders. Are you looking for the Big Solution, the magic pixie dust that PROMISES “the competitive edge”? As a Functional Medicine doctor I often joke with my patients on the transparencies of supplement marketing, in particular, protein powder. If the protein powder is “super” “packed” with “ultra strength” and promising the bulging muscles of The Hulk, most consumers are going to lunge straight for the bottle with the largest font and most enticing label. The real competitive edge can and should actually come from something much more simplified then synthesized protein powder. The best and most efficient form of protein is actually from real food sources, not GNC’s manufacturing warehouse. The problem with protein powder is that most people are applying it to a less then adequate diet. Too often low quality protein powder is consumed in exchange for a high quality, highly energized meal. Protein powder is meant to supplement the diet, not be utilized in exchange for real food protein. Protein powders can also be a challenge for your body to breakdown and apply to muscle mass. As a result, the now excess protein gets converted into triglycerides, shuttled in between muscle fibers and stored as fat mass. In fact, it’s that extra fat that gives the elusion of bulkiness to muscle. Keep in mind that bulky muscles do not equate to functional muscles. What matters most is the physical performance of the muscle mass itself, especially in sports like MMA. Functional and sustainable muscle performance depends on how much of the ingested protein is actually converted into muscle mass, not fat in between the muscle mass. As with all supplements, protein powders are intended to drive specific physiological processes toward a particular outcome. Protein powders are taken with the intent of driving the process of building lean muscle mass. However, if your body is already starving for basic nutrients, it will shuttle your expensive protein to the areas of deficiency first, away from the specific process you’ve intended it for. Trust me, your innate physiology is more consumed by survival then it is by vanity or performance aspirations. If you fail to consume a high quality diet and neglect real food protein, the protein powders are not going to build muscle mass as they are intended. 10

VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011

by Dr. Melissa Ponce, D.C.

In Functional Medicine, every patient struggles with various physiological deficiencies. I view my performance patients in the same light. But before we can rebuild specific deficiencies, we first have to build a solid foundation. This process starts with daily food intake. For athletes looking to increase their stamina, endurance and lean muscle mass, I encourage red meat for its high fat and iron content. Fatty fish like salmon and trout are also excellent options. Chicken and turkey are good for variety but don’t be afraid to branch outside the low-fat realm of white meat. For vegetarians, the healthy option is a combination of beans, rice, avocados and nuts for lean mass enhancement. For optimal recovery time refuel with a combination of proteins and fats. Athletes who train hard but don’t refuel efficiently are going to hit the over training zone much faster then their well fed counterparts. I find that many of my patients suffering from chronic arthritic pains and overtraining syndrome are actually lacking adequate amounts of protein and saturated fats in their diet. Consider that your aching joints might be screaming for the natural fat from meat, avocados, nuts or organic butter. Real foods are foundational to a solid muscle-enhancing program. Sure, genetics and plain hard work have their roles but without the substrate to build and grow, your muscles will never increase in lean mass. The substrate I’m referring to is whole food nutrition, from Mother Nature’s market, and it’s the foundation of muscle mass assimilation. So next time you find yourself scouring the vitamin isle for the newest and boldest protein powder, resist the urge to grab the flashy protein tub. Instead head to the grocery store and pick up some real protein at the butcher’s counter or, if you’re more of a gatherer then a hunter, the bulk isle for nuts and beans. Your gym bag won’t be so bulky but your muscles are likely to pick up the excess mass.

Dr. Melissa Ponce is a Functional Medicine practitioner and Chiropractor in San Francisco and Cupertino, CA. She specializes in performance enhancement and chronic disease management. You can learn more about her practice at www.drmelissaponce.com.


Jon

Fitch Pedagogy Studies to UFC Welterweight Contender

12

VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011


Upon first walking into American Kickboxing Academy (better known as “AKA”) in San Jose you can’t help but notice the oversized posters hanging high on the walls of their stable of fighters: Jon Fitch, Cain Velasquez, Josh Koscheck, Mike Swick, Josh Thomson, Daniel Cormier, Bobby Southworth, Herschel Walker and many more. Javier Mendez, “Crazy” Bob Cook and Dave Camarillo have built a world class fight factory in this nondescript gym located in a strip mall that systematically turns out fighters one after another. Today, I’m here to get to know one of their products, Jon Fitch, widely recognized by most as the #2 Welterweight (170 lbs.) fighter in the world. Jon is six weeks away from fighting living legend, B.J. “The Prodigy” Penn, at UFC 127 on February 27th in Sydney, Australia. The Fort Wayne, Indiana-born mix martial artist will take a record of 23 wins, 2 losses and 1 ‘No Contest’ into battle against a sure-in future UFC “Hall of Famer”. A victory gets him one step closer to that elusive title belt. Jon is ranked in the Top 10 of the World’s MMA Pound-for-Pound List with the only loss in his last 22 fights coming against UFC Welterweight Champion, Georges St. Pierre. What I quickly realized was that his physical abilities no matter how great they are don’t measure up to his intellect. How does someone so smart, down-to-earth and funny go from studying Pedagogy Administration at Purdue University’s graduate school to becoming a UFC title contender. We’re here to find out.

h by Ernesto Maestas

Photography by Jeff Spirer / Daniel Nolan

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011 | VINCITmagazine.com

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jon fitch What did you want to be when you grew up?

Why did you stop going to graduate school?

From as early as I can remember I’ve always wanted to be a professional football player. The first day of school when they ask, ”What do you want to be when you grow up? It was a professional football player and I kept that dream alive until my senior year in high school. And it wasn’t until towards the end of the season that I realized that colleges weren’t banging on my door offering me (football) scholarships or asking me to walkon but college wrestling programs were. I started shifting my mindset towards being more of a wrestler and education-base where I would take that wrestling skill-set and eventually turn it into teaching and coaching.

I did 12 credits and I just wasn’t feeling it. I really didn’t like it that much. I knew I didn’t want to start teaching yet and I won the ‘Red Mackey Award’ which is awarded to three seniors (student athletes) every year at the university from all the men’s and women’s (sports) programs and it’s based on athletic performance, work in the community and academics and that afforded me a free year in grad school. That’s why I stayed around for grad school. I got free room and board. While I was doing that I started getting interest in MMA and I started fighting during that year in grad school. I started off playing at it and it took me a while to figure out that I was passionate about it and I really loved doing this. It took that knockout loss to Wilson Gouveia to realize that I had to move out of Indiana and get to some place where I could really immerse myself in MMA and focus on nothing but fighting. I was a wrestling volunteer assistant who was punching a heavy bag with hand wraps and no gloves and every once in a while got to grapple with some judo guys from the judo club at Purdue. Just kind of winging it . Half-assing it. That loss made me realize that you’re not going to be very good at this if you keep half-assing it. It would have been easy for me to find a teaching and coaching job in Indiana. I basically confronted my fear and sprinted at it head on. The fear was failing at this fighting thing. The safe path was taking a teaching job but I said screw it and I did it quick. I took a final on Thursday and left on Friday. I was out.

What position did you play as a football player?

Middle linebacker and a little bit of tailback too. I didn’t get to carry the ball as much because I was the best blocking tailback/fullback so they used me as a blocking back even though I could have probably gained more yards if I was carrying the ball. I just liked hitting people. That’s why I loved middle linebacker - you were always in the middle of everything and you always get in the mix. I hated fakes or running out and fake to get the pass because then I was nowhere near the action and couldn’t hit anybody. Something about those two positions where I could hit people hard every play. How is it you grew up in Indiana and didn’t grow up wanting to play basketball?

I played basketball. You grow up in Indiana and you have a basketball hoop in your driveway and you’re given a basketball at birth. Even though I hate basketball I still do have a pretty good jump shot. Part of it was as a wrestler (and a lot of wrestlers) hated basketball coming out of Indiana because we could see that we worked ten times harder than these guys. We easily worked ten times harder than these guys and we got zero recognition for our hard work. Nobody would believe us that we worked harder. There’s a lot of unfairness out there…but that’s life. People in more popular things get favorable recognition and more attention. It kind of drives you to work even harder because you want to prove to everyone else that we’re a better sport or it’s harder to do what we do. What did you major in at Purdue University?

I majored in Physical Education and minored in History. I picked the two classes I hated the least in high school. I majored in wrestling in Purdue because all I wanted to do is wrestle then be a wrestling coach. I didn’t really care about the teaching aspect of it that much. When I had to student teach ...man, I knew I didn’t want to teach. The grade school, the K-6, was awesome but the high school – no thanks. As a grad student I studied Pedagogy Administration. Those are the courses you take to become an athletic director, principal, more of the higher up ends of the academic world. A lot of those education classes are such a waste. It’s an irritating thing that we waste a lot of time and money for stupid reasons. Like there’s no reason to spend a semester on teaching theory. Why learn about teaching theory? Why not be in a classroom practicing good teaching theories? We would spend weeks on bad teaching theory that you’re never suppose to use. Why not just say never do things like this and move on? I guess it’s because they’re making money on it but whatever. I think there are better ways. Going through the good and bad experiences of student teaching and seeing how schools are run and the curriculum in our school systems in this country – they are garbage and I couldn’t be a part of it. A lot of teachers after five or six years are like dead on the inside because there’s no hope, there’s no change, there’s nothing – it’s the same. They’re just turning out crappy product. We have to revamp everything. That’s what’s disgusting is there’s not a single problem that this country faces that cannot be solved through a better education system. Everything: health care, budgeting, international relations. Everything that needs to be repaired should start there with the education system. And you take more and more cuts from the education system every year. 14

VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011

What made you change to become such a health food ‘nut’?

My wife, who I was dating at the time, started reading a book a few years ago called “Skinny Bitch”. She changed her diet all around and she lost weight and was feeling better. She got me to read the male counterpart of that book which is called “Skinny Bastard”. It opened my eyes up to a lot of studies and literature showing the negative side effects to eating certain foods. So I started cutting out a lot of things. It started cutting down on eating meat and only eating organic fruits and vegetables and organic meats. I try to avoid anything genetically modified, processed, prepackaged and anything with preservatives. I then noticed a huge difference within two weeks. I started about two weeks before UFC 100 and the weight cut was the easiest weight cut I’ve ever had. I stopped being lethargic in the mornings for sparring. I had no more ‘flat’ days and my energy levels were much higher and everything was just much better and faster. I kept refining that diet more and more. What’s this about you hating tuna?

I didn’t have money to eat very nice or go to the store. I only had a budget of $800 a month to live on. That’s it. That’s all I had. I had to scrape things together to eat so the majority of my food was eggs, ramen noodles and canned tuna. I’ve always hated canned tuna. It’s disgusting but that’s all I could afford at about 99 cents per can of tuna. That and a lot of white rice. It wasn’t until I started getting into the UFC when I was able to get away from that diet. Swiss cakes. Are they your guilty pleasure?

Ya, those are (laughing). Swiss cakes go way back but what I discovered out here that I’m a sucker for are the chocolate-covered cream puffs and the chocolate-covered mini éclairs. After a fight I’d go buy a tub of éclairs. I would freeze them and eat all of them as I played video games. That’s why my weight would fluctuate up to 205 lbs. sometimes.


FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011 | VINCITmagazine.com

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What hobbies do you have?

One of the new things I’m getting into is editing and putting together my Youtube page. On our honeymoon we went to Hawaii and I bought a ukulele and I’ve been learning to play. I play my own music for the videos on my ukulele (laughing). Also playing video games and I go snowboarding sometimes. I haven’t had a huge chance to volunteer but I went to Vietnam a couple years ago with my wife’s family and did some work volunteer work with a blind school there and orphan kids with AIDS over there as our trip. It was a life-changing experience too. I stopped complaining about a lot of stuff after witnessing what goes on over there. Seeing what an average life is over there. Six year old kids walking at 4am in the morning trying to sell gum to tourist. Why did you pick American Kickboxing Academy over the other camps out there?

I really didn’t know where to go or what to do and they kind of found me. Dwayne Zinkin who was an All American wrestler from Fresno State started getting involved in MMA and he knew that wrestlers would make the best fighters. He started coldcalling universities and asking coaches if they had any guys who are interested after college at all in the sport. He spoke to coach Tom Erikson and he said, ”Ya, I have a guy fighting this July”. I ended up visiting for a week over Thanksgiving when I was in grad school and I told my mom I was coming out just for vacation. I trained out here for week and it was the best training. I saw what was available here. There was a lot of great stuff. This is where I need to keep coming to train but I wasn’t committed to moving yet. So it wasn’t until the loss to Wilson Gouveia when I decided I needed to move full time and live there (AKA). I saw the options and saw what hard work could do in a place like this. I knew this was the place to go. I also knew that even if things didn’t work out here that the Bay Area is the mecca for MMA. At the time you could drive a half an hour in any direction and find a pretty good gym. Why is American Kickboxing Academy so good?

I think it’s the team and the attitude. Javier (Mendez) is the keystone of the arch holding it together and has attracted like-minded people and we’ve worked hard to keep this an ego-free, hard-working facility. A lot of us come from a wrestling background so it easy for us to get this program running like what we’re use to which is a college wrestling program – head coach, assistant coaches and structure. You have to clean it (the gym) until you make a name for yourself. I mopped these floors for years. It’s about two or three years since I mopped these floors. I had a good three or four year run (laughing). We’ve built up the name of AKA so much now that we’re able to bring guys in. If we really do need something we can invite people in and they’re usually pretty open to it. Jake Shields and Gilbert Melendez have trained with us before. Jake was a huge training partner for me in the GSP (Georges St. Pierre) fight.

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VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011

Do you ever train with Cain Velasquez?

He’s gotten too good. Back when he had less technique I would mess with a little bit but it’s been a while. I’ll mess with him when he’s in a gi. He’s just such a monster and he doesn’t get tired. He’s a freak. He’s one in a million. I’ve never seen a heavyweight like him.


At what point did you say, “Wow! I can actually make a living doing this fighting thing”?

My initial reason to get into this was money-based because I was hearing stories while at Purdue University when I was still wrestling there. I was hearing stories from Tom Erikson who was fighting in Japan in PRIDE and he’s buddies with Mark Coleman and Gary Goodridge. They would come into town and train if one of them had a fight. They just had great stories. I thought they had great adventure stories about going to different countries and fighting. They were talking about bringing home tons of cash from bonuses for great performances. They were making huge money but they forgot to mention at the time that the pay scale is much different for heavyweights than lighter weights. People will look at the big guy and say, “He’s huge! He can kill me”. People don’t like to accept that a 125 lb. guy can take your head off just as good as the heavyweight – maybe even better. I only got into fights in college when I had to make the way to escape with our lightweights. You don’t pick on them – he’s going to take your head off. So there are times when you’re pulling your wrestler off a frat boy. How will you beat B.J. Penn?

My plan is to put pressure on B.J. and push him and be technically superior in every way and frustrate him to the point where he cannot continue. B.J. is a guy you can’t make mistakes on. If you make a mistake with BJ he’s going to put you away. It has to be a very technical fight. We’ve made appropriate adjustments to handle what BJ has. How much longer can you continue to fight at 170 lbs.?

Especially with the diet change it’s easy and I don’t have a problem with it. My long term goals are to win the welterweight title and clean out the weight class. Ideally, I’d like to move up and fight at 185 lbs. just to challenge myself. But I have to get the belt at 170 lbs first.

How long can you picture yourself fighting?

As long as I can keep having fun. If things keep going like this, I can keep fighting for another ten to fifteen years. Why not? Randy Couture is doing it. He’s still a force. If I can stay healthy and keep the passion for the hard work. If the hard work becomes something that I don’t want to do that’s when it’s time to hang it up. If you’re not willing to do the hard work then it’s not there. You’re going to half-ass it and you’re going to get hurt…and possibly embarrassed. Hurt goes away. There’s nothing more embarrassing than getting beat because you didn’t prepare. I think some guys like it that way because they have a crutch and they can make an excuse. What do you want to do once you retire?

I have a couple of ideas. I’m planning of some day opening up a training facility but I can’t disclose where or what it’s involving but I’m planning a lofty 10-year plan. I’d also like to do a high-end equipment line some day because the training equipment we have today is garbage. The only thing worth buying are Winning boxing gloves for $300. For a professional like myself it will last you a couple of years. You’re going to buy $50-$100 gloves and they’re going to last three months and they fall apart. Everything falls apart. It’s disgusting to me that you can’t buy decent equipment. From someone that’s doing kickboxing casually you shouldn’t be buying gloves every couple of years. You should be able to only buy one or three pairs in a lifetime. People can get hurt. Is there anyone you would like to thank?

Zinkin Entertainment (my mananagement). They’re awesome. They’ve been taking care of me my whole career and taking care of a lot of us. I want to thank SCORE (Chiropractic) Clinic for keeping me together. I want people to check out my website www.jonfitch.net and my Youtube page, @OfficialJonFitch. They can keep up to date with what I’m doing and watch some of my goofy videos. Surprisingly, my most popular videos on there are the ones with my dog, my English bulldog, Bricks. FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011 | VINCITmagazine.com

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workout

Power of the Medicine Ball Side Throw by Timothy Chau

The ability to generate power in combat sport is vital. Power is

important because the ability to deliver an accurate punch to your opponent can mean knockout or a turning point in a fight. The

The weight of the medicine ball is dependent on the athlete’s weight and experience. Beginners should start with a light medicine ball. Heavier is not better. If the athletes struggle to throw the medicine ball then the ball is too heavy.

medicine ball is an excellent tool that is easy to learn. The medicine ball side throw is an effective way to develop rotational power and it

The velocity of the medicine ball training is the key.

is a sport specific exercise that can mimic the action of a punch. It can be done with a partner or against a wall. However, it is best to throw it against the wall to maximize the plyometric effects from the medicine ball.

The athlete should stand about one body length away from the wall and throw it as hard and explosively as they can. The distant from the wall is dependent on their power output, so the athletes can move closer or farther accordingly.

Starting Position - Stand with feet hip width apart with medicine ball in both hands. - Both knees and arm slightly bent

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VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011

- 1 kg – 4kg Medicine ball - 3-8 sets 5-10 reps -1-3 minute rest ( I usually pair this up with 2-3 other exercises, so by the time I’m done with the other exercises I can perform the medicine ball side throw again. - The velocity of the medicine ball training is the key. - The athlete should stand about one body length away from the wall and throw it as hard and explosively as they can. The distant from the wall is dependent on their power output, so the athletes can move closer or farther accordingly.

Execution - Throw the ball with maximum velocity against the wall by stepping with the lead leg and pivot the back foot. - It is important to throw with the hips and initiating the action from the back foot to generate power. - Follow through with your arms. - Catch the ball from the wall or partner and perform the movement again.


Bulgarian Split Squat The Bulgarian split squat was developed by Angel Spassov in the 1980’s. It is also known as the one-leg bench squat or Rear-Foot-Elevated Split squat (RFESS). It is an excellent exercise to help develop balance and leg strength. It primary targets the quadriceps, and glutes. The exercise can be performed by using bodyweight, dumbbells, kettlebells and barbells. In combat sports the majority of the time the athlete is in a split stance or is pushing off one leg to perform and action (kicking and punching), So it make sense to train that way and you can see the benefits of single leg exercise. Basic Guidelines - Week I 2-3 set 8 reps - Week II 3 sets 10 reps - Week III 3 sets 12 reps - For strength (3 sets 5 reps with weights) - Beginner should slowly progress by performing a bodyweight split squat then advance to the Bulgarian split squat. Exercise should be done with bodyweight first then add external load Coaching Cues - Abdominal tight - Glutes fire - Chest up

Starting Position

Execution

- Start by putting your rear foot on the bench - Hold the dumbbell by your side. - Chest up, abdominal tight and glutes fire.

- Start by lowering your body until the front thigh is parallel to the floor. - Keep body at an upright position while keeping the abdominal tight.

This information is for general information only, for more detailed information on these exercises please check with a professional certified trainer and training advice from your own doctor or any other health care professional. These exercises are recommendations only and are performed at your own risk. If you feel any discomfort during exercise, stop immediately.

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011 | VINCITmagazine.com

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K

VINCIT GIRL OF THE MONTH 20

VINCITmagazine.com | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011

photography by Justin Price


Kristie Brie Lawner

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2011 | VINCITmagazine.com

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vincit girl

KRISTIE BRIE LAWNER My name is Kriste Brie and I am a 20 year old native New Yorker who has been living in South Florida since I was 2 years old. Presently, I am finishing my second year of college majoring in fashion design and merchandising. My lifetime dream had always been to work with runway models designing their clothing and applying their makeup, until now. Just being in front of the camera and posing, reinforced my love of fashion and photography. My ultimate goal will be designing and wearing my own clothing line for all the world to see.

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V

VINCIT M AGAZINE . CO M SACRAMENTO

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SAN FRANCISCO

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LOS ANGELES


MEAL MENU

by Dr. Melissa Ponce, D.C.

Breakfast - Option 1: Poached Eggs with Asparagus and Roasted Tomatoes A handful of cherry tomatoes 5 trimmed asparagus 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil Sea salt and black pepper for flavor 2 large eggs 1 tbsp fresh thyme, chopped (for added flavor) 1. Heat oven to 425. Put tomatoes and asparagus in a baking dish and drizzle with oil, season with sea salt and pepper. Place in oven at 450 for 20 minutes. 2. While tomatoes are cooking, poach your eggs: boil 2 cups of water in a saucepan. Crack open your two eggs into the boiling water and allow them to cook for 4 to 5 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove eggs from water. 3. Serve eggs over roasted tomatoes and asparagus. Add sea salt for flavor as desired.

- Option 2: Healthy Scramble

- Option 3: Green Smoothie

3 eggs - whipped Handful of chopped broccoli 1 cup pico de gallo 1 chopped avocado ½ chopped yellow onion 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 cup kale, stems removed. ½ cup parsley leaves 1 granny smith apple 1 ripe banana, chopped 2 ¼ filtered water

1. Heat pan on medium high and coat with extra virgin olive oil. 2. Add onions to the pan and allow them to cook by themselves for 2 minutes. 3. Add in whipped eggs, pico de gallo and avocado. Stir the mixture until eggs are cooked (about 3-4 minutes). Sprinkle with sea salt to taste.

1. Combine all ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth. Add ice as desired. 2. If you prefer a more milky consistency, add Almond Milk as desired. With this breakfast option, be sure to add a handful of nuts to add protein and fats to your breakfast meal.

LUNCH - Option 1: Chicken Salad on a Bed of Spinach and Kale. 5 oz. chicken grilled chicken 1 cup spinach 1 cup chopped kale 4 brussel sprouts chopped Handful of sunflower seeds 2 tbsp olive oil 1 avocado, sliced Sea salt and black pepper for seasoning 2 tsp. Dijon mustard ½ lemon 1. In a cup mix 3 tbs. olive oil and 2 tsp Dijon mustard and squeeze juice from ½ lemon. Stir mixture together. 2. In a large salad bowl, add spinach, chopped kale, chopped brussel sprouts, sliced avocado and a handful of sunflower seeds. 3. Drizzle with your olive oil mixture. Season salad with sea salt and black pepper as desired. This salad is great to keep in the fridge and ration out over 2-3 days.

- Option 2: Salmon with Quinoa and Steamed Veggies ½ cup quinoa Sea salt 1 carrot, sliced 1 zucchini sliced 5-oz salmon fillet Sea salt 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1. Add quinoa, chopped carrots and zucchini into a small pot. Add water to fill 1 inch over the contents. Bring water to a boil and then lower heat to bring to a rolling boil. Once quinoa is cooked (about 20 minutes), remove from heat and strain any excess water out of mixture. 2. While the quinoa and veggie mixture is cooking, coat another pan with extra virgin olive oil. Season salmon fillet with sea salt and cook in pan over medium heat. Continue turning salmon every 3 minutes to ensure it cooks all the way through. 3. Serve cooked salmon over bed of quinoa and vegetables. Season with sea salt and black pepper as desired.

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- Option 3: Kale Turkey Wrap 6 slices of turkey Dijon mustard 3 slices of organic cheese (raw is best) 6 collard green leaves 1 sliced avocado 1. Lay 2 collard greens flat on top of each other. Place 2 slices of turkey on top of each leaf. 2. Dress with Dijon mustard 3. Add 1 slice of cheese and top with avocado slices. 4. Sprinkle with sea salt for added flavor. 5. Roll into a wrap and enjoy! Not enough? Healthy Sides: - Raw almond butter and sliced apples - Handful of raw nuts: almonds, sunflower seed, pumpkin seeds etc. (avoid peanuts) - Side of roasted potatoes or baked sweet potato. Add organic butter and season with sea salt or cinnamon. - Pitted avocado with mango salsa


dinner - Option 1: Grilled Beef Skewers with Grilled Zucchini and Brown rice. 1 cup brown rice 3 scallions 8oz. grass fed sirloin steak, cut into 1 ½ inch cubes 3 zucchinis sliced Sea salt and black pepper for flavor 1 lime cut into wedges Extra virgin olive oil 1. Cook brown rice in water until tender (about 45 minutes). Once cooked, stir in sliced scallions. 2. Preheat grill pan over medium heat and coat with olive oil. Thread beef on skewers and season with sea salt and pepper. Grill in pan until meat is cooked (about 6-8 minutes). 3. Serve over rice.

- Option 2: Beef Tacos 1 pound ground beef 1 can black or pinto beans Sea salt 1 cup water 1 sliced avocado ½ cup chopped kale or spinach Stone ground corn tortilla (buy as fresh as possible) Pico de gallo 1. Season ground beef as desired and cook in pan. 2. Cook black or pinto beans in 1 cup of water. Season with sea salt. 3. Wrap 3-5 corn tortillas in tin foil and place in oven at 350. Allow tortillas to warm for 5-10 minutes. 4. Assemble tacos: Place ground beef on corn tortillas. Add sliced avocados, kale or spinach and top with pico de gallo. Serve with a side of beans.

- Option 3: Black Rice Vegetable Warm Salad 1 chopped onion 2 tbsp organic butter (raw is preferable) 1 ½ cups black rice 1 cup quinoa 2 cups chopped mushroom 4 ½ cups organic vegetable broth ½ cup chopped parsley 1/3 cup pine nuts Sea salt and black pepper 1. Fill a large bowl with water and let black rice sit in water for at 15-20 minutes before cooking. 2. In the meantime, sauté the onion and carrot with butter for 4-5 minutes, or until onion is browned. Add mushrooms. 3. Strain rice and add to the sauté mixture. Pour vegetable stock in pan and add 1 tsp sea salt and a dash of pepper 4. Bring water to a boil and then lower to a simmer. Cover and let simmer for 1 hour. 5. After one hour, remove cover and add parsley and pine nuts. Salt to taste.


A Blast From the Past In the sport of boxing, unlike other sports, a top level performer can become old over-night. Their reflexes can disappear, feet become slower, and they also may not be able to take a punch like they once were. All signs of impending retirement. But on the rare occasion, these signs of slowing down can elude a fighter, allowing him to fight past his prime years, yet still compete at the highest level. A prime example of such an occasion occurred on December 11, 2010, when Bernard “The Executioner” Hopkins, a forty five year old, former undisputed champion, out of Philadelphia, PA, took on reining WBC Light-Heavyweight champion of the world, Jean Pascal, of Quebec, Canada. Despite fighting a younger, fresher, fighter in his home town, and after being dropped twice in the first three rounds, Hopkins was able to defy all odds, get stronger as the fight progressed, and fought back to a disputed draw – many boxing experts believed that he did enough to win the fight. Hopkins’ outing showed that despite being just four weeks shy of his fortysixth birthday, that this old dog still had some new fight left inside of him, and defied father time.

by Tommy Ruiz Art Work Design by Sundeep Sidhu

The fight started off with more action than many believed it would have. Hopkins, taking on the unusual role of aggressor, took the fight to the younger Pascal in the first round. However, with just ten seconds left, an even round quickly turned the way of Pascal, as he landed a disputed punch behind the head, sending Hopkins to the canvas for the first time in sixteen years. Round two and three were much of the same, with both fighters having their moments. Pascal bull-rushing in to catch Hopkins with wide punches, while the more tactical Hopkins, landed clean, crisp, punches. But in the third round, after an exchange on the ropes, Pascal caught Hopkins with a looping hook, sending him to the floor for a second time, extending his early lead. In spite of being dropped twice in the early rounds, Hopkins came out in round four and five looking to make up some lost ground. He applied pressure on Pascal, beat him to the punch, withstood mid-round flurries, and landed effective body punches. In the later part of round five, Hopkins was able to slow down the pace of the fight to better suit his counter punching style of boxing. Round six and seven showed a timid Pascal throwing far less punches than the older Hopkins. When Pascal did decide to throw, however, Hopkins’ head and feet movement created odd angles, causing him to miss many punches. On the other hand, Hopkins, once again created pressure, trapping Pascal along the ropes a few times, to land flurries. Round eight and nine showed Hopkins getting the better of Pascal through some exchanges. Although Pascal threw far more punches than in the previous two rounds, Hopkins’ punch output and movement still got the best of him, evening stunning Pascal briefly in round nine with a sneaky straight right punch. Round ten showed the best Pascal since round three, landing some flush punches on Hopkins. A couple of exchanges through the round created some excitement as the two fighters continued on to the championship rounds. Going into the championship rounds, Hopkins knew that he must come up big to complete his comeback from the two early knockdowns. In round eleven, his output was significantly higher than Pascal’s. Hopkins continued his body assault and got the better of Pascal. Hopkins jumped into the final round, starting off with a flurry and pushing Pascal to the ropes. Through the middle of the round he sustained his attack, throwing combinations and out-punching the faster Pascal, eating some counter punches in return. In the waning seconds of the final round, the older Hopkins and younger Pascal stood toe to toe in the middle of the ring in an attempt to land one final blow. The final scorecards read 114-112 in favor of Hopkins, and 113-113 and 114-114, resulting in a majority draw. Although Bernard Hopkins fell just short of becoming the oldest person to win a recognized world championship title, he showed the boxing world that a fighter can continue to fight past his “prime” years and still be successful. While this may not always be the case, this old warrior showed that there’s still some fight left inside him and fought with enough spirit to warrant a rematch.

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• Faster Reflexes • Improve Accuracy when Striking or Punching • Faster Response Time and Awareness in and outside the ring or cage • Improve Hand and Eye Coordination • Enhances Mental Focus and Alertness Created for all Athletes and Martial Arts Practitioners. Fight Smart and Efficiently so you will last longer in the Ring.

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