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NEWS

Issue 273 - 16 August 2019

Lithgow Aged Care Ltd “Working with Residents and the Community as Partners in Care” Position Vacant – Maintenance Supervisor Lithgow Aged Care Facility is located in Lithgow NSW and is a 95-bed residential aged care facility on a split site. We are currently undergoing development of a new 6 star lodge for an additional 36 beds to be opened in early 2020. Our vision is to ensure that we provide the best care to our residents and maintain excellent relationships with our staff. We are looking to employ a Maintenance Supervisor to look after our maintenance team on a permanent basis. This position is responsible for the maintenance of three residential aged care lodges. The person will be required to maintain a scheduled maintenance program, as well as undertake minor repairs, painting, ordering of equipment, liaising with contractors, ensuring servicing and cleaning of vehicles and other general duties as required. We are looking for an applicant who is able to supervise other staff, show initiative and be a self thinker. Previous experience in this type of field is essential. A relevant trades qualification is desirable but not essential. Applications close by 5.00pm, Friday, 23 August 2019

NEW RESEARCH REVEALS RELAXED ATTITUDES OF NEW SOUTH WALES DRIVERS ON RURAL ROADS Australian Road Safety Foundation launches monthlong safety initiative that targets high-risk rural roads.

Today, The Australian Road Safety Foundation (ARSF) officially launched ​Rural Road Safety Month in Bathurst, by releasing new research and remembering those who tragically lost their lives on regional roads last year. With two thirds of road deaths occurring on regional roads, the ARSF has conducted new research which reveals one in three New South Wales drivers admit they are more likely to undertake risky behaviour on rural roads. As a powerful reminder of the fatal consequences when taking risks behind the wheel, more than 7​ 00 large yellow flowers were laid in memory of every life lost on rural roads last year. The solemn installation comes as the research report shows that not even having children in the car is a deterrent for dangerous driving behaviour on rural roads. ARSF Founder and CEO Russell White urged Australians - both regional and city based - to take ownership for their role in reducing the rural road toll. “While there are a number of factors that contribute to the regional road toll, it’s everyday Australians that hold the key to safer roads,” Mr White said. “The research has told us that New South Wales drivers are taking risks on rural roads because they’re either less likely to get caught or perceive there to be fewer dangers. “We will continue to see a significant and unnecessary loss of life on regional roads until we make a collective effort to shift this mentality so that safety is front of mind for all road users.” The ARSF research has also highlighted the disparity in attitudes and behaviours between rural and city drivers.

According to the data, rural residents in New South Wales are more likely than metro drivers to engage in dangerous behaviour on rural roads. In fact, rural drivers overtook their metro counterparts when it came to speeding, driving while fatigued and driving under the influence, with the most shocking statistic being that 1 in 3 rural drivers have driven under the influence of drugs or alcohol, compared to 22 per cent of metro drivers. However, the research also showed that one in three road users recognised that a shift in attitudes and behaviour would have the biggest impact on the road toll. “Despite making up only 16.5 per cent of the nation’s population, regional road deaths account for a staggering two in every three of the national toll. Since this same time last year, the New South Wales has seen a 10% increase in rural casualties,” Mr White said. “Acknowledging that everyday road users have a personal responsibility is the first step and it’s our hope that Rural Road Safety Month will encourage drivers to choose road safety and turn this sentiment into real action.” Following community support of last year’s inaugural Rural Road Safety Week, the initiative has been extended to a month-long campaign from August 1 to 31, with the ARSF imploring locals to choose road safety and take ownership for their role in reducing the regional road toll. Backed by the Australian Government and long-time sponsor Suncorp, businesses, community groups and individuals are encouraged to choose road safety and get involved by hosting a local awareness raising event. The ARSF research was conducted by a third-party research company, Pure Profile, and was an online survey of more than 1,000 licenced Australians, nationally representative by gender, age and location. For more information or to find out how to get involved, visit ​arsf.com.au​.

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Paul Toole at the ARSF - Rural Road Safety Event

RURAL ROAD SAFETY MONTH 2019 NEW SOUTH WALES FACT SHEET GENERAL STATISTICS:

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- More than 1 in 3 New South Wales drivers admit they are more likely to break a road rule when driving on rural roads - New South Wales drivers are 1.5 times more likely to speed on rural roads than they are on city or suburban streets - New South Wales road users are more likely to overtake on a double line if driving on a rural road, compared to city or suburban streets - 58% of drivers who admit they are more likely to break rules on rural roads would do so because they are less likely to be caught by police - More than 1 in 3 New South Wales drivers believe that rural road rules should be relaxed to allow for higher speed limits, higher blood alcohol limits and mobile phone usage - However, one third of New South Wales road users believe a shift in driver attitudes and behaviours would have the biggest impact on the rural road toll

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METRO V REGIONAL DRIVERS IN NEW SOUTH WALES:

- 1 in 3 rural drivers admit to speeding, using their mobile phone or driving distracted while their own kids are in the car - the same amount as New South Wales metro drivers - However, metro road users are twice as likely to take risks behind the wheel while someone else’s children are in the car when compared to rural road users - Metro residents (61%) are just as likely as rural residents (60%) to drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol, drive fatigued, not wear a seatbelt and speed - Metro drivers admitted that they were more likely to break a road rule on rural roads, compared to local drivers - Driving under the influence, fatigue and speeding were the three biggest differences between rural and metro drivers in New South Wales: - 1 in 3 rural drivers have driven under the influence of drugs or alcohol, compared to 22 per cent of metro drivers - Almost three quarters of rural drivers admit to driving whilst fatigued, compared to 64 per cent of metro drivers - Metro drivers (80%) and rural drivers (82%) are equally likely to speed on the roads

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Lithgow Local Paper - Village Voice #273  

Headspace officially opens doors, Lithgow APprentice wins top award and much more!

Lithgow Local Paper - Village Voice #273  

Headspace officially opens doors, Lithgow APprentice wins top award and much more!

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