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Northeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (NEAMAP)

Mid-Atlantic Nearshore Trawl Program

Progress Report: Fall 2007 Survey Data Summary

20 March 2008

Submitted to: Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Washington, DC

By: Christopher F. Bonzek James Gartland J. David Lange Robert J. Latour, Ph.D.

Department of Fisheries Science Virginia Institute of Marine Science College of William and Mary Gloucester Point, VA


NEAMAP ASMFC Progress Report I.

Project Title: Data collection and analysis in support of multispecies stock assessments in the mid-Atlantic: Northeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program Nearshore Trawl Program.

II.

Grantee State and Contact Name: Virginia/Virginia Institute of Marine Science – Christopher F. Bonzek

III.

Project Period: 1 August 2005 – 31 May 2009 Reporting Period: 1 August 2007 – 31 January 2008

IV.

Project Description: This is a new fisheries-independent bottom trawl survey operating in the near coastal ocean waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The survey is an element of the ASMFC Northeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (NEAMAP) and is designed to sample fishes and invertebrates from coastal waters bounded by the 20ft.and 60ft. depth contours between Montauk, New York and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and waters between the 60ft.and 120ft. depth contours in Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound using a bottom trawl. The main objective of the survey is the estimation of biomass, length and age structures, various other assessment related parameters and diet compositions of select finfishes inhabiting the area.

V.

Project Summary/Accomplishments: The fall 2007 survey was successfully completed during a research cruise which occurred between 27 September and 20 October 2007. A total of 150 stations, the target number, were sampled. About 1.1 million individual fishes weighing almost 50,000kg and representing about 130 species (including selected invertebrates which where processed similarly to fishes) were captured. Individual length measurements were recorded for over 73,000 specimens. Lab processing is proceeding on the 5,150 otoliths and 3,905 stomach samples which were collected (2,433 otoliths and 1,930 stomachs have been fully processed as of the date of this report). A full report is attached to this standard project summary.

VI.

Challenges/Changes: Beyond completion of laboratory samples, no significant challenges remain for this contract segment.

VII.

Participants: Primary program personnel remain unchanged.

VIII. Quality Assurance: Previous progress reports provided brief descriptions of quality assurance procedures in selecting fishing gear, conducting fishing operations, and processing the catch. These are interwoven into the attached report as well. Data collected during the survey have been processed through several data quality checks which were previously developed for other survey work and new checks developed specifically for NEAMAP. IX.

Funding Status: Expenditures have been generally in line with expectations. We anticipate sufficient funds will be available until Research Set Aside Program funds are dispersed later in 2008.

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X.

Future Activities: The future of this program is dependent upon continued funding. We anticipate sufficient funds to complete both the spring and fall 2008 cruises.

XI.

Presentations/Public Outreach: Since completion of field sampling, presentations of survey results have been (or will be) made as follows: • • • • • • •

February 2008: Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council February 2008: Cape May NJ Party and Charter Boat Association February 2008: NMFS NEFSC Trawl Advisory Panel February 2008: Bass Pro Shops Fishing Classic (Hampton, VA), Booth exhibit March 2008: NEAMAP Operations Committee March 2008: NEAMAP Board April 2008: New England Fishery Management Council

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Introduction Concerns regarding the status of fishery-independent data collection from the continental shelf waters between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and the U.S. / Canadian border led the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission’s (ASMFC) Management and Science Committee (MSC) to draft a resolution in 1997 calling for the formation the Northeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (NEAMAP) (ASMFC 2002). NEAMAP is a cooperative state-federal program modeled after the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP), which had been coordinating fishery-independent data collection south of Cape Hatteras since the mid-1980s (Rester 2001). The four main goals of this new program directly address the deficiencies noted by the MSC for this region and include 1) developing fishery-independent surveys where current sampling is either inadequate or absent 2) coordinating data collection amongst existing surveys as well as any new surveys 3) providing for efficient management and dissemination of data and 4) establishing outreach programs (ASMFC 2002). The NEAMAP Memorandum of Understanding was signed by all partner agencies by July 2004. One of the first major efforts of the NEAMAP was to design a trawl survey intended to operate in the coastal zone of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB - i.e., Montauk, New York to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina). While the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Northeast Fisheries Science Center’s (NEFSC) bottom trawl survey has been sampling from Cape Hatteras to the U.S. / Canadian border in waters less than 91.4m since 1963, few stations are sampled in waters less than 27.4m due to the sizes of the sampling area and vessels (NEFSC 1988, R. Brown, NMFS, pers. comm). In addition, of the six coastal states in the MAB, only New Jersey conducts a fishery-independent trawl survey in its coastal zone (Byrne 2004). This new NEAMAP Inshore Trawl Survey is intended to fill the aforementioned gap in fisheryindependent survey coverage, which is consistent with the program goals. In early 2005, the ASMFC made $250,000 of “plus-up” funds that it had received through the Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act (ACFCMA) available for pilot work in an effort to assess the viability of the NEAMAP Inshore Trawl Survey. The Virginia Institute of Marine Science provided the sole response to the Commission’s request for proposals and was awarded the funding in August 2005. Two brief pre-pilot cruises and the full pilot cruise were conducted in 2006 (Bonzek et al., 2007). Early in 2007 ASMFC bundled funds from a combination of sources which were sufficient to begin full scale sampling operations in the fall of 2007. This report summarizes results from the fall 2007 cruise. Two significant changes to the area sampled by the NEAMAP Nearshore Trawl Program occurred prior to the fall 2007 cruise: • In 2007 NEFSC took delivery of the FSV Henry B. Bigelow, began preliminary sampling operations, and determined that the vessel could safely operate in waters as shallow as 18.3m. NEFSC then made a determination that future surveys would likely extend inshore to that depth contour (R. Brown, NMFS, pers. comm.). The NEAMAP Operations Committee subsequently decided that the offshore boundary of the NEAMAP survey coastal sampling (i.e., Montauk to Cape Hatteras) should be realigned to coincide

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with the inshore boundary of the NEFSC survey, and that NEAMAP should discontinue sampling between the 18.3m and 27.4m contours along the coast. NEFSC contributed significant funds toward NEAMAP full implementation with the provision that the additional under-sampled areas of Block Island Sound and Rhode Island Sound be added to the NEAMAP sampling area. These areas are deeper than other NEAMAP regions but from a ‘distance from shore’ standpoint are within the range covered by NEAMAP in other states.

Methods Station Selection Primary consideration in regards to survey stratification was consistency with the NMFS bottom trawl surveys. However, those surveys will be redesigned and re-stratified for 2009 (and beyond) and so re-stratification for the inshore NEAMAP areas was open for consideration as well. Examination of existing NMFS strata revealed that the major divisions among survey areas (latitudinal divisions from New Jersey to the south, longitudinal divisions off Long Island) generally corresponded well with major estuarine outflow areas. Therefore these boundary definitions, with minor modifications so that regional boundaries would more closely correspond to state borders, were used for the NEAMAP survey. However, examination of the current NMFS depth stratum definitions reveals that in some areas (primarily off the southern states) current stratum boundaries do not correspond well to actual depth contours. Depth stratum assignments were redrawn using depth sounding data from the National Ocean Service using depth strata 20ft.-40ft. and 40ft.-60ft. Finally, each stratum was subdivided into a grid pattern of potential sampling locations, with each cell measuring 1.5 x 1.5 minutes (2.25sq. nm). The number of stations (cells) selected for each stratum was assigned by proportional sampling according to surface area within the stratum, with a minimum of two stations per stratum. During the pilot cruise, an equal number of stations was selected for each depth stratum within a particular region. This assured that sufficient sampling occurred in the small, shallow strata closest to shore. As the large offshore (60ft. – 90ft.) strata were not sampled in the fall of 2007, this procedure was no longer required and straight proportional sampling was implemented. Species Priority Lists During the survey design phase, the NEAMAP Operations Committee developed a set of species priority lists. Priority ‘A’ species were to be subjected to the full processing procedure (see Procedures at Each Station below) at each station in which they were collected. Compared to the list used for the 2006 pilot survey, several Priority ‘A’ species were added due to the expanded survey area (should lead to collections of additional species of management importance) and the requests of the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council. Priority ‘B’ species were to be sampled for full processing as time allowed. Priority ‘C’ species would only be taken for full processing if sampling of A and B species would not be affected. These three categories might be summarized as ‘must have’ ‘great to have’ and ‘nice to have,’ respectively. All other species (here called Priority ‘D’) were to have aggregate weights recorded and all or an appreciable subsample to be measured. A fifth category (‘E’) was later defined, including

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species which required special handling. This category included sharks (other than dogfish) and sturgeon, which were measured, tagged, and released; and selected invertebrates which were processed similarly to Priority D fish species. Species included in categories A-C are presented below (Table 1). Table 1. Species priority lists (categories A-C only). A LIST

Atlantic Cod Black Sea Bass Bluefish Butterfish Haddock Pollock Scup Silver Hake Striped Bass Summer Flounder Weakfish Winter Founder American Shad Atlantic Menhaden Atlantic Croaker Monkfish Skate and Ray Species Smooth Dogfish Spiny Dogfish Spot Yellowtail Flounder

Alewife Atlantic Herring Atlantic Mackerel Black Drum Blueback Herring Red Drum Speckled Trout Tautog

Gadus morhua Centropristis striata Pomatomus saltatrix Peprilus triacanthus Melanogrammus aeglefinus Pollachius virens Stenotomus chrysops Merluccius bilinearis Morone saxatilis Paralichthys dentatus Cynoscion regalis Pleuronectes americanus B LIST Alosa sapidissima Brevoortia tyrannus Micropogonias undulatus Lophius americanus Mustelus canis Squalus acanthias Leiostomus xanthurus Limanda ferruginea C LIST Alosa pseudoharengus Clupea harengus Scomber scombrus Pogonias cromis Alosa aestivalis Sciaenops ocellatus Cynoscion nebulosus Tautoga onitis

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Gear Performance Wingspread, doorspread, and headrope height were measured on each tow during the fall 2007 cruise using a digital Netmind Trawl Monitoring System. Wingspread sensors were positioned on the middle net ‘jib’ in accordance with NFMS procedures. The headrope sensor was mounted at the midpoint of the headrope. A catch sensor was mounted in the cod-end, set to signal when the catch reached roughly 5,000lbs. GPS coordinates and vessel speed were recorded every 60 seconds using the ship’s chartplotting software. These data can be used to plot tow tracks for each station. The same computer used to record Netmind readings was also employed to plot station locations (and the corners of each sampling cell) and to run the countdown clock for each tow. Procedures at Each Station All fishing operations were conducted during daylight hours. Each tow was 20 minutes in duration with a target tow speed of between 2.9 and 3.3 knots. No tows were truncated due to known hangs in the tow path, surface traffic etc. One tow was terminated at 15 minutes due to an anticipated (and realized – 6,400kg) large catch, as indicated by triggering of the catch sensor midway through the tow. At each station several standard parameters were recorded. These included: • All necessary station identification parameters (date, station number, stratum, depth). • All necessary vessel operation parameters (beginning and ending GPS position, beginning and ending tow times, compass course, engine RPMs). • All necessary gear identification and operational parameters (net type code and net number, door type code and door numbers, amount of cable deployed). • Atmospheric and weather data (air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, general weather state, sea state, barometric pressure). • Hydrographic data at the surface and at the bottom (water temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen). Upon arrival near a sampling cell, the Captain and Chief Scientist jointly determined the desired starting point and tow path. Flexibility was allowed with regard to these parameters such that a clear tow could be accomplished while staying within the boundaries of the defined cell. Hydrographic data were taken prior to the beginning of each tow, except rarely when taking these readings would have delayed the tow until after sunset; in these cases hydrographic data were recorded at the completion of the tow. Vessel crew were responsible for all aspects of deployment and retrieval of the fishing gear. Due to the relatively shallow waters, 75fm. or less of warp was set out at all stations. One scientist was present in the wheelhouse during deployment and retrieval. The Captain signaled when the gear was fully set (winch brakes engaged), at which time the Netmind software and the countdown clock were both activated. At the conclusion of each tow, the scientist signaled the Captain when the clock reached zero, haulback commenced, and the Netmind recording software was stopped. Vessel crew dumped the catch into one of two enclosed locations on deck for sorting.

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The catch was sorted by species and modal size group. Aggregate biomass (kg) was measured for each species-size group combination. For priority A species, and often for priority B and C species, a subsample of five individuals from each group was selected for full processing (see next paragraph). For certain common priority B species including spot (Leiostomus xanthurus), Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus), skates, rays, and dogfish only three individuals per group were sampled for full laboratory processing. Data collected from each subsampled specimen included length (to the nearest millimeter), total and eviscerated weight (measured in grams, accuracy depended upon the balance on which individuals were measured), and macroscopic sex and maturity stage (immature, mature-resting, mature-ripe, mature-spent) determination. Stomachs were removed (except for spot and butterfish, for which previous sampling indicated that little useful data could be obtained from the stomach contents) and those containing prey items were preserved for subsequent examination. Otoliths or other appropriate ageing structures were removed from each subsampled specimen for later age determination. All specimens not selected for the complete processing were weighed (aggregate weight), and individual length measurements were recorded for either all or a large proportion, in accordance with approved subsampling procedures when necessary. Laboratory Methods Otoliths (or, depending upon the species, other appropriate ageing structures) were (and are being) prepared according to methodology established for other VIMS surveys. One otolith was selected and mounted on a piece of 100 weight paper with a thin layer of Crystal Bond. A thin transverse section was cut through the nucleus of the otolith using two Buehler diamond wafering blades and a low speed Isomet saw. The section was then mounted on a glass slide and covered with Crystal Bond. If necessary, the section was wet-sanded to an appropriate thickness before being covered with Crystal Bond. Some smaller, fragile otoliths were read whole. Both sectioned and whole otoliths were most commonly read using transmitted light under a dissecting microscope. Age was determined as the mode of three independent readings, one by each of three readers. Stomach samples were (and are being) analyzed according to standard procedures (Hyslop 1980). Prey were identified to the lowest possible taxon. Experienced laboratory personnel are able to process, on average, approximately 30 to 40 stomachs per person per day. Analytical Methods (Abundance) Estimates of abundance are expressed in terms of minimum trawlable number or biomass according to the general formula: cA , N= a

(1)

where N is the minimum number (or biomass) of fish present within the sampling area that are susceptible to the sampling gear, c is the mean number (or weight) of fish captured per tow, a is the area swept by one trawl tow, and A is the total survey area. Specifically, abundance was calculated in accordance with standard stratified random sampling:

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n

s Nˆ = ∑ As Nˆ s ,

(2)

s =1

where As is the area of stratum s, ns is the total number of strata in which striped bass were ˆ captured, and N s is an estimate of the mean area-swept catch in stratum s given by: nt ,s

Nˆ s =

∑ aˆ

ci

i =1

nt , s

i

,

(3)

In equation (3), ci and aˆi represent the catch (number or weight) and an estimate of the trawl area-swept at sampling location i, respectively, and nt,s is the number of tows in stratum s. Note that the ai estimates were calculated using vessel GPS data for distance towed and net mensuration gear for measurements of net opening (an average value was calculated from the measurements taken during each tow). As no correction is made for gear efficiency these estimates represent the minimum number (or biomass) of fish present within the sampling area that are susceptible to the sampling gear. This method produces estimates of abundance for each stratum, which are totaled to produce estimates for the entire survey area. As regional stratum boundaries were drawn to generally correspond with state borders, estimates of abundance (and certain other stock parameters) can be produced on a state-specific basis. While usually not biologically meaningful, for some parameters it was considered worthwhile to present results in this way due to the potential usefulness for fishery managers. Analytical Methods (Sex Ratios) Sex ratios were determined by summation of data from fully processed specimens. For this and several other stock parameters, data from fully processed specimens are expanded to the entire sample (i.e., catch level) for parameter estimation. Because workup procedures result in differential subsampling rates among size groups, failure to account for such factors would bias resulting stock parameter estimates. In the NEAMAP database each specimen has a calculated expansion factor associated with it which represents the number of fish that the specimen represents in the total sample for that station. Analytical Methods (Length Frequency) Length frequency histograms were designed using 10mm bins and the expansion factors as previously described. Length bins were identified using the bin midpoint (e.g. the 250mm bin represents individuals between 245mm and 254mm). Analytical Methods (Length-Weight Regressions) Power regressions for length-weight relationships were calculated and plotted by sex as well as both sexes combined. No tests for differences in growth by sex were performed. No expansion factors were used in these calculations as they do not depend on subsampling rates.

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Analytical Methods (Maturity Regressions) Logistic regressions were calculated and plotted separately for males and females. No expansion factors were used in these calculations as they do not depend on subsampling rates. Analytical Methods (Diets) Diets for each species were determined by estimating the mean proportional contribution of prey type (k) to predator (x) by weight or number (Wk,x) using the following equation: n

Wk , x =

∑M i =1

i,x

qi ,k , x ,

n

∑M i =1

(4)

i,x

where

qi ,k , x =

wi ,k , x wi , x

,

(5)

where Mi,x is the number of predator x captured at station i, wi,k,x is the total weight (or number) of prey type k encountered in the stomachs of predator x collected at station i, and wi,x is the total weight (or number) of all prey items encountered in these stomachs (Buckel et al. 1999). This cluster sampling estimator was used since trawl collections yield a cluster of each predator at each station. Results Gear Performance As was the case during the pilot survey and prior work, the 4-seam net performed consistently within the expected parameters (Figure 1). The addition of doorspread sensors provided valuable supplementary information. Mounting these sensors onto the relatively small trawl doors however (Figure 2), decreased the efficiency (i.e., spreading power) of the doors, and early in the cruise wingspread measurements were 1-2m less than previously achieved. Slight modifications to the warp and backstrap attachment points on the doors, combined with additional scope, brought the net back within specifications and provided the expected door spread measurements. Discounting the early stations at which the gear was slightly underspread, there did not appear to be an increasing trend in either the doorspread or wingspread measurements as was observed in the 2006 pilot survey. The same net was used for the fall 2007 survey as was used for the pilot survey. We will monitor whether this phenomenon appears in future surveys using new nets. No major gear damage occurred during the survey.

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Stations Sampled Based on a specified sampling rate of one station per 30sq.nm, the target number of stations to be sampled was 150 for the entire sampling area (1,938 cells x 2.25sq.mi. per cell / 30 stations per sq.nm. = 145 stations) and 150 stations were successfully occupied. The number of stations available and the number sampled in each stratum is given (Table 2). Of the 150 stations sampled, 129 were sampled within the specified primary sampling cell and 21 were chosen from the available randomly selected alternate sites, due to issues such as known hangs or other obstructions, fixed gear, or vessel traffic. One extra station was occupied in Region 12 (Virginia) to make up for one station not sampled in BI Sound (data from this station were assigned to Region 12, not to BI Sound). The highest number of alternate stations occupied was in BI Sound (2 out of 10) and RI Sound (7 out of 17) due to a high degree of caution, to unfamiliarity with the area, and to a relatively small number of towable locations in this area. For future surveys we anticipate obtaining a better sample of known towable locations through cooperation with local industry representatives. A region-by-region summary of these results is presented (Table 3). Maps comparing selected and actual stations sampled are shown (Figure 3).

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Table 2. Number of available sample cells and number sampled in each stratum. Region

State*

Stations Sampled 20ft.-40ft. Stations sampled

40ft. – 60ft.

Total cells

Stations sampled

Total cells

Stations sampled

Total cells

Stations sampled

Total cells

Stations per sq. nm.

60ft. – 90ft.

90ft. – 120ft.

RI Sound

RI

6

85

11

161

32.6

BI Sound

RI

4

42

5

88

32.5

1

NY

0

0

2

19

21.4

2

NY

2

8

3

19

12.2

3

NY

2

16

3

28

19.8

4

NY

2

16

3

29

20.3

5

NY

2

27

3

45

32.4

6

NJ

2

20

3

42

27.9

7

NJ

4

49

6

97

32.9

8

NJ

2

32

7

90

30.5

9

DE

4

53

8

113

31.1

10

MD

2

33

8

114

33.1

11

VA

5

62

9

122

29.6

12

VA

5

60

6

67

26.0

13

VA

7

94

11

142

29.5

14

NC

2

24

5

61

27.3

15

NC

2

25

4

55

43

519

81

1043

Total

30.0 10

127

16

249

29.1

* Note that region boundaries are not perfectly aligned with all state boundaries: • Some stations in RI Sound may occur in MA • Some stations in BI Sound may occur in NY • Region 5 spans the NY-NJ Harbor area • Some stations in Region 9 may occur in NJ

Table 3. Number of primary and alternate stations occupied in each region. Region

Primary Alternate Total Region Primary Alternate Stations Stations Stations Stations 10 7 17 8 1 RI Sound 8 7 2* 9 11 1 BI Sound 9 1 1 2 10 0 1 10 4 1 5 13 1 2 11 5 0 5 9 2* 3 12 5 0 5 15 3 4 13 5 0 5 7 0 5 14 4 1 5 5 1 6 15 10 0 10 7 Total 129 21 * One planned station in BI Sound was not sampled; an extra station was occupied in Region 12.

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Total 9 12 10 14 11 18 7 6 150


On the 17 full sampling days (i.e., no long steam times or port calls), an average of 7.9 stations per day were sampled. Counting all 24 days at sea, including transit days and partial sampling days, the number of stations averaged 6.25. Day-by-day vessel activities and work schedules are presented (Table 4). Table 4. Summary of activities conducted during each day at sea during the fall 2007 NEAMAP cruise. Hours Worked and Stations Sampled Each Day

Date 24-Sep 25-Sep 26-Sep 27-Sep 28-Sep 29-Sep 30-Sep 1-Oct 2-Oct 3-Oct 4-Oct 5-Oct 6-Oct 7-Oct 8-Oct 9-Oct 10-Oct 11-Oct 12-Oct 13-Oct 14-Oct 15-Oct 16-Oct 17-Oct 18-Oct 19-Oct 20-Oct 21-Oct

12: 6: 00 00 AM AM Final Survey Preparations Steaming Day - Hampton to Montauk Steaming Day - Hampton to Montauk

Time of Day 12: 00 PM

Crew Change / Survey Demo. Montauk

Survey Demo. Cape May

No Fishing / Crew Change and Resupply in Hampton No Fishing / Crew Change and Resupply in Hampton

Survey Finished

6: 00 PM

11: 00 No. PM Station 0 0 0 7 7 7 7 6 2 7 8 9 10 10 2 9 9 7 9 6 0 0 1 7 7 8 4 0

= Fishing hours = Personnel hours

Catch Summary A total of 1,101,152 specimens weighing 49,868kg were collected during the fall 2007 survey. A total of 73,473 individuals were measured (laying all individuals head-to-tail 11,465m, or 7.1miles, of fish were measured). Of those specimens taken for full workup, 5,150 otoliths (or other ageing structures) were taken and 3,905 full stomachs were preserved for later analysis. On average at each station, 7,132 (range 75 – 151,598) specimens were captured (Figure 4) weighing 332kg (range 7.4kg – 6,396kg) (Figure 5), 490 specimens were measured (range 57 – 1,394), and 34 specimens were processed for the full workup (range 4 – 77). At each station, an average of 20.4 species was captured (range 7 – 36) (Figure 6). The number of specimens processed for each species, separately for each priority category, is summarized in Table 5.

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Species Data Summaries Several graphical data summaries are shown for each species (Figures 7-173). Species are organized alphabetically. For priority A species, most or all of the following figures are presented (at the time of report preparation 2,433 otoliths and 1,930 stomachs for priority A species have been analyzed): • Distribution maps showing catch rates by number and biomass for all stations. • Bar graphs showing the minimum trawlable number (MTN) and biomass (MTB) by state, annotated with estimates of the overall MTN and MTB and percent standard error for each. • Length-frequency histograms annotated with the total number of specimens captured and measured and the number of otoliths and stomachs removed for processing. • Length-frequency histograms by age. • Histograms of sex ratio by state, and for species with adequate sample size, by size groups, annotated with the number of specimens examined. • Logistic regressions for maturity, by sex, annotated with sizes at 50% and 99% maturity. • von Bertalanffy growth regressions, by sex if appropriate. • Age distribution graphs (ageing has been completed only for black sea bass, scup, summer flounder, weakfish, and striped bass (not shown) ) shown with the total number of specimens by age if all specimens had been aged. • Length-weight power regressions for sexes combined and separately. • Diet compositions by weight and number, with prey types separated into broad taxonomic groups, annotated with the number of stomachs analyzed. These data summaries are numbered as follows: • Black seabass – Figures 33-42. • Bluefish – Figures 43-49. • Butterfish – Figures 59-64. • Scup – Figures 96-105. • Silver hake – Figures 106-111. • Summer flounder – Figures 139-148. • Weakfish – Figures 149-158. • Winter flounder – Figures 159-168.

For priority B species, some or all of the following data summaries are presented: • Distribution maps showing catch rates by number and biomass for all stations. • Bar graphs showing the MTN and MTB by state, annotated with estimates of the overall MTN and MTB and percent standard error for each. • Length-frequency histograms annotated with the total number of specimens captured and measured and the number of otoliths (or vertebrae for elasmobranchs) and stomachs removed for processing. • Histograms of sex ratio by state, and for species with adequate sample size, by size groups, annotated with the number of specimens examined. • Logistic regressions for maturity, by sex, annotated with sizes at 50% and 99% maturity.

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Length-weight power regressions for sexes combined and separately.

These data summaries are numbered as follows: • Atlantic croaker – Figures 12-17. • Atlantic menhaden – Figures 18-23. • Bluntnose stingray – Figures 50-52. • Bullnose ray – Figures 56-58. • Clearnose skate – Figures 65-70. • Cownose ray – Figures 71-73. • Little skate – Figures 82-86. • Smooth butterfly ray – Figures 115-117. • Smooth dogfish – Figures 118-123. • Spot – Figures 127-132. • Winter skate – Figures 169-173. No Priority C species were captured in sufficient numbers to allow meaningful data summaries to be presented. Several other species were captured in significant numbers as well (labeled as Priority D in Table 5). Data summaries for these species that are shown are: • Distribution maps showing catch rates by number and biomass for all stations. • Bar graphs showing the MTN and MTB by state, annotated with estimates of the overall MTN and MTB and percent standard error for each. • Length-frequency histograms annotated with the total number of specimens captured and measured. These data summaries are numbered as follows: • Atlantic spadefish – Figures 24-26. • Atlantic thread herring – Figures 27-29. • Bay anchovy – Figures 30-32. • Kingfish spp. – Figures 79-81. • Northern searobin – Figures 90-92. • Pinfish – Figures 93-95. • Silver perch – Figures 112-114. • Spanish mackerel – Figures 124-126. • Striped anchovy – Figures 133-135. • Striped searobin – Figures 136-138. Finally, several invertebrate species (or species groups) and selected sharks were captured in sufficient numbers to be of note (described as Priority D species in Table 5). Data summaries for these species that are shown are: • Distribution maps showing catch rates by number and biomass for all stations. • Bar graphs showing the MTN and MTB by state, annotated with estimates of the overall MTN and MTB and percent standard error for each.

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• • •

Length-frequency histograms annotated with the total number of specimens captured and measured. Histograms of sex ratio by state, annotated with the number of specimens examined (horseshoe crab only). Length-weight power regressions for sexes combined and separately (horseshoe crab only).

These data summaries are numbered as follows: • American lobster – Figures 7-11. • Brown shrimp – Figures 53-55. • Horseshoe crab – Figures 74-78. • Loligo squid – Figures 87-89.

Literature Cited Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC). 2002. Development of a Cooperative State/Federal Fisheries Independent Sampling Program. ASMFC Document, Washington, DC. Bonzek, C.F., J. Gartland, R.J. Latour. 2007. Northeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (NEAMAP) Mid-Atlantic Nearshore Trawl Program Pilot Survey Completion Report. ASMFC. 97pp. Byrne, Don. 2004. Counting the fish in the ocean. Online. Internet. <http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/artoceancount.htm> Hyslop, E. J. 1980. Stomach contents analysis – a review of methods and their application. Journal of Fish Biology 17:411-429. NEFC. 1988. An evaluation of the bottom trawl survey program of the Northeast Fisheries Center. NOAA Tech. Memo. NMFS-F/NEC-52, p. 83. Rester, J.K. 2001. Annual report to the Technical Coordinating Committee Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission. Report of the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) to the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, Ocean Springs, Mississippi.

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Table 5. Number of specimens captured and measured and number of otoliths (or other hard parts) and stomachs sampled, by species priority level.

Species black seabass bluefish butterfish scup silver hake (whiting) striped bass summer flounder weakfish winter flounder

Species American shad Atlantic croaker Atlantic menhaden Atlantic torpedo bluntnose stingray bullnose ray clearnose skate cownose ray Leucoraja spp. little skate monkfish roughtail stingray skate spp. smooth butterfly ray smooth dogfish southern stingray spiny butterfly ray spiny dogfish spot winter skate yellowtail flounder

Species alewife Atlantic herring Atlantic mackerel black drum blueback herring red drum tautog

Priority A Species Total Total Number Species Number Caught Weight (kg) Measured 401 85.3 401 4,635 394.5 2,613 148,182 1,904.9 6,015 276,234 3,928.7 13,718 346 24.8 346 17 66.3 17 960 625.5 926 60,990 4,168.1 5,747 391 98.7 391 Priority B Species Total Total Number Species Number Caught Weight (kg) Measured 9 0.8 9 58,763 7,616.5 2,843 740 30.2 288 8 92.3 8 349 1,178.9 307 731 1,155.0 631 1,499 1,847.7 1,355 451 3,976.6 150 20 5.7 20 5,288 3,026.2 2,659 6 31.2 6 92 510.1 92 60 37.0 60 292 557.1 292 1,690 1,555.6 765 18 139.0 18 133 1,366.7 133 17 51.3 17 44,437 3,942.0 2,507 951 925.3 735 1 0.1 1 Priority C Species Total Total Number Species Number Caught Weight (kg) Measured 56 3.1 56 198 5.4 198 3 0.3 3 35 5.8 35 50 1.6 50 2 14.9 2 4 3.7 4

Number of Otoliths 219 588 538 808 59 16 716 572 118

Number of Stomachs 210 485 11 797 59 16 448 471 114

Number of Otoliths 9 211 78 7

Number of Stomachs 9 193 78 3

340

324

194 6 1

187 6 1

202

200

13 160 171 1

12 9 160 1

Number of Otoliths 24 20 3 33 18 1 4

Number of Stomachs 24 20 1 25 18 1 4

continued

- 16 -


Table 5. cont..

Species African pompano Atlantic bumper Atlantic cutlassfish Atlantic moonfish Atlantic pomfret Atlantic spadefish Atlantic sturgeon Atlantic thread herring Atlantic threadfin banded drum bay anchovy Berycidae bigeye bigeye scad blackcheek tonguefish blue runner bluespotted cornetfish cobia conger eel crevalle jack dwarf goatfish Etropus sp. Florida pompano flying gurnard fourbeard rockling fourspot flounder fringed flounder gray triggerfish Gulf Stream flounder harvestfish hickory shad hogchoker inshore lizardfish jellyfish spp king mackerel kingfish spp lane snapper lined seahorse longspine snipefish lookdown

Priority D Species Total Total Number Species Number Caught Weight(kg) Measured 2 0.2 2 2 0.0 2 212 2.1 117 2,803 15.1 1,196 2 0.2 2 673 31.0 478 2 29.4 2 3,345 167.7 554 3 0.3 3 655 50.7 210 119,741 203.4 3,961 5 13.7 5 11 1.7 11 75 2.4 75 3 0.2 3 175 9.9 160 1 0.0 1 4 33.1 4 1 0.7 1 31 1.1 31 13 0.2 8 24 0.3 24 43 7.6 43 1 0.0 1 1 0.1 1 73 15.7 73 27 0.4 27 23 9.2 23 91 1.9 91 102 10.0 57 7 2.4 7 130 14.3 129 514 56.9 514 818.3 5 22.1 5 9,124 1,398.8 1,707 4 0.1 4 2 0.0 2 1 0.2 1 5 0.2 5

Number of Otoliths

Number of Stomachs

continued

- 17 -


Table 5. cont. Priority D Species (continued)

Species mackerel scad mantis shrimp northern pipefish northern puffer northern searobin northern sennet northern stargazer orange filefish pigfish pinfish planehead filefish red goatfish red hake rock crab rough scad round herring round scad sea raven sharksucker sheepshead short bigeye silver anchovy silver perch smallmouth flounder Spanish mackerel Spanish sardine species unidentified spotfin mojarra spotted hake striped anchovy striped burrfish striped searobin threadfin shad triggerfish spp. windowpane

Total Number Caught 38 14 1 93 881 222 12 1 287 2,744 1 1 74 117 140 452 258 4 3 6 3 42 1,398 32 161 276 40 87 207 224,369 25 760 2 1 744

Total Species Weight (kg) 0.4 0.4 0.0 5.8 104.2 19.7 21.1 0.1 18.7 107.3 0.0 0.0 8.4 12.6 2.9 9.1 1.9 3.8 0.2 21.5 0.1 0.5 39.0 0.5 42.5 5.2 22.8 1.3 25.7 2,519.3 11.2 171.5 0.2 0.1 114.0

Number Measured 38 14 1 93 782 76 12 1 269 331 1 1 74 117 70 447 243 4 3 6 3 42 141 32 161 114 40 82 207 4,990 23 546 2 1 694

Number of Otoliths

Number of Stomachs

continued

- 18 -


Table 5. cont. Priority E Species

Species American lobster Atlantic angel shark Atlantic sharpnose shark blue crab - juvenile female blue crab - male blue crab, adult female brown shrimp dusky shark horseshoe crab jonah crab Loligo squid sandbar shark sea scallop squid spp thresher shark white shrimp Total

Total Number Caught 262 3

Total Species Weight (kg) 59.0 12.8

Number Measured 262 3

68

257.4

68

1 4 12 898 4 795 2 119,501 15 32 11 5 48 1,101,152

0.0 0.1 1.6 21.6 18.1 1,447.9 0.2 2,277.5 100.1 4.3 1.1 73.6 1.8 49,868

1 4 12 459 4 342 2 9,614 15 32 11 5 20 73,473

Number of Otoliths

Number of Stomachs

10

8

1

1

9

9

5,150

3,905

Figure 1. Chronological summary of average net performance parameters for each tow. Accepted ranges for each parameter are given by the dotted lines. 40

7

D. Spread - 32.6m

35

6

5

25 4

Speed – 3.2kts 20

3 15 2

W. Spread – 13.1m

10

1

5

Height – 5.3m

0

0

01

10 10

19 20

2830 3740 46 50 55 60 64 7073

80 82

90 91

Tow Number Station Number - 19 -

100 100 109 110 118 120 127 130 136140145 150

Speed (kts)

Distance (m)

30


Figure 2. Thyboron Type IV 66â&#x20AC;? trawl doors frontside (A) and backside (B) with mounting bracket for Netmind sensor. A.

B.

- 20 -


Figure 3. Comparison of stations selected (red) to locations sampled (black) in Rhode Island to New York (A), New Jersey to Maryland (B), and Virginia to North Carolina (C).

A

2

1 BI

RI

3 5

4

B

C

11

6 12

7

13

14

8

9 10

15

- 21 -


0 50 1, 0 00 1, 0 50 2, 0 00 2, 0 50 3, 0 00 3, 0 50 4, 0 00 4, 0 50 5, 0 00 5, 0 50 6, 0 00 6, 0 50 7, 0 00 7, 0 50 8, 0 00 8, 0 50 9, 0 00 9, 0 50 10 0 ,0 10 00 ,5 11 00 ,0 11 00 ,5 12 00 ,0 12 00 ,5 13 00 ,0 13 00 ,5 14 00 ,0 14 00 ,5 15 00 ,0 15 00 ,5 16 00 ,0 16 00 ,5 17 00 ,0 17 00 ,5 18 00 ,0 18 00 ,5 19 00 ,0 19 00 ,5 20 00 ,0 25 00 ,0 26 00 ,0 27 00 ,0 28 00 ,0 29 00 ,0 30 00 ,0 31 00 ,0 32 00 ,0 33 00 ,0 34 00 ,0 35 00 ,0 50 00 ,0 68 00 15 , 00 0, 0 00 0

Number of Tows

- 22 -

Number of Fish per Tow 40

38

36

34

32

30

28

26

24

22

20

18

16

14

12

10

8

6

4

2

0

Number of Tows

Figure 4. Frequency histogram of number of species captured at each station. 20

10

0 Number of Species per Tow

Figure 5. Frequency histogram of number of specimens captured at each station (note irregularly incremented values at the high end of the x-axis).

18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0


Figure 6. Frequency histogram of biomass of all specimens captured at each station (note irregularly incremented values at the high end of the x-axis).

20

10

10 0 15 0 20 0 25 0 30 0 35 0 40 0 45 0 50 0 55 0 60 0 65 0 70 0 75 0 80 0 85 0 90 0 95 0 1, 00 0 1, 05 0 1, 10 0 1, 15 0 1, 20 0 1, 25 0 1, 30 0 3, 60 0 6, 50 0

0

0 50

Number of Tows

30

Total Weight per Tow (kg)

- 23 -


American Lobster (Priority E)

A

B

Figure 7. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for American lobster.

- 24 -


Figure 8. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for American lobster. 1,200,000

300,000

1,100,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 1,164,274

1,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 262,773 Pct. S.E. = 50% (number) 46% (biomass)

900,000 800,000

200,000

Biomass (kg)

Number

700,000 600,000 500,000

100,000

400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000

Avg Wt: 0.224kg

Avg Wt: 0.344kg

Avg Wt: 0.284kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 9. Length frequency histogram for American lobster. 80 70

Number Captured = 262 Number Measured = 262

Expanded Number

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Carapace Length (cm) - 25 -

8

9

10

11

12


Figure 10. Sex ratios for American lobster, by state.

n= 100

126

2

3

100

100

100

51

100

33

90 80 70 Percent

67 60 50

49 40 30 20

Sex U M F

10 0 1-RI

2-NY STATE

- 26 -

3-NJ


Figure 11. Length-weight regression for American lobster, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 700

600

Weight(g) = 1.8115 x Length(cm)2.4836 (n = 131)

Weight(g)

500

400

300

200

A

100

0 3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Carapace Length(cm)

700

Fe m ale s: We ight(g) = 1.923 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.4553 (n = 65)

600

Male s: (n = 65)

We ight(g) = 1.6928 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.5167

Weight(g)

500

400

300

200

100

B

0

3

4

5

6

7

8

Carapace Len gth(cm) - 27 -

9

10

11


Atlantic Croaker (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 12. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for Atlantic croaker.

- 28 -


Figure 13. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for Atlantic croaker. 150,000,000

18,000,000

140,000,000

17,000,000

130,000,000 120,000,000

16,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 30,231,523

15,000,000 14,000,000

Pct. S.E. = 42% (number) 40% (biomass)

110,000,000

13,000,000

100,000,000

12,000,000

90,000,000

11,000,000 10,000,000

80,000,000

9,000,000 70,000,000

8,000,000

60,000,000

7,000,000

50,000,000

6,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.281kg

40,000,000

5,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.194kg

30,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.122kg

4,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.086kg

3,000,000 20,000,000 10,000,000

2,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.305kg

Avg Wt: 0.794kg

1,000,000 0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 14. Length frequency histogram for Atlantic croaker. 9,000

Number Captured = 58,763

8,000

Number Measured = 2,843

Expanded Number

7,000

Number of Otoliths = 211 6,000

Number of Stomachs = 193

5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

Total Length (cm) - 29 -

30

35

40

45

Biomass (kg)

Number

Minimum Trawlable Number = 231,508,457


Figure 15. Sex ratios for Atlantic croaker by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n= 100

3

54

25

31

71

27

100.00

100.00

99.99

100.00

100.00

100.00

100

59

74

57

42

38

90 80

Percent

70 60

62 58

Sex

50 40

U M F

42

41

30

25

20 10 0 2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

100

6-VA

7-NC

STATE

B Percent SUM n=

5-MD

7 100

14 100

32 100

43 100

40 100

30 100

18 100

15 100

8 100

3 100

1 100

74

14

43

52

39

74

46

18

15

100

100

90

86

80

82

85

70 60

60

57 50

Sex

53

48

U M F

40 30 20

26

26

10 5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15 Inch-class

Length (cm)

- 30 -

.5 40 .0 -4 2

.0 37 .5 -4 0

.5 35 .0 -3 7

.0 32 .5 -3 5

.5 30 .0 -3 2

.0 27 .5 -3 0

.5 25 .0 -2 7

.0 22 .5 -2 5

.5 20 .0 -2 2

.0 17 .5 -2 0

15 .0 -1 7

.5

0


Figure 16. Maturity logistic regression for Atlantic croaker, by sex. 1.0 99% maturity

0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 10

20

30

Total Length (cm)

- 31 -

40

50


Figure 17. Length-weight regression for Atlantic croaker, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 1100

A

1000 900 800

Weight(g) = 0.0104 x Length(cm) 3.0628 (n = 209)

Weight(g)

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

10

20

30

40

50

Total Length(cm) 1100 1000

Females: W eight(g) = 0.0103 x Length(cm) 3.0676 (n = 132)

900

Males: W eight(g) = 0.0123 x Length(cm) 3.0124 (n = 75)

800

B

Weight(g)

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 10

20

30

T otal Len gth (cm)

- 32 -

40

50


Atlantic Menhaden (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 18. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for Atlantic menhaden.

- 33 -


Figure 19. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for Atlantic menhaden. 60,000

1,600,000 1,500,000 1,400,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 2,255,876

1,300,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 109,297

50,000

1,200,000

Pct. S.E. = 70% (number) 32% (biomass)

1,100,000

40,000

1,000,000

Number

30,000

800,000 700,000 600,000

20,000

500,000 400,000 300,000

10,000

Avg Wt: 0.012kg

200,000 Avg Wt: 0.018kg

100,000

Avg Wt: 0.202kg

Avg Wt: 0.269kg

Avg Wt: 0.330kg

Avg Wt: 0.187kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State

Expanded Number

Figure 20. Length frequency histogram for Atlantic menhaden. 200 190 180 170 160 150 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Number Captured = 740 Number Measured = 288 Number of Otoliths = 78 Number of Stomachs = 78

0

5

10

15

20

Fork Length (cm) - 34 -

25

30

35

Biomass (kg)

900,000


Figure 21. Sex ratios for Atlantic menhaden by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n= 100

100

7

12 100

100

33

100

8

100

7

100

6

20

94

26

13

100

67

90 38

80

60

53

Percent

70 60

Sex

50

50

U M F

40 33

30 20

21

20

10 6

0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

B Percent SUM n= 100

5-MD

6-VA

STATE

12 100

2 100

54

1 100

2 100

9 100

18 100

50

100

100

81

96

90

9

6

14

100

100

100

7

48

17

62

80

83

70 60 50 40

Sex

53

50

U M F

46

30

32

20

19 10 3

4

5

7

8

9

10

11

12

Length (cm)

- 35 -

.5 30 .0 -3 2

.0 27 .5 -3 0

.5 25 .0 -2 7

22 .5 -2 5

.0

.5 20 .0 -2 2

.0 17 .5 -2 0

.0 12 .5 -1 5

.5 10 .0 -1 2

07 .5 -1 0

.0

0

Inch-class


Figure 22. Maturity logistic regression for Atlantic menhaden, by sex. 1.0

99% maturity 0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 0

10

20

Fork Length (cm)

- 36 -

30

40


Figure 23. Length-weight regression for Atlantic menhaden, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 600

500

Weight(g) = 0.0331 x Length(cm)2.7901 (n = 78)

Weight(g)

400

300

200

100

A

0 0

10

20

30

40

Fork Length(cm) 600

Fe m ale s: We ight(g) = 0.0358 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.7632 (n = 19) Male s: (n = 35)

500

We ight(g) = 0.0319 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.8059

Weight(g)

400

300

200

100

B

0

0

10

20

Fork Length(cm)

- 37 -

30

40


Atlantic Spadefish (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 24. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for Atlantic spadefish.

- 38 -


Figure 25. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for Atlantic spadefish. 90,000

1,800,000 1,700,000 1,600,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 2,595,794

1,500,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 102,415

1,400,000

80,000

70,000

Pct. S.E. = 35% (number) 32% (biomass)

1,300,000

60,000

1,200,000

50,000

Number

1,000,000 900,000

40,000

800,000 700,000

30,000

600,000 500,000

20,000

400,000 300,000 Avg Wt: 0.045kg

200,000

Avg Wt: 0..047kg

10,000

100,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 26. Length frequency histogram for Atlantic spadefish. 300

Number Captured = 673

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 478 200

100

0 0

5

10

15

20

Fork Length (cm) - 39 -

25

30

35

Biomass (kg)

1,100,000


Atlantic Thread Herring (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 27. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for Atlantic thread herring.

- 40 -


Figure 28. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for Atlantic thread herring. 600,000

7,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 13,526,564 6,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 710,948

500,000

Pct. S.E. = 52% (number) 65% (biomass) 5,000,000

400,000

Number

300,000 3,000,000

200,000 2,000,000

100,000 1,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.005kg

Avg Wt: 0.141kg

Avg Wt: 0.080kg

Avg Wt: 0.027kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 29. Length frequency histogram for Atlantic thread herring. 900

Number Captured = 3,345

800

Number Measured = 554

Expanded Number

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0

5

10

15

Fork Length (cm) - 41 -

20

25

Biomass (kg)

4,000,000


Bay Anchovy (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 30. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for bay anchovy.

- 42 -


Figure 31. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for bay anchovy. 400,000

180,000,000 170,000,000 160,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 452,812,195

150,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 799,420

140,000,000

Pct. S.E. = 28% (number) 15% (biomass)

300,000

130,000,000 120,000,000

Number

100,000,000

200,000

90,000,000 80,000,000 70,000,000 60,000,000 50,000,000

100,000 40,000,000 30,000,000 20,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.005kg

10,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.001kg

Avg Wt: 0.002kg

Avg Wt: 0.002kg

Avg Wt: 0.002kg

Avg Wt: 0.003kg

MD

VA

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

NC

State Figure 32. Length frequency histogram for bay anchovy. 40,000

Number Captured = 119,741 Number Measured = 3,961

Expanded Number

30,000

20,000

10,000

0 0

5

10

Fork Length (cm) - 43 -

15

Biomass (kg)

110,000,000


Black Sea Bass (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 33. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for black sea bass.

- 44 -


Figure 34. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for black sea bass. 110,000

600,000

100,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 1,568,759 500,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 326,991

90,000

Pct. S.E. = 22% (number) 23% (biomass)

80,000

400,000

60,000 300,000

50,000

40,000 200,000

30,000

20,000

100,000

Avg Wt: 0.741kg

Avg Wt: 0.253kg

Avg Wt: 0.198kg

Avg Wt: 0.102kg

Avg Wt: 0.074kg

Avg Wt: 0.111kg

Avg Wt: 0. 069kg

10,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 35. Length frequency histogram for black sea bass. 40

Number Captured =401 Number Measured = 401

Expanded Number

30

Number of Otoliths = 219 Number of Stomachs = 210

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Total Length (cm) - 45 -

40

45

50

55

60

Biomass (kg)

Number

70,000


Figure 36. Sex ratios for black sea bass, by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n= 100

24

45

100.00 7

90

69

22

18

34

7

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.01

31

5 8

100

22

16

43

14

87

80

82 79

74

70 Percent

67

60 14

50 40

Sex U M F

43

30 20 10 0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

100

6-VA

7-NC

STATE

B Percent SUM n=

5-MD

2 100.0

13 100.0

100

6

94

90

97 100.0

32 100.0

29 100.0

10

11

18

86

86

24 100.1

11 100.0

5 100.0

2 100.0

3 100.0

1 100.0

10

26

40

100

33

100

38

80

78 74

70

67

60

60

Sex

50

52

U M F

40 30 20 10 2-4

4-6

6-8

8-10

10-12

12-14

14-16

16-18

18-20

20-22

22-24 Inch-class

Length (cm)

- 46 -

55 -6 0

50 -5 5

45 -5 0

40 -4 5

35 -4 0

30 -3 5

25 -3 0

20 -2 5

15 -2 0

10 -1 5

05 -1 0

0


Figure 37. Maturity logistic regression for black sea bass, by sex. 1.0 99% maturity

0.9

0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 10

20

30

40

50

60

Total Length (cm) Figure 38. Expanded age frequency histogram for black sea bass. 169

170 160 150 140

Catch curve Z ages 1-9 = -0.68 Catch curve Z ages 2-9 = -0.63

130 120 110 100

93

90 80 70

61

60

54

50 40 30 20

6

10

3

2

1

2

0

0

Age (Year Class)

- 47 -

(1 99 7) 10

(1 99 8) 9

(1 99 9) 8

(2 00 0) 7

(2 00 1) 6

5

(2 00 2)

(2 00 3) 4

(2 00 4) 3

(2 00 5) 2

(2 00 6) 1

(2 00 7)

0

0

Expanded Number

Probability of Maturity

0.8


Figure 39. Age-specific length-frequency histograms for black sea bass for ages 0 through 3, and 5.

AG E = 0 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

40

45

50

55

60

40

45

50

55

60

40

45

50

55

60

40

45

50

55

60

To ta l Le n g th (c m ) AG E = 1 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

To ta l Le n g th (c m ) AG E = 2 5

4

3

2

1

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

T o t a l Le n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 3 5

4

3

2

1

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

T o t a l Le n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 5 2

1

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

T o t a l Le n g t h ( c m )

- 48 -


Figure 40. von Bertalanffy growth curves for black sea bass, by sex. 60

Fe m ale s : L(m ax) = 70.5 T(ze ro) = 0.263 K = 0.232

50

Length (cm)

M ale s :

L(m ax) = 46.2 T(ze ro) = 0.401 K = 0.453

40

30

20

10 0

1

2

3

4

5

Age

- 49 -

6

7

8

9

10


Figure 41. Length-weight regression for black sea bass, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B).. 3000

Weight(g) = 0.0286 x Length(cm) 2.7973 (n = 219)

Weight(g)

2000

1000

A 0 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

Total Length(cm)

3000 Females: W eight(g) = 0.0251 x Length(cm) 2.8433 (n = 177) Males: W eight(g) = 0.1191 x Length(cm) 2.3719 (n = 26)

Weight(g)

2000

1000

B 0 10

20

30

40

T otal Len gth (cm)

- 50 -

50

60


Figure 42. Diets of black sea bass by percent weight (A) and percent number (B).

A

B

- 51 -


Bluefish (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 43. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for bluefish.

- 52 -


Figure 44. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for bluefish. 500,000

8,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 16,765,929 7,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 1,519,012 400,000

Pct. S.E. = 17% (number) 13% (biomass)

6,000,000

5,000,000

Number

4,000,000

200,000 3,000,000

2,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.297kg Avg Wt: 0.453kg

1,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.028kg

Avg Wt: 0.103kg

NY

NJ

Avg Wt: 0.134kg

Avg Wt: 0.100kg

100,000

Avg Wt: 0. 149kg

0

0

RI

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 45. Length frequency histogram for bluefish. 600

Number Captured = 4,635

500

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 2,613 Number of Otoliths = 588

400

Number of Stomachs = 485 300

200

100

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

Fork Length (cm) - 53 -

50

55

60

65

70

75

Biomass (kg)

300,000


Figure 46. Sex ratios for bluefish, by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n= 100 90

64

99

164

43

70

104

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

37

9.2

84.7

22.3

46.5

5.1 57.0

47.1

17.0

66.2

54.3

80 45.7

Percent

70 60 53.5

50

Sex

21.3

U M F

40 37.9

30

32.0

31.6

28.7

24.6

20

13.9

10 0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

5-MD

6-VA

7-NC

STATE

B Percent SUM n= 100

18 100

78 100

123 194 56 100 100 100

99

78

45

14

58

67 100

13 5 100 100

36

12

40

2 100

7 4 11 2 1 100 100 100 100 100

50

86

50

27

100

100

90 88

47

80 70

73 64

60

60 Sex

35

50

50

50

40 39

U M F

42

30 20

21

20

4-6

6-8

10

2-4

14 8-10 10-12 12-14 14-16 16-18 18-20 20-22 22-24 24-26 26-28 28-30 Inch-class

Length (cm)

- 54 -

70 -7 5

65 -7 0

60 -6 5

55 -6 0

50 -5 5

45 -5 0

40 -4 5

35 -4 0

30 -3 5

25 -3 0

20 -2 5

15 -2 0

10 -1 5

05 -1 0

0


Figure 47. Maturity logistic regression for bluefish, by sex. 1.0

99% maturity 0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 0

10

20

30

40

50

Fork Length (cm)

- 55 -

60

70

80


Figure 48. Length-weight regression for bluefish, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B).. 5000

Weight(g)

4000

Weight(g) = 0.0211 x Length(cm)2.8645 (n = 588)

3000

2000

1000

A

0 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Fork Length(cm)

5000

Fe m ale s: We ight(g) = 0.0218 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.8541 (n = 236) Male s: We ight(g) = 0.0179 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.9133 (n = 229)

Weight(g)

4000

3000

2000

1000

B 0

0

10

20

30

40

50

Fork Length(cm) - 56 -

60

70

80


Figure 49. Diets of bluefish by percent weight (A) and percent number (B).

A

B

- 57 -


Bluntnose Stingray (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 50. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for bluntnose stingray.

- 58 -


Figure 51. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for bluntnose stingray. 4,000,000

1,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 1,342,462

900,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 4,613,305 800,000

Pct. S.E. = 21% (number) 23% (biomass)

3,000,000

700,000

Number

2,000,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

1,000,000 200,000

100,000

Avg Wt: 0.492kg

Avg Wt: 0.772kg

Avg Wt: 2.493kg

Avg Wt: 3.874kg

Avg Wt: 2.542kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 52. Width frequency histogram for bluntnose stingray. 30

Number Captured = 349

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 307

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Disk Width (cm)

- 59 -

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

Biomass (kg)

600,000


Brown Shrimp (Priority E)

A

B

Figure 53. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for brown shrimp.

- 60 -


Figure 54. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for brown shrimp. 60,000

3,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 3,364,019 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 81,052

50,000

Pct. S.E. = 20% (number) 16% (biomass)

40,000

30,000

20,000

1,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.026kg Avg Wt: 0.021kg

Avg Wt: 0.024kg

10,000

Avg Wt: 0.023kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 55. Length frequency histogram for brown shrimp. 300

Number Captured = 898

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 459 200

100

0 0

5

10

Total Length (cm) - 61 -

15

20

Biomass (kg)

Number

2,000,000


Bullnose Stingray (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 56. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for bullnose stingray.

- 62 -


Figure 57. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for bullnose stingray. 3,000,000

1,600,000 1,500,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 2,989,245

1,400,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 4,747,851

1,300,000

Pct. S.E. = 16% (number) 17% (biomass)

1,200,000 1,100,000

2,000,000

1,000,000

Biomass (kg)

Number

900,000 800,000 700,000 600,000

1,000,000

500,000 400,000

Avg Wt: 1.127kg

300,000 Avg Wt: 1.209kg

200,000

Avg Wt: 1.360kg

Avg Wt: 1.236kg

Avg Wt: 1.938kg

100,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 58. Width frequency histogram for bullnose stingray. 80

Number Captured = 731 70

Number Measured = 631

Expanded Number

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

Disk Width (cm)

- 63 -

50

55

60

65

70

75

80


Butterfish (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 59. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for butterfish.

- 64 -


Figure 60. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for butterfish. 5,000,000

300,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 556,339,149 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 7,433,615 Pct. S.E. = 30% (number) 18% (biomass)

4,000,000

200,000,000

Number

2,000,000 100,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.018kg

Avg Wt: 0.004kg Avg Wt: 0.037kg Avg Wt: 0.012kg

Avg Wt: 0.018kg

Avg Wt: 0.023kg

Avg Wt: 0.043kg

1,000,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 61. Length frequency histogram for butterfish. 40,000

Number Captured = 148,182 Number Measured = 6,015

Expanded Number

30,000

Number of Otoliths = 538 Number of Stomachs = 11

20,000

10,000

0 0

5

10

Fork Length (cm) - 65 -

15

20

Biomass (kg)

3,000,000


Figure 62. Sex ratios for butterfish, by state (A) and length group (B).

A n = 100.0 120

100

79.3

90

107

30

54

104

24

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.1

97.8

81.8

99.6

77.7

52.3

9.1

90

30.5

80

Percent

70 60

60.5 Sex

50

U M F

10.4

40 37.3

30 20

14.0

5.3 17.0

6.7

10

11.5 6.7

0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

100

5-MD

6-VA

7-NC

66 100.1

20 100.0

STATE

B Percent SUM n=

4-DE

33 100.0

135 100.0

121 100.0

75 100.0

79 100.0

100

100

99

57

11

42

18

90

50 80

82

70 60

55

50 40

26

Sex U M F

39

30 20

17 10 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Length (cm)

- 66 -

.0 17 .5 -2 0

.5 15 .0 -1 7

.0 12 .5 -1 5

.5 10 .0 -1 2

.0 07 .5 -1 0

.5 05 .0 -0 7

02 .5 -0 5

.0

0

Inch-class


Figure 63. Maturity logistic regression for butterfish, by sex. 1.0 99% maturity

0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

Fork Length (cm)

- 67 -

15

16

17

18

19


Figure 64. Length-weight regression for butterfish, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 180 170 160 150 140 130

Weight(g) = 0.015 x Length(cm) 3.1259 (n = 535)

Weight(g)

120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30

A

20 10 0 3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

Fork Length(cm)

180 170 Females: W eight(g) = 0.0269 x Length(cm) 2.9149 (n = 106)

160 150

Males: W eight(g) = 0.0113 x Length(cm) 3.2363 (n = 96)

140 130

Weight(g)

120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30

B

20 10 0 7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

Fork Len gth (cm)

- 68 -

15

16

17

18

19


Clearnose Skate (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 65. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for clearnose skate.

- 69 -


Figure 66. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for clearnose skate. 3,000,000

2,100,000 2,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 5,728,724

1,900,000 1,800,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 6,975,177

1,700,000

Pct. S.E. = 8% (number) 8% (biomass)

1,600,000 1,500,000

2,000,000

1,400,000

Number

Biomass (kg)

1,300,000 1,200,000 1,100,000 1,000,000 900,000 800,000

1,000,000

700,000 600,000 500,000 Avg Wt: 1.177kg

400,000 Avg Wt: 1.542kg

300,000

Avg Wt: 1.414kg

Avg Wt: 1.052kg

Avg Wt: 1.084kg

Avg Wt: 1.295kg

Avg Wt: 1.178kg

200,000

0

100,000

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 67. Width frequency histogram for clearnose skate. 130

Expanded Number

120 110

Number Captured = 1,499

100

Number Measured = 1,355

90

Number of Vertebrae = 340

80

Number of Stomachs = 324 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

Disk Width (cm)

- 70 -

35

40

45

50

55


Figure 68. Sex ratios for clearnose skate, by state (A) and width group (B).

A

n= 100

9

58

39

22

121

100

100

100

63

100

100

100

100

28

31.3

88.2

74.6

61.0

75.0

27.0

33.3

90 80 73.0

70 Percent

68.7

66.7

60 Sex

50

U M F

40 39.0

30 25.4

20 10

25.0

11.8

0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

100

6-VA

7-NC

STATE

B Percent SUM n=

5-MD

4 100

2 100

18 100

46 100

45 100

72 100

69 100

48 100

28 100

7 100

1 100

28

100

55

52

75

61

59

27

38

40

100

62

60

90 80 70

73

72

60

Sex

50

45

40

48 39

U M F

41

30

25

20 10

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

21

DiskLength Width(cm) (cm) - 71 -

.0 52 .5 -5 5

.0 47 .5 -5 0

.5 45 .0 -4 7

.0 42 .5 -4 5

.5 40 .0 -4 2

.0 37 .5 -4 0

.5 35 .0 -3 7

.0 32 .5 -3 5

.5 30 .0 -3 2

.0 27 .5 -3 0

25 .0 -2 7

.5

0

Inch-class


Figure 69. Maturity logistic regression for clearnose skate, by sex. 1.0

99% maturity 0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 20

30

40

Disk Width (cm)

- 72 -

50

60


Figure 70. Width-weight regression for clearnose skate, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 3000

Weight(g) = 0.0283 x Length(cm) 2.9061 (n = 339)

Weight(g)

2000

1000

A 0 20

30

40

50

60

Disk Width(cm)

3000 Females: W eight(g) = 0.0265 x Length(cm) 2.9201 (n = 166) Males: W eight(g) = 0.0231 x Length(cm) 2.9641 (n = 173)

Weight(g)

2000

1000

B 0 20

30

40

Disk Width (cm) - 73 -

50

60


Cownose Ray (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 71. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for cownose ray.

- 74 -


Figure 72. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for cownose ray. 1,900,000

19,000,000

1,800,000

18,000,000

1,700,000

17,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 2,015,335

1,600,000

16,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 18,366,308

15,000,000

1,500,000

Pct. S.E. = 63% (number) 88% (biomass)

14,000,000

1,300,000

13,000,000

1,200,000

12,000,000

1,100,000

11,000,000

1,000,000

10,000,000

900,000

9,000,000

800,000

8,000,000

700,000

7,000,000

600,000

6,000,000

500,000

5,000,000

Biomass (kg)

Number

1,400,000

4,000,000

400,000 300,000

Avg Wt: 1.681kg

Avg Wt: 1.705kg

Avg Wt: 10.089kg

3,000,000

Avg Wt: 1.232kg

200,000

2,000,000

100,000

1,000,000 0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 73. Width frequency histogram for cownose ray. 30

Number Captured = 451

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 150

20

10

0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

Disk Width (cm)

- 75 -

7 5

8 0

8 5

9 0

9 5

1 0 0

1 0 5

1 1 0

1 1 5


Horseshoe Crab (Priority E)

A

B

Figure 74. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for horseshoe crab.

- 76 -


Figure 75. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for horseshoe crab. 3,000,000

1,100,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 3,394,754

1,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 6,168,907

900,000

Pct. S.E. = 31% (number) 32% (biomass)

800,000

2,000,000

Biomass (kg)

Number

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

1,000,000 300,000

200,000

Avg Wt: 0.136kg

100,000

Avg Wt: 0.246kg

Avg Wt: 0.158kg

Avg Wt: 0.118kg

Avg Wt: 0.122kg

Avg Wt: 0.120kg

Avg Wt: 0.092kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 76. Width frequency histogram for horseshoe crab. 120

Expanded Number

110 100

Number Captured = 795

90

Number Measured = 342

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 0

5

10

15

20

Carapace Width (cm) - 77 -

25

30

35


Figure 77. Sex ratios for horseshoe crab, by state (A) and width group (B).

A n= 100

100

5

100

52

100

36

18 100

32 100

21 100

40.0

36.9

21.2

38.2

41.8

35.0

90 80

78.8

Percent

70 60

63.1

60.0

65.0

61.8 58.2

Sex

50

U M F

40 30 20 10 0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

B n= Percent SUM

100

5-MD

6-VA

STATE

1 100

1 100

12 100

44 100

40 100

100

100

89

84

15

42 100

97

22 100

2 100

100

100

90

85

80 70 60

Sex

50

U M F

40 30 20

17

10 5

6

11 7

8

9

10

11

12

Carapace Width (cm) Length (cm) - 78 -

.5 30 .0 -3 2

.0 27 .5 -3 0

.5 25 .0 -2 7

.0 22 .5 -2 5

.5 20 .0 -2 2

.0 17 .5 -2 0

.5 15 .0 -1 7

12 .5 -1 5

.0

0

Inch-class


Figure 78. Width-weight regression for horseshoe crab, sexes combined (A), and by sex (B). 5000

4000

Weight(g)

Weight(g) = 0.0297 x Length(cm) 3.4455 (n = 166) 3000

2000

1000

A

0 13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

Carapace Width (cm)

4000 Females: W eight(g) = 0.1044 x Length(cm) 3.068 (n = 108) Males: W eight(g) = 0.2982 x Length(cm) 2.6636 (n = 56)

Weight(g)

3000

2000

1000

B 0 13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

Carapace Width (cm) - 79 -

26

27

28

29

30

31

32


Kingfish spp. (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 79. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for kingfish (spp).

- 80 -


Figure 80. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for kingfish (spp). 5,000,000

40,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 36,116,481 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 5,611,106

4,000,000

Pct. S.E. = 33% (number) 35% (biomass)

30,000,000

Number

20,000,000

2,000,000

10,000,000

1,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.119kg

Avg Wt: 0.142kg

Avg Wt: 0.159kg

RI

NY

NJ

Avg Wt: 0.117kg

Avg Wt: 0. 205kg

Avg Wt: 0.158kg

Avg Wt: 0.120kg

VA

NC

0

0

DE

MD

State Figure 81. Length frequency histogram for kingfish (spp). 1,400

Expanded Number

1,300 1,200

Number Captured = 9,124

1,100

Number Measured = 1,707

1,000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

Total Length (cm) - 81 -

30

35

40

Biomass (kg)

3,000,000


Little Skate (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 82. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for little skate.

- 82 -


Figure 83. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for little skate. 7,000,000

11,000,000

10,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 18,483,896

6,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 10,732,786

9,000,000

Pct. S.E. = 14% (number) 13% (biomass)

8,000,000

5,000,000

7,000,000

Number

5,000,000

3,000,000 4,000,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

2,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.592kg

Avg Wt: 0.549kg

Avg Wt: 0.566kg

RI

NY

NJ

Avg Wt: 0.530kg

1,000,000

Avg Wt: 1.254kg

1,000,000

0

0

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 84. Width frequency histogram for little skate. 1,500 1,400 1,300

Number Captured = 5,288

1,200

Number Measured = 2,659

Expanded Number

1,100

Number of Vertebrae = 194

1,000

Number of Stomachs = 187

900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Disk Width (cm) - 83 -

40

45

50

55

60

Biomass (kg)

4,000,000 6,000,000


Figure 85. Sex ratios for little skate, by state (A) and width group (B).

A

n= 100

81

74

38

1

100

100

100

100

35

16

100 96

90

84

80 70

65

Percent

60

Sex

50

U M F

40 30 20 10 0 1-RI

2-NY

B

3-NJ

4-DE

STATE

n= Percent SUM

100

3 100

17 100

117 100

44 100

4 100

1 100

1 100

1 100

2 100

2 100

1 100

1 100

100

25

25

23

13

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

90

87

80

75

70

75

77

60

Sex

50

U M F

40 30 20 10 8

9

10

11

12

13

16

18

19

20

21

22

Disk Width Length (cm)(cm) - 84 -

.5 55 .0 -5 7

.0 52 .5 -5 5

.5 50 .0 -5 2

.0 47 .5 -5 0

.5 45 .0 -4 7

.5 40 .0 -4 2

.0 32 .5 -3 5

.5 30 .0 -3 2

.0 27 .5 -3 0

.5 25 .0 -2 7

.0 22 .5 -2 5

20 .0 -2 2

.5

0

Inch-class


Figure 86. Width-weight regression for little skate, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 5000

4000

Weight(g)

Weight(g) = 0.0554 x Length(cm) 2.8085 (n = 194) 3000

2000

1000

A

0 20

30

40

50

60

Disk Width(cm)

5000 Females: W eight(g) = 0.2536 x Length(cm) 2.3443 (n = 149) Males: W eight(g) = 0.0695 x Length(cm) 2.7514 (n = 45)

Weight(g)

4000

3000

2000

1000

B

0 20

30

40

Disk Width (cm) - 85 -

50

60


Loligo Squid (Priority E)

A

B

Figure 87. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for Loligo squid.

- 86 -


Figure 88. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for Loligo squid. 5,000,000

300,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 435,880,830 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 8,546,121 Pct. S.E. = 16% (number) 14% (biomass)

4,000,000

200,000,000

Number

2,000,000 100,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.025kg

Avg Wt: 0.021kg

Avg Wt: 0.015kg

Avg Wt: 0.028kg

Avg Wt: 0.018kg

Avg Wt: 0.032kg

1,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.037kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 89. Length frequency histogram for Loligo squid. 30,000

Number Captured = 119,501

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 9,614 20,000

10,000

0 0

5

10

15

Mantle Length (cm) - 87 -

20

25

Biomass (kg)

3,000,000


Northern Searobin (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 90. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for northern searobin.

- 88 -


Figure 91. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for northern searobin. 500,000

4,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 3,978,887 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 456,313

400,000

Pct. S.E. = 21% (number) 28% (biomass)

3,000,000

Number

2,000,000

200,000

1,000,000

100,000

Avg Wt: 0.017kg

Avg Wt: 0.104kg

Avg Wt: 0.124kg

NY

NJ

Avg Wt: 0.086kg

Avg Wt: 0.059kg

Avg Wt: 0.034kg

Avg Wt: 0.034kg

0

0

RI

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 92. Length frequency histogram for northern searobin. 130 120

Expanded Number

110 100

Number Captured = 881

90

Number Measured = 782

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 0

5

10

15

20

Total Length (cm) - 89 -

25

30

35

Biomass (kg)

300,000


Pinfish (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 93. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for pinfish.

- 90 -


Figure 94. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for pinfish. 9,000,000

400,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 8,245,445 8,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 323,903 Pct. S.E. = 85% (number) 83% (biomass)

7,000,000

300,000

6,000,000

Number

200,000 4,000,000

3,000,000

100,000 2,000,000

1,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.097kg

Avg Wt: 0.039kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 95. Length frequency histogram for pinfish. 1,400 1,300 1,200

Number Captured = 2,744

Expanded Number

1,100

Number Measured = 331

1,000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0

5

10

Fork Length (cm) - 91 -

15

20

Biomass (kg)

5,000,000


Scup (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 96. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for scup.

- 92 -


Figure 97. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for scup. 5,000,000

600,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 943,933,018 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 15,083,844 500,000,000

Pct. S.E. = 23% (number) 13% (biomass)

4,000,000

400,000,000

Number

300,000,000

2,000,000 200,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.014kg

Avg Wt: 0.005kg

Avg Wt: 0.036kg

Avg Wt: 0.062kg

Avg Wt: 0.048kg

Avg Wt: 0.050kg

Avg Wt: 0.047kg

1,000,000 100,000,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 98. Length frequency histogram for scup.

Expanded Number

90,000 80,000

Number Captured = 276,234

70,000

Number Measured = 13,718 Number of Otoliths = 808

60,000

Number of Stomachs = 797 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

Fork Length (cm) - 93 -

30

35

40

Biomass (kg)

3,000,000


Figure 99. Sex ratios for scup by state (A) and length group (B).

A n = 219

142

149

77

40

128

40

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.1

100.1

100.0

99.9

92.7

99.9

60.9

37.8

10.3

14.0

29.9

100 90

49.0 36.1

80

Percent

70

21.1

60

26.9

Sex

50 40

49.9

48.9

6-VA

7-NC

U M F

40.8

18.3 35.4

30 20

20.8

10

5.7

0

1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

B

5-MD

STATE

n= Percent SUM

100

1 100.0

100

95 159 100.0 100.0

100

99

107 99.9

46

205 170 100.1 100.0

24 100.0

13

66

18 9 100.0 100.0

11

33

3 100.0

3 100.0

1 100.0

97

33

100

41

90

89

36 80 70

67

67

60

23

50

52

55

Sex U M F

40

35

30

30

20 10 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

12

13

Length (cm)

- 94 -

.0 32 .5 -3 5

.5 30 .0 -3 2

.5 25 .0 -2 7

.0 22 .5 -2 5

.5 20 .0 -2 2

.0 17 .5 -2 0

.5 15 .0 -1 7

.0 12 .5 -1 5

.5 10 .0 -1 2

.0 07 .5 -1 0

.5 05 .0 -0 7

02 .5 -0 5

.0

0

Inch-class


Figure 100. Maturity logistic regression for scup, by sex. 1.0 99% maturity

0.9

0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 0

10

20

30

40

Fork Length (cm) Figure 101. Expanded age frequency histogram for scup.

2007

300000

Catch curve Z ages 0-4 = -2.82

241790 200000

100000

28476 1027

108

3

0

Age (Year Class) - 95 -

(2 00 2) 5

(2 00 3) 4

(2 00 4) 3

(2 00 5) 2

(2 00 6) 1

(2 00 7)

0

0

Probability of Maturity

0.8


Figure 102. Age-specific length-frequency histograms for scup for ages 0 through 3. AG E = 0 4 ,0 0 0

3 ,0 0 0

2 ,0 0 0

1 ,0 0 0

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

T o t a l Le n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 1 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

25

30

35

40

25

30

35

40

To t a l L e n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 2 30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

To ta l Le n g th (c m ) AG E = 3 30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

F o r k Le n g th (c m )

- 96 -


Figure 103. von Bertalanffy growth curves for scup, by sex. 40

Fe m ale s : L(m ax) = 70.5 T(ze ro) = 0.263 K = 0.232 M ale s :

Length (cm)

30

L(m ax) = 46.2 T(ze ro) = 0.401 K = 0.453

20

10

0 0

1

2

3

Age

- 97 -

4

5


Figure 104. Length-weight regression for little skate, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 900 800 700 Weight(g) = 0.0144 x Length(cm) 3.1465 (n = 806)

Weight(g)

600 500 400 300 200

A

100 0 0

10

20

30

40

Fork Length(cm)

900 800

Females: W eight(g) = 0.015 x Length(cm) 3.1337 (n = 305)

700

Males: W eight(g) = 0.013 x Length(cm) 3.1791 (n = 174)

Weight(g)

600 500 400 300 200

B

100 0

0

10

20

Fork Length(cm)

- 98 -

30

40


Figure 105. Diets of scup by percent weight (A) and percent number (B).

A

B

- 99 -


Silver Hake (Whiting) (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 106. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for silver hake.

- 100 -


Figure 107. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for silver hake. 110,000

1,300,000 1,200,000

100,000

1,100,000

90,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 1,480,829 1,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 107,251 900,000

80,000

Pct. S.E. = 60% (number) 66% (biomass) 70,000

700,000

60,000

600,000

50,000

500,000

40,000

400,000

30,000 300,000

20,000 Avg Wt: 0.078kg

200,000

Avg Wt: 0.006kg

Avg Wt: 0.005kg

Avg Wt: 0.083kg

10,000

100,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 108. Length frequency histogram for silver hake. 70

Expanded Number

60

Number Captured = 346 Number Measured = 346

50

Number of Otoliths = 59 Number of Stomachs = 59

40

30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

Fork Length (cm) - 101 -

20

25

30

Biomass (kg)

Number

800,000


Figure 109. Sex ratios for silver hake by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n= 100

46

100

5100

100

7

80

100

33

90 80

Percent

70

63

60

Sex

50

U M F

40 30 20

20

10 0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

STATE

B n= Percent SUM

100

3 100.0

10 100.0

4 100.0

7 100.0

5 99.9

6 100.0

14 100.0

8 100.0

1 100.0

100

100

100

20

43

36

39

100

100

90 80

13

70

68

64

60

61

14

50 40

Sex U M F

43

30 20 10 2

3

4

5

6

8

9

10

11

Length (cm)

- 102 -

.0 27 .5 -3 0

.5 25 .0 -2 7

.0 22 .5 -2 5

.5 20 .0 -2 2

.5 15 .0 -1 7

.0 12 .5 -1 5

.5 10 .0 -1 2

.0 07 .5 -1 0

05 .0 -0 7

.5

0

Inch-class


Figure 110. Maturity logistic regression for silver hake, by sex. 1.0 99% maturity

0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

Fork Length (cm)

- 103 -

22

23

24

25

26

27

28


Figure 111. Length-weight regression for silver hake, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 140 130 120 110 Weight(g) = 0.0074 x Length(cm) 2.9604 (n = 59)

100

Weight(g)

90 80 70 60 50 40 30

A

20 10 0 0

10

20

30

Fork Length(cm)

140 130

Females: W eight(g) = 0.0079 x Length(cm) 2.9399 (n = 30)

120

Males: (n = 8)

110

W eight(g) = 0.0195 x Length(cm) 2.6403

100

Weight(g)

90 80 70 60 50 40

B

30 20 10

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

Fork Length(cm)

- 104 -

22

23

24

25

26

27

28


Silver Perch (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 112. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for silver perch.

- 105 -


Figure 113. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for silver perch. 140,000

6,000,000

130,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 6,971,143 5,000,000

120,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 189,861 110,000

Pct. S.E. = 38% (number) 30% (biomass) 100,000 4,000,000

90,000

Number

70,000

3,000,000

60,000 50,000 2,000,000

40,000 30,000 1,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.052kg

Avg Wt: 0.025kg

Avg Wt: 0.032kg

Avg Wt: 0.039kg

20,000 10,000 0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 114. Length frequency histogram for silver perch. 500

Number Captured = 1,398

400

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 141

300

200

100

0 0

5

10

Total Length (cm) - 106 -

15

20

Biomass (kg)

80,000


Smooth Butterfly Ray (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 115. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for smooth butterfly ray.

- 107 -


Figure 116. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for smooth butterfly ray. 1,800,000

600,000

1,700,000

500,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 1,090,128

1,600,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 2,182,600

1,500,000

Pct. S.E. = 21% (number) 19% (biomass)

1,400,000 1,300,000 1,200,000

400,000

Number

1,000,000 900,000

300,000

800,000 700,000 600,000

200,000

500,000 400,000 100,000

Avg Wt: 3.032kg

300,000

Avg Wt: 0.854kg

200,000 100,000 0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 117. Width frequency histogram for smooth butterfly ray. 30

Number Captured = 292

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 292 20

10

0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

Disk Width (cm) - 108 -

7 5

8 0

8 5

9 0

9 5

1 0 0

1 0 5

1 1 0

1 1 5

Biomass (kg)

1,100,000


Smooth Dogfish (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 118. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for smooth dogfish.

- 109 -


Figure 119. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for smooth dogfish. 4,000,000

2,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 7,381,432

1,900,000 1,800,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 6,667,209

1,700,000

Pct. S.E. = 32% (number) 53% (biomass)

1,600,000

3,000,000

1,500,000 1,400,000 1,300,000

Number

1,100,000

2,000,000

1,000,000 900,000 800,000 700,000 600,000

1,000,000

500,000 400,000

Avg Wt: 2.821kg

300,000

Avg Wt: 1.995kg

Avg Wt: 0.592kg

Avg Wt: 0.240kg

Avg Wt: 0.551kg

Avg Wt: 0.516kg

200,000 100,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 120. Length frequency histogram for smooth dogfish. 300

Number Captured = 1,690

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 765 Number of Vertebrae = 202 200

Number of Stomachs = 200

100

0 30

35

40

45

50

55

60

65

70

75

Precaudal Length (cm) - 110 -

80

85

90

95

100

105

Biomass (kg)

1,200,000


Figure 121. Sex ratios for smooth dogfish by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n= 100

11 100

36 100

100

52

100

28

100

37

100

38

88.5

37.0

87.6

39.4

70.6

76.7

90 80

Percent

70 63.0

60

60.6 Sex

50

U M F

40 30 29.4

23.3

20 10

12.4

11.5

0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

100

6-VA

STATE

B n= Percent SUM

5-MD

2 100

33 100

91 100

8 100

5 100

7 100

4 100

8 100

14 100

12 100

9 100

5 100

1 100

3 100

77

67

61

94

29

79

100

68

35

37

28

24

100

33

90 80

76

70

72

71 65

60

67

63

Sex

50

U M F

40

39 30 20

33

32

23

21

10

Length (cm)

- 111 -

34-36

36-38

38+ Inch-class 95 +

32-34

90 -9 5

30-32

85 -9 0

28-30

80 -8 5

26-28

75 -8 0

24-26

70 -7 5

22-24

65 -7 0

20-22

60 -6 5

6

55 -6 0

40 -4 5

35 -4 0

30 -3 5

18-20

50 -5 5

14-16 16-18

45 -5 0

12-14

0


Figure 122. Maturity logistic regression for smooth dogfish, by sex. 1.0

99% maturity 0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Precaudal Length (cm)

- 112 -

100

110

120

130


Figure 123. Length-weight regression for smooth dogfish, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 7000

6000

Weight(g) = 0.0871 x Length(cm) 2.3552 (n = 202)

Weight(g)

5000

4000

3000

2000

A

1000

0 30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Precaudal Length(cm)

7000 Females: W eight(g) = 0.0312 x Length(cm) 2.6113 (n = 90)

6000

Males: W eight(g) = 0.3867 x Length(cm) 1.9733 (n = 112)

Weight(g)

5000

4000

3000

2000

B

1000

0 30

40

50

60

70

Precaudal Len gth (cm) - 113 -

80

90

100


Spanish Mackerel (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 124. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for Spanish mackerel.

- 114 -


Figure 125. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for Spanish mackerel. 80,000

400,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 618,880 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 167,037

70,000

Pct. S.E. = 25% (number) 21% (biomass) 60,000

300,000

40,000

200,000

30,000

100,000

Avg Wt: 0.010kg

Avg Wt: 0.660kg

Avg Wt: 0.409kg

Avg Wt: 0.296kg

Avg Wt: 0.231kg

20,000

10,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 126. Length frequency histogram for Spanish mackerel. 30

Number Captured = 161

Expanded Number

Number Measured = 161 20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

Fork Length (cm) - 115 -

30

35

40

45

Biomass (kg)

Number

50,000


Spot (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 127. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for spot.

- 116 -


Figure 128. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for spot. 10,000,000

110,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 174,432,892

100,000,000

9,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 15,589,723

90,000,000

8,000,000

Pct. S.E. = 31% (number) 31% (biomass) 80,000,000

7,000,000 70,000,000

Number

60,000,000

5,000,000 50,000,000

4,000,000 40,000,000

3,000,000 30,000,000 Avg Wt: 0.111kg

Avg Wt: 0.109kg

Avg Wt: 0.105kg

Avg Wt: 0.090kg

Avg Wt: 0.080kg

20,000,000

2,000,000

1,000,000

10,000,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 129. Length frequency histogram for spot. 12,000

Expanded Number

11,000 10,000

Number Captured = 44,437

9,000

Number Measured = 2,507

8,000

Number of Otoliths = 160

7,000

Number of Stomachs = 9

6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 0

5

10

15

Fork Length (cm) - 117 -

20

25

Biomass (kg)

6,000,000


Figure 130. Sex ratios for spot by state (A) and length group (B).

A n= 100

2

38

100

100

100

33

3

29

100

100

33

37

57

100

30

100 75

56

90 80

64

60

67 63

Sex

50 40

U M F

40

30 25

20 10 0 1-RI

3-NJ

4-DE

5-MD

6-VA

7-NC

STATE

100

4 100.0

70 100.1

82 100.0

3 100.0

43.8

8.6

65.9

95.7

90

40.8

80 70 60 50

56.2

Sex 50.7

U M F

40

34.1

30 20 10 5

6

7

8

Length (cm)

- 118 -

.5 20 .0 -2 2

17 .5 -2 0

15 .0 -1 7

.0

.5

0 .0

B

Percent SUMn =

12 .5 -1 5

Percent

70

Inch-class


Figure 131. Maturity logistic regression for spot, by sex. 1.0

99% maturity 0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 13

14

15

16

17

18

19

Fork Length (cm)

- 119 -

20

21

22

23


Weight(g)

Figure 132. Length-weight regression for spot, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 220 210 200 190 180 170 160 150 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30

Weight(g) = 0.0126 x Length(cm)3.1211 (n = 159)

A

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

Fork Length(cm)

Weight(g)

220 210

Fe m ale s: We ight(g) = 0.007 x Le ngth(cm ) 3.3293 (n = 94)

200 190 180 170 160 150 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30

Male s: (n = 62)

We ight(g) = 0.0295 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.819

B 13

14

15

16

17

18

Fork Length(cm) - 120 -

19

20

21

22


Striped Anchovy (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 133. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for striped anchovy.

- 121 -


Figure 134. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for striped anchovy. 5,000,000

500,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 878,956,591 Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 9,935,140 Pct. S.E. = 41% (number) 40% (biomass)

400,000,000

4,000,000

200,000,000

2,000,000

Number

3,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.015kg

Avg Wt: 0.011kg

Avg Wt: 0.011kg

1,000,000

100,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.020kg

Avg Wt: 0.008kg

Avg Wt: 0.015kg

Avg Wt: 0.013kg

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 135. Length frequency histogram for striped anchovy. 80,000

70,000

Number Captured = 224,369 Number Measured = 4,990

Expanded Number

60,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

0 0

5

10

Fork Length (cm) - 122 -

15

Biomass (kg)

300,000,000


Striped Searobin (Priority D)

A

B

Figure 136. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for striped searobin.

- 123 -


Figure 137. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for striped searobin. 600,000

1,900,000 1,800,000 1,700,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 2,709,314

1,600,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 659,547

1,500,000

Pct. S.E. = 38% (number) 57% (biomass)

500,000

1,400,000 1,300,000

400,000

1,200,000

Number

1,000,000

300,000 900,000 800,000 700,000

200,000

600,000 500,000 400,000

100,000

300,000

Avg Wt: 0.200kg

200,000

Avg Wt: 0.278kg

Avg Wt: 0.151kg

NY

NJ

Avg Wt: 0. 190kg

Avg Wt: 0. 032kg

Avg Wt: 0. 054kg

Avg Wt: 0. 016kg

100,000

0

0

RI

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 138. Length frequency histogram for striped searobin. 70

Number Captured = 760 Number Measured = 546

Expanded Number

60

50

40

30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

Total Length (cm) - 124 -

30

35

40

45

Biomass (kg)

1,100,000


Summer Flounder (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 139. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for summer flounder.

- 125 -


Figure 140. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for summer flounder. 700,000

1,300,000 1,200,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 3,600,065

1,100,000

600,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 2,283,875

1,000,000

500,000

900,000

Pct. S.E. = 9% (number) 10% (biomass)

800,000

Number

600,000

300,000 500,000 400,000

200,000

300,000 200,000

Avg Wt: 1.113kg

Avg Wt: 0.865kg

Avg Wt: 0.607kg

NY

NJ

Avg Wt: 0.686kg

Avg Wt: 0.579kg

Avg Wt: 0.333kg

100,000

Avg Wt: 0.325kg

100,000

0

0

RI

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 141. Length frequency histogram for summer flounder. 60

Number Captured = 960 Number Measured = 926

50

Expanded Number

Number of Otoliths = 716 Number of Stomachs = 448

40

30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Total Length (cm) - 126 -

55

60

65

70

75

80

Biomass (kg)

400,000 700,000


Figure 142. Sex ratios for summer flounder by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n = 100.0 110

100

180

78

100.0

99.9

50

100.0

25.1

44.3

41.8

29.2

47

100.0

231

33.7

19

100.0

100.1

45.5

5.3 21.1

90 80

74.9

Percent

70

73.7

70.0

60

62.7

58.2

55.7

50

Sex

52.2

U M F

40 30 20 10 0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE

B Percent SUM n= 100

5-MD

6-VA

7-NC

STATE

3 2 70 106 132 118 97 90 56 24 11 4 1 1 99.9 100.0 100.0 100.1 100.0 100.1 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

33

39

7

60

42

53

32

13

100

100

100

100

100

100

65

90

87 80 70 60

68

33 62 58

Sex

50

U M F

46

40

39 30

33 28

20 10 4-6

6-8

8-10 10-12

12-14 14-16 16-18 18-20 20-22 22-24 24-26

26-28 28-30 30-32 Inch-class

Length (cm)

- 127 -

75 -8 0

70 -7 5

65 -7 0

60 -6 5

55 -6 0

50 -5 5

45 -5 0

40 -4 5

35 -4 0

30 -3 5

25 -3 0

20 -2 5

15 -2 0

10 -1 5

0


Figure 143. Maturity logistic regression for summer flounder, by sex. 1.0 99% maturity

0.9

0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Total Length (cm) Figure 144. von Bertalanffy growth curves for summer flounder, by sex. 80 Females: L(max) = 70.5 T(zero) = 0.263 K = 0.232 Males:

L(max) = 46.2 T(zero) = 0.401 K = 0.453

70

60

Length (cm)

Probability of Maturity

0.8

50

40

30

20

10 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Age

- 128 -

8

9

10

11

12

13

14


- 129 -

Age (Year Class)

1)

0

(1 99

0)

1)

0

(1 99

16

(1 99

2)

Expanded Number

245

16

2)

1

(1 99

15

(1 99

3)

0

15

3)

0

(1 99

14

(1 99

4)

0

14

4)

2

(1 99

13

(1 99

5)

0

13

5)

3

(1 99

12

(1 99

6)

)

)

)

)

0

12

6)

2

(1 99

11

99 7

(1 99

(1

99 8

99 9

00 0

)

1

11

7)

3

(1 99

10

9

(1

(1

(2

00 1

)

)

)

)

0

10

)

3

99 8

215

(1

)

8

7

6

(2

00 2

00 3

00 4

00 5

)

3

9

99 9

)

)

7

(1

00 0

00 1

)

5

(2

(2

(2

(2

00 6

4

8

(2

(2

00 2

)

4

3

2

1

(2

5

7

6

(2

00 3

)

)

)

)

0

18

5

(2

00 4

00 5

00 6

00 7

209

4

(2

(2

(2

(2

100

3

2

1

0

Expanded Number

Figure 145. Age frequency histogram for summer flounder for 2006 (A) and 2007 (B). 300

A

200

94

70

17

0

0 0

Age (Year Class)

300

B

243

Catch curve Z ages 1-14 = -0.51

200

149

100

52

36

0

0

0


Figure 146. Age-specific length-frequency histograms for summer flounder for ages 0 through 6. AG E = 0 4 0

3 0

2 0

1 0

0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

A G E =T o1t a

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

7 5

8 0

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

7 5

8 0

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

7 5

8 0

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

7 5

8 0

l L e n g th (c m )

4 0

3 0

2 0

1 0

0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

A G E =T o2t a

l L e n g th (c m )

1 4 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

A G E =T o3t a

l L e n g th (c m )

1 8 1 7 1 6 1 5 1 4 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

T o ta l L e n g th (c m )

AG E = 4 4

3

2

1

0

0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

ta A G E T=o 5

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

7 5

8 0

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

7 5

8 0

4 5

5 0

5 5

6 0

6 5

7 0

7 5

8 0

l L e n g th (c m )

3

2

1

0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

T o ta l L e n g th (c m )

AG E = 6 2

1

0 0

5

1 0

1 5

2 0

2 5

3 0

3 5

4 0

T o ta l L e n g th (c m )

- 130 -


Figure 147. Length-weight regression for summer flounder, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 6000

5000 Weight(g) = 0.0033 x Length(cm) 3.3013 (n = 716)

Weight(g)

4000

3000

2000

A

1000

0 10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Total Length(cm)

6000 Females: W eight(g) = 0.003 x Length(cm) 3.3221 (n = 448)

5000

Males: W eight(g) = 0.006 x Length(cm) 3.1409 (n = 256)

Weight(g)

4000

3000

2000

1000

B

0

10

20

30

40

50

Total Len gth(cm)

- 131 -

60

70

80


Figure 148. Diets of summer flounder by percent weight (A) and percent number (B).

A

B

- 132 -


Weakfish (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 149. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for weakfish.

- 133 -


Figure 150. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for summer weakfish. 8,000,000

100,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 230,584,843

90,000,000

7,000,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 16,269,075 80,000,000

Pct. S.E. = 20% (number) 20% (biomass) 6,000,000

70,000,000

5,000,000

Number

4,000,000

50,000,000

40,000,000

3,000,000 30,000,000

Avg Wt: 0.031kg

Avg Wt: 0.061kg

Avg Wt: 0.112kg

Avg Wt: 0.109kg

Avg Wt: 0.074kg

Avg Wt: 0.078kg

Avg Wt: 0.081kg

2,000,000

20,000,000

1,000,000 10,000,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 151. Length frequency histogram for weakfish. 9,000

Number Captured = 60,990

8,000

Number Measured = 5,747

Expanded Number

7,000

Number of Otoliths = 572 6,000

Number of Stomachs = 471

5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Total Length (cm) - 134 -

40

45

50

55

60

Biomass (kg)

60,000,000


Figure 152. Sex ratios for weakfish by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n=

77

100

50

161

16

72

129

100.1

100.0

100.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

26.5

12.6

52.6

74.6

49.3

11.1

53.1

67

90

40.9

87.4 80

31.6

Percent

70 60

Sex

50

50.7

47.3 40

48.0

46.8

6-VA

7-NC

U M F

42.0

30

25.4

20 10 0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

4-DE STATE

B n= Percent SUM

100

5-MD

2 100

45 100

171 100

192 100

116 100

29 100

9 100

5 100

1 100

1 100

1 100

100

30

13

45

31

21

16

24

100

100

100

90

38

84

80

80 76

70

40

69

60

Sex

56

50

50

U M F

40 30

30

20 10 2-4

4-6

6-8

8-10

10-12

12-14

14-16

16-18

18-20

20-22

22-24 Inch-class

Length (cm)

- 135 -

55 -6 0

50 -5 5

45 -5 0

40 -4 5

35 -4 0

30 -3 5

25 -3 0

20 -2 5

15 -2 0

10 -1 5

05 -1 0

0


Figure 153. Maturity logistic regression for weakfish, by sex. 1.0 99% maturity 0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 50% maturity 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 10

20

30

40

50

60

70

Total Length (cm) Figure 154. Age frequency histogram for weakfish.

40000

34312 Catch curve Z ages 0-3 = -1.49

30000

17622

20000

10000

6017 342

Age (Year Class) - 136 -

5

(2 00 3) 4

(2 00 4) 3

(2 00 5) 2

(2 00 6) 1

0

(2 00 7)

0

0 (2 00 2)

0


Figure 155. Age-specific length-frequency histograms for weakfish for ages 0 through 3. AG E = 0 500

400

300

200

100

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

40

45

50

55

60

40

45

50

55

60

To t a l L e n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 1 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

To t a l L e n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 2 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

To t a l L e n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 3 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

To ta l Le n g th (c m )

- 137 -

40

45

50

55

60


Figure 156. von Bertalanffy growth curves for weakfish, by sex. 60

Fe m ale s : L(m ax) = 70.5 T(ze ro) = 0.263 K = 0.232

50

Length (cm)

M ale s :

L(m ax) = 46.2 T(ze ro) = 0.401 K = 0.453

40

30

20

10 0

1

2

Age

- 138 -

3

4


Weight(g)

Figure 157. Length-weight regression for weakfish, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B).. 1800 1700 1600 1500 1400 1300 1200 1100 1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

Weight(g) = 0.0099 x Length(cm)2.9942 (n = 571)

A 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

Total Length(cm)

1800

Fe m ale s: We ight(g) = 0.0098 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.9949 (n = 280)

1700 1600

Male s: We ight(g) = 0.0103 x Le ngth(cm ) 2.9844 (n = 257)

1500

Weight(g)

1400 1300 1200 1100 1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200

B

100 0

10

20

30

40

T otal Len gth(cm) - 139 -

50

60


Figure 158. Diets of weakfish by percent weight (A) and percent number (B).

A

B

- 140 -


Winter Flounder (Priority A)

A

B

Figure 159. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for winter flounder.

- 141 -


Figure 160. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for winter flounder. 500,000

1,700,000 1,600,000 1,500,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 1,639,213

1,400,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 413,370

400,000

1,300,000

Pct. S.E. = 32% (number) 27% (biomass)

1,200,000 1,100,000

Number

900,000 800,000 700,000

200,000

600,000 500,000

Avg Wt: 0.252kg

400,000

100,000

300,000 200,000 100,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 161. Length frequency histogram for winter flounder. 60

Number Captured = 391 50

Number Measured = 391

Expanded Number

Number of Otoliths = 118 40

Number of Stomachs = 114

30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

Total Length (cm) - 142 -

30

35

40

45

Biomass (kg)

300,000

1,000,000


Figure 162. Sex ratios for winter flounder by state (A) and length group (B).

A

n=

118

100

100

27

90 80 70

69 Percent

60

Sex

50

U M F

40 30 20 10 0 1-RI STATE

B n= Percent SUM

100

1 100

8 100

100

15 100

14 96

63

90

15 100

17 100

22

11 100

16 100

19 100

22

95

8 100

7 100

1 100

100

100

100

92

46

80

78

76

70 60

Sex

50 40

U M F

40

30

33

20 10 6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

17

Length (cm)

- 143 -

.0 42 .5 -4 5

.0 37 .5 -4 0

.5 35 .0 -3 7

.0 32 .5 -3 5

.5 30 .0 -3 2

.0 27 .5 -3 0

.5 25 .0 -2 7

.0 22 .5 -2 5

.5 20 .0 -2 2

.0 17 .5 -2 0

15 .0 -1 7

.5

0

Inch-class


Figure 163. Maturity logistic regression for winter flounder, by sex. 1.0

99% maturity 0.9

Probability of Maturity

0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5

50% maturity

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1

SEX

F M

0.0 10

20

30

40

50

Total Length (cm) Figure 164. Age frequency histogram for winter flounder. 300

235

200

100

87 62

4

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

Age (Year Class) - 144 -

(1 99 7) 10

(1 99 8) 9

(1 99 9) 8

(2 00 0) 7

(2 00 1) 6

(2 00 2) 5

(2 00 3) 4

(2 00 4) 3

(2 00 5) 2

(2 00 6) 1

(2 00 7)

0 0

Expanded Number

Catch curve Z ages 1-7 = -1.01


Figure 165. Age-specific length-frequency histograms for winter flounder for ages 1 through 3. AG E = 1 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

30

35

40

45

30

35

40

45

T o t a l Le n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 2 4

3

2

1

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

T o t a l Le n g t h ( c m ) AG E = 3 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0

5

10

15

20

25

T o t a l Le n g t h ( c m )

- 145 -


Figure 166. von Bertalanffy growth curves for winter flounder, by sex. 50

Fe m ale s : L(m ax) = 70.5 T(ze ro) = 0.263 K = 0.232 M ale s :

Length (cm)

40

L(m ax) = 46.2 T(ze ro) = 0.401 K = 0.453

30

20

10 1

2

3

4

5

Age

- 146 -

6

7

8


Figure 167. Length-weight regression for winter flounder, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 1100 1000 900 800

Weight(g) = 0.0115 x Length(cm) 3.0331 (n = 118)

Weight(g)

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 10

20

30

40

50

Total Length(cm)

1100 1000

Females: W eight(g) = 0.0126 x Length(cm) 3.0084 (n = 95)

900

Males: W eight(g) = 0.0079 x Length(cm) 3.1393 (n = 18)

800

Weight(g)

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 10

20

30

T otal Length(cm) - 147 -

40

50


Figure 168. Diets of winter flounder by percent weight (A) and percent number (B).

A

B

- 148 -


Winter Skate (Priority B)

A

B

Figure 169. Number (A) and biomass (B) of specimens captured at each station for winter skate.

- 149 -


Figure 170. Minimum trawlable number and biomass by state for winter skate. 1,400,000

1,900,000 1,800,000

1,300,000

1,700,000

Minimum Trawlable Number = 3,048,125

1,600,000

1,200,000

Minimum Trawlable Biomass (kg)= 2,756,000

1,500,000

1,100,000

Pct. S.E. = 29% (number) 18% (biomass)

1,400,000

1,000,000 1,200,000

900,000

1,100,000

800,000

1,000,000

700,000 900,000 800,000

600,000

700,000

500,000

600,000

400,000

500,000

300,000

400,000 300,000

Avg Wt: 0.752kg

200,000

Avg Wt: 1.127kg

200,000

Avg Wt: 1.270kg

100,000

100,000

0

0

RI

NY

NJ

DE

MD

VA

NC

State Figure 171. Width frequency histogram for winter skate. 70

Number Captured = 951

Expanded Number

60

Number Measured = 735 Number of Vertebrae = 171

50

Number of Stomachs = 160 40

30

20

10

0 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Disk Width (cm) - 150 -

40

45

50

55

60

Biomass (kg)

Number

1,300,000


Figure 172. Sex ratios for winter skate by state (A) and width group (B).

A

n= 100

81

84

100

100

100

55.7

22.5

75.0

4

90 80

76.7

Percent

70 60

Sex

50

U M F

44.3

40 30

25.0

20 10 0 1-RI

2-NY

3-NJ

STATE

B n= Percent SUM

100

1 100

6 100

21 100

28 100

34 100

100

19

60

23

28

37 100

12

90

30 100

11 100

1 100

51

62

100

85

80

81

77

70

72

60

Sex

50

49 40

40

U M F

38

30 20 10 4-6

6-8

8-10

10-12

12-14

14-16

16-18

18-20

22-24

Length (cm) (cm) Disk Width

- 151 -

55 -6 0

45 -5 0

40 -4 5

35 -4 0

30 -3 5

25 -3 0

20 -2 5

15 -2 0

10 -1 5

0

Inch-class


Figure 173. Width-weight regression for winter skate, sexes combined (A) and by sex (B). 6000

5000

Weight(g) = 0.0269 x Length(cm) 3.0104 (n = 171)

Weight(g)

4000

3000

2000

1000

0 10

20

30

40

50

60

Disk Width (cm)

5000 Females: W eight(g) = 0.0161 x Length(cm) 3.1552 (n = 109) Males: W eight(g) = 0.0314 x Length(cm) 2.9603 (n = 59)

Weight(g)

4000

3000

2000

1000

0 10

20

30

40

Disk Width (cm) - 152 -

50

60


NEAMAP Fall 2007 Final Report