__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


Upcomming Events 2/2

2/14

POKER NIGHTÂ

WINE TASTING

A news article is on a well-defined topic or topics that are related.

2/19

A news article is on a well-defined topic or topics that are related.

2/15

WEEKEND CRUISE

VALENTINES DAY

A news article is on a well-defined topic or topics that are related.

A news article is on a well-defined topic or topics that are related.

2/22

2/27

BAKING CLASS

CRAFT NIGHT

A news article is on a well-defined topic or topics that are related.

A news article is on a well-defined topic or topics that are related.


tranquility rules BY SHARON FOX

Meditation allows for quiet reflection, a place to process these influential changes and move into a new stage of life with resiliency and grace, rather than defeat and stagnation. As you become more self-aware through the practice of meditation, you may find you’re better able to control your emotions and reactions—not that you won’t feel the pain or sting of loss, rejection, or disappointment, but that you’ll know better how to move forward once you’ve allowed yourself to freely experience the feelings around them.

The goal of meditation is a calm mind and body; however, any challenges you may have with being able to focus can produce the opposite effect. For those struggling to quiet the body and mind, following a specific script or model may be helpful. This one is adapted from Psychology Today:Think of a word that stirs a positive emotion for you—an emotion perhaps you’d like to feel during and after meditation—such as joy or peace.Picture that word in your mind. Spell it out on your arm with your fingertips. Tap out its syllables on the palm of your hand. Whatever helps you keep that word front and center, go with it.Think of that emotive word as a color, and picture it in that color. Then picture the backdrop to the word in another color.Keep writing the word in your head, one letter at a time, perhaps even saying the letters out loud in a soft voice..


The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), part of the National Institutes of Health, describes meditation practice as a “focus on the interactions among the brain, mind, body, and behavior.”As with anything new, your comfort and ease with meditation will grow with time and practice. Don’t get discouraged if you find that your mind and/or your body is distracted the first few times you meditate. Keep moving forward, even if you don’t feel any noticeable difference. As time goes on, these mindful moments will add up and eventually transform your restless mind and body into one at peace.

ENROLL NOW

First Month Free !


We’ve always asked a lot from our homes—to provide shelter, to reflect our personality, to offer financial security, to give a sense of belonging. That desire for a warm feeling has never been stronger than during the COVID19 pandemic. Right now, there is a collective aching for comfort, for soothing coping mechanisms to alleviate anxiety, grief, and overwhelming emotions wrought by the new coronavirus and its ripple effects through society: comfort baking, comfort shopping, eating comfort foods, and to find more comfort at home through the objects that surround us, like the textiles and décor.Creating a space that is truly comforting and soothing requires more than reaching for the quick fix of a cozy pillow and blanket, as helpful as they are; it’s about tapping into sensibilities that speak to our deepest and most essential needs on a physical and psychological level. Bring nature in, light a candle, cook something that smells good. The ritual of setting a beautiful table and having something nourishing is calming. It’s important to feel good about the pieces you invest in for your home so that they bring personal joy.

limitless expression.. YOUR OWN DESIGN MARC STEIN


SPACE AND EASE


AFFE CTÉ MAINS

STEAK & POTATOES A medium-rare steak with a side of potatoes

20

LAMB An oven-roasted lamb with a side of potatoes

20

GRILLED CHICKEN Grilled chicken breast in a creamy dill sauce

18

SALMON Baked 'til the skin is crispy, with dill sauce

15

RISSOTTO Orzo pasta in a thick wine reduction sauce

15

PLATTERS

CALAMARI Squid rings coated with breadcrumbs and fried

25

SHRIMP A large platter of shrimp served with garlic butter

20

HAYSTACK Shoestring fries topped with cheese and bacon

18

DESSERT

BROWNIE ALA MODE Decadent brownie topped with vanilla ice cream

10

12

A New Restaurant

CHOCOLATE CAKE A soft and moist cake with a caramel center

10

AFFECTE.COM

DATE PUDDING with butterscotch sauce and vanilla ice cream

AFFECTÉ


word games


BONJOUR DISCOVER THE TASTE OF HEALTHY ITALIAN CUISINE


It's not uncommon to come across two doctors who love to cook, but it may be a bit rare to find two physician chefs who are married to each other. Robert M. Sangrigoli, MD, and Renee Sangrigoli, MD, both Doylestown Health cardiologists , share an appetite for creating a variety of heart-healthy culinary dishes.Their interest in cooking began when they were children, growing up in houses filled with the smell of homemade Italian cooking. When they met in medical school, it was one of the things they had in common. "For us, our family and our heritage mean we see the kitchen as a place to congregate, to eat and to cook as a family," says Renee Sangrioli, MD.The couple love to cook Italian, but the high carbohydrates usually associated with the cuisine led them to alter the way they cook to make it healthier.

1Tips for Healthy Italian Cooking Eat less pasta (and smaller portions). Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables. Grill dishes when available. Use spices and herbs rather than salt and sugar. Eat fresh food and stay away from processed foods. Use seasonal ingredients. When cooking with oil, use good quality olive oil. Try to eat two servings of fish weekly. Use sauces in moderation. Dress your salad with balsamic vinegar and a little virgin olive oil.


MARTIN AND LAURA STAYING FIT AND ENJOYING EVERY MINUTE


Dancing Away By Jesse Davis Most adults are well aware of the physical and mental health benefits of exercise and understand the importance of engaging in some form of regular physical activity. As the United States copes with the new coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, business closures, social distancing, and changes in everyday schedules are disrupting just about every aspect of ordinary life — and exercise routines are no exception. Finally, if you prefer group activities or exercise variety, the internet is overflowing now with free exercise classes and instructional videos. Try a dance video if you feel vigorous and coordinated, or tai chi for something gentler. You’ll love incorporating your personal style. Nowadays with Covid people, should do some type of aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes every day, according to FamilyDoctor.org. Dance exercise is an aerobic activity that burn calories, works the heart muscle and is appropriate for any age and level of fitness. Dance requires constant movement at your own pace, which elevates the heart rate to pump oxygen faster through your blood. This is what makes it aerobic, or cardiovascular. Doing aerobics five to six days a week can help improve your energy levels, reduces risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes, strengthens your heart and improves your overall mood. The American Council on Exercise suggests that dancing for aerobic fitness also can help improve your memory. Dance exercise is an aerobic activity that burn calories, works the heart muscle and is appropriate for any age and level of fitness. Dance requires constant movement at your own pace, which elevates the heart rate to pump oxygen faster through your blood. This is what makes it aerobic, or cardiovascular. Doing aerobics five to six days a week can help improve your energy levels, reduces risk of high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes, strengthens your heart and improves your overall mood. The American Council on Exercise suggests that dancing for aerobic fitness also can help improve your memory.

Dance exercise also can be effective physical therapy. Dance therapy improves gait, overall balance, stamina and walking speed which aids and benefits our day to day activity. There are a wide variety of dance exercise programs for all ages and skill levels, but many people are afraid to try it, thinking you have to know how to dance prior to taking a class. Most dance exercise classes require no formal training and are taught in a way that anyone can do it. Many dance exercise classes offer a trail class to see if it is right for you. Prior to trying the class talk to the teacher about any concerns you may have. Many agree that dancing is an incredible way to reduce stress and boost your mood—which we could all use right now. Not only is dancing a fantastic way to improve your level of fitness and cardiovascular stamina, but it also can provide a sense of community and encouragement. Learning a new dance routine and getting better with each step gives us something to look forward to. We've rounded up 3 of the best online dance classes you can try at home. 305 Fitness: This all-levels dance cardio fitness class feels like an ‘80s-style aerobic workout. Head over to YouTube for free live and recorded classes with themes like throwback Thursday and country hoedown. Gaga: Get in touch with your creative side with the improvisation-based movement language developed by Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin. Taught by certified Gaga teachers, classes are offered six times a day, seven days a week via Zoom. Suggested donation is $5 a class. Steezy Studio: Live out your commercial dance dreams with the online dance platform that aims to be the Netflix of dance classes. For $20 a month, Steezy Studio offers hundreds of class videos in styles including hip-hop, krump, dance hall and house. Levels range from beginner to advanced. And don’t forget: There’s no need to take class to dance. Just turn on your favorite music and jam out in the living room. It’s a great way to relieve stress and anxiety, and make lasting memories.


People are aware that cognitive skills decline with aging and are eager to find things that might help stave off this natural process. At first, the changes are subtle: it gets a little harder to tune out distractions or keep up with the rapid-fire chatter of young children. Then, maybe names start to slip away, or it becomes difficult to hold a phone number in mind when making a call. These changes, starting in the late 40s and early 50s, are a normal part of aging. Historically, people have used several games from Sudoku to crosswords — to try to boost their cognitive abilities. Even Mark Twain wasn’t impervious to their appeal. He created his own memory builder trivia game while writing The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The digital brain game industry has only grown exponentially since then. It earned more than $1 billion in 2012 and is estimated to reach $6 billion by 2020, according to a rreport by the market research firm Sharp Brains.

A 2019 report from The Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study revealed that training to boost processing speed reduced older adults’ odds of developing dementia 10 years later. Participants who underwent the training, which involved identifying images that flashed briefly on a computer screen, cut their risk for developing dementia by 29 percent. Adults who received other types of brain training, such as training to boost memory or improve reasoning skills, experienced a much smaller reduction in dementia risk. Scientists have started looking at how a multidimensional approach may better support brain health. There’s already some evidence suggesting physical exercise helps maintain mental skills, as does improving sleep quality, reducing stress, and spending time doing social activities like playing cards with friends, or even dancing. A lot of this is still just correlational in nature. But it does provide ideas for things we can explore in the future that might improve cognition.


EVERYDAY OUTINGS GETTING OUTSIDE CAN HELP YOUR OUTLOOK

While we continue to practice physical distancing to keep each other safe during the pandemic, many of our usual stress-relief outlets like going to the gym, getting a massage or hanging out with friends are not available to us right now. Fortunately, we can still get outside and there is health benefit for us there. Take time during a walk or run to notice the sounds and smells around you. Pay attention to the colors and textures; notice what is blooming today, or how the sun glints on some trees while casting others in shadow. If you find that parks and trails are not a viable option right now, consider the world just beyond your door. Some of the best sources for nature experiences are close at hand, such as the backyard for bird watching and gardening.

Consider how you feel when you witness an inspiring sunrise or sunset to start or close the day. Recall the refreshing sensation of stepping outdoors and breathing in fresh air. Encounters with nature — wildlife, trees, mountains, bodies of water, even neighborhood gardens — can offer solace from stress. Studies have indicated that exposure to direct sunlight or a reduction in levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Lower levels of cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline have been shown to boost immunity and improve mood. It is also associated with a lower heart rate, lower blood pressure and improved sleep. Maybe you’ll discover its the best medicine for you.


Profile for theMHCmag

MHC magazine  

MHC magazine  

Advertisement