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scen sc enee

E AT • D R I N K • P L AY • W AT C H • L I S T E N • R E A D • T A K E A H I K E

CAPE ROSIER

‘Without the Harvest, We Don’t Exist ‘ UNITY

Common Ground Art Speaks for Maine

CAMDEN

Wrapping the Shoot BOOTHBAY

Special Olympiads

on the Green

ISLE AU HAUT TO ISLESBORO

Art Afloat ROCKLAND

In and Out of Perspective

FREE! SEPTEMBER 2 011 VOL. 2 • NO. 9 DISTRIBUTION ALONG THE CREATIVE COAST: KNOX, WALDO, LINCOLN AND HANCOCK COUNTIES


Comprehensive Patient Care Low Dose Digital X-rays Oral Cancer Screening Advanced Cavity Detection Restorative Care Crowns and Veneers

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Teeth Whitening Head, Neck & Facial Pain Therapy Sleep Apnea Appliance Therapy Gentle exams and cleanings for your family We work with Insurance companies

www.midcoastfamilydentistry.com Quality, professional service when you need it most.

Shane verge (center) received the keys to a 2001 Volkswagon Passat from Rockport Automotive owner Steve Diason (right). At left is David McFarland who nominated Verge for the award

Open Mon. - Sat. at 8:00 a.m. (Open ’til midnight Tues., Wed., & Thurs.) www.rockportautos.com 42

Wheels To Prosper Winner!! Shane Verge of Cushing, ME

Specializing in the Service & Repair of Asian, European & Domestic Cars & Light Trucks

Rt. 1, Rockport • 236-2431

www.rockportautomotive.com theSCENE • September 2011


Head 2 Toe

Leather Works & Cobbling Leather works, cobbler, seamstress and beautician The only female cobbler in the State of Maine • Custom Leather Clothing • Leather Accessories •Repairs If you can think of it, I can make it!

135 Thomaston St., Thomaston • 594-2342 • Mon ~ Fri 10 - 7, Sat by appointment

Sue Carleton Independent Beauty Consultant 7 Kimberly Drive Rockport, Maine 04856 (207) 596-9553 (Cell) (207) 594-4721 (Home) scarleton@marykay.com www.marykay.com/scarleton

THE GHOST in the MACHINE State-wide 24 hour

Our store now fills an entire theater!

O GH

HI NE

SALES AND SEVICE OF COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION, KITCHEN EQUIPMENT, EXHAUST HOODS, AND ROOFTOP HEATING / A.C. SYSTEMS

ST IN THE MAC

207-542-5760 • Reliable • Honest • Affordable www.TheGhostOnline.com

10 Boothbay House Hill Boothbay Harbor, ME

207-633-4992

Clothing Section Features Geetah, Celtic & Renaissance-Style Clothing • Reversible Floor-Length Capes in Velvet & Satin • Knives & Swords, Crystal Ball & Bowls • Scrying Mirrors • Wiccan Supplies • Magic Wands • Magic Spells & Candles • Eastern Incense & Native American Sage, Cedar and Juniper • Variety of Pipes and Grateful Dead Memorabilia • New Age & Metaphysical Books • 300+ Tarot Decks & Runes • Egyptian Statuary • Eastern Relious Items & Statuary • Angels & Fairies • Dragons & Gargoyles • Chimes, Cards & Calendars, Crystals, Jewelry, Gems & Minerals • Massage & Essential Oils • Body Jewelry • Tapes & CDs

Open daily year round. Call for hours

www.enchantments-maine.us

ROCKPORT – Large renovated barn attached to a beautifully restored Maine farmhouse. Many possibilities for home business. Beautiful views off large back deck. Established landscaping. $179,900

SOUTH THOMASTON – Spacious 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath cape offers country living only minutes from the ocean and shopping. Wood burning fireplace, granite counter tops in the kitchen and private deck with hot tub. $241,500

THOMASTON – Updated home in a quiet neighborhood. House features a sunny and private back deck, oversized garage & workshop. Newer second story addition, roof and heating system. Turn-key condition. $159,900

ST. GEORGE – This wonderful 3 bedroom home has been completely remodeled! New kitchen, new baths, hardwood floors, finished basement with private bath. Gorgeous water views! $269,000

WASHINGTON – This 3 bedroom farmhouse is completely renovated with a new kitchen, bedroom, floors and bathroom. Several great barns and lot of acreage with great potential. $145,000

WARREN – Beautiful home close to everything. This home offers two bedroom living all on one floor. Attached 2 car garage and large walk-out basement. $145,000

Hundreds of benches, tables, and chairs in stock! Wild & wonderful Teak Root benches and tables. Each one a unique and durable addition to your landscape. Don’t miss our huge collection of teak bowls, spectacular wood carvings, and massive slabs in exotic wood species. Route 1, Wiscasset (just 6 miles north of Bath) • 207-882-7225 and 38 Sea Street, Boothbay Harbor • 207-633-9899 Open April 15-October 15 Daily, 9 a.m. to 5p.m.

theSCENE • September 2011

3


EXPERIENCE THE BOOTHBAY HARBOR REGION

Boothbay Harbor Region Chamber of Commerce www.Boothbayharbor.com

$

199/ FOURSOME

188 Holes W/cart After 1pm (Add $10/player Before 1 pm) Must Call For Advanced Tee Time & Mention Offer. Must Present Coupon At Proshop Check-in. Expires 2011

33 Country Club Road • Boothbay, ME 04537 (207) 633-6085 • www.boothbaycountryclub.com

Close To Downtown Boothbay Harbor Free Continental Breakfast Jacuzzi Room & Suites Available Open Year Round Heated Outdoor Pool & Hot Tub In Season Visit our Website for Rates, Coupons & Specials! 1-800-660-5094 • www.BoothbayLodging.com 200 Townsend Ave, Rt 27 • Boothbay Harbor, ME 04538

4

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theSCENE • September 2011


theSCENE • September 2011

5


In this

issue 7

TOP DISH: Newcastle Publick House

8

MUSIC SCENE How tough is the biz for artists?

Contributors

Nathaniel Bernier Nathaniel Bernier, owner of Wild Rufus Records, previously retail and now online, has immersed himself in music for 35 years, hosting several radio shows, deejaying at clubs and parties, writing music reviews and interviewing artists. He lives on the coast of Maine and continues to live through music. wildrufus. com; wildrufus.blogspot.com

Kay Stephens Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance writer, has covered both mainstream and underground events, people and scenes. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow through Facebook: facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

Shannon Kinney Shannon Kinney of Dream Local has more than 15 years of experience in the development of successful Internet products, sales and marketing strategy.

10 BEHIND THE SCENE Port Clyde Lobster Tours 12 HARVEST SCENE 16 TOP DISH: Traci’s Diner

Daniel Dunkle

17 BREW REVIEW 57 Bayview Bar & Bistro

Daniel Dunkle writes the weekly humor column, “Stranger Than Fiction,” and “Down in Front” blogs and movie reviews. He is Associate Editor for The Herald Gazette. His column appears in the Friday editorial pages. Follow him on twitter at twitter.com/#!/DanDunkle.

18 WHITE HOT SPOTLIGHT Featuring Andy White 19 BOATYARD DOG SCENE

Holly Vanorse Got an idea for monthly photos? Each month, I’ll be out capturing a different theme for the monthly photo spread. Everything from the great outdoors, stock car racing to the small town night life. Call or e-mail Holly Vanorse at hvanorse@villagesoup.com or 594-4401 with your idea.

20 YANKEE CHEF

Lacy Simons

22 ART SCENE Totally off the wall in Rockland

Lacy Simons is the new owner of hello hello, known currently to all as Rock City Books in Rockland. She is a reader, a maker, and a collector of fine-point pens and terrible jokes. To find more picks and reads: facebook.com/ hellohellobooks Twitter: @hellohellobooks.

24 ART SCENE Inside the box, out on the water 26 KILLER PIX 27 BEER REVIEW The Flavor of Fall

Tiffany Howard and Jim Dandy Tiffany Howard and Jim Dandy co-own Opera House Video, an independent video rental store in downtown Belfast featuring an extensive collection of new releases, foreign films, documentaries, classics and television series. Each takes turns writing the movie review. Find them on Facebook.

28 MOVIE SCENE Crazy, Stupid, Love Cowboys & Aliens 29 FILM SCENE One wraps, another set to shoot 30 THE STORY BEHIND… the Tattoo

After managing and consulting with artists and small independent labels for years, Marc has started a small independent music company that concentrates on singer - songwriters. It’s called Mishara Music based here in Midcoast Maine . Marc writes about the national and local music business. Visit Marc online at misharamusic. com or marcrescue.wordpress.com. Write him at thescene@villagesoup.com

32 TOP DRINK: The Lookout Bar & Grill 33 THE SCENE IN BRIEF Harvest Hootennany Country Roads Tour Putting for Olympiads in Boothbay 35 TOP CHEF Manuel Mercier, Youngtown Inn

Jim Bailey Chef Jim Bailey is a Maine native who has more than 25 years experience in the New England kitchen. Although proficient in international cuisine, is an authority of Yankee Food History, New England genealogy and the New England lifestyle since the 17th Century. With two cookbooks just written, Chef Jim looks forward to hearing from you at via email theyankee@aol.com or theyankeechef.com.

36 NATURE SCENE Oudoors at Hidden Valley 37 SOCIAL MEDIA MAVEN

the

Contact us: thescene@villagesoup.com Send calendar items to: calendar@villagesoup.com

scene

the

39 CALENDAR OF EVENTS Things to do in September

301 Park St. • P.O. Box 249 Rockland, ME 04841 207.594.4401 • 800.559.4401 and 23 Elm St. • Camden, ME 04843 207.236.8511

A graduate of Siebel Institute for Brewing Studies in Chicago, Ruggiero worked as a consultant across the east coast setting up micro-brewery on Long Island, N.Y. called James Bay Brewing Company. In 1995 he relocated to Rockland, Maine to build Rocky Bay Brewery which closed in 2007. He is now the brewmaster at the new Shag Rock Brewing Company in Rockland, located at Amalfi’s Restaurant on the water.

Marc Ratner

31 CIFF announces opening, closing films

scene

Richard Ruggiero

E AT • D R I N K • P L AY • W AT C H • L ISTEN • RE A D • TA K E A HIKE CAPE

Published Monthly

Production Department Christine Dunkle, Manager Designers Heidi Belcher, David Dailey, Beverly Nelson, Debbie Post, Kathleen Ryan and Michael Scarborough

ROSIER

UNITY

Common Ground Speaks for Maine Art

ALAN FISHMAN “Summer into Autumn” detail, from the painting

The Four Seasons 2007, acrylic on canvas, 5’x20’ For more information alanfishmanstudio.com CAMDEN

Wrapping the Sho ot BOOTHBAY

Special Olymp

on the Green

facebook.com/thescene1

6

FREE!

‘Without the Har We Don’t Exist ‘ vest,

Cover Art: Lynda Clancy - Editor Marydale Abernathy - Creative Director, VP Business Development Sales Department Candy Foster, Jody McKee, Pamela Schultz and Nora Thompson

SEPTE MBER 2 011 VOL. 2 • NO. 9

DISTR IBUTIO IBUTI ON N ALON G THE CREAT IVE COAST: KNOX , WALD O, LINCO LN AND HANC OCK COUN TIES

iads

ISLE AU HAUT

TO ISLESBORO

Art Afloat

ROCKLAND

In and Out of Perspective

Ad Deadline for October is 9/19/11

theSCENE • September 2011


Top

dish Maine shrimp and chicken gumbo 1 small chicken Maine shrimp meat Andouille sausage Sweet onion Red bell pepper Celery Garlic Cajun Spice blend Thyme Bay leaves Kosher salt Chicken stock Lobster stock Flour Blended oil black pepper brown whole grain rice

Dinner served nightly — Private dining room available for special occasions

Come feast with us ....

ROUTE 52 LINCOLNVILLE

down a winding country road through the Camden Hills...

Since 1991

Reservations Suggested

763-4290 www.youngtowninn.com

“A taste of France in the Maine countryside ”

The secret: It’s all in the chocolate colored roux and homemade stocks. It’s all about taking the time, no canned chicken stock here!

Newcastle Publick House 52 Main Street • Newcastle; Phone: 207-563-3434; newcastlepublickhouse.com Hours: Sun - Thurs: 11:00 am - 11:00 pm; Fri - Sat: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

THE VILLAGE RESTAURANT 5 Main Street, Camden

Casual full service restaurant serving great seafood plus a full menu from sandwiches to steaks “The only thing we overlook . . . is the harbor.” Open lunch anddinner dinner OpenDaily daily11-9 forfor lunch and Private Private Dining Dining Room Room for for Parties Parties Reservations Reservations 236-3232 236-3232

Come try our new menu “featuring” local organic meat, fish and produce

Live Music Wed. & Thurs. nights

Open Year ’Round Enjoy patio dining 52 Main St. • Newcastle

563-3434

www.newcastlepublickhouse.com

Bullwinkles

Comfort Inn

Seafood & Steakhouse

& The Bog Tavern Home Style Country Cooking Open

Everyday for Breakfast & Lunch Thursday, Friday & Saturday Dinner Mon. Tue. Wed. 6:00 am–2:30 pm Thur. Fri. Sat. 6:00 am–8:00 pm Sun. 7:00 am–2:30 pm 1422 Heald Highway (Rt. 17) Union 785-2300

Athens pizzeria

• Steaks • Seafood • Chicken • Pasta • Gourmet Pizza • Full Bar • BBQ’s on the deck • Draft Beers Mon. - Thurs. 3 - 8, Fri. 3 - 9, Sat. 12 - 9, Sun 12 - 8 2919 Atlantic Highway, Waldoboro 832-6272

Locally Sourced Responsibly Handled Inspired Cuisine

When I get hungry I get Moody! www.moodysdiner.com 832-7785 Rte. 1, Waldoboro

159 Searsport Ave. Belfast

338-2646 comforinnbelfast.com/dining “Come for dessert and stay for dinner”

207-338-4565 • 52 Main Street Beautiful Belfast, Maine 04915 Delvinosgrill@yahoo.com

Open 7 Days: 11:30am-9p.m

“Have you had your slice today?”

EAT IN OR TAKE OUT 179 Main Street • Thomaston 354-0040 Mon.-Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

theSCENE • September 2011

Rustic French Cuisine Main St. in Rockland Serving Lunch m-f 11-2 Serving dinner 7 days starting at 5 207.594.4141 www.lilybistromaine.com

7


Music

scene By Marc Ratner

So how tough is the music biz for artists these days?

As always there’s good news and bad news... he good news: Technology has advanced so much that a musician no longer needs the say-so from some ivory tower fake hipster in the corporate music world to record his or her music. Many of the best albums released these days are home studio recordings.

T

The bad news: Because of media corporate control, the huge number of recordings being released and the wide diversity of the Internet, where so much music is discovered now, it’s almost impossible for a self-produced and recorded artist to get appropriate attention focused on his or her music. In other words, there are stunningly wonderful records being released every week that you haven’t heard of and possibly never will. It’s not fair to the artist or the listener. Here are some sales statistics from 2009 about the 100,000 albums released that year. Forget about the million sellers; look how few records of the 100,000 sold even 10,000 copies Of the some 100,000 albums released last year, 17,000 of them sold only one copy; more than 81,000 albums sold fewer than 100 copies; in fact, just 1,300 albums were sold as more than 10,000 copies. Albums selling more than 10,000 units in 2009: 1,319 Albums selling more than 5,000 units in 2009: 2,058 Albums selling under 1,000 units in their first year of release: 92,601 Number of albums selling less than 100 copies in 2009: 81,000

Putnam Smith We Could be Beekeepers

There are a lot of talented musicians who will never make a living with music. This is not because their albums don’t deserve to sell more. It’s that the people who would be their fans never find out they exist. That’s the major challenge of the music business in the 21st Century. It’s not about illegal downloading. How does a talented and well deserving musician reach his or her audience? My company and many others are trying to find that answer. My belief is that the key is word of mouth. That’s how I always found out about great musicians. Here on the Midcoast, we’re lucky to have three non-commercial broadcasters that buck commercial trends and expose not only national artists of note but also those from our state. In Rockland you’ve got WRFR, a local low power station that broadcasts on 93.3 in Rockland and 99.3 in Camden. It’s a grassroots station with a volunteer staff and more than 50 different shows of both music and talk varieties.

Laura Marling I Speak Because I Can

The two big stations for musicians to build an audience in the region are WERU Blue Hill (89.9 from Blue Hill and 99.9 out of Bangor), a full-power, mostly-music station, and Sara Willis’ “In Tune By Ten” show (10 p.m. Monday through Thursday and Sundays at 10 a.m.), which is broadcast on the Maine Public Broadcasting Network (MPBN) all over the state, with the local outlet on the Midcoast at 90.5 out of Camden. Gillian Welch The Harrow & The Harvest

Children’sMenu/Family Menu/Family Friendly Children’s Friendly Full Bar Bar Full Open Wednesdays-Sunday Open Wednesday-Sunday Summer Hours:

“Ask About Our Dessert Specials” Mon.-Thurs. 4-9Nightly • Fri.-Sun. 11:30-9:00 Year ’round Dining in the Heart of the Mid-Coast

“Maine Fare with a Southern Flair”

Fridays Slow Cooked Prime Rib

SPEAR’S FARM STANDS

Saturdays

Visit us for your Fresh Produce & Meats Fill your Freezer Now!

Uncle Samo’s B-B-Q

Sundays Roast Turkey Dinner with all the trimmings

(207) 677-6771

2477 Bristol Rd, New Harbor Only 3 miles from Pemaquid Point Light on Rt 130.

Fall Products Arriving Daily

Happy Hour every day Wed.-Sun. 4 - 6 pm $1 off all drinks

Center Street, Nobleboro Mon.-Sat 9-5 June-Sept. 563-7191

Squash~Pumpkins Apples~Flowers

U.S. Route 1, Waldoboro Mon.-Fri. 9-6 • Sat. & Sun. 9-5 May-Nov. 832-0483 www.spearsfarmstand.com

Open Monday ~ Friday 9:00 to 5:00

8

theSCENE • September 2011


Sara’s show may seem to be about singersongwriters but as she says: “It’s not one genre, it’s music that’s good and that fits. For example, Asha from Nigeria and Mason Jennings from Minnesota, you couldn’t have two more diverse records but they’ll end up together in the same show.”

their attention and local Maine artists are designated by an orange sticker. Because of the multiple formats on the station WERU receives approximately 4,000-5,000 new albums a year. I asked Sara and Denis about what they’ve liked lately. Denis: New Gillian Welch album “The Harrow & The Harvest” — The biggest folk release of the year so far. Sara: Wonderful more obscure new projects that deserve wider audiences, Laura Marling, Vetiver, Fruit Bats & Ana Egge. Sara mentioned a few Maine artists off the top of her head: Putnam Smith, Arborea (who have a big following in Europe especially in Spain), a new record from a band named Beads and Phantom Buffalo to name a few.

The secret for Sara is the segue, how she puts the songs together. She spends hours and hours listening and selecting songs for her shows. She receives on average 40 new albums a week, more than 2,000 yearly that fit her show’s format. As she’s learned from 10 years of broadcasting In Tune By Ten, “the listeners really do want a wide spectrum that includes gems from the past that you won’t hear anywhere else.” Denis says that the DJs on WERU have full authority to play whatever they want. He does flag notable CDs to bring them to

In Tune By Ten: mpbn.net WERU: weru.org WRFR: wrfr.org

Tips for artists submitting their music to radio s important as the digital revolution is for music, both Sara and Denis work with CDs and neither has time to download digital submissions.

A

Denis advises artists to include information about the recording one is sending. You’d be amazed at how many artists don’t include any information. And a big tip: Don’t send CDs in paper or cardboard sleeves. Use digipaks or jewel cases with information on the spine of the package. At every radio station nationwide CDs are filed in rows with the spine facing out. If your CD has no spine and written information on it, it’ll just disappear into the files. Mail CDs to:

How can you help? If you love a recording by a new artist, talk about it. Share with your friends. Become a musical advocate. If you don’t, then you can’t complain that commercial radio stations and the big box retailers only play and sell the lowest common denominator records from the winners of the TV karaoke shows.

Denis Howard WERU, PO Box 170 East Orland, ME 04431 Sara Willis MPBN, 63 Texas Ave Bangor, ME 04401

SUNDAY at CAPPY’S

not just lunch . . . think . . .

would How u like yo ggs? e your

. orry

oh s

Men

1 Main St. 236-2254

theSCENE • September 2011

u

Sunday Brunch 11-3 Mon.-Thurs 11-10 Fri. & Sat. 11-11

9


scene

Behind

the

Checking for keepers.

Captain Gary Libby looks out at Marshall Point Lighthouse

Port Clyde Lobster Tours Story and photos by Kay Stephens n Maine, if you’re doing what you really you want for a living, you usually have about four part-time jobs. That’s how Captain Gary Libby makes his living in Port Clyde. When the weather is good, he’ll work seven days a week doing a little commercial fishing here, a little lobstering there, and when there’s time, he’ll run casual tours off his lobster boat, MisKim.

I

Until recently, if you ever wanted to know the ins and outs of lobster fishing, you had to rely on books, documentary DVDs or YouTube clips. Smart people do not approach working lobstermen in the harbor and ask them brilliant questions like “How come those lobsters in your trap are green?” There are better ways to find that out. Port Clyde Lobster Tours originated out of the public’s need to get up close and personal on a lobster boat. Kim Libby, office manager for Port Clyde Lobster Tours, said: “I worked at the postal service in Port Clyde for several years and got asked the same question time and time again: ‘Is there any way a person could go out on a lobster boat and see how it was done?’ Back then, there really wasn’t. So, a few years ago, my husband saw the writing on the wall and got his lobster license back. He’s also a commercial ground fisherman. Once he got

10

his lobster boat in operation again, we decided to put this tour together and started getting a lot of calls. “You can expect a real live lobsterman who works 400 traps at any given time when he’s not fishing or doing tours. He’s got his Grundens on, and is usually looking pretty unkempt with fish goo up to his elbows. He always takes Red, our dog along. The dog’s part of the deal.” Just then, Red climbs up into the canvas chair, the only other spot a person can sit on the boat. He’s a sweetheart of a dog, but it’s clear that this is his spot on the boat and he ain’t moving. Since the tour can only fit about four people comfortably, it’s easier to stand. The boat itself is refreshingly grungy, as is Captain Libby. This is no sanitized schooner tour with life vests, cushy blankets and barrels of soft drinks. Grime splatters the windows and the mung flies off the warp as it coils onto the boat deck. Next to the canvas chair is a live well, which is a built-in saltwater tank to hold the lobsters he catches.

Measuring a lobster.

The boat itself is refreshingly grungy, as is Captain Libby. This is no sanitized schooner tour with life vests, cushy blankets and barrels of soft drinks.

“If you don’t have a live well on your boat, ya got dead lobsters,” Libby said.

theSCENE • September 2011


Captain Gary Libby is as nice a guy you could ever get for a guide, said his wife, who understands how curious people are about the profession, yet intimidated to approach a working lobsterman. “He just a really laid-back, laconic guy,” she said. “If he were any more laconic he’d be dead. But his approach is really easy going; he doesn’t mind answering any questions at all.” That said, one of their favorite questions from tourists is: “Why do all the boats point the same way?” Hint: Google this before you ask it. The two-hour tour starts in Port Clyde as MisKim putters around the harbor. Captain Libby will tell you anything you want to know about lobstering as he hoists his traps up on a winch, opens them up, takes out the lobsters and demonstrates how to measure them with a brass gauge. He likes to let his trap sit — or “soak” for at least four nights before he checks them again. Out of his wire traps, he pulls out large whelks, Jonah crabs, and a bunch of undersized lobsters, called shorts, before tossing them all back into the sea. After we’ve pulled up about six traps with only a few soft shell lobsters in each, Captain Libby does some calculations. Bait costs $120 a barrel and that covers roughly 100 traps. So he needs to catch at least a one-

pound lobster in each trap to break even on his bait costs, but that’s not counting gas. Ideally, catching five or six lobsters in each trap would make a profit. Captain Libby doesn’t like to waste anything. You get the sense when he’s hauling traps on these tours, it’s not just for the tourists’ benefit; he’d actually like to make his bait back while simultaneously educating his guests. As her husband of 17 years talks and tends to his traps, Kim Libby rubs Red’s head and said, “All we have to do is bottle that accent of his and we’ll have it made.” As Captain Libby motors between islands tending traps, you will get to observe seabirds, seals sunning themselves on rocks and the occasional porpoise. You will also have the opportunity to see take pictures of the Marshall Point Lighthouse most known for its cameo in the movie “Forrest Gump.” Winding through Huppers Island and Raspberry Island, you will understand what fishermen in Maine have known for centuries; there is nothing more beautiful than being on the ocean on a sparkling, sunny day. At the conclusion of each tour, each customer receives a live lobster to take home. (Check out their website to see how you can remotely “own” a lobster trap and all of its sustainable lobster to be shipped to your home.) For more information about Port Clyde Lobster Tours, visit portclydelobsteradvent ures.com/index.htm; call 593.6808 or email Kim@portclydelobstertours.com.

Red’s spot.

Capt. Libby

Next to the saltwater tank is a tubful of bait — pogies, the term for menhaden, that have been sitting there salted for the last few days.

We have a large variety of granite slabs on site

Add beauty to your home one stone at a time Granite Kitchen Counter & Vanity Tops ~ Fireplace Surrounds

Slate & Soapstone Sinks & Countertops

68 State Road, West Bath

443-9691 www.midcoastmarbleandgranite.com

theSCENE • September 2011

11


Harvest

scene

PHOTOS BY HOLLY S. EDWARDS

Harvesting Maine “W

Kathy Vicory was wwoofing at Blue Sky Farm this summer, before heading back to Colorado. Blue Sky Farm is an organic blueberry operation just down the road from Four Season Farm on Cape Rosier. Wwoofing (Worldwide Opportunities in Organic Farming), is what young high school and college students are doing these days, traveling the world and working as volunteers on organic farms. It is a phenomenon that has grown, and many Maine students are learning about sustainable farming through the network. Stop a mother in a grocery store, and she’s apt to mention that her daughter or son is wwoofing in Hawaii or New Zealand. Kathy, a graphic designer at the Art Institute in Denver and trained in equine science, came east after learning about wwoofing from other young travelers. About the harvest: “It’s very colorful. Since I’ve been focusing on low bush blueberries, I can tell you the different types of blueberries are all a different shade. The harvest is getting your hands in the dirt and enjoying the fruit of your labor.”

12

ithout the harvest, we don’t exist,” Eliot Coleman says succinctly, as he refastens the chicken fencing so the darting and clucking hens do not slip into the next field. A few of them run with an independent streak, and he is especially wary of their next moves. “The harvest is 12 months,” said Eliot, who owns Four Season Farm, an experimental market garden along with Barbara Damrosch. The farm produces vegetables year-round and has become a nationally recognized model of small-scale sustainable agriculture. As humans, we are a long trail’s away from our days of hunting and gathering, but still on a steep learning curve of how to feed — and nourish — ourselves. Eliot is at the forefront of that curve, and many look to his farm, his world, for wisdom and guidance. At then end of a fine August afternoon on Cape

Report of the harvest, 1854 From the New York Times archives, 1854: Reports from reliable men in every county in the state, whose attention has been especially directed to inquiries concerning the state of the crops and the prospects of the harvest, enable us to state with a good degree of confidence, that the agricultural products of Maine this year will be abundant; in reregard to some crops, more than an average, and that in the aggregate, Maine farmers, even at prices greatly reduced from those which now prevail, will receive a larger money compensation than was ever realized by them in any one year. Hay and potatoes are the principle staples of Maine. In respect to hay, the question concerning the crop is settled. In order to secure large crops of hay, two conditions are necessary: a favorable Spring, which, means a

Rosier, the fog is moving in and out, just kissing the tops of the tall spruce, but not enough to cover the sun, which still warms the crops and fruit trees. Though Cape Rosier is remote, locals and summer people make regular treks to Four Season Farm for vegetables and spring when the early rains are frequent and copious, to give the grass a strong hold of the land and make the undergrowth plentiful and vigorous, and a favorable haying season. Both of these conditions have been realized, and the result is, with a few exceptions, a hay harvest, unprecedentedly large and unusually good. The barns of Maine are filled to overflowing with the abundant crop of hay. The later rains fell just at the time when the fears of the farmers began to be aroused that the pasture feed would be dried up and the after crop would be a failure. Had that result ensued, the disaster would have been serious and widespread, for, with good fall feed, farmers so husband their hay that they can send thousands of more tons to market than they otherwise could do. As it is, the recent frequent and generous rains have put a new face upon the fields, and the prospect in regard to the whole of the grass crop is most encouraging.

theSCENE • September 2011


fruit; conversely, it stocks many restaurants and farmers markets in the area. It is a business, a highly functioning agricultural enterprise that has become a model across the northern latitudes. Eliot’s consistent exploration of gardening methods over his lifetime has illuminated the way for many in Maine who grow their own food, and the push to extend the growing season year-round is no longer a novelty. It has become a welcome reality. “The natural world is very eager to feed us,” he says. And most amazingly is that the farm thrives in such an unforgiving landscape. Cape Rosier is beautiful, yes, formidably so; but the soil there is a thin layer of old leaves and pine needles masquerading as dirt as it all clings to ledge. Trees are tall, but their roots are shallow. Hardscrabble farmers knew this centuries ago, and many tried their hands at making an agricultural way of life only to move on, either to nearby towns with more productive soil, or to the Midwest, during the country’s great push westward. But Eliot is figuring it out, feeding the soil with manure and seaweed, building its composition, and rotating crops and greenhouses to develop optimum conditions for big, beefy tomatoes, towering sunflowers and greens that bring sustenance through the long, dark winter. With what he learns, he passes on to legions of young farmers who are inspired by him, and he teaches the rest of us who try to cultivate gardens right through November and winter. Eliot opens the farm stand in June, signaling the start of the season; yet, each year, the farm finds itself in competition with itself to see how many crops it can offer customers in that month. This year, the farm produced 18 different items (including tomatoes!), which as any farmer and gardener in Maine knows, is staggering. “The world not being able to feed itself? That is the world listening to big agriculture,” says Eliot. This is what he said earlier this year at a California conference: “The radical idea behind organic agriculture is a change

in focus. The new focus is on the quality of the crops grown and their suitability for human nutrition. That is a change from the more common focus on growing as much quantity as possible and using whatever chemical techniques contribute to increasing that quantity.” “The country was pretty much together when 20 percent of the population were farmers,” he says, recommending we all read “The Founding Gardeners” by Andrea Wulf, and who investigates the founding fathers from the perspective of their lives as gardeners, plantsmen, and farmers. “It offers a look at how important the soil and food production was in creating the country,” he said. For the founding fathers, gardening, agriculture, and botany were elemental passions, as ingrained in their characters as their belief in liberty for the nation they were creating. Wulf describes how, even as British ships gathered off Staten Island, George Washington wrote his estate manager about the garden at Mount Vernon; how a tour of English gardens renewed Thomas Jefferson’s and John Adams’s faith in their fledgling nation; how a trip to the great botanist John Bartram’s garden helped the delegates of the Constitutional Congress break their deadlock; and why James Madison is the forgotten father of American environmentalism. Dylan Chapman, of Rockport, is a 2008 graduate of Camden-Hills Regional High School. In fact, he was the class salutatorian. He got interested in gardening in his senior year of high school. Last year, he spent in Seattle. “It wasn’t right for me. I missed the country life. I wrote Eliot because I had read his books several times — something about the soil grabbed me and I always liked working with my hands [‘Make sure you soil,’ he tells me.‘Not dirt. Dirt is on your clothes.’]” Dylan wants to be a farmer and grow food for himself and other people. The harvest:“It’s the reward for all of our hard work. It’s the completion of our cycle.”

theSCENE • September 2011

Four Season Farm A traditional farm stand with produce and cut flowers An art gallery with paintings, sculpture and crafts by the Cape Rosier Artist Collective Open 1-5 pm, Monday through Saturday, June-September 609 Weir Cove Road, Harborside Are we living the good life in Maine? In a way, but we have a long way to go. How we nourish our bodies and souls will ultimately decide how healthy we are in body, mind

and spirit. We are moving full throttle into the harvest this month, and it is time to put up the beans, can the tomatoes and freeze the blackberries. What a bounty we have!

The Harvest Moon By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes And roofs of villages, on woodland crests And their aerial neighborhoods of nests Deserted, on the curtained window-panes Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests! Gone are the birds that were our summer guests, With the last sheaves return the laboring wains! All things are symbols: the external shows Of Nature have their image in the mind, As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves; The song-birds leave us at the summer’s close, Only the empty nests are left behind, And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

13


Year of the Canning A common ground of art By Ethan Andrews ime is fast approaching for the Common Ground Country Fair, now in its 35th year. The 2011 poster, designed by Dacia Klinkerch, of Raymond, was the winning entry in the annual design contest and portrays home-canned and fresh vegetables. Fair Director Jim Ahearne and Tom Opper, of Liberty Graphics, recently agreed to look back through the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOGFA) image archive and talk with Ethan Andrews of VillageSoup about the development of the iconic posters and T-shirts that mark the organization’s signature event.

T

1977

C E L E B R AT E R U R A L L I V I N G

WITHMOFGA

SEPTEMBER 23, 24 & 25, • 2011

1985

UNITY, MAIN E Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association

www.mofga.org

2011

Ethan: I understand that the poster design became a contest sometime after Dahlov Ipcar’s poster in 1987. How many entries do you typically get? Tom: We typically receive between 40 and 60, and this year we were fortunate. We had more entries and some very good ones. It’s a lot of fun when the quality and the quantity of entries are greater. Ethan: I was looking at the posters on MOGFA’s website which date all the way back to 1977. Many of them appear to have a similar look — an isolated agricultural specimen or an animal with a certain type treatment. Jim: One of the things we convey to artists who submit designs is a certain style or format that we think will work well as an iconic Common Ground Fair design. But we try not to specify too much because we don’t want to constrain artists to conform to a clump of vegetables or a profile of an animal’s face. This leaves room for submissions like 2007’s praying mantis. Entries like that one may present a number of challenges in terms of reproduction, but they are worth it.

1984

Ethan: What’s the relationship between the poster and the T-shirt? Jim: A poster is something that you can see from across the room and you know what it is. A shirt is similar, though some of the design elements that work in a static print like a poster on paper might not work as well on a t-shirt when someone is wearing it. Some entries would make excellent prints, but without enough contrast they won’t work on a T-shirt. If you can’t step 15 or 20 feet away and see that it’s, for example, two animals, it’s not going to work.

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theSCENE • September 2011


Ethan: There’s a really recognizable style now, but the 1977 poster is quite different. It’s got the whole program listed, and seems very functional. It doesn’t look like something you would hang on your wall. Tom: Over the first half a dozen years there was a great deal of maturing in terms of understanding the importance of imagery, and in developing a consistency with it. Early on there was no relationship between the T-shirt and the poster. The unification of those things in 1984 built a stronger image for the fair. Initially people didn’t know what the Common Ground Fair was, so it was necessary to give a more comprehensive picture of the event. Generally speaking, people now know what the Common Ground Fair is, so we’re able to choose whatever image seems most appropriate.

many T-shirts and who has worked at Liberty Graphics for 25 years. She knows what a T-shirt looks like and how to create a good graphic image that can be seen from a distance. D. D. was commissioned, and before that Liberty Graphics commissioned the artists. 1991 might have been the first contest year. That image is by Bryan Wiggins. He was a commercial artist, if I remember right, a graphic illustrator.

Ethan: Some familiar elements appear early on, like the treatment of the type in the title. Around 1983, “Common Ground Country Fair” incorporates a large capital “C” and “D,” and that jug handle look seems to stick around for the rest of the run. Tom: The exception was 1997. Beverly Kocenko, Liberty Graphics art director for 25 years and the designer of 1985 pea poster, had a propensity to try something different. Some people questioned it, but there were enough strong voices that said ‘yes,’ that the convention of the presentation was broken that year.

Ethan: Images are selected a year in advance, and recently you decided on the image for 2012. When will we see it? Jim: We don’t usually display the image until the January before the fair. Until the artist we select has a chance to work with Liberty Graphics to finalize something everyone knows will work, we tend to withhold announcing it. For example, the 2010 design by Holly Meade is actually a combination of two separate submissions by her. Each featured a rooster and a sun, but for the poster and the shirt to work we wanted to use the rooster from one entry and the sun from the other. So she worked with us to combine the two.

Ethan: I noticed a real difference between the images for 1990 and 1991. The first one is a pig and some wildflowers, which is obviously observed. Only close observation could capture the flowers so well or the white fuzz around the pig’s ears. The 1991 poster art seems more conceptual, using a stylized farm and an apple with the Earth superimposed on it. Tom: The 1990 image was done by D. D. Tyler, an artist who’s done many,

1990

1991

Ethan: Wasn’t 1991 when Earth Day came back? Jim: Yes, I think that was very much an Earth Day year. I was working at an Earth Day concert at Foxboro Stadium.

1997

2007

Ethan: Looking back, do you have any personal favorites? Jim: One of my favorites is the year of the carrots, and that’s because it was the first time I went to the fair. That’s one thing that’s neat — the designs become sort of an era. People look back and refer to the ‘year of the pig’ or the ‘year of the beet.’ Tom: I’m partial toward the peas. Beverly was such an integral part of Liberty Graphics, and the screen-printing of the poster was wonderful. I’m also partial to the pig, because D. D. Tyler is one of my all time favorite T-shirt artists. But I know better than to be partial now. To view reproductions of posters from 1977 to 2011, visit MOFGA’s website, mofga.org. The 2011 Common Ground Fair will be held Sept. 23, 24 and 25, at the MOFGA fairgrounds, Unity.

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theSCENE • September 2011


Brew

Review

T

he 57 Bayview Bar & Bistro is my latest happy hour haunt not just because the bar is tucked away in a mahogany-topped outdoor patio and not just because it goes from 3 to 6 p.m,, but because it offers an unprecedented happy hour discount. (Apologies to other establishments out there, but if your beers are normally $4.50 and your “happy hour” discount consists of 50 cents off, [buzzer sound] that doesn’t cut it.) Here, the 25 domestic and craft bottles you can choose from during happy hour are $2.75 across the board. Enough said. Here are a few you can expect to see on the menu:

Chang Thai Beer, Thailand Owner and chef Ray Losnes has fond memories of this beer. When he was in koh lanta, Thailand, at a place called Mong’s bar, the owner, Mong (a stocky muscular guy who sounds exactly like his name) poured him a shot from a bottle of whiskey with a dead five-foot cobra coiled inside, then poured him a shot of whiskey with bits of monkey brain floating inside, then poured him a chaser of Chang. After a sip of this rice-based bright and golden beer, you’re just glad to look down in your glass and not see something that would royally cheese off PETA.

Red Stripe So, in tribute to Mong’s Bar, which is quite Rastafarian in design and uh... practice, Ray says he’d offer Mong a Red Stripe if he ever

57 Bayview Bar & Bistro 57 Bay View Street, Camden • 236-4451

By Kay Stephens

came to this country. Everyone is pretty familiar with this Jamaican lager, which pours crisp and smooth, as smooth as the time Mong put a six-year-old kid’s hand on his bar while the kid’s parents watched from behind, took a hatchet (yes, a hatchet) and played the knife game back and forth between the kid’s splayed fingers without a single nick. Whoever that kid’s parents were, you can be sure a couple of shaky-handed cobra whiskey shots followed.

Magic Hat 9 Why is 3 x 3 the magic number with this Vermont-based beer? The magic, it seems, is not only in the hint of apricot in this light pale ale. It’s in the trippy label, which finds you staring deeply into it, trying to decipher it like the echoey overdubbed feedback loops on the Beatles track, “Revolution 9.” So after a Chang, a Red Stripe and a couple more Magic Hats, what is the significance of three? The next morning it all becomes clear: that’s as many as I should stick to when doing a Brew Review. For more happy hour specials, including $5 specialty martinis, $4 mixed drinks and half-price house wines by the glass, stop by 57 Bayview Bar & Bistro in Camden.

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17


White Hot

spotlight

Featuring Andy White

By Kay Stephens

ndy White guessed the correct photo in last month’s “How Well Do You Know Midcoast Maine” photo contest. As the winner’s creative hobbies or outlets are typically featured, we lucked out with Andy, particularly when we learned he was the designer behind the new bicycle wheel sliding door dividing the space between the new Rock City Coffee from the hello hello book store in the back. Andy has a BFA in sculpture from Mass College of Art. He’s also been a welder and pipe fitter, antennae rigger and tower climber in Antarctica. He describes himself as an artist/sculptor/maker.

A

What do you like to do for fun when you’re not creating something for someone else? I draw and paint. I run the Life Drawing group over at Lincoln Street. I’m a sculptor and an artist and really, that’s my passion. There’s not a big distinction between what I do for fun that I’m not already doing in my work. A buddy of mine has a theory about work and play. Work can be play if you approach it with the right state of mind and look for opportunities to be creative. Take on projects where you don’t know what it is going to look like when it is done. A lot of the fun can be found the discovery process.

PHOTO BY: KAY STEPHENS

The winner of “How Well Do You Know Midcoast Maine” gets The White Hot Spotlight on The Killer Convo as a way to profile artists in the area.

What’s an example of something you recently did using this theory? My friend Daniel Bennett and I recently created a mobile, wood-fired pizza oven for Uproot Pie Co. in Union that can be used outdoors. It started with a pile of steel, bags of concrete and the design happened largely one-to-one on the chalkboard. A lot of sitting and thinking happened along the way… and eventually it became moving food sculpture.

Tell us about the Bicycle Wheel Sliding Doors. How did that even come about? I’ve always loved old barn doors on rollers and I played around with different ideas. It just popped into my head to use bike wheels instead of rollers. Sometimes you can exaggerate one element of a design and come up with a creative new solution.

Where did you get the parts?

PHOTO BY: KAY STEPHENS

One of the wheels was from my own bike. The rest were from the Rockland dump. I bought the doors from Viking and painted them. The beam we found on the side of the road—free for the taking. I love Maine!

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theSCENE • September 2011


Boatyard Dog

scene

By Holly Vanorse

I

n its ninth year, the Boatyard Dog trials at the Maine Boats, Homes and Harbors Show, Aug. 12-14 in Rockland, was once again a big spectator draw. With dogs and handlers finding themselves in the chilly water of Rockland Harbor, five dogs competed to be named the 2011 Boatyard Dog. The winner of the title, and the coveted doggie bone shaped plaque with a dog dish in the center, was Fenway, a shepherd/lab mix and also the mascot for the Loyal Biscuit Company. Fenway and her handler, Joel Neal, put on quite a show, and made a lot of waves, landing them in the top spot. Neal, a police officer with the Rockland Police Department, is also Fenway’s owner, along with Heidi Vanorse. Neal and Vanorse own the Loyal Biscuit Company, with store in Rockland and Belfast.

theSCENE • September 2011

19


cuisine

scene

The Three Yankee Chefs

I

am stopped so many times and asked about my father (the second Yankee Chef, Jack Bailey) and my grandfather (the second Yankee Chef, Samuel Bailey) and always asking me “Are you as good a cook as your dad? Or grandfather? My answer is, and always will be, emphatically ‘NO!’ Although I have great confidence in my skills, it takes much more to be a great chef. Attitude, decisiveness, compassion, understanding and a graceful disposition are but a few attributes that separates the good and great chefs. I like to think I do possess those qualities but not nearly to the extent 50 to 60 years of sweating in the kitchen brought to them. The second most often asked question is what were their favorite main course, not only to eat but to prepare. Dad’s favorite was au Poivre, especially Pork Chops Au Poivre. Grampy’s favorite food was Golden Onion and Fontina Stuffed Chicken. So I give you both.

Pork Chops au Poivre Steak au Poivre , French for ‘with pepper.’ Classically, this steak is seared very quickly in a hot skillet so that the outside layer of peppercorns form a great tasting crust while the inside stays about medium-rare.My father told me that he chose sour cream over the traditional heavy cream in the sauce

because of the pungent kick it gives, more so than mustard, which is also generally used. 2 teaspoon cracked black pepper 1/2 teaspoon salt, divided Four 4-ounce boneless pork chops, 1/2inch thick, trimmed* 1/4 cup flour 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium shallot, minced 1/2 cup brandy 1/2 cup sour cream Combine pepper and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a small bowl. Pat the mixture onto both sides of each pork chop. Place flour in a shallow dish; dredge each chop in the flour, shaking off any excess. Heat oil in a large skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add the chops, reduce heat to medium and cook until browned and just cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate and tent with foil to keep warm. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add shallot to the pan and cook, stirring, until softened, about 1 minute. Add brandy and cook, stirring and scraping up any browned bits, until most of the liquid has evaporated, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat; stir in sour cream and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt. Serve the pork chops with the sauce.

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20

Yankee Chef

By Jim Bailey

Chicken Stuffed with Golden Onions & Fontina Grampy Sam like the aged Fontina because it had a sharper taste and firmer texture than ordinary Fontina. He was indeed a true Yankee, the sharper the flavor of his cheese, the darker the coffee, and the stronger the rum, the happier he was. 4 teaspoons olive oil, divided 1 1/2 cups thinly sliced red onion 2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary, divided(or 1 teaspoon dried) 1/8 teaspoon salt Black pepper, to taste 2/3 cup shredded Fontina cheese, preferably aged 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, about 1 pound 1/2 cup white wine 1 cup chicken broth 4 teaspoons flour Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and 1 teaspoon rosemary; cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is golden brown, 6 to 7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Let cool; stir in fontina. Meanwhile, cut a horizontal slit along the thin, long edge of each chicken breast half, nearly through to the opposite side. Stuff each breast with 1/4 cup of the onion-cheese mixture. Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in the same skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook until golden, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Add wine and the remaining 1 teaspoon rosemary to the pan. Cook over mediumhigh heat for 2 minutes. Whisk broth and flour in a bowl until smooth; add to the pan, reduce heat to low and whisk until the sauce thickens, about 1 minute. Return the chicken to the pan and coat with the sauce. Cook, covered, until the chicken is just cooked through, 2 to 4 minutes. Serve the chicken topped with the sauce. My favorite entree? You have no idea how hard this is! Anything lobster or crab I would say would be my first choice, just plain steamed. Dull huh? Alright then, how about my favorite breakfast treat?

Raspberry-Swirled Sweet Rolls 1 cup milk 2/3 cup sugar 2 tablespoons active dry yeast 1 stick butter or margarine, softened 2 eggs 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest 1/2 teaspoon salt 4 1/4 cup flour, plus more for dusting 1 10-ounce package frozen raspberries, not thawed 1/4 cup, plus 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon cornstarch 1 cup powdered sugar 3 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted 1 1/2 tablespoons heavy cream In a small saucepan, warm the milk over moderately low heat until it is warm. Pour the warm milk into the bowl of a standing electric mixer fitted with the dough hook and stir in the sugar and yeast. Let stand until the yeast is foamy, about 5 minutes. Add the softened butter, eggs, grated

lemon zest and salt. Add the flour and beat at medium speed until a soft dough forms, about 3 minutes. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat until the dough is soft and supple, about 10 minutes longer. Scrape the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it with your hands 2 or 3 times. Form the dough into a ball and transfer it to a lightly buttered bowl. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let stand in a warm place until doubled in bulk, 1 to 2 hours. Line the bottom of a 9-by-13-inch baking pan with parchment paper, allowing the paper to extend up the short sides. Butter the paper and sides of the pan. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and, using a rolling pin, roll it into a 10-by-24-inch rectangle. In a medium bowl, toss the frozen raspberries with the sugar and cornstarch. Spread the raspberry filling evenly over the dough. Tightly roll up the dough to form a 24-inch-long log. Working quickly, cut the log into quarters. Cut each quarter into 4 slices and arrange them in the baking pan, cut sides up. Scrape any berries and juice from the work surface into the baking pan between the rolls. Cover the rolls and let them rise in a warm place until they are puffy and have filled the baking pan, about 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 425°. Bake the rolls for about 25 minutes, until they are golden and the berries are bubbling. Transfer the pan to a rack to cool for 30 minutes. In a small bowl, whisk the confectioners’ sugar with the butter and heavy cream until the glaze is thick and spreadable. Invert the rolls onto the rack and peel off the parchment paper. Invert the rolls onto a platter. Dollop glaze over each roll and spread with an offset spatula. Serve warm or at room temperature. My favorite other sweet indulgence?

Blueberry Drop Cookies 3/4 cup butter or margarine, softened 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon rind 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup milk 1 cup fresh blueberries (or frozen, thawed and drained) Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease a cookie sheet. In a mixing bowl, beat butter and sugar until fluffy texture. Add eggs, lemon rind, and vanilla; beat until combined. In another bowl, add the flour, baking powder, and salt; stir to combine. Beat flour mixture into creamed mixture alternately with milk. Fold in the berries. Drop dough by teaspoonfuls onto the prepared cookie sheet. Bake for 10-12 minutes. Transfer cookies to a wire rack to cool. Makes approximately 2 1/2 dozen.

theSCENE • September 2011


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theSCENE • September 2011

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Art

scene Totally off the wall in Rockland

“In and Out of Perspective” represents fresco artist Barbara Sullivan’s portion of a four-artist show mounted this month at the Caldbeck Gallery in Rockland.

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arbara Sullivan’s work literally pops off the wall as she integrates large scale drawings with her signature fresco bas relief sculptures. Her work is surprising and fun, as she combines her marvel way of using the fresco technique with engaging stories she presents in her cartoon room creations. What are fresco bas relief sculptures? Historically, fresco is one of the most ancient ways of applying color pigments to a wall. The famous Sistine Chapel ceiling, painted by Michelangelo in the 1500s used the fresco technique. The process involves a chemical reaction with pigment and plaster that makes an enduring surface unlike any other. Color isn’t just applied on top of the surface, it is integrated with wet plaster and must be expertly applied and manipulated as the plaster dries and hardens. It was customary for fresco painters to use a full-sized detailed drawing, a “cartoon,” to transfer a design onto a plaster surface and this process seems to be referred to in Sullivan’s style of presenting a pen drawing on

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paper from which she displays her relief fresco pieces on the wall. The almost austere, black and white drawings contrast beautifully with the rich pigments of the fresco work. About this new work, she says: “The play of how things are constantly in and out of perspective, metaphorically and physically, interests me. How things are, in reality, are never as they appear in a drawing or in life. There is always something on the surface and under the surface. We see things differently in the present than we do in the past and future, because we always bring whatever experience we have to it.” Sullivan has given many fresco workshops at colleges and art centers throughout New England and New York, and currently teaches drawing and painting at The University of Maine at Farmington. She had been awarded several prestigious grants (a Pollock/ Krasner Grant and two Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Support Grants). This is her eighth solo show with the Caldbeck Gallery, where she has shown since 1996.

Barbara Sullivan’s shaped frescoes and Sharpie on paper. Top: Kitchen, 6’x7’. Above: Bird Guide Installation, 9’x9’.

theSCENE • September 2011


Janice Kasper, St. Moose, 2011, Oil on Panel, 18”x11”. Right: Skunk and Woodpeckers, 2010, Oil on Canvas, 28”x 36”

Painter Janice Kasper of Swanville explains that her new work is about two separate things: The larger paintings are a part of a “shadow species” series, based on animals found in Maine, but are seldom seen, focusing on the patterns found in Maine’s flora and fauna; the smaller paintings, in oil on panel, are directly influenced by Medieval illuminated manuscripts. In the artist’s 21st Century version, the central saint figures are animals instead of humans, and the painting’s borders and backgrounds reflect the environmental issues that affect us all. (D. Dominick Lombardi, writer for the New York Times, commented that Kasper’s work “can be loosely described as Georgia O’Keeffe with a cause”.) In 2007, Kasper received an artist-in-residence position at Denali National Park in Alaska. She has shown with the Caldbeck since 1985. Frederic Kellogg is one of a number of artists engaged in the search for what can be called a contemporary realism. Like others, he has been deeply influenced by the work of American Realists such as Edward Hopper and Fairfield Porter, and challenged by the impact of photography as an art form, as well as the innovations of the mid- twentieth-century Abstract Expressionists and their aftermath. “Realism has to find a new legitimacy, “ the artist says. “It demonstrates that which only painting can do in helping people to see what is around them.” In “Goodbye Miami and Other Reflections on the 21st Century”, the artist has created a body of work that visually ponders the nature of mankind’s endeavors. His work is represented in the permanent collections of the Farnsworth Museum, the Portland Museum of Art, MBNA Bank, corporate collections in Boston and Washington, and private collections throughout the country. This is his third solo show with the Caldbeck.

Frederic Kellogg, Bowling, Watercolor on paper, 15”x24”

In “Domestic Partners”, Carol Sloane, of Washington, paints the intensity of feeling that plays out between people and their canine or feline partners. Her juicy paint and sculptural figures fill her canvases with an energy and realism, though in some of the paintings, mysterious truncation of shapes lead the viewer into another plane of reality, making one wonder, “what is going on here?” There seem to be several levels of meaning, though each viewer would most likely interpret them differently. A founding member of the Downtown Gallery in Washington, the artist was awarded the Carina House Residency on Monhegan Island in 2002, the Helen Wurlitzer Foundation Residency of Taos, New Mexico in 2005 and 2010, and the Cill Rialaig Project in Ballinskelligs, Ireland, in 2006. She spent the winters of 2007-09 on solo painting sessions in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. Sloane first exhibited with the Caldbeck in 1998, and has exhibited widely in Maine. Caldbeck Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 11-4, and Sunday 1-4. For more information, call 594-5935. Carol Sloane, Domestic Partners 2010: Oscar, Bretta, and Bernice, Oil on Canvas, 12”x12”

theSCENE • September 2011

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Art

scene

Inside the box,

out on the water

A bit of Burnt Island history is represented in “Little Fox Island Thorofare.” PHOTO BY: DAGNEY C. ERNEST Anne-Emmanuelle Marpeau, a native of Brittany, France, visits Maine every year to research the history of its islands and remote coastal communities. PHOTO BY: JULIE CAWLEY

Marpeau’s ‘Art Afloat’ shadowboxes By Dagney C. Ernest

hen the little worlds created by artist Anne-Emmanuelle Marpeau went on view last year at Searsport’s Penobscot Marine Museum, they were a big hit. Marpeau, who lives in a boatyard in Brittany, a peninsula in northwestern France between the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay, came to the Midcoast with her shadowbox dioramas, which were borrowed from a variety of owners for the show.

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She returned last month with a new batch of shadowboxes for “Art Afloat: Tales of Maritime Maine,” an exhibit that traveled to island and coastal communities of Knox, Waldo and Hancock counties aboard the Maine Sea Coast Mission’s Sunbeam V and are on view through Sept. 18 at Dowling Walsh Gallery, 357 Main St. Marpeau constructs her shadowboxes out of wood, fabric and plaster. She calls them ex-votos, which, Ben Fuller, the museum’s Richard Saltonstall Jr. curator, said is literally translated as “from the vow made” and were traditionally placed in churches to seek grace or give thanks. He said Marpeau’s pieces are offerings, story boxes that tell tales of events gone past and of events imagined. The idea of an onboard exhibition was hatched during Marpeau’s stay

last year with Polly Saltonstall of Rockport and her family. Saltonstall, then president of the museum’s board of trustees and currently a board member, said the artist wanted to visit one of Maine’s islands so they went to Southern Island and Islesboro during her visit. “Since she was staying with John [Saltonstall’s husband] and me, we spent a lot of time together. I got to learn a lot about what she does, how she does it and why she does it,” Saltonstall said. Somewhere in their conversations, Marpeau, who grew up around boats, said she had always wanted to have an art show on one. So they visited some of the Midcoast’s windjammers and “kicked the idea around” a bit. It was clear a different kind of vessel was needed. After the artist returned to Brittany last fall, Saltonstall contacted Maine Sea Coast Mission, a historically non-denominational mission that provides spiritual, health and youth development programs on eight coastal islands and Down East coastal communities, and spoke with its new outer islands pastor, Rob Benson. “He said he loved the idea of bringing art around to the islands,” said Saltonstall.

“Blue Hill Bay Light” is depicted in 1859. PHOTO BY: DAGNEY C. ERNEST

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theSCENE • September 2011


Marpeau calls (her shadowboxes) ex-votos, which is literally translated as “from the vow made” and were traditionally placed in churches to seek grace or give thanks. Marpeau’s pieces are offerings, story boxes that tell tales of events gone past and of events imagined.

The Maine Sea Coast Mission’s Sunbeam V will become an art gallery for three days this month.

Having cemented that partnership, Saltonstall started working the phones. Other nonprofit partnerships were formed with Northeast Harbor’s Great Harbor Maritime Museum; North Haven’s Waterman’s Community Center; the Penobscot East Resource Center in Stonington; Swans Island Education Association; and the Heliker-LaHotan Foundation of Great Cranberry Island. Creative connections were made with professional photographer Peter Ralston, who prefaced his illustrated talk at the Stonington Opera House with Penobscot Marine Museum’s historical slide show; and recent Camden Hills Regional High School graduate Andy Schlebecker, who videotaped the tour before heading down to Emerson College.

of a vessel that ran aground at Two Bush Light.

Another partnership really made the whole project possible, said Saltonstall. Dowling Walsh Gallery arranged for the work to be shipped and will create a catalog for it. A week before “Art Afloat” was set to be installed on the Sunbeam V, the big wooden shipping crate could be spotted in the alley behind the downtown gallery.

Organizing the tour was a new challenge for Saltonstall, and she said she was inspired by not only the chord that Marpeau’s work strikes with people but by her own love for both the Sunbeam and Penobscot Marine Museum. For the artist, who Saltonstall said is quite shy but who will be onboard throughout, “Art Afloat” is a one-of-a-kind opportunity.

The shadowboxes depict some of the more intriguing tales told in Charles McLane’s “Islands of the Mid-Maine Coast” including the strange story

theSCENE • September 2011

The extraordinary wreck of the circus animal-laden steamer Royal Tar off Vinalhaven is strikingly depicted. PHOTO BY: DAGNEY C. ERNEST

“The crew went ashore to wait for it to get afloat with the tide and it floated away before they got back to it,” said Saltonstall. The true stories depicted took place in small coastal communities and the goal of the show is to have people in those and similar communities see the work, Saltonstall added. When last year’s Penobscot Marine Museum show was running the museum’s education department offered a series of diorama workshops, which were very popular. The final “Art Afloat” workshop of the tour is set for Saturday, Sept. 17; to register, call 548-2529, ext. 202.

Monhegan’s “Island School” is one of shadowbox artist Anne-Emmanuelle Marpeau’s subjects. PHOTO BY: DAGNEY C. ERNEST

“She loves boats and showing her work this way is one of her dreams,” said Saltonstall.

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Books, Movies, and Music reviews by those obsessed with books, movies and music. Compiled by Kay Stephens

EAST OF EDEN! September is a month of nostalgia for most of us — returns to school, seasons changing — so I thought I’d look back a little and feature John Steinbeck’s superb, called-a-classic-for-good-reason East of Eden. I love this book so much, I’m jealous of people who’ve never read it before because they get to experience it for the first time, which I’d pay to do again. I won’t summarize the content for you here, because it’s a task too epic for these pages, but I will say these few things: don’t watch the movie if you haven’t read the book, because after you read the book you probably won’t want to watch the movie. And: don’t avoid the book because it’s long or because Oprah chose it a few years ago or because it’s well over fifty years old. None of that matters. The story is exquisite, as is Steinbeck’s writing.

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PAUL Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, the duo behind the brilliant zombie comedy Shaun of the Dead and the clever cop movie spoof Hot Fuzz, are back with their latest offering, the new sci-fi send-up, Paul. Directed by Greg Mottola of Superbad fame, Paul is the story of two blokes, Graeme and Clive, on holiday in America, who first visit Comic-Con then rent a Winnebago for a road trip tour of UFO hotspots. When they happen upon an actual alien escaped from federal custody, they begin a fugitive-style adventure that includes evading a man-in-black alien hunter and his haplessly conflicted lackeys. Next, they unwittingly kidnap a fundamentalist Christian RV park proprietor, all while coming to grips with their preconceptions of alien life and the reality that their new friend Paul isn’t exactly E.T. Paul has a great cast that includes Kristen Wiig, Jason Bateman and Bill Hader as well as several fun cameos I won’t ruin for you. While this film certainly doesn’t eclipse Frost and Pegg’s earlier works, it is nevertheless a heck of a good time full of (forgive me) out-of-this-world fun! REVEREND PEYTON’S BIG DAMN BAND This release is worth picking up for the sheer nakedness of the instruments used, and only one microphone to record the voices! Truly recorded with the thought of replicating the great Charley Patton and how he recorded back in the 1920s and early 30s. “Mississippi Boweavil Blues” is a bouncing juke with Peyton’s fingers jumping across the strings. “Some of These Days I’ll be Gone” is an electrifying banjo pluckfest that will surely have you stomping your feet. Peyton is on guitars and banjo only, Washboard Breezy sparingly uses her famous washboard and “Cuz” only uses a 100-year-old tobacco barrel for percussion instead of his usual drum kit. Naked, barren, plain, yet beautiful, this is blues re-done, and yet done as if it were 90 years ago! An amazing album paying homage to a Mississippi delta blues king.

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theSCENE • September 2011


Beer

Review

The Flavor of Fall

By Richard R. Ruggiero ith summer now becoming a legend, the kickoff to the fall season is just upon us. Thinking back on the vast verity of beer I had the pleasure of sampling this summer, I was amazed to see the addition of two great beers: Eienbecker Pils from Germany, a full bodied light in color pilsner with a clean crisp finish, wonderful on a hot day, and believe me we had plenty of them this summer; and, Biter and Twisted from Scotland, a full-bodied ale with an assertive hop finish.

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Both were a delightful surprise. It just goes to show, people are always searching out unique flavors from the ho hum of mass produced dullness. Without the consumer seeking flavor, the distributors would not make these great beers available in the U.S. market. With fall sneaking around the corner, don’t forget to visit upcoming beer festivals. The Southwest Harbor Oktoberfest Columbus Day weekend, Naples Beer Fest, Sept. 24, Old Port Brewers Fest Labor Day Weekend, and Rockland’s first Beer Fest: Shag a Beer and Barbeque on the Pier fest at Amalifi in October. These festivals are a wonderful opportunity to taste some of Maine’s great beer and food offerings. Fall is a great time to sample beer. Although the brooding heavy beers of winter are still much ahead, some of the celebratory styles that make their debut in the fall are full bodied and bursting with flavor. One of my favorite styles is the Oktoberfest, brewed in the lager tradition, using a lager yeast strain and cooler fermentation temps than its counterpart, the ale. Lagers also go through a long cold conditioning process to bring the crisp malty flavors to life. The conditioning process for a lager beer can be up to six months. The Oktoberfest style beer was originally brewed for King Ludwig of Germany in celebration of his daughter’s wedding in the fall of 1516. Beer at that time in Europe was brewed with questionable ingredients, which were causing ill effects on ones’ digestive system. King Ludwig ordered a strict brewing law, which stated that the only ingredients used to brew were to be pure water, malted grain, hops and yeast. Beer history was made with the Reinheitsgebot beer purity law of 1516. Being a king, you can incorporate such laws you know. It’s good to be the King!

theSCENE • September 2011

The law originated in the city of Ingolstadt in the duchy of Bavaria on Sept. 23, 1516, although a lighter version was first put forward in 1487 concerning standards for the sale and composition of beer. A revised, watered down version of the law still exists in Germany to this day.

Let’s sample some beer! The first is, what else but, an Oktoberfest beer, brewed by one of the oldest brewerys in Europe, Spaten. Spaten is deeply rooted in Munich’s beer brewing tradition, yet the brewery remains modern but still dynamic. Spaten Oktoberfest was created in 1872 for the Munich folk festival. It pours into the glass a translucent amber, the immediate sense of Carmel roasted malts; honey and a slight nutty aroma take to the nose. The rich white head laces nicely to the glass, and at 5.9 percent alcohol, it is also prominent in the nose. This lager passes over the palate with a beautiful balance of malt to hops, with a sweet roasted finish at the end, which lingers nicely in the back. This is a medium to slightly full bodied Oktoberfest that is very refreshing and drinkable; I truly love the rich textured palate that leaves an underlying sweetness in the finish, a great example of a true German Oktoberfest Lager. Commonly available in bottles, but I have enjoyed this Lager on draft at certain pubs and restaurants during the late summer and fall seasons. Give this lager a try. Your taste buds will cry with flavor satisfaction. Fall Summit Ale is made by Peak Organic Brewing Co., of Portland. Fall Summit, although not classified as an Oktoberfest, has some of the same qualities of an Oktoberfest style lager and is cold fermented like a lager. This beer also uses the Mighty hop Summit Hop, as far has I can tell. Peak Organic was the first and only brewery to showcase and brew with this hop which are grown right in Maine. As this ale descends into the glass the aroma of the summit hops take to nose with pine, spice and citrus aromas. The head is rich and frothy

and last right to the bottom of the glass. The palate is first taken by the warm rich flavors of toasted malts, which balance out beautifully with the contrast of hops up front. This ale finishes with a surprisingly crisp clean finish, which in part is due to the cold fermentation process, and at 5.7 percent alcohol and 64 IBU’s (bitterness measurement) this ale comes in full bodied and bursting with flavor. It is a beer that would fair well with fall food parings and hearty fall dishes. I have only had this beer in bottles, but would love the opportunity to consume this beer on draft, it can only get better. Remember: The road through life can be long and rocky. Make sure you bring plenty of good beer.

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Movie

scene

Cowboys, aliens and marriage problems abound in summer films

Crazy, Stupid, Love So the kids were out of the house and my wife and I decided to go to “Crazy, Stupid, Love,” one of the few romantic comedies I’ve reviewed in recent memory. It seemed like a date movie. I went in with high expectations. I’m a big fan of Steve Carell, famous for “The Office” (Yes, the American version!) and “The 40 Year Old Virgin.” Julianne Moore is usually pretty good, though I haven’t quite forgiven her for “The Hours,” and like everyone, I think Emma Stone is terrific. I’m not a young woman, so I really don’t care

Cowboys & Aliens I knew that when I went up to ask for tickets I would say “Cowboys and Indians” by mistake, and I did. It’s like trying to say, “I’m sick and fatigued.” There’s just an automatic trigger in there. This movie was a little more my speed, a summer, popcorncrunching, event movie about a small group of old west types trying

much about Ryan Gosling one way or the other. The only thing I remember him from is “The Notebook,” which I was made to sit through and which was one of the most depressing films I have ever seen. Anyway, “Crazy, Stupid, Love” tries to straddle the line between comedy and drama as it tells the story of a sad sack, Carell, trying to regain his self esteem and manhood after getting dumped rather suddenly by his wife. Carell plays the mild-mannered good provider husband, a guy who makes decent money and takes care of the house and garden, and a guy who never envisioned himself ending up on the used husband lot. While his wife, who he considers his one true soul mate in life, explores her options with a sleazy, homewrecking co-worker (Kevin Bacon), Carell begins taking lessons in meeting women from Gosling. Gosling basically channels Barney from “How I Met Your Mother” in this film, while serving in the teacher role Will Smith

did in “Hitch.” So what we have, is a new movie that’s been built from the parts of lesser dead movies and reanimated, kind of like a cinematic Frankenstein’s monster. It’s part “Kramer vs. Kramer,” part “Hitch,” part every movie where the guy who thinks he’s a lady killer falls head over heels and doesn’t know what to do about it. And while it has all of these terrific actors and all of this critical acclaim built up around it, it’s still a pretty formulaic rom-com, complete with the stupid embarrassing public speech declaration of love thing at the end. I’m docking it in terms of grade for that, as I always do. For the most part, it’s good for what it is, and my only real complaint is the one I have with so many “comedies.” They forgot to be funny half the time. I would rather watch “The Slammin’ Salmon,” which has no real artistic value, and laugh than watch something like this and be bored. But I’m not the target audience.

to thwart an alien invasion. Daniel Craig plays an outlaw, who lost his memory after being abducted by space invaders. He brings this great, gritty intensity to the film. Hollywood would be foolish not to cast him as a train robber or something down the road. Harrison Ford brings his grumpy old man routine as a rich rancher and war vet bent on getting back his abducted son, Paul Dano (of “I drink your milkshake!” fame). Sam Rockwell is also in the movie, which I thought would be good news since I’m a huge fan of “Galaxy Quest” and “Moon,” but he really never gets to show his awesomeness. Olivia Wilde serves in the obligatory eye candy role. There’s not a lot to say about the plot. It’s pretty much in the title. It was a bit darker than I expected and a

little scary (parents be warned!). I was expecting a few more jokes and oneliners, but the movie strongly favors action over humor. It probably avoided a few pitfalls that way, but it also ended up treating such a silly premise with a bit too much gravity for my taste. The result is a very competently made, by-the-numbers, action movie. Everything happens the way it should at the moment it should, but there were also no real surprises or groundbreaking moments. You’ll like it, but you’ll forget all about it until it comes up on cable a few years from now and you’ll say, “Oh yeah, they made a movie about cowboys and aliens.” Based on the reviews that are out there, I probably should have gone to “Rise of the Planet of the Apes.” You live, you learn.

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theSCENE • September 2011


Film

scene By Kay Stephens

One wraps while another is set to shoot…

(Untitled) Camden Maine Film camdenmainefilm.com Emily Best, producer and actress in the still untitled Camden film shot this summer, is talking to me from her car as she drives back home to New York City on a dreary, rainy day. The film just finished shooting two days earlier. She tells me the rest of her cast and crew are most likely sleeping, having collapsed in an exhausted heap after a grueling 24-day shoot done during mostly nights. Not only did they shoot this independent film shoot at a breakneck pace between July 12 and August 7, they did so with a tiny crew — only 17 people — so everyone, including the actors, did the job of three or four people. The Maine roots on this film start primarily with Caitlin FitzGerald, the cowriter and lead actress, who grew up in Camden. Her family and friends provided much of the community support needed to get through the shoot. FitzGerald, noted for her roles in It’s Complicated as Meryl Streep’s daughter and as the female lead in Ed Burns’ newest film, Newlyweds, said it was her dream to return to Maine this summer to make this small narrative movie based on the loss of childhood friends, an experience both she and cowriter Caroline von Kuhn experienced in their early 20s. The synopsis of the film follows Charlie, a young journalist, who learns her best childhood friend, Katherine, has died. She returns home to Camden, where she hides at dad’s camp to write the eulogy. Stuck in the process, Charlie sequesters herself further until two other close childhood friends, Grace and Jen, arrive at the house to drag her out of her solitude and help her write a definitive portrait of Katherine. “We set out as six women to tell a story that was very personal,” Best said. “We all stayed together in four different places in Camden and we had a real family vibe.” Most of the shooting occurred in private homes

Cast and crew photo at Cuzzy’s Restaurant and Bar in Camden. PHOTO BY: TRIBE LLC and in outdoor locations around Camden. Cuzzy’s Restaurant and Bar served as a backdrop for some pivotal scenes. “Cuzzy was an absolute king among men,” said Best. “For three nights in a row we shot from 2 a.m. to 2 p.m. He was there the whole time and played himself in the movie. He also let us shoot out at his house on Megunticook Lake.” The scene at Cuzzy’s that took place over the three consecutive nights was in the back room upstairs by the dartboards as Grace and Jen force Katherine out of her solitude and go out for drinks. The micro-budget of this film relied on a lot of help and donations from the Midcoast community, everything from manpower to bug spray. “There were so many people who were unbelievably helpful,” said Best. “The Community School put some of us up. Rock City Roasters took care of all of our coffee needs. Market Basket provided catering and I will tell you everyone on set said it was the best set food they’d ever eaten. David Berez, owner of Post Office Editorial, Inc., was an endless source of help. We actually ended up living at his house and it became the production center. John Carter from Shepard Motors in Rockland provided us with several cars for certain scenes. We also rented office space from Karen Hansen, who owns Connect Space. Jack Churchill hooked us up with all of his film kids at the high school; they ended up being an amazing source of help as interns. Maine Media Workshop was really fantastic as well. At one point we got desperate for crew and they put out a call and got us some extra crew.” Once everyone gets caught up on their sleep, the next steps include editing the film starting Sept. 1. The film is estimated to be about 90-100 minutes and they’re aiming for a spring release to coincide with film festivals, including the Camden International Film Festival. “Ben Fowlie [CIFF’s founder] was actually in our movie and he was a wonderful source of help as well,” said Best. With more exposure, the filmmakers are hoping to pick

theSCENE • September 2011

up a distributor. “Maine really provided the perfect backdrop to tell this story,” said Best. “There is something about Maine in the summer that is so vibrant and so alive that teases out this dichotomy between grief and the joy and forces you to grow.” For more information about the future of this film and blog updates, keep up with their website, above.

Anatomy of the Tide anatomyofthetide.com The last time we checked in with these local filmmakers in the February 2011 issue of TheScene, they were in the last fundraising stages to make their independent film and eager to begin shooting this summer. The good news is that the film is officially greenlighted to shoot Sept. 5 with rising, young stars from Los Angeles and New York attached to the project. The film will be shot in and around Rockland and Vinalhaven and focuses on two boys in their final summer of adolescence as they’re forced to manage a dark secret on the secluded island where they’ve grown up. The producers just finished an extensive casting call session in New York City this past spring. After weeks of negotiations, the film has landed Jamie-Lynn Sigler, best known for her role as Tony Soprano’s daughter in The Sopranos. Also attached is Gabriel Basso, who recently starred in J.J. Abrams’ film, Super 8, as well as Susan Traylor (Heat and To Die For), Nathan Keyes (The Good Doctor, Worst. Prom. Ever.) and Daniel Flaherty (MTV’s Skins) Every independent film needs all of the help it can get. Because of the producers’ strong relationships with the Midcoast waterfront community, they will have unfettered access to a range of resources, from lobster boats to stellar locations. “Ryan Post [one of the film’s producers], and I have our own boats so we know so much of this territory ourselves,” said screenwriter/director, Joel Strunk. “We have already found some amazing places.” Strunk and cinematographer, Daniel Stephens, just finished their first draft of a “look book” for the film. “It’s going to be beautiful — Maine as it’s never been seen,” said Stephens. For more information about casting and blog updates behind the scenes, keep up with their website, Facebook and Twitter feeds.

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The story behind...

the Tattoo Story and photos by Kay Stephens

O

Just go to your happy place....

Chelsea Trenholm

n the bare white upper part of her arm, Chelsea Trenholm’s tattoo sticks out like a ticking time clock of her own mortality. Trenholm, a sloe-eyed platinum (for now) blonde, has the tender skin of a 22year-old. The artwork displayed on her arm reveals a bejeweled antique stopwatch surrounded by roses at the height of their bloom; some petals are dying and falling off. The face of the watch is cracked, its hands in a fixed position at 9:05, the exact moment of her birth. The antiqued look of this tattoo is the creation of Alison Wheeler, co-owner of Rockland’s Siren Song Tattoo. Wheeler, who holds a bachelor’s in fine arts with a concentration in painting and printmaking from Virgina Commonwealth University, sits at her wooden desk, flipping though scraps of her designs. She first works out her designs on bits of tracing paper with a mechanical pencil, much the way a writer scribbles bits of inspired exposition down on cocktail napkins. “I never start anything on nice paper because I’m neurotic about it,” she said. “I redraw something three to five times before it’s put on a nice piece of watercolor board or someone’s skin.”

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Wheeler’s style is influenced by drawing and she trusts my vision. Once traditional tattoo iconography as well as the linework is in, then she can pick the antique and primitive folk art. color scope.” “In art school you learn how to draw Trenholm thinks she has more than everything correctly and realistic,” said 20 hours of tattoo work done on her. Wheeler. “And once you learn to do it She got her first tattoo at age 18 and right, doing it wrong is very hard to do. plans to keep going. That’s part of my attraction to traditional “I get one whenever I have spare tattoo images — they weren’t originally change,” she said. done by professional artists. They were technicians, just trying to make money. Just like any other manual labor job.” This is Wheeler’s first tattoo on Trenholm; they met when Trenholm previously came in to get a piercing and they instantly liked one another. Trenholm decided she wanted a tattoo next and looked though scraps of Wheeler’s drawings A Siren Song design. until she found one that resonated with her. Wheeler then customized and texted an Her plan is to have Wheeler do an outline of it to Trenholm. entire sleeve on her right arm. “Normally I don’t send people art, “I told a different artist he could have but because I knew she was cool, I made my entire left arm,” she explained. an exception for her,” she said. In tattooing, it’s not uncommon for Like most tattoo artists, Wheeler different artists to have “dibs” on parts of has to be somewhat protective about one’s body. digitizing original art before it’s made Tattoos aren’t like a pedicure. Luckily into a tattoo. for this girl, she’s tough. “I’ve just had too many situations “Let me tell you, it hurt soooo bad,” where my buddy on the street ends up Trenholm said. “To get through it, I just doing it,” she said. whine. I kind of just whimper a little bit, As for the stopwatch design? go to my happy place and Alison and I “I pretty much let Alison do talk throughout the whole thing. whatever she wanted,” Trenholm said. Wheeler said: “It’s a fun atmosphere “I just gave her a general idea and told here. If one of our customers starts her to go for it. I trust her judgment, whining, we all start whining. We give obviously.” out kind of like a big pirate yell, ‘Yarrrrrr!’ Trust is a two-way street for both the The whole shop will scream. That’s how artist and the customer. we help our customers get through the “It worked out that Chelsea really pain. We’ve been doing that forever.” likes what I do,” said Wheeler. “That’s To see more of Siren Song’s artwork, when I know I have a great person check it out on Facebook: Siren Song to work with, when I can show her a Tattoo.

theSCENE • September 2011


Camden International Film Festival announces opening, closing films Full slate online at camdenfilmfest.org “Hell and Back Again,” winner of the Grand Jury Award and Cinematography Award at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival, focuses on 25-year-old Sergeant Nathan Harris during the war in Afghanistan and throughout his recovery after being hit by a Taliban machine-gun bullet. COURTESY OF: DANFUNG DENNIS he Camden International Film Festival will tackle the themes of life, death and transformation in its opening (Thursday, Sept. 29) and closing (Sunday, Oct. 2) films. With locations ranging from the war in Afghanistan and a small town in North Carolina to an artist family’s unusual home in Portugal, the films “Hell and Back Again” and “Convento” will push attendees to consider exactly what life is and how easily it can be transformed.

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Opening night at Camden Opera House The festival will open with the New England Premiere of “Hell and Back Again,” directed by Danfung Dennis. Winner of the Grand Jury Award and Cinematography Award at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival, this film masterfully contrasts the intensity of the frontline with the unsettling normalcy of home. From his embed with US Marines Echo Company in Afghanistan, photojournalist and filmmaker Dennis introduces 25-year-old Sergeant Nathan Harris and follows his life during the war and throughout his recovery after being hit by a Taliban machine-gun bullet. The film seamlessly transitions from stunning war reportage to an intimate, visceral portrait of one man’s personal struggle at home in North Carolina, where Harris confronts the physical and emotional difficulties of readjusting to civilian life. Director Dennis will be in attendance.

Closing night at Cellardoor The festival will close with a free community screening of “Convento” sponsored by, and presented at, the Cellardoor Winery and Vineyard in Lincolnville. Directed by Jarred Alterman, “Convento” tells the story of the Zwanikken family living in Sao Francisco, a 400-year-old monastery that sits at the convergence of the rivers Oeiras and Guadiana in Portugal, an area that some believe possesses mystical energies. This family

Camden International Film Festival will tackle the themes of life, death and transformation in its opening (Thursday, Sept. 29) and closing (Sunday, Oct. 2) films. of artists embraces and enhances the surrealist storybook landscape where they live. Notably, Dutch kinetic artist Christiaan Zwanikken creates new life in this unusual space, transforming a combination of animal skulls, bones and robotics into new creatures that can walk, talk and fly. Director Alterman will be in attendance. “We are more than thrilled to be book-ending the 2011 Festival with such powerful films,” said Benjamin Fowlie, founder and director of the Camden International Film Festival.

Fowlie added the festival has always been committed to highlighting new voices in nonfiction storytelling and both Dennis and Alterman have reset the bar for what is typically considered a documentary. “I don’t think you could find two more different films, but both are similar in their poetic camera work and their ability to completely immerse audiences in the stories that they are sharing. These are two films that people have been talking about all year and I’m very excited to be bringing them both to Maine to continue the conversations,” Fowlie said. The Camden International Film Festival will showcase nearly 60 documentary features and shorts over the course of the four-day festival, plus several special screenings and events, musical performances and the Points North Documentary Forum. The Points North Documentary Forum consists of workshops and panels and a live pitching session featuring dozens of filmmakers and industry delegates from all over the world. Now in its seventh year, the Camden International Film Festival is the largest documentary film festival in New England. The remainder of this year’s slate of films have just been posted online. For further information about the films or to purchase passes, visit camdenfilmfest.org.

The 2011 Camden International Film Festival will close with a free community screening of “Convento” sponsored by, and presented at, the Cellardoor Winery and Vineyard in Lincolnville.

theSCENE • September 2011

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Top

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theSCENE • September 2011


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Harvest Hootennany: Music, Family Fun and Food ome on down to the Second Annual Harvest Hootenanny and celebrate with neighbors at the Midcoast’s new favorite family event. Pull up a hay bale and kick back with a friend or jump right into the fun. If you love live music, great local food and a kid-friendly atmosphere, the “Hoot” is the place for you! All proceeds go to support Five Town Communities That Care’s efforts to promote the healthy development of youth in the Five Town area. Dancers, shake your tail feathers from noon to 5 p.m. to the high-energy sounds of Evergreen, Breezemere Bottom Boys, Three Button Deluxe, Katahdin Valley Boys, and Roosevelt Dime. When you need cooling off, ride the chairlift and catch the sounds from the summit of Ragged Mountain. For those who like to rock and ride, take your mountain bike on the lift with you — Snow Bowl bike

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trails will remain open all day. Children can bop to the rhythm in the bounce house, join a treasure hunt, enjoy balloon sculpting or get their face painted. There will be tastes for every palate with offerings from Sal’s Calzone and Sausage, the Kiwanis Food Truck, The Coffeeman, Marko Loco Tacos, and Carroll’s Soups and Chowder. BBQ lovers will have a chance to vote on their favorite entry in the Hootenanny BBQ contest. Think your own family recipe is the best north of Memphis? Enter the contest and see how you stack up against your fellow grill-masters… and don’t forget to save some room for the pie contest! (Entry forms and rules available at fivetownctc.org/Hoot).

Country Roads Arts and Artisans Tour ountry Roads Arts and Artisans Tour: Sept. 9, 10 and 11, showcasing highly refined skills of local craft designers and artists. It includes a wide variety of work, all carefully and thoughtfully handmade at studios in the Midcoast Maine. Most of the studios on the tour are open all year, but on one special September weekend, you are invited to go behind the scenes

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of creativity and visit with the artists and artisans on the free open studio tour. For more information, call 236-9619. All studios are open from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. during the three days of the tour, but regular hours differ. For more information pick up a brochure at either of the Penobscot Bay Regional Chamber offices, at participating studios, or online at artisanstour.org.

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Putting for olympiads on the green in Boothbay he Boothbay Charities Classic, held each year to support the Special Olympics of Maine, is gearing for its 21st annual“par up” on Sept, 22 and continuing through Sept. 24, with a variety of events, including 18 holes of golf, an auction and a lobster bake. The classic takes place in Boothbay, beginning Friday, Sept. 22, with a meet and greet of major sponsors of the event and celebrities. Alumni celebrities include Ken Coleman, Thurlow Cooper, Otto Graham, Bud Leavitt, Dan Sullivan and Stump Merril, just to name a few. Businesses interested in being a sponsor fo the event are encouraged to contact Brenda Blackman, blackmanduke@yahoo.com There are four different sponsorship levels with some great benefits. Team up with friends for a great cause! For those not planning to sponsor but still want to participate, the entry fee is $200 and includes a host fun, such as: Attending a good old fashion lobster bake at the Boothbay Railway Museum, Friday, Sept. 23, starting at 4 p.m., followed by a sports memorabilia auction at 6 p.m. * Then, on Saturday, Sept. 24, rise and shine for 18 holes of golf at the Boothbay Country Club. It all begins at 8 a.m. with a continental breakfast/registration for cart and hole assignment. A shot gun start is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. sharp, scramble format. Four person teams with celebrity added. There will be prizes for longest drive,

%

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theSCENE • September 2011

low gross, low net and closest to pin. (four separate holes). Hole in One prizes are sponsored by J. Edward Knight. The Celebrity Sports Auction takes place at the Railway Museum in Boothbay. Plan to attend and run shoulders with some of the sports’greats, and check out the large selection of autographed memorabilia that will be auctioned off to raise funds for the Special Olympics Maine. The auction includes baseballs autographed by Dennis Exkersley, a Red Sox Hall of Famer and Tom Seaver, a MLB Hall of Famer; footballs autographed Tom Brady, Patriots QB and 3 time SB and Fred Bilenikoff, Oakland Raiders; HOF jerseys autographed by NFL Hall of Famers Troy Aikman, Dallas Cowboys, and Jack Lambert, Pittsburg Steelers; basketballs autographed by Celtic legends John Havlicek, eight-time NBA Champ and HOF Glenn Davis ( Big Baby), NBA Champ. Other items include time shares, plane tickets and much more. For more information, and to sign up, contact Brenda Blackman, 6335149, or Ken, 633-3914; or visit chamber. boothbayharbor.com/Events/details/21stannual-boothbay-charities-classic.

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BELFAST, Maine

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Tuesday through Saturday Noon to 5pm theSCENE • September 2011


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chef Manuel Mercier, the Youngtown Inn What inspired you to pursue the culinary arts? My family had summer home in the south of France and one summer when I was 16 I started as an apprentice working in small bistro in the town of Les Arcs. I was inspired by all the fresh produce and seafood delivered to our kitchen door each morning and going to the open air markets. From that, I decided to pursue a career in to the culinary arts. I really enjoyed coming up with different recipes.

Where do you get your start? After working one summer at Les Arcs, I went on to do a full two-year apprenticeship in the four-star Majestic hotel in Cannes. I trained under the head chef, Bagnasco, in each section, and learned about all departments of the kitchen, from prepping fish to butchering meats to making sauces and working the line. From there, I continued training at the Grovenor House hotel in London. I spent two years there refining my culinary skills, then went on to Germany and Switzerland, and eventually made my way to the United States as a private chef for the Wildenstein family in New York.

What is the best part of running a restaurant? Being able to design my own menu and work with all the local purveyors and farmers to come up with exciting ingredients. It’s a wonderful feeling to be here for 20 years and have the same customers return

time and time again, year after year, and come into the kitchen and tell me what a wonderful meal they had. It inspires me to keep doing what I am doing.

What is your favorite dish to create? I like to work with local seafood. We are so lucky to have an abundance of great fish. I enjoy cooking halibut with champagne mushroom sauce. I also like the challenge of making dessert soufflés. Its all about timing and I enjoy seeing the entire dining room turn and look when one comes out of the kitchen. It’ s a show stopper and if the first table of the evening orders one than every table after that usually does, too.

If you were marooned on desert island, what meal would you want most to eat? I would want a simple roast chicken with truffles between the PHOTO BY: LYNDA CLANCY skin and breast, St. André cheese, crusty French bread and nice red burgundy wine.

What makes a kitchen work well? Why did you choose the coast of Maine to live and work? I came up to Maine looking for a restaurant to buy. I visited quite a few properties around the state, but when I came across the Camden Hills it reminded me of the south of France, on a smaller scale. That, and this historic building, sold me.

What is your favorite cooking tool? A very sharp knife.

The design of it, and having well-maintained and functioning equipment.

If you were not a chef, what might you be? Travel writer.

Youngtown Inn Route 52 and Youngtown Road • Lincolnville; Phone: 207-763-4290; info@youngtowninn.com

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theSCENE • September 2011

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Nature

scene By Kate Kastelein

ere’s a favorite outdoor spot for families and nature enthusiasts in the Midcoast. Trails range in length from 1.5 to three miles in length, and are clearly marked. Slick Rock trail leads to Dyer Pond with picnic tables and canoes for rent. Each trail leads through lush green woods, and each has its own charm. Look for hidden forest pools on the Two Dog Trail or marvel at fantastic natural rock formations left behind by glaciers on Bowl Loop Trail. Take bring water, a snack, bug spray, sunscreen and wear appropriate clothing. Wildlife watchers: take a pair of binoculars and field notebook, as Hidden Valley Nature Center is teeming with moose and otter, salamanders, toads, bald eagles and nuthatches. Spend all day observing native Maine creatures in their habitat. The Center also has overnight accommodations. Choose between two rustic huts or a yurt. There’s no electricity, but you will certainly have a unique experience. Campsites are also available for rent if you’d rather stay in your own tent.

Vernal pools

Outdoors at Hidden Valley H

Hidden Valley Nature Center 130 Egypt Road • Jefferson

HVNC is open year round, and has trails open for skiing and snow shoeing, and winter camping.

members. Currently we are looking for people interested in leading nature walks and giving talks.”

“We are looking for volunteers year round,” said Connie Hayward, “We have a number of people who are retired but not tired who help out frequently, and wer are always looking for new

A suggested donation of $5 for hiking. Well behaved dogs are allowed, and must be under voice or leash control at all times, and cleaned up after. Visit hvnc.org; 586-6752.

We are excited to announce the opening of a second store in Belfast Located in The Cherished Home at 31 Searsport Ave,

the Maine Cloth Diaper Annex will be with Jill Lepow Designs. Open Mon - Sat 10 - 5

207-563-2333 (Both locations) 157 Main Street ~ Damariscotta Wed - Sat. 10 - 4 or by appointment Visit our New web site www.maineclothdiaper.com Gift Registries Available

East Boothbay General Store “Ask Lizzie about your catering needs” Fantastic Pizza Sandwiches World Beers & Wines Lobster Rolls Cheeses & Salamis Doughnuts on weekends Breads, Pastries, Muffins & Pies

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theSCENE • September 2011


Social media

maven By Shannon Kinney his is a series of articles relating to Tforsocial media trends, tips and tricks your personal and business lives by Shannon Kinney of Dream Local. She has more than 15 years of experience in the development of successful Internet products, sales and marketing strategy. She has worked on the teams developing successful Internet brands such as cars. com, careerbuilder.com, over 60 online media properties for newspapers all over the U.S. and Canada, and has worked with high profile companies such as Google, Microsoft, Yahoo! and many others on their online strategy development.

Ten ways to grow your Facebook fan base One of the largest challenges in social media marketing is building your audience of fans that can’t wait to hear the latest news about your products and services. So how do you tell the masses about your fantastic page? Here are 10 quick tips: 1. Link to it from your personal profile: Did you know when you list your employer in your profile you can

link it to your actual business page? It’s easy. 2. Outbound marketing: Commenting on other business’ pages or people’s profiles is a great way to promote your business page. In June’s issue of theScene, this column was entirely focused on outbound marketing tactics including how to tag other people or business names in your post (use the @symbol with no spaces), liking other business pages as your business page, and more. 3. Promoting through “widgets” and “badges” on your website: There are a variety of images and links that you can add to your website to promote your social media pages, including some that also show other fans, allow you to comment on posts, or see content. For a beautiful example of a Facebook badge integration, visit knightmarineservice.com

4. Email and direct mail marketing: Send a message to your mailing lists and your customers and encourage them to fan your pages for Facebook only specials, tips and more.

and post them on Facebook. Then, encourage people to tag themselves. When they do this, the photo also becomes visible to their friends, thus spreading the word about your page.

5. In-store promotions: If you have a guestbook, consider putting business cards that say “fan us on Facebook” with links to your page next to it, place signage in your windows and/or near your registers encouraging people to fan your pages, and other strategies to bring your online experience into your bricks and mortar experience.

9. Contests: While Facebook has updated their regulations and terms of service on contests, you can still hold contests that require people to become a fan to be eligible. Think of a fun way to encourage people to join your page through a giveaway, drawing, or even white paper that they can download. There are also several apps that can be used to hold other kinds of sweepstakes, ask us if you need advice here.

6. Email signatures and letterhead: Make sure your Facebook (and other social media pages) address is listed in your email signature, your letter head, and any other correspondence you send each day. It’s as important as your web site address is. 7. Linking your social media channels: Be sure if you use LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ or other social media platforms that you link them together and/or promote the channels on each. It’s possible to also automate postings from one platform to another, but that is only recommended in certain circumstances. Ask us if you have question about this, and we’ll show you how and when it can work. 8. Photos: People love to see photos of themselves. Find opportunities to take photos of your customers, your employees and visitors

696 Waldoboro Rd., (Rt. 32), Jefferson 207-549-7424 fabric, notions, patterns, books, gifts Largest selection of punchneedle supplies in the area

10. Suggest to friends: The suggest to friends feature used to be the primary way people announced new pages. Over the past several months, it has become a far less effective tool and most suggestions go unnoticed by the recipients. It’s important to cover your bases and try it, but start with these other ideas first! Social media channels can be powerful tools for marketing your business, be sure to spend time focused on growing your audience on a regular basis. For more tips, tricks, and ideas on how to manage your online marketing, become a fan at www.facebook.com/ dreamlocal. Have a question for Shannon or suggestion of what you’d like to see in the next issue? Send it to shannon@dreamlocal.com. Follow me on LinkedIn, Foursquare, Facebook or Twitter: facebook.com/dreamlocal www.twitter.com/shannonkin

“Earthly Necessities to ADORN HEAVENLY BODIES “12ish & GRANDER’’

HARVEST OF SQUARES Fall Shop Hop, Thurs., Sept. 29 through Sun., Oct. 2nd Registration $5.00

Open Now ys D 7 a

www.womenofsubstance.us

508 Main St., Damariscotta 207-563-6809

Women’s Consignment & Resale Shop Now Accepting Fall Styles Walk-Ins - No Limit - Earn Cash or Credit

153 Main St. Thomaston at the lights

354-1199 smartypants@myfairpoint.net

theSCENE • September 2011

Mon.-Fri. 10-5:30 Sat. 10-4 Sun. 12-5

37


Etsy?

You Betsy!

This feature highlights all the crafties in Maine who don’t necessarily have a physical shop or an online presence other than Etsy (etsy.com), which is like an online open craft fair that allows users to sell vintage items, handmade items that are modified, as well as unique (sometimes downright wacky), handcrafted art.

By Kay Stephens

M

PHOTO BY: DAVID SAVAGE

eet Bangor resident David Savage, owner of Dorkorama Jewelry who describes himself as a “dorky jewelry maker, and all around crafty-man. Kinda like if Martha Stewart was an eccentric, chubby, fabulous, dork. I’m really selling it, huh?” He looks for materials that have a “wow” factor or a uniqueness about them, adding, “I’m inspired by the ocean, small towns and gigantic cities, oddities and curiosities, keepsakes and treasures, myths and ghost stories, revolutionaries and rebels, outsiders and the underground, antique technology and relics, kitsch, camp, pop art and punk rock, geeks, nerds, dorks, and all manner of oddballs.” This ring design is called “Steampunk, Seventeen Jewels Watch Movement Ring, Crystal-Sparklemotion.” Here, he describes the inspiration behind it: “I made this piece with a vintage 17-jewel watch movement and Swarovski crystals. I love the contrast of the old, antiqued and utilitarian object next to the sparkly crystals and ornate setting. I like making jewelry with contradictions or surprises. That is the essence of Dorkorama Jewelry — beauty and interest in the often unexpected or overlooked. When it was finished, Sparklemotion from the movie Donnie Darko popped in my head. I love Maine and that is often reflected in my work. We are so fortunate in Maine to have such a large and supportive artist-craftermaker community. That has definitely nurtured my creativity, from the folks of the Etsy Maine team when I started with an Etsy shop to the amazing folks at Maine Jewelry and Art and The Rock and Art shops who encourage me and carry my work, along with scads of other talented local folks in their shops!” To find out more about Dorkorama’s stuff go to facebook.com/ Dorkorama

September

BOOK SIGNINGS AT THE

MAINE COAST BOOK SHOP

SANDRA GARSON Veggiyana: The Dharma of Cooking: With 108 Deliciously Easy Vegetarian Recipes Saturday September 3rd at 12pm GOVERNOR ANGUS KING Governor’s Travels: How I Left Politics, Learned to Back Up a Bus, and Found America Friday September 16th at 11am Lincoln County Community Theater LOU URENECK Cabin: Two Brothers, a Dream, and Five Acres in Maine Friday September 23rd at 10am Skidompha Library 158 Main Street, Damariscotta, ME • 563.3207 www.mainecoastbookshop.com

CORSON’S AUTO SUPPLY

Hand Painted Velvet Clutches... Step Out In Style!

212 PARK STREET, ROCKLAND

Uptown Studio

M-F 7:30-5:30, Sat. 7:30-4:00, Sun. 9:00-1:00

Clothing · Home Décor · Gifts

www.uptownstudio.net 371 Main Street · Rockland, Maine 04841 207-594-1100

38

Open 7 Days A Week!

596-6554 theSCENE • September 2011


1

Thursday

• 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, provides non-sectarian community program for preschool children, toddlers and infants. FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org. Fosters creative play in a safe, nurturing environment and promotes cooperation and goodwill among participating children, their parents or other caregivers. Toy Library follows the RSU 13 vacation calendar and cancellations. • 5 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Chess Club, Meets every Thursday at Tim Horton’s, Camden Street, Rockland. FMI: call Frank, 975-2433 or fcollemer@myfairpoint.net. • 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Belfast Summer Nights, Outdoor summer music series presents the Willy Kelly Band at corner of High and Main streets. Free/ donations. FMI: 322-7123. Bring folding chairs, dancing shoes. • 6 to 8 p.m. Library Coffeehouse Series, Season begins with a Songswap at downtown Camden Public Library. All welcome. Free. FMI: Ken Gross, 236-3440. • 6:30 p.m. History of Harvesting Seaweed Talk, Parker Laite will give a slide talk about the local history of harvesting seaweed for Marine Colloids at Rockland Public Library. This program is co-sponsored by the Rockland Public Library and the Rockland Historical Society. Special accommodations for persons with disabilities can be made with 48 hours notice. Please call the library at 594-0310. • 7 to 10 p.m. Live Music, Simon and McFarland play jazz and blues Thursday evenings at Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St. behind the business block, Thomaston. No cover charge. FMI: 3541177. • 7 to 9 p.m. Velvet Lounge Jazz, The Bill Barnes Jazz Trio performs every other Thursday at Rock City Cafe, 318 Main St., Rockland, in coffeebar/cafe setting. Free/tips for musicians. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. The Tartan Terrors, Celtic-flavored music, comedy and dance at Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: $20. FMI: 948-7469. • 8 to 10 p.m. Bay Chamber Concert, Summer season finale with First Chair All Stars performing masterworks at the Rockport Opera House, 6 Central St. Cost: $50; $8 younger than 19; plus season and series pass discounts. Pre-concert talk/post-concert reception. FMI: 236-2823; 888-707-2770.

39

• Through Sept. 30, a benefit exhibit at the Maine Art Gallery, 15 Warren St., Wiscasset Works by award winning impressionist artist Candasa Edwards Epstein. Reception Sept. 10, 3 to 6 p.m.; 882-7511

2

Friday

• 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Belfast Farmers’ Market Main Street Festival, Upper Main Street, between Church, High streets, Belfast. Season opens with monthly fest. Live entertainment. First Fridays through October. • 9:30 to 11 a.m. Tea and Puppets Playgroup, Free playgroup morning for children 18 months through 3 years old with a parent or caregiver. Come to play, share tea time, and see a puppet story. Ashwood Waldorf School, 180 Park St., Rockport. Please call 2368021 to register. • 10 a.m. Baby Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. • 12 to 9 p.m. Camden Windjammer Festival, Three-day festival of sail, food, music and more on Camden waterfront, Harbor Park and other downtown locations. Full schedule: camdenwindjammerfestival.com. • 1 to 4 p.m. Schoolhouse Museum Open, The Lincolnville Historical Society Schoolhouse Museum is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Old Schoolhouse/LIA. Building on Route 173, quarter mile up from Route 1 at Lincolnville Beach. Curator Connie Parker will be on hand to show visitors around and help them search for artifacts, photos or genealogy. FMI: history7@midcoast.com. • 2 to 9 p.m. First Friday Art Tour. A Friday full of art shows, artist receptions, new exhibits and studio tours. This self-guided tour features fine art accompanied by wine, light refreshments and edibles at 8-14 galleries on the First Friday of every month. Presented by members of the Boothbay Artist Colony and sponsored by the Boothbay Region Art Foundation of Boothbay Harbor. • 5 to 6:30 p.m. Book signing, Tracy Ann Lord introduces her novel “Good Catch” in Kramer Gallery of Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Coincides by opening reception for artist Jerri Finch. • 5 to 8 p.m. First Friday Art Walk, Galleries in downtown Rockland open their doors for new shows,

open houses and receptions. • 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Live Jazz Music, The Bill Barnes Trio performs at Amalfi on the Water, 12 Water St., Rockland. FMI: 596-0012. • 6:30 to 11 p.m. Belfast Flying Shoes contra dance, First Friday dance event begins with Community Dance for all ages led by caller Chrissy Fowler with music by The All-Comer’s Band, followed by 7:30 p.m. Tasty Treat Potluck of savory or sweet finger snacks and 8 p.m. contra dance with Crowfoot, Fowler calling, at American Legion Hall Post #43, 143 Church St., Belfast. Cost: $2 adults, $1 children community dance; $8 adults, $6 teens/those who attended Community Dance. FMI: 338-0979 or belfastflyingshoes.org. • 7 to 9 p.m. Wine Tasting & Art Opening, The Belfast Co-op (123 High St.) is hosting a free monthly wine tasting of highlighted seasonal wines, gourmet cheeses and crackers and the opening of Megan Marsanskis’ exhibit of her photographs, titled “Egypt.” Jack Scully of Easterly Wine and Co-op wine manager, Ron Poirier, will be available to answer questions. Featured wines are 10-percent off during the tasting. Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. • 7 to 9 p.m. The Velvet Lounge, Rock City Cafe, 318 Main St., Rockland, presents acoustic duo Jim James and Dan Wilson in coffeebar/cafe setting. Free/tips for musicians. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free ballroom dancing, Weekly evening of practicing all the favorite dances on a newly refinished large hardwood floor with an excellent sound system at East Belfast Elementary School, Swan Lake Avenue. Free. FMI: 505-5521. Bring clean dancing shoes. • 7:30 p.m. Reggae dance party featuring Inner Visions ( with opening act CatchaVibe), a benefit for the community’s cultural nonprofits, WERU Community Radio and The Grand; Tickets, $17, general admission, at the Grand, downtown Ellsworth. Hailing from St. John, US Virgin Islands, Inner Visions is a family band (two brothers and two sons). • 8 to 10 p.m. Farnsworth Films at The Strand, First Friday series screens “Views on Vermeer” (2010, USA) at Strand Theatre, 345 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $8.50; $7 Farnsworth Art Museum members.

list

to

September do

Legendary Antarctic Expedition,” an illustrated talk presented by Richard Cornelia at the Camden • 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Camden Windjam- Public Library, as part of Camden’s mer Festival, Three-day festival of sail, Windjammer Festival. food, music and more on Camden • 2 to 3 p.m. Author Signing, Local waterfront, Harbor Park and other author and Realtor Vicki Doudera downtown locations. Full schedule: signs her latest Darby Farr mystery, camdenwindjammerfestival.com. “Killer Listing,” at the Owl & Turtle • 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Farmers market Bookshop, 32 Washington St. in the in Winterport, The Winterport Knox Mill complex. FMI: 236-4769. Area Business Association will be • 4:30 to 6 p.m. Public supper in sponsoring a farmers market in the Freedom, A public supper will be main parking lot of Winterport, held at the Freedom Congregationfrom 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., the first and al Church. Menu includes: pork third Saturdays of each month roast, mashed potatoes, vegetable, from June through September. baked beans, dinner rolls, assorted Featured will be local artisans, bak- desserts, coffee and punch. $7 per ers and growers. Vendor space still adult; $3 for children 12 and unavailable for $15. Any questions der. Children 3 and under eat for call Ann at 223-5854. free All proceeds benefit church • 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Parentprojects. Handicap accessible. ing Education Class, Offered by • 5 p.m. Public supper in Belfast, A ParentWorks, first Saturday of public supper will be held at the each month at Lincoln Street Belfast United Methodist Church, Center, Rockland. To register 23 Mill Lane in East Belfast. Menu or FMI call 596-0014 or e-mail includes baked beans, casseroles, pworks@midcoast.com. salads, rolls, beverages and pies for • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Designing Wom- dessert. Adults: $7, children 5-12: en Show/Sale, Designing Women, a $3.50 and kids under 5: free. professional membership organiza- • 5 to 7 p.m. Walk for Fukushima tion, hosts fine art and craft show Send Off Party, Walk for Fukuat the First Congregational Church, shima potluck supper and walkers 55 Elm St./Route 1, Camden. Cost: send-off party at Penobscot School, $2, includes raffle ticket. Benefits 28 Gay St., in Rockland. Walkers New Hope for Women. Luncheon depart, same location, Sunday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 4 at 11 • 9 to 11 a.m. Useful Clothing Sale, a.m. Public Broad Cove Church. Pleasant Point and supportRoad, Cushing. ers invited. • 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Washington FMI, call Patti Grange Farmers’ Market, Every at 975-3317, Saturday. Old Union Road, across mkathearn@mail.goo.ne.jp. from the Gibbs Library in Washing- • 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Labor Day ton. FMI: 845-2140. Weekend Public Supper, John • 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Life drawing Street United Methodist Church, groups, Tuesdays 6:30-9 p.m. and 98 John St., Camden, serves up Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon. steaming baked beans and a variety Non-Instructional, bring your own of home-made casseroles, salads materials. $12/session. Waterfall and pies. Cost: $7. FMI: 236-4829, Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, jsumc@midcoast.com. visit waterfallarts.org, or call 338• 7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, True 2222. Country plays the Union Masonic • 10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Lodge No. 31, 149 Sennebec Road. Children’s Room, Rockland Public Cost: $10. FMI: 712-1314. Door Library. Also on Wednesdays. prizes, 50/50 raffle and snack bar; • 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. River Festival, BYOB. Medomak Valley Land Trust’s an• 7 to 9 p.m. The Velvet Lounge, nual outdoor festival celebrates the Low Lights and Mood Music with culture, history and bounty of the DJ Hot Tamale at Rock City Cafe, watershed in the Village Parking 318 Main St., Rockland, in cofLot behind Waltz’s pharmacy, feebar/cafe setting. Free/tips for downtown Waldoboro. Free. FMI: musicians. 832-5570. Activities include a • 7 to 9 p.m. Live music at Amore, cookout, live music, a market of Amore Restaurant and Lounge, farmers, artisans and community Route 1, East Belfast. Tango groups, touch tank, critter corner — vocalist Kristen and more. Collaboration with Real Burkholder and Food Institute of Midcoast Maine singer Martin Gotand Midcoast Green Collaborative. tlieb — will perform • 1 p.m. Shackleton’s Antarctic Exthe best of the great pedition, “Sir Ernest Shackleton’s American Songbook

3

Saturday

theSCENE • September 2011


at Amore Restaurant and Lounge, Route 1, East Belfast. Free: for reservations close to the stage, call 338-5939. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. “Captains Courageous” Screening, Annual Camden Windjammer Festival screening of 1937 film in the Camden Amphitheatre, Atlantic Avenue. Free/donations. Bring lawn seating. Canceled in case of rain. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. Tim Sample, Maine humorist brings his latest and greatest to the Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: $10. Tickets at Camden Opera House (or online at camdenoperahouse.com), Once a Tree, Small Wonder Gallery and the Camden and Rockland offices of the Chamber of Commerce. Benefits Camden Windjammer Festival. • 7:30 p.m. Tim Sample Concert, Maine humorist Tim Sample performs at Camden Opera House, 29 Elm St. Part of Camden Windjammer Festival. Tickets are $10 and are on sale by calling 236-4406 or going to camdenoperahouse. com/events.cfm.

4

Sunday

• 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Camden Windjammer Festival, Three-day festival of sail, food, music and more on Camden waterfront, Harbor Park and other downtown locations. Full schedule: camdenwindjammerfestival.com. • 2 to 4 p.m. Music Jam at the Museum, Musicians, bring instruments and voices and make music together informally at Sail, Power and Steam Museum at Sharp’s Point South, 75 Mechanic St., Rockland. Coffee and cookies provided. Every Sunday. • 3 to 5:30 p.m. Monthly Jazz Jam, Midcoast and visiting musicians gather at the Waldo Theatre Annex, 47 Glidden St., Waldoboro. Cost: $5; free for playing musicians. FMI: 593-7445. Free refreshments. First Sunday of the month. • 3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. Musicians encouraged to bring their instruments and join in; listeners welcome too. FMI: 354-1177. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. Dave Rowe Trio with Denny Breau, Maine musical masters perform roots music of sea and land in Harbor Park, Atlantic Avenue. Free conclusion of Camden Windjammer Festival.

5

Monday

• 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Katrina Crie Memorial Ride/Walk, Come Spring Farm sponsors memorial fundraiser at Camden Hills State Park, Route 1. Cost: $3 park fee plus $17 to Katrina Crie Windred Trust (for Osage). Unlimited walkers; limit to riders, preregistration for horses

40

and trailers required. FMI: Vicki Harriman at Comespri@tidewater. net, 691-0629 or 785-4761. • 1 to 4 p.m. Schoolhouse Museum Open, The Lincolnville Historical Society Schoolhouse Museum is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Old Schoolhouse/LIA. Building on Route 173, quarter mile up from Route 1 at Lincolnville Beach. Curator Connie Parker will be on hand to show visitors around and help them search for artifacts, photos or genealogy. FMI: history7@midcoast.com. • 5 p.m. Transition Cafe, Casual discussion about how folks in and around Belfast will transition from oil dependence to local resilience. Belfast Co-op, 123 High St., Belfast. • 7 to 10 p.m. Monday Night Blues, Harper performs in the upstairs music room of Time Out Pub, 275 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $15. FMI: 593-9336.

6

Tuesday

• 10 a.m. Children’s Story Hour, Children’s Story Hour. Reading, arts and crafts. Free. Gibbs Library, 40 Old Union Rd., Washington. • 4 p.m. Children’s Art Time, Art instruction with Catinka Knoth. Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. • 6 to 8 p.m. “Rabbit Hole” Auditions, Lincoln County Community Theater holds tryouts for November production of David LindsayAbaire’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama at Lincoln Theater, Theater and Elm streets, downtown Damariscotta. FMI: 563- 3424, atthelincoln.org. • 6:30 to 8 p.m. Illustrated Author Talk, Architectural photographer Brian Vanden Brink introduces his new book “Porch” at Camden Public Library, 55 Main St./Route 1 and Atlantic Avenue, Camden. FMI: 236-3440 or info@librarycamden. org. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4 Fun, Weekly night of freestyle, any style, no partner needed, all kinds of music dancing takes place in second-floor Studio Red dance studio in Odd Fellows building, 16 School St., downtown Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931; dancing4fun. org. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic, Good music, good company and fun every Tuesday night at Cuzzy’s, 21 Bay View St., Camden.

7

Wednesday

• 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, provides non-sectarian community program for preschool children, toddlers and infants. FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org. Safe, nurturing environment promoting play, cooperation and goodwill. Follows RSU 13 vacation calendar and cancellations. • 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Family Music

and Movement Class, Midcoast Music Together offers free sample class for infants through age 5 (siblings welcome) and their parents/caregivers at the Thomaston Yoga Studio, Main Street/Route 1. To register, call Jess Day at 5936645. Class session starts week of Sept. 13. • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bach at Beech Nut, Open House at Beech Hill, Rockport, features music by violinist Heidi Karod from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Final event celebrating Coastal Mountains Land Trust’s 25th anniversary. • 10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Also on Saturdays. • 1 to 4 p.m. Schoolhouse Museum Open, The Lincolnville Historical Society Schoolhouse Museum is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Old Schoolhouse/LIA. Building on Route 173, quarter mile up from Route 1 at Lincolnville Beach. Curator Connie Parker will be on hand to show visitors around and help them search for artifacts, photos or genealogy. FMI: history7@midcoast.com. • 2 to 4 p.m. Old Homestead Open, Old Homestead, 453 Ash Point Drive, Owls Head, was built before I820 and was acquired by the Mussel Ridge Historical Society from the town of Owls Head in 1963. A great deal of work on restoring the building has been done; come see the work in progress. FMI: musselridge@earthlink.net. • 5:30 p.m. Friends of Rockland Breakwater Lighthouse Meeting, Monthly meeting of the Friends of Rockland Breakwater Lighthouse, held at the Rockland Yacht Club, located in Harbor Park, Rockland. FMI: 542-7574 or info@rocklandlighthouse.com. • 7 to 9 p.m. Jazz Jam, Open jazz jams are held first and third Wednesdays of every month at Fallout Shelter of Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. Donations. FMI: 338-2222. Come to play or listen. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic Night, Weekly performance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland.

8

Thursday

• 9 to 11:30 a.m. Parent/Child Class, Ten-week session for children 18 months through 3 years old and a parent or caregiver. Program incorporates imaginative free play, a simple craft activity, a snack prepared together, a puppet play, circle songs, finger plays, and outdoor time. Ashwood Waldorf School. FMI: 236-8021. • 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library Open House, Come join us for an open house as we prepare the Toy Library, 11 White St., Rockland, for the upcoming

year. Rona Spear, TLC director, will be on hand to meet new and returning members and answer any questions regarding membership. Check out our Facebook page for more information. • 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Family Music and Movement Class, Midcoast Music Together offers free sample class for infants through age 5 (siblings welcome) and their parents/caregivers at the Bay Chamber Community School, 18 Central St., Rockport. To register, call Jess Day at 593-6645. Class session starts week of Sept. 13. • 5 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Chess Club, Meets every Thursday at Tim Horton’s, Camden Street, Rockland. FMI: call Frank, 975-2433 or fcollemer@myfairpoint. net. • 6 to 8 p.m. “Rabbit Hole” Auditions, Lincoln County Community Theater holds tryouts for November production of David LindsayAbaire’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama at Lincoln Theater, Theater and Elm streets, downtown Damariscotta. FMI: 563- 3424, atthelincoln.org. • 6 p.m. Church Supper, At the Second Congregational Church of Warren, 260 Main St., Warren Village. Baked beans, casseroles, salads and pies. Punch, coffee, and tea included. Handicapped entrance, all welcome. • 6:30 p.m. Communities Taking Care of Elders, Dr. Ira Mandel will present “Communities Taking Care of Elders, ” at the Camden Public Library. Regardless of nursing home availability, most elders would much rather remain in their own homes than be institutionalized. The program is sponsored by Full Circle America; call 236-3176 to register. • 6:30 p.m. Loving Our Enemies Talk, Kate Braestrup will give talk titled Loving Our Enemies? as part of the Rockland Public Library’s series of events for the tenth anniversary of 9/11. Special accommodations for persons with disabilities can be made with 48 hours notice. Please call the library at 594-0310. • 7 to 10 p.m. Live Music, Simon and McFarland play jazz and blues Thursday evenings at Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St. behind the business block, Thomaston. No cover charge. FMI: 354-1177. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Rosie MacKenzie, Cape Breton fiddler plus singer Kyle Carey play Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: $15. FMI: 948-7469. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. Cushing Historical Society Screening, Brief business meeting followed by private viewing of a new documentary about mining in Mongolia at Cushing Historical Society, Hathorn Point Road. Free. FMI: 354-6351. The public is welcome to attend.

9

Friday

• 9 to 11:30 a.m. Parent/Child Class, Ten-week session for

children 18 months through 3 years old and a parent or caregiver. Program incorporates imaginative free play, a simple craft activity, a snack prepared together, a puppet play, circle songs, finger plays, and outdoor time. Ashwood Waldorf School. FMI: 236-8021. • 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library Open House, Come join us for an open house as we prepare the Toy Library, 11 White St., Rockland, for the upcoming year. Rona Spear, TLC director, will be on hand to meet new and returning members and answer any questions regarding membership. Check out our Facebook page for more information. • 10 a.m. Baby Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. • 1 to 4 p.m. Schoolhouse Museum Open, The Lincolnville Historical Society Schoolhouse Museum is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Old Schoolhouse/LIA. Building on Route 173, quarter mile up from Route 1 at Lincolnville Beach. Curator Connie Parker will be on hand to show visitors around and help them search for artifacts, photos or genealogy. FMI: history7@midcoast.com. • 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Live Music, The Kennebunk River Band plays at Amalfi on the Water, 12 Water St., Rockland, covering everything from Dylan to the Dead to Tom Petty and Joni Mitchell. The band performs performs a wide variety of music including rock, country and bluegrass. FMI: 596-0012. • 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Round Top Coffee House, Doors open 6:30 p.m. for musicians, poets and other performers to sign up for 6:45 to 8:15 p.m. open mic; featured performers play 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Damariscotta River Association’s Round Top Farm, Business Route 1, Damariscotta. Cost: $6; $3 senior citizens; free for children. FMI: 563-1393. Second Friday of each month.

10

Saturday

• 8:45 to 9:45 a.m. Family Music and Movement Class, Midcoast Music Together offers free sample class for infants through age 5 (siblings welcome) and their parents/caregivers at the Bay Chamber Community School, 18 Central St., Rockport. To register, call Jess Day at 593-6645. Class session starts week of Sept. 13. • 9 a.m. Woofstock 2011, Round Top Farm, Damariscotta. Seminars, demonstrations, rescue groups, pet games and services, pet-related vendors, raffles, yard sale, food and kids tent. Benefits New England shelters and rescues. Admission: “Pay what you can.” Presented by: The Animal House. Sponsored by: Nature’s Variety, The First, N.A., Newcastle Publick House. • 9 to 11 a.m. Useful Clothing Sale,

theSCENE • September 2011


Broad Cove Church. Pleasant Point Road, Cushing. • 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Washington Grange Farmers’ Market, Every Saturday. Old Union Road, across from the Gibbs Library in Washington. FMI: 845-2140. • 10 a.m. David McCullough book signing, Pulitzer Prize-winning author signs his latest, “The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris,” and other books at the downtown Left Bank Books, 21 E. Main St./Route 1, Searsport. To reserve copies, call 548-6400. • 10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Also on Wednesdays. • 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Chairlift Rides, Camden Snow Bowl, 20 Barnestown Road, offer scenic rides up and down Ragged Mountain. Cost: $5; $15 unlimited. FMI: 2363438. Mountain bikers welcome. • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Harvest Hootenanny, Second annual day of family and musical fun at the Camden Snow Bowl, 20 Barnestown Road. Cost: $10; free younger than 12. Benefits Five Town Communities That Care. Details on BBQ and pie contest at www.fivetownctc.org. Children’s activities, six musical acts, chair lift rides and mountain bike trails. • 12 p.m. Beta Sigma Phi Luncheon, Beta Sigma Phi, an International cultural and social women’s’ sorority, will hold a Beginning Day luncheon and meeting at the home of Dottie Liberty in Owls Head. FMI: 596-6032. • 2 p.m. Good Kid, Tough Choices Talk, Dr. Rushworth Kidder will present “Good Kids, Tough Choices: How Parents Can Help Their Children Do the Right Thing” in a talk for parents on parenting and ethics, at the Camden Public Library. • 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Public Supper, Casseroles, salads, coleslaw, drinks, bread, pies and desserts. Cost: $8 adults; $4 children. $1 off per person with each food pantry donation. Held at Evening Star Grange, across from Gibbs Library, 33 Old Union Road, Washington. Proceeds benefit Grange programs. • 7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, Bob Elston plays at Union Masonic Lodge No. 31, 149 Sennebec Road. Cost: $10. FMI: 712-1314. Door prizes, 50/50 raffle and snack bar; BYOB. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. Acoustic, alternative folk concert, Roosevelt Dime and O Deer perform at the Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St., as part of the Maine Grassroots Media Conference, hosted by WERU and Unity College. Suggested donation of $5 to $10. FMI: 469-6600. • 8 p.m. King’s Jazz, The second Saturday of every month, the Hatchet Mountain Publick House in Hope will host King’s Jazz for live jazz music. $5 cover. Reservations for dinner

41

encouraged. FMI: 763-4565. • Pownalborough Court House celebrates 250th birthday, Dresden, 9 a.m. to dusk. Activities for the whole family. The Lincoln County Historical Association, the Dresden Recreation Committee and Goodwin’s Company invite everyone to come for the day or a part of it. Living historians in period dress and demonstrations of period crafts: blacksmithing, lathe operation, barrel making, shingle making and cooking. Event officially marked the transition from military frontier to settled community. Map and schedule posted at lincolncountyhistory.org; Facebook: Lincoln County Historical Association Maine.

11

Sunday

• 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Congregational Cafe, Second Congregational Church in Warren, 252 Main St., hosts time of fellowship, free coffee, snacks and conversation immediately following worship service. All ages welcome. FMI: 273-2338, sccowmaine@gmail.com. • 12 to 4 p.m. Maine Wienerfest, As many as 400 dachshunds of every kind will gather on the waterfront at Steamboat Landing for Maine Weinerfest. The event will take place, rain or shine, at Steamboat Landing, on the waterfront in Belfast. Admission is $1 (free for children under 10), and proceeds will benefit the Belfast Dog Park. The general public, including well-behaved dogs of other breeds, is welcome to come enjoy the fun. For a schedule of the event, sponsored by Friends of Belfast Parks, visit friendsofbelfastparks.org. • 2 to 4 p.m. Music Jam at the Museum, Musicians, bring instruments and voices and make music together informally at Sail, Power and Steam Museum at Sharp’s Point South, 75 Mechanic St., Rockland. Coffee and cookies provided. Every Sunday. • 3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. Musicians encouraged to bring their instruments and join in; listeners welcome too. FMI: 354-1177. • 5 p.m. St. Thomas’ Evening Service, St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church, Camden. • 6:30 to 8:15 p.m. Drum, Jam and Hooping, Weekly gathering at Mildred Merrill Park, Main Street overlooking Harbor Park, Rockland. FMI: tims@sullboat.com or 542-6705.

12

Monday

• 1 to 4 p.m. Schoolhouse Museum Open, The Lincolnville Historical Society Schoolhouse Museum is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Old Schoolhouse/LIA. Building on Route 173, quarter mile up from Route 1 at Lincolnville Beach. Curator Connie Parker will be on hand to show visitors around and help them search for artifacts, photos or genealogy. FMI: history7@midcoast.com.

• 7 to 9 p.m. Traditional shape note singing, Four-part unaccompanied singing using “Sacred Harp” and “Northern Harmony” tune books in First Church Fellowship Hall, between Church and Court Streets with the entrance on Spring Street, Belfast. FMI: 338-1265 or 594-5743. Second Monday each month.

13

Tuesday

• 10 a.m. Children’s Story Hour, Children’s Story Hour. Reading, arts and crafts. Free. Gibbs Library, 40 Old Union Rd., Washington. • 12 p.m. Waldoboro Woman’s Club, The Waldoboro Woman’s Club will meet at the VFW Hall on Mill Street in Waldoboro. • 4 p.m. Children’s Art Time, Art instruction with Catinka Knoth. Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. • 6:30 p.m. History and Duties of the U.S. Secret Service, “History and Duties of the U.S. Secret Service,” by Tom McCarthy, former member and instructor for the Secret Service. At the Camden Public Library. The talk will explore the skills and resources used to counter risks to public figures in the 21st century. Films of actual assassinations – some successful, some not – will be utilized to emphasize teaching points. Discussion will be encouraged. • 7 p.m. Author Talk, Thomaston Historical Society’s September program will feature Capt. Jim Sharp (boat captain, owner of Rockland’s Sail, Power & Steam Museum, and maritime historian) who will offer an entertaining presentation on the creation of his book, “With Reckless Abandon.” Refreshments at 7 p.m.; program begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Knox Farmhouse & Museum, 80 Knox St. in Thomaston. Meeting is free and open to all. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4 Fun, Weekly night of freestyle, any style, no partner needed, all kinds of music dancing takes place in second-floor Studio Red dance studio in Odd Fellows building, 16 School St., downtown Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931; dancing4fun.org. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic, Good music, good company and fun every Tuesday night at Cuzzy’s, 21 Bay View St., Camden.

14

Wednesday

• 9 a.m. Owls Head Garden Club Meeting, The Owls Head Garden Club will hold their first meeting for the 2011-2012 season. The meeting will be held as usual at The Owls Head Community Building. The program will be presented by John Fromer on cut flowers. FMI: Dottie, 596-6032. • 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library,

St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, provides non-sectarian community program for preschool children, toddlers and infants. FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org. Safe, nurturing environment promoting play, cooperation and goodwill. Follows RSU 13 vacation calendar and cancellations. • 10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Also on Saturdays. • 1 to 4 p.m. Schoolhouse Museum Open, The Lincolnville Historical Society Schoolhouse Museum is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday in the Old Schoolhouse/LIA. Building on Route 173, quarter mile up from Route 1 at Lincolnville Beach. Curator Connie Parker will be on hand to show visitors around and help them search for artifacts, photos or genealogy. FMI: history7@midcoast.com. • 2 to 4 p.m. Old Homestead Open, Old Homestead, 453 Ash Point Drive, Owls Head, was built before I820 and was acquired by the Mussel Ridge Historical Society from the town of Owls Head in 1963. A great deal of work on restoring the building has been done; come see the work in progress. FMI: musselridge@earthlink.net. • 6 to 8 p.m. U.S. Cellular Device Workshop, U.S. Cellular is hosting a free workshop at 725 Main St. in Rockland to guide attendees through all of the features and functions of the company’s Android-powered, Windows Phone and BlackBerry devices that can enhance their lives. Workshop open to all current smartphone owners and those interested in upgrading. Attendees do not have to be a U.S. Cellular customer. • 7 to 9 p.m. Penobscot Bay Singers startup, Voice placement auditions for new members held after first two rehearsals at the St. Margaret’s parish hall on Court Street, Belfast, or by arrangement. For audition information, contact MaryAnn Valaitis-Whaley 567-4321 or M_Valaitis@yahoo. com. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic Night, Weekly performance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland.

15

Thursday

• 9 to 11:30 a.m. Parent/Child Class, Ten-week session for children 18 months through 3 years old and a parent or caregiver. Program incorporates imaginative free play, a simple craft activity, a snack prepared together, a puppet play, circle songs, finger plays, and outdoor time. Ashwood Waldorf School. FMI: 236-8021. • 2 to 9 p.m. National Theatre’s “One Man, Two Guvnors”, High definition satellite broadcast from London of Richard Bean’s version of the 1746 Goldoni Italian comedy, set in the 1960s, 2 p.m./rebroadcast 7 p.m. at Strand Theatre, 345 Main St., Rockland.

Cost: $23; $18 younger than 18. FMI: 594-0070. General admission; school group rates available. • 4 to 6 p.m. Coastal Senior College Anniversary Party, Coastal Senior College, which offers classes to Lincoln and Knox County citizens 50 years and older, will celebrate its 10th anniversary at Thomaston Academy, Route 1. Live music, refreshments, slides and presentations by founders, including David Bailey of Newcastle. FMI: 1-800286-1594. • 5 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Chess Club, Meets every Thursday at Tim Horton’s, Camden Street, Rockland. FMI: call Frank, 975-2433 or fcollemer@myfairpoint.net. • 6:30 p.m. Mushroom Talk, “Basic knowledge of mushrooms and how to cook them,” with Travis Benner, at the Camden Public Library. Hosted by the Midcoast Audubon Society. • 7 to 10 p.m. Live Music, Simon and McFarland play jazz and blues Thursday evenings at Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St. behind the business block, Thomaston. No cover charge. FMI: 354-1177. • 7 to 9 p.m. Velvet Lounge Jazz, The Bill Barnes Jazz Trio performs every other Thursday at Rock City Cafe, 318 Main St., Rockland, in coffeebar/cafe setting. Free/tips for musicians.

16

Friday

• 7 p.m. Waldoboro Fire Department Benefit Dinner, The Waldoboro Fire Department will host a lobster and steak supper — with an iconic Maine comedian for entertainment — as a fundraiser for the fire department’s anniversary celebration in 2013. Dinner will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. at the fire station. Humorist Gary Crocker will entertain at 8:30 p.m. Cost: $30 at the Waldoboro Town Office, Movie, Pizza Shoppe, calling the town office at 832-5369, or calling Assistant Chief William Maxwell at 631-7208. Also get tickets at the door. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free ballroom dancing, Weekly evening of practicing all the favorite dances on a newly refinished large hardwood floor with an excellent sound system at East Belfast Elementary School, Swan Lake Avenue. Free. FMI: 505-5521. Bring clean dancing shoes. • 7:30 to 9 p.m. Katahdin Valley Boys, Maine’s bluegrass band performs at the Waldo Theatre, Main Street/Route 220, Waldoboro. FMI: 832-6060 or thewaldo.org. • 8 p.m. April Verch and her band, Opera House at Boothbay Harbor. The energy that fiddler, vocalist and step-dancer April Verch brings to the stage is unmatched. Folk music inspired by her upbringing in the Ottawa Valley in Canada mixes with a bit of Nashville sound to create an

theSCENE • September 2011


unforgettable evening. • 8 to 11 p.m. Dance Beat!, Public dance party with live DJ at Swing & Sway Dancing, 143 Maverick St., Rockland. Cost: $10, 21-and-older. Music of every genre from Prince to Queen to Lady Gaga. No prior experience or partner necessary.

17

Saturday

• 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Farmers market in Winterport, The Winterport Area Business Association will be sponsoring a farmers market in the main parking lot of Winterport, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., the first and third Saturdays of each month from June through September. Featured will be local artisans, bakers and growers. Vendor space still available for $15. Any questions call Ann at 223-5854. • 5 to 7 p.m. Masons public supper, Public supper to be held at Masonic hall on New England Road in Searsmont. • 7 to 9 p.m. Annual Barbershop Show, Windjammer Barbershop Chorus invites everyone to Come Celebrate The Sound! at the Rockport Opera House, 6 Central St. Cost: $15; $12 senior citizens and students. Tickets at door or from Nick Greenwood, 236-2159. Also features Starboard Watch quartet, Nor’easter Barbershop Chorus from Bath and Good Time Sound northeastern barbershop competition quartet. • 7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, Frye Mountain Band plays at Union Masonic Lodge No. 31, 149 Sennebec Road. Cost: $10. FMI: 712-1314. Door prizes, 50/50 raffle and snack bar; BYOB.

18

Sunday

• 10 a.m. Heritage Tour of Frye Mountain, Once again the Montville Historical Society is offering horse-drawn wagon tours of Frye Mountain. There will be two tours, leaving at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., respectively, from a field about a quarter mile up from the main entrance off Route 220 towards Walker Ridge. Just follow the signs. Each ride aboard the open wagons lasts about two hours. Space is limited, so pre-registration is needed to reserve a seat, with a $20 deposit, which will be refunded when participants arrive for the ride. This is to ensure that all drivers, who donate their horses, equipment, and time, have a full wagon-load but not more than their teams can pull. FMI, and to sign up, call Barbara Boulay at 589-4414. • 2 p.m. Baby Shower, Tea, The Women’s Club of Our Lady of Good Hope, 7 Union St., Camden, is hosting a Baby Shower/Tea to benefit mothers and their babies in need at local crisis pregnancy centers in Maine. Please bring an unwrapped gift such as clothes for newborn to

42

2T, diapers, checks, etc. and join the group for the tea. FMI: Jo Ann, 338-0340 or Irene 230-0301. Email reservations (by Sept. 11) to Carol, cadp39@aol.com. • 2 to 4 p.m. Music Jam at the Museum, Musicians, bring instruments and voices and make music together informally at Sail, Power and Steam Museum at Sharp’s Point South, 75 Mechanic St., Rockland. Coffee and cookies provided. Every Sunday. • 3 to 5 p.m. Monthly Jazz Jam, Rhythm section is in attendance; musicians, vocalists and listeners welcome at Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. Donation for listeners. FMI: 338-2222. Refreshments. Third Sunday of every month. • 3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. Musicians encouraged to bring their instruments and join in; listeners welcome too. FMI: 354-1177. • 4 to 7 p.m. Benefit Auction, Lobster Bake, Sunday, Sept. 18, 4-7 p.m. at the American Legion Hall, 91 Pearl St., Camden. An auction and lobster dinner to benefit the family of the late Kevin Moholland, 45, cook at the Elm St. Grille for 10 years. Silent auction bidding will start at 4 p.m. along with viewing of live auction items. Lobster dinner starts at 5 p.m. Four-course dinner tickets are $25 available at Elm St. Grille and Country Inn. Live auction starts promptly at 6 p.m. Dinner includes fish chowder; lobster, clams, corn, potato; salads and desserts. Anyone interested in donating items may contact the Elm St. Grill, 236-7722 or the Country Inn, 236-2725. • 8 to 10 p.m. Bruce Cockburn, Acoustic activist and romantic performs at the Strand Theatre, 345 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $35 reserved. FMI: 594-0070 or rocklandstrand.com.

19

Monday

• 2 to 7 p.m. American Red Cross blood drive, There will be a blood drive held at the North Searsport United Methodist Church.

20

Tuesday

• 7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4 Fun, Weekly night of freestyle, any style, no partner needed, all kinds of music dancing takes place in second-floor Studio Red dance studio in Odd Fellows building, 16 School St., downtown Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931; dancing4fun.org. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic, Good music, good company and fun every Tuesday night at Cuzzy’s, 21 Bay View St., Camden.

21

Wednesday

• 2 to 4 p.m. Old Homestead Open, Old Homestead, 453 Ash Point Drive, Owls Head, was built before

I820 and was acquired by the Mussel Ridge Historical Society from the town of Owls Head in 1963. A great deal of work on restoring the building has been done; come see the work in progress. FMI: musselridge@earthlink.net. • 7 to 9 p.m. Jazz Jam, Open jazz jams are held first and third Wednesdays of every month at Fallout Shelter of Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. Donations. FMI: 338-2222. Come to play or listen. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic Night, Weekly performance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland.

22

Thursday

• 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Free Songbirds Demo Class, Trish Jonason, board-certified music therapist and owner of Coastal Music Therapy, offers free parent-child music group for young children newborn to 5-years-old at The Playroom, Route 90, Warren. FMI: 691-7900. Fall and winter class session planned, see coastalmusictherapy.com. • 5 to 8 p.m. Come Spring Quilters Meeting, Come Spring Quilters will be having their first meeting for this year at the People’s Methodist Church in Union. New members and beginners are welcome. FMI: 273-3331 or 785-5134. • 5 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Chess Club, Meets every Thursday at Tim Horton’s, Camden Street, Rockland. FMI: call Frank, 975-2433 or fcollemer@myfairpoint. net. • 7:30 p.m. Karen Montanaro, Opera House at Boothbay Harbor. What do you get when you cross Marcel Marceau with Anna Pavlova? Karen Montanaro. World renowned, Karen tours with her one woman show Tanzspeil, blending the arts of mime and dance to create theater with rare physical and emotional power. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Téada, One of Irish music’s leading exponents plays the Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: $15. FMI: 948-7469. • 7 to 10 p.m. Live Music, Simon and McFarland play jazz and blues Thursday evenings at Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St. behind the business block, Thomaston. No cover charge. FMI: 354-1177.

23

Friday

• 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Raising Successful Readers Talk, “Raising Successful Readers, ” presented by: Norm LeBlanc, Regional Parent Support Coordinator for the G.E.A.R Parent Network. This workshop offers an understanding of how to engage your child in reading. Reading to our children routinely in their early years increases their language development, helps your child develop an attention span and the concentration skills. Join us to share reading strategies and meet other parents who are also interested in

striving to raise successful readers! Mid Coast Maine Community Action, 7 Union St., Rockland.

24

Saturday

• 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lincolnville 8th Grade Fall Car Wash, The Lincolnville 8th grade can help get your car spotlessly clean! Drop by Keybank, Hannaford’s Plaza in Camden and let us pamper your car. Get your car spotlessly clean and help the 8th grade with their fundraising for their trip to Quebec! Rain date: Oct. 1. • 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Washington Grange Farmers’ Market, Every Saturday. Old Union Road, across from the Gibbs Library in Washington. FMI: 845-2140. • 7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, Still Kickin’ plays at Union Masonic Lodge No. 31, 149 Sennebec Road. Cost: $10. FMI: 712-1314. Door prizes, 50/50 raffle and snack bar; BYOB. • 8 to 11 p.m. Monthly Contra Dance, Live music and calling at Simonton Corner Hall, corner of Park and Main streets, Rockport. Cost: $8. FMI: 832-5584. All dances taught, beginners welcome. Usually fourth Saturday of the month.

25

Sunday

• 2 to 4 p.m. Music Jam at the Museum, Musicians, bring instruments and voices and make music together informally at Sail, Power and Steam Museum at Sharp’s Point South, 75 Mechanic St., Rockland. Coffee and cookies provided. Every Sunday. • 3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. Musicians encouraged to bring their instruments and join in; listeners welcome too. FMI: 354-1177. • 6:30 to 8:15 p.m. Drum, Jam and Hooping, Weekly gathering at Mildred Merrill Park, Main Street overlooking Harbor Park, Rockland. FMI: tims@sullboat.com or 542-6705.

27

Tuesday

• 7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4 Fun, Weekly night of freestyle, any style, no partner needed, all kinds of music dancing takes place in second-floor Studio Red dance studio in Odd Fellows building, 16 School St., downtown Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931; dancing4fun.org. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic, Good music, good company and fun every Tuesday night at Cuzzy’s, 21 Bay View St., Camden.

28

Wednesday

• 2 to 4 p.m. Old Homestead Open, Old Homestead, 453 Ash Point Drive, Owls Head, was built before I820 and was acquired by the Mus-

sel Ridge Historical Society from the town of Owls Head in 1963. A great deal of work on restoring the building has been done; come see the work in progress. FMI: musselridge@earthlink.net. • 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic Night, Weekly performance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland.

29

Thursday

• 5 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Chess Club, Meets every Thursday at Tim Horton’s, Camden Street, Rockland. FMI: call Frank, 975-2433 or fcollemer@myfairpoint.net. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Cathie Ryan, Irish-American singer/songwriter performs at Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: $15. FMI: 948-7469. • 7 to 9:30 p.m. Camden International Film Festival Opening Night, Seventh annual Camden International Film Festival opens at Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: $8.50; festival passes available. FMI: camdenfilmfest.org. Preceded and followed by VIP Pass-only receptions. • 7 to 10 p.m. Live Music, Simon and McFarland play jazz and blues Thursday evenings at Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St. behind the business block, Thomaston. No cover charge. FMI: 354-1177. • 7 to 9 p.m. Velvet Lounge Jazz, The Bill Barnes Jazz Trio performs every other Thursday at Rock City Cafe, 318 Main St., Rockland, in coffeebar/cafe setting. Free/tips for musicians.

30

Friday

• 12 to 10 p.m. Camden International Film Festival, Seventh annual CIFF screenings at Bayview Street Cinema, Camden; Rockport Opera House; and Strand Theatre, Rockland. Cost: $8.50; festival passes available. FMI: camdenfilmfest.org. Continues Oct. 1 and 2 at Bayview Street Cinema, Camden; Strand Theatre and Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland (ends Sunday evening at Cellardoor Winery and Vineyard, Lincolnville. • 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Monthly Ballroom Dance Party, Starts with Country Two-step warm-up class, social dancing starts 7 p.m. at Swing & Sway Dancing, 143 Maverick St., Rockland. Cost: $10 for both class and dance. No prior experience or partner necessary. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.“Noises Off”, British farce staged at the Waldo Theatre, Main Street/Route 220, Waldoboro. FMI: 832-6060 or thewaldo.org. Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 p.m. through Oct. 8 plus 2 p.m. Oct. 9. • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free ballroom dancing, Weekly evening of practicing all the favorite dances on a newly refinished large hardwood floor with an excellent sound system at East Belfast Elementary School, Swan Lake Avenue. Free. FMI: 505-5521. Bring clean dancing shoes.

theSCENE • September 2011


– Senior Citizens – to Camden Hills Villa; an elegant, family owned, independent living residence located in the heart of coastal Maine. Each private residence offers an array of amenities all designed to make living at Camden Hills Villa a truly rewarding experience.

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ELCOME HOME

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and you walk through the double doors, don’t be surprised if you are welcomed home with a warm smile and sincere hello from a caring staff member. HEN YOU FIRST COME HOME

CAMDEN HILLS VILLA you will find real down-east home cooking that is served by a gracious and experienced wait staff; a private beauty salon for residents: a well- stocked private library and courteous staff 24 hours a day. T

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two blocks from the Atlantic Ocean, a daily shuttle service will run from Camden Hills Villa to downtown Camden. This allows you to enjoy all that living in the charming community of Camden, Maine has to offer. In fact, just across the street is a farmer’s market that is open all summer and into the fall and features fresh produce from area farms. INCE YOU ARE ONLY

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ITH CAMDEN HILLS VILLA located just 9 miles from Pen Bay Hospital, and only one block from the Camden Fire Department; not to mention a stateof-the-art security system, residents of Camden Hills Villa can always feel safe and secure.

Welcome home!

Tours by Appointment • Now Taking Deposits Email: joe@countryvilla.com 51 Mechanic Street • 852-2231 • Camden, Maine

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*Lowest priced entrée is free. Please bring this ad to receive offer. Offer expires: Friday September 30, 2011.

Camden Bath Boothbay Harbor 800-414-5144 | www.houseoflogan.com theSCENE • September 2011


Every day is

A Welcoming Day at the University of Maine Hutchinson Center!

Meet Ginny Yarnell Ginny Yarnell, full of smiles and warmth

G

inny has been the welcoming face and voice at the Hutchinson Center for the past ten years. If you have a question about any and everything -- Ginny can answer your question or direct you to someone who can. It is amazing to meet Ginny and realize her depth of knowledge and love of people. Our guess is if she were on Jeopardy, she’d be the highest scoring winner ever. So take the challenge and give Ginny a call (338-8000) to register for a course or for more information about all the Hutchinson Center has to offer (classes, conferences, and community programs -- just to name a few). She is our ray of sunshine and she offers the best welcome you’ll ever find! She’ll give you the “Maine Welcome” and so much more.

Just a few things Ginny can help you with: • Information on how to begin or continue college and apply for financial aid • Upcoming conferences and events • Art exhibits, opera performances, Senior College information • Information about specific courses and instructors • Get you enrolled in an Accuplacer test • Proctor an exam or contact an instructor for you • Make an appointment for you with our academic advisor • Even tell you where the best places are to go for a walk or get a bite to eat!

Hutchinson Center

It’s as easy as walking in our front door.

80 Belmont Ave., Belfast, Maine • 338-8000 or 1-800-753-9044 42

theSCENE • September 2011

theScene September 2011  

theScene, Maine’s lively magazine celebrating all the coast has to offer from Wiscasset to Bar Harbor - a region rich in art, artisans, cuis...

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