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APRIL 2011 VOLUME 2 NO. 4

FREE!

EAT • DRINK • PLAY • WATCH • LISTEN • READ DISTRIBUTED IN KNOX, LINCOLN AND WALDO COUNTIES

Boothbay Harbor’s Fishermen’s Festival RAD Happenings Oyster Creek Mushrooms Camden Cake Walk Dancing With The Local Stars


Comprehensive Patient Care Low Dose Digital X-rays Oral Cancer Screening Advanced Cavity Detection Restorative Care Crowns and Veneers Teeth Whitening

Welcoming New Patients

Head, Neck & Facial Pain Therapy Sleep Apnea Appliance Therapy Gentle exams and cleanings for your family We work with Insurance companies

www.midcoastfamilydentistry.com Quality, professional service when you need it most.

g n i Quality r e f Of

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Please call or email for price Check pricing online at

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Specializing in the Service & Repair of Asian, European & Domestic Cars & Light Trucks

Rt. 1, Rockport • 236-2431

www.rockportautomotive.com


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April 2011

HAVING MORE RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS IS NOT THE SAME

AS HAVING MORE MONEY. To learn how consolidating your retirement accounts to Edward Jones could make sense for you, call today. Doug Curtis Jr, AAMS® Financial Advisor

www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC

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279 Main Street Suite 5 Rockland, ME 04841 207-594-9323

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Sue Carleton

Independent Beauty Consultant 7 Kimberly Drive Rockport, Maine 04856 (207) 596-9553 (Cell) (207) 594-4721 (Home) scarleton@marykay.com www.marykay.com/scarleton

THE GHOST in the MACHINE State-wide 24 hour

SALES AND SEVICE OF COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION, KITCHEN EQUIPMENT, EXHAUST HOODS, AND ROOFTOP HEATING / A.C. SYSTEMS

O GH

Like theSCENE on Facebook!

HI NE

facebook.com/thescene1 ST IN THE MAC

207-542-5760 • Reliable • Honest • Affordable www.TheGhostOnline.com

Hundreds of benches, tables, and chairs in stock! Wild & wonderful Teak Root benches and tables.

Each one a unique and durable addition to your landscape. Don’t miss our huge collection of teak bowls, spectacular wood carvings, and massive slabs in exotic wood species. Route 1, Wiscasset (just 6 miles north of Bath) • 207-882-7225 and 38 Sea Street, Boothbay Harbor • 207-633-9899 Open April 15-October 15 Daily, 9 a.m. to 5p.m.

WASHINGTON - Well built custom home on 7 private acres with pond. Features wood burning stove, fireplace, deck, built-ins, cathedral ceilings, family room, skylights, office, large master suite. $179,000

SOUTH THOMASTON - Wonderful three bedroom newly built home right in the heart of town. Master bedroom on the main floor. This home is move in ready. $190,000

WISCASSET - Beautiful new waterfront post and beam. This gem features 3 bedrooms, hardwood floors, granite counters, wood burning stove and bright, open floor plan. Home is 90% finished. $320,000

CUSHING - Long views down the Saint George can be yours with this beautiful saltwater site. Open, sloping fields to 550 feet on the river. Shared private road, septic and power in place. $475,000

VASSALBORO - What an opportunity to own a cute as a button bungalow on Webber Pond. The camp has recently been updated with a new septic, siding, well, wiring and aluminum roll out dock. Great fishing! $145,000

THOMASTON - 3 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath home in a wonderful neighborhood. Large deck looking at the St. George River. Large living room with balcony above. Small workshop in basement. $189,000

SOUNDVEST PROPERTIES

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in this issue

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April 2011

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Hop on board The Bunny Train Movie Review

Down in Front with Dan Dunkle p.7 Bunny Train ................................ 4 Cake Walk ................................. 5 supportSCENE .............................. 6 filmSCENE...................................... 7 topCHEF .................................... 8 Chad’s Journey ........................ 9 Social Media ........................... 10 dancingSCENE ......................12-13 kiteSCENE ................................... 14 behindtheSCENE ....................... 15 bandSCENE ................................ 17 Beer Reviews ......................18-19 Fishermen’s Festival ...........20-21 pubSCENE .................................. 22 shroomSCENE ............................. 23 barSCENE ................................... 24 supportSCENE ............................ 26 etsyYOU betsy......................... 27 poetSCENE ................................. 28 photoSCENE ............................... 30 radHAPPENINGS ..................... 31 Click! 80 ................................... 32 afterHOURS ............................. 33 bookSCENE ................................ 34 blackBOOK ............................. 36 killerPIKS ................................... 38 Herd on the Street .................. 38 April HAPPENINGS .............................................39-42

Story Behind The Beer Labels p.15 Boothbay Harbor’s Fishermen’s Festival Schedule of Events p. 20-21

To celebrate the arrival of spring, Maine Eastern Railroad has announced that it will operate two special Bunny Trains on Saturday, April 23rd. The current schedule calls for two separate round trip trains on that day, both departing from the historic downtown passenger depot in Rockland. The first train will leave the station at 11:00AM; and the second train will leave the station at 12:15PM. Each trip will last approximately 35 minutes. Called the Spring Bunny Special, and complete with a cute and cuddly costumed bunny, the event is designed for children of all ages. Be sure to bring your cameras. According to a railroad spokesperson, this event is the result of several inquiries and requests over the years. Now entering its 8th season, in addition to its full spring, summer and fall schedule, Maine Eastern Railroad also runs Mothers Day and Fathers Day Specials, Festival and Theme Trains, Fall Foliage Trips, and Christmas Holiday Trains. Tickets go on sale for the Spring Bunny Special on April 4th; reservations are suggested. Advance Ticket prices are: $17 for adults and children over age 10; $ 9 for children age 2 years through 9 years. Ticket prices will be $2 more for each person on the day of the Spring Bunny Special. For tickets and reservations, please call 207.596.6725.

Bob Gagnon Dinner & Auction will be held on April 8, 2011 at the Rockland Elks Club, on Rankin Street in Rockland. Dinner is at 5 p.m., with the auction at 6:30 p.m. There will be raffles, door prizes, silent auction and a live auction with midcoast’s auctioneer Bruce Gamage. Tickets will be on sale at the door, $10 for adults and $5 for children under age 12.

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301 Park St. • P.O. Box 249 Rockland, ME 04841 207.594.4401 • 800.559.4401 23 Elm St. , Camden, ME 04843 207.236.8511 thescene@villagesoup.com Published Monthly

facebook.com/thescene1

Sales Department Terri Mahoney.................................................. Director Peter Lynch .......................................................Manager Candy Foster ................................ ................ Representative Pamela Schultz ............................ ................ Representative Jody McKee .................................................. Representative Dawn Burns .................................................... Representative

credits

Layout Designer .............................................. Trina Johnson Production Department Christine Dunkle .................................................... Manager Trina Johnson ....................................................... Asst. Manager Designers: Debbie Post, Michael Scarborough, David Dailey, Heidi Belcher, Kathleen Ryan and Beverly Nelson

Cover image by Molly Miller


April 2011

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30th Birthday Celebration April 18 to 24

Sarah’s will be OPEN Easter Sunday

Camden cake walk to benefit historical society The Camden Rockport Historical Society and 11 Camden inns are holding the annual Cake Walk on Saturday, May 7, from 1 to 4 p.m. Visit and tour the inns and sample cakes ranging from cheesecake to pound cake to cupcakes. All proceeds benefit the Camden Rockport Historical Society. Inns participating in this years event are Abigail’s, Belmont, Blue Harbor House, Blackberry, Camden Maine Stay, Captain Swift, Hartstone, Hawthorn, Lord Camden and Grand Harbor. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for children under 12. They go on sale April 1 at the following locations: Market Basket, HAV II, Camden-RockportLincolnville Chamber of Commerce, and Dot’s.

With a great breakfast buffet and wonderful Family Lunch Specials from 7:30 am to 3 pm Check online for daily specials and events at

www.sarahscafe.com • famous triple chowder and soup buffet • desserts • seafood and more!

Open 7 days 11 am to 8 pm Waterview dining inside and out

Sarah’s Cafe, creating wholesome family goodness since 1981: where the first ingredient is Love!!! Sarah’s Café & Twin Schooner Pub Route 1, Wiscasset Village • 882-7504 Open 7 days a week 11 am to 8 pm visit our website: www.sarahscafe.com

Easter Sunday April 24th

• Homemade Chocolate • Lilys • Bulb Gardens • Greenhouse Plants • Fresh Flowers

Call for Special Prices

Andrus Flower Market

66 Maverick Street, Rockland

594-4033

Monday - Saturday 8 - 5

We Deliver!


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April 2011

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Loyal Biscuit Co. teams up with The Maine POM Project

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Sunday, May 8, 2011 7:00 p.m. Camden Opera House Most tickets $25! Youth $8 (18 & under). Prime $45 Tickets: 236-2823 or www.baychamberconcerts.org

From left, Bobby Silcott of The Maine POM Project with Loyal Biscuit Company owners Heidi Vanorse and Joel Neal. PHOTO BY: HOLLY VANORSE The Loyal Biscuit Company on Main St. in Rockland is helping The Maine POM Project achieve its goal of having every fire and rescue department within the state of Maine equipped with a kit of pet oyxgen masks (POM). On March 4 of this year, the Loyal Biscuit Company along with Maine POM founder Bobby Silcott, gave 5 of the kits to area fire departments. Silcott, a Harvest Hills Animal Shelter board member and area animal control officer, founded the project in 2009 with the initial goal of having the 19 towns surrounding the HHAS supplied with the kits. Soon the goal spread to statewide. All proceeds from the Animal First Aid class taught by Silcott go towards the purchase of the kits. On May 1, the Loyal Biscuit Company will be holding one of the first aid classes in an effort to help raise more money for more kits. For more information or to sign up call the store at 594-5269. Donations for the Maine POM Project can be sent to 9 Stony Ridge Ct. Naples, ME 04055. Checks should be made payable to Maine POM Project. For more information about the project, contact Silcott at 647-1112.

community music school

Trackside Station hosts Pints for Paws Trackside Station Restaurant and The Loyal Biscuit Co. are teaming up for a fun fundraiser for the Humane Society of Knox County. Join them Monday, April 18, from 5 to 8 p.m. for “Pints for Paws,” a social for animal lovers for the benefit of animals. The evening will feature entertainment by local musician Paddy Mills, raffle prizes from Loyal Biscuit, Sea Dog Brewing, Eastern Maine Railroad and Dragons Breath Pottery, as well as giveaways and more. Plus, for every pint of beer sold, Trackside Station will donate $1 per pint to the Humane Society.

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Author Holly Sherburne of “The Maine Plate” will be on hand selling and signing a new, special release dog-themed license plate poster, proceeds of which will benefit the shelter. The Humane Society of Knox County will also be present and will have their tote bags made from recycled dog, cat and feed bags available for sale. Due to the location, pets are not allowed, but bring a hard-copy photo of your pet(s) to be entered in the “Pints for Paws” Cutest Pet Contest. Attendees of all ages are welcome and are asked to bring an item to donate to the shelter – canned dog or cat food, paper towels, gallons of bleach, old towels or blankets, etc. This promises to be a fun event for a great cause. Trackside Station is located at 4 Union St., Rockland. For information visit www.facebook.com/TracksideStation or www.facebook.com/LoyalBiscuit or call Trackside at 594-7500 or Loyal Biscuit at 594-5269.


7 ‘Rango’ a little rough while ‘Mars’ makes the grade April 2011

‘Mars’

‘Rango’

“Mars Needs Moms” is a less challenging, less dark, fun family movie starring Seth Green as Milo, a boy trying to save his mother from the Martians who have abducted her. The movie is animated using the same motion-capture technology used in “The Polar Express” where the actors act out all the scenes that are played by their animated avatars onscreen. At first, the almost human look of the computer characters is a little creepy, but you get used to it. Milo is a typical American boy, who, after having a fight with his mom (Joan Cusack), discovers that Martians are spiriting her away in the night. He follows them to their spaceship and ends up stowing away for the trip to the red planet. Once there, he discovers a totalitarian government run by an icy Martian matriarch. The Martians, it seems, have forgotten how to raise their children in nuclear families and have resorted to sucking the knowledge out of Earthling moms’ brains, killing them in the process, and putting that information into nanny-bots that raise the alien young. Milo enlists the help of Gribble, a fellow Earthling who has been living on Mars for years since losing his own mother to the aliens. Gribble (voiced by Dan Fogler) appears to be in his thirties, but still acts like a child. He also thinks things on Earth have not changed since 1986, making references to the Cold War, “Top Gun” and Reagan. They eventually also find help from a rebellious Martian girl, who has taken to protesting through graffiti after watching transmissions of TV shows about hippies from Earth. Yes, really. The movie is fun, exciting and suspenseful. It’s even surprisingly moving at one point near the end, or maybe I just didn’t get enough sleep before watching it. It was directed by Simon Wells, who is the great-grandson of famous science fiction pioneer H.G. Wells. Simon Wells also directed the 2002 remake of “The Time Machine.” (Family history or not, I liked the original better.)

Johnny Depp stars (or at least his voice does) as a goofy lizard in “Rango,” a CGI takeoff on everything from Clint Eastwood’s spaghetti Westerns to Don Knotts’ “The Shakiest Gun in the West.” Depp, a scrawny, oddball pet chameleon gets thrown from his owner’s car onto a desert highway. With directions from a road kill armadillo (Alfred Molina), he makes his way to a wild west town out in the desert and decides to reinvent himself as a tough gunslinger. I found most of the movie to be a hilarious takeoff on the old Westerns I used to watch with my grandfather. Depp’s Rango bumbles his way through the obligatory bar scene where he eats a cigar, washes it down with strong drink and belches fire in the face of the tough guy who’s pulled up next to him. He ends up in six-shooter duels, riding in a posse and acting as the town’s newest lawman and pawn to the evil mayor (voiced by Ned Beatty). Most of it offered a good mix of action and comedy. There were a few places where it got off-target, most notably Depp’s drug-trip communion with the “Spirit of the West,” a Clint Eastwood gunman voiced by Timothy Olyphant. It seems like an annoying distraction from an otherwise tight plot to make Depp feel like he’s doing enough hipster navel-gazing to maintain his credibility with the poseur set. Some of the parents I know complain that the language was a bit rough. I don’t think the movie would have lost anything if they had toned that down, especially the tough talk from Bill Nighy’s Rattlesnake Jake. Some also complain about the smoking and drinking, but it really reminds me a bit of the old Looney Toons when Yosemite Sam would say, “Gimme Red Eye in a dirty glass.” It’s rated PG, but could have been upgraded to PG-13. It was directed by Gore Verbinski, who is known for the “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies and the horror tale “The Ring.” Kind of an odd choice for a family movie director.

Down in Front

By Daniel Dunkle

“Rango” Rated: PG Genre: Animated Western comedy adventure Starring: Johnny Depp, Isla Fisher, Harry Dean Stanton Geeking out: This off-kilter, dark and twisted take on the family film may end up being its own geek thing. Harry Dean Stanton is best known for being in the geektastic “Alien” and lends his voice to this. From the makers of: “Pirates of the Caribbean” Verdict: B+

“Mars Needs Moms”

Rated: PG Genre: Kids, science fiction, adventure Starring: Seth Green, Dan Fogler, Joan Cusack Geeking out: This was based on a book by cartoonist Berkeley Breathed, creator of long-running comic strip “Bloom County.” I own every book of cartoons he ever did. Plus, the whole H.G. Wells thing. From the makers of: “Time Machine,” “Prince of Egypt” Verdict: B+

A Cheeky Little Department Store April Sale: 25% OFF

Table Top; linens, aprons, napkins Yo Mamma’s Home open 7 days 96 Main Street, Belfast 207-338-4884 yomammashome.com

Winding Brook Farm

Natural Wool 2 & 3 ply. Coopworth, Shetland and Cotswold mix, Vanilla and Chocolate hues. Maine-raised and a unique gift for the knitter in your life. www.windingbrookfarm.farming.officelive.com windingbrookfarm@gmail.com

(207) 338-4581

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Order your Easter cupcakes now!! Sabrosa

CUPCAKE CO. Heidi Timmermann-Vigue Owner 61 Oyster River Road., Thomaston, ME 04861 sabrosacupcakes@yahoo.com

207-701-1890


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THE VILLAGE RESTAURANT 5 Main Street, Camden

Make your Easter Dinner reservations early!

Good friends, good service, good people Extensive menu from hot dogs to lobster rolls, including fries, onion rings, and more!

“The only thing we overlook . . . is the harbor.”

Check out our Soup Specials on www.knox.villagesoup.com Mon-Fri 10:30 - 4 • Sat 10:30 - 3 Call Ahead Service • 236-8751 85 Elm St., (Rt. 1), Camden Market Place, Camden

Tues.-Sun. 11-8 Private Dining Room for Parties Reservations 236-3232

Bullwinkles Seafood & Steakhouse

& The Bog Tavern • Steaks • Seafood • Chicken • Pasta • Gourmet Pizza • Full Bar • BBQ’s on the deck • Draft Beers Mon. - Thurs. 3 - 8, Fri. 3 - 9, Sat. 12 - 9, Sun 12 - 8 2919 Atlantic Highway, Waldoboro 832-6272

Comfort Inn 159 Searsport Ave. Belfast

338-2646

comforinnbelfast.com/dining “Come for dessert and stay for dinner”

Open Daily 5:30am-9pm “All You Can Eat Seafood”

Granny Graffam’s Crab Cakes (minus the secret ingredient)

White bread, diced fine Egg Mustard Old Bay Seasoning Roasted Red Pepper, chopped steamed onions Lemon juice Mayonnaise Worcestershire sauce Black pepper to taste 8 oz container Crabmeat Bread crumbs Mix all wet ingredients together, except crabmeat. Gently fold in diced bread. Set mixture aside for approx 1/2 hour. When bread in mixture has softened, gently break up the mixture and add the crabmeat. Then add breadcrumbs by the handful until the desired consistency has been met. Remember to allow a few minutes between handfuls for the breadcrumbs to soften and absorb moisture. Measure out mixture in approximately 1/4 lb portions, roll into ball, form into a patty, and gently coat in bread crumbs. Makes 6-8 Pan fry over medium heat with cooking spray for 3-4 minutes per side, until golden brown. Serve on a bed of greens with a remoulade sauce.

Home Style Country Cooking Open

Everyday for Breakfast & Lunch Thursday, Friday & Saturday Dinner Mon. Tue. Wed. 6:00 am–2:30 pm Thur. Fri. Sat. 6:00 am–8:00 pm Sun. 7:00 am–2:30 pm 1422 Heald Highway (Rt. 17) Union 785-2300

207-338-4565 • 52 Main Street Beautiful Belfast, Maine 04915 Delvinosgrill@yahoo.com

Open 7 Days: 11:30am-9p.m

Graffam Brothers Seafood

211 Union St., PO Box 340, Rockport, ME 04856 Phone: 1-800-535-5358; 1-207-236-8391 Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:30am-6pm Email: sales@lobsterstogo.com

207-596-7556 441 Main Street Rockland


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April 2011

Q&A with David Cooke, chef and co-owner of Amalfi On The Water What inspires you about the culinary arts?

The vast amount of incredible products available and the freedom to use them as you see possible.

Where did you get your start?

As a young teen, I started in small, family owned, ethnic restaurants in the Chicago area. I learned how to work hard, create from your heart and to be part of an alternative family.

What do you consider some of your greatest professional achievements?

Being a part of the team that opened the 100th Hyatt Hotel in Beaver Creek, Co. And then being part of a team that opened the 500th Marriott Hotel in San Francisco (during the earthquake).

What is the best part of running a restaurant?

Everyday is whack. You never know what’s coming in which door next.

What is your favorite dish to create? The one in the moment.

If you were marooned on a desert island, what meal would you most want to eat? Lou Molnatti’s Deep Dish Chicago style pizza. Morning, noon & night.

Why did you choose the Midcoast to live and work? The Woodster asked me to come help her open Waterworks in 1995. The rest is history.

Chef David Cooke serves up a Seafood Sampler and a Blood Orange Cocktail.

Easter

Call us for the perfect cut of meat for your special Holiday get-together! Since 1868

Deli • Bakery • Produce • Catering Beer • Wine • Grocery • Meats

Best Customer Service in the Area!

1 Elm Street • Camden • 236-3361

For catering, please call 230-7163 Mon. - Sat. 6 a.m. - 7 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. catering@frenchandbrawn.com

Spring is bursting at New products arriving daily: • Housewares • Kitchenware • Home accessories • Jewelry • Birdhouses 31 Main Street, Camden, Maine (207) 236-3995 • www.onceatree.net Open every day

What are the most important elements of a restaurant kitchen? Sanitation, Organization and Pride.

What are your favorite cooking tools? My knives, a saute pan and a pair of tongs.

If you could not be a chef, what might you be? An architect.

MCN COINS

Barrie Jenkins, Proprietor 207-701-8411 890 West St Rockport, Me 04856 Hours: Tues.-Fri. 9-4 Sat. 9-3 or by appointment Closed Sun. & Mon.

Located on Route 90

21st Season BATH ANTIQUES SHOWS

Sunday, April 10 10 AM - 3 PM

Bath Middle School Bath, Maine (Exit US Rt 1 at Congress Ave) 50 DEALERS ADM $400 • W/AD $350

P.T. PROMOTIONS, INC. • POLLY THIBODEAU Food Available PO Box 333 • Bath, Maine 04530 • 207 443-8983 Email: polly@bathantiquesshows.com • www.bathantiquesshows.com

Mia’s Shear Perfection

161 Church St., Damariscotta • 563-5656 Monday & Tuesday 9-7 • Wednesday-Friday 9-5 • Saturday 9-1

Full Service Salon Latest cuts & styles • Colors, foils, straightening • Perms Tanning • Pedicures, manicures • Full body waxing

Come and see us!


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T S O L I ! s b l 0 8 I recently read a story that started out by saying that losing 75 to 100 pounds is no big deal ... But I say it is. You have to make the commitment to yourself to keep going and keep it off. I have been trying to stay focused on my eating and oversize during my knee injury but I must confess that my head was not always 100 percent into the program during the last few weeks. I could sit here and give you many reasons why I was not focused and you might even say that makes sense. But things like an injury or the anniversary of my dad’s passing threw me off track. It is my fault I was not focused ... life happens! It is what you do to get back on track that matters. I am back! The one thing that I have noticed is that how the heck can a normal person on a budget eat healthy? The cost of healthy food is sky high even when you price shop. I just have to remember to stay committed to myself and look for the best deals and sales on the right food. I also have been suffering from depression. Dropping weight is not easy to do the working out and the change of eating habits as you drop the weight makes you realize there is a reason for my eating habits.

Upcoming Events Daily Walking — Monday to Friday at noon we meet at the Penobscot Bay Regional Chamber of Commerce on Park Street for a 25-minute walk. (Thank you Phil Clayton for keeping this going during my injury.) Dancing with the Local Stars — I am dancing! April 15 at the Camden Opera House!

My issue is rejection. I turned to eating when I feel rejected. I am learning to deal with that as well as how to deal with situations in my life that come up (and they do) but I am getting stronger from facing it! I have a great team and community that is committed to keeping me in line and focused!

5K For Phyllis road race— Saturday, April 16 from 8:30 a.m. to noon at Trackside Station Restaurant, Rockland.

From the Peanut Gallery ... How do you feel Chad has done overcoming the obstacles he has faced the two months? “Chad is doing good. I think he’s working hard and that he needs to keep following his dreams to accomplish what he wants to do.” — Matthew Stanley E. Stanley Photography

“Chad has had a tough obstacle to overcome as he was side-lined with a knee injury and surgery in the middle of February. He has persevered and continues to walk, strength train and inspire the challenges.” — Sandy Bodamer YMCA Wellness Director

“Chad has kept a very positive attitude. He has worked very hard at recovering from his injury. It’s great having him back at work.” — Jason Wiley Sterling Ambulance


April 2011

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Finding your social media voice

I often get questions from business owners that relate to what to write in their status updates on Facebook or how to communicate on Twitter, how to balance marketing messages with out too much sales pitch, how to be professional but not TOO professional. This question is actually a critical one for businesses, and those that don’t explore this often fail on social media and don’t understand why. Finding the answer, however, can be easily done at a cocktail party. Seriously! Imagine yourself at a cocktail party, networking with many prospects for your business. Consider how you would talk with them, how you would describe your business. Would you write something stiff like “we are open from 11am – 11pm, seven days per week, serving lunch and dinner”, or would you write “our bar is where it’s at for happy hour – come down and see us today, first five guests get a free one on

Social Media Maven By Shannon Kinney Shannon Kinney of Dream Local (formerly Capture Media Associates) has more than 15 years of experience in the development of successful Internet products, sales and marketing strategy. She has worked on the teams developing successful Internet brands such as cars.com, careerbuilder.com, over 60 online media properties for newspapers all over the U.S. and Canada, and has worked with high profile companies such as Google, Microsoft, Yahoo! and many others on their strategy development.

us!”. Essentially translate how you would talk about your business to a group of potential customers – including your passion and your smile – into a status update. This is a key part of social media marketing. Businesses that are too stiff or too self-motivated by only selling and not conversing are shrugged off, businesses that engage in conversation and assist their customers reap the benefits building a larger, engaged fan base. When meeting with a client yesterday, she shared a story with me about a post she saw on Facebook from a gal complaining about her “stupid” clients at her job. When this young lady posted this, she incorrectly assumed that only her friends saw it. What she didn’t recognize is if people post comments or likes on her post, their friends can now see it, making posts more public. And, while we all have days at work tat are more challenging than others, her decision to refer to her clients as “stupid” were seen by none other than her clients. But that isn’t the whole story. My client shared this post with her staff indicating that they would be terminated if they engaged in such behavior. Do you have guidelines for your staff on how they refer to your business on social media? Do they understand they are representing your brand? While all of this social media stuff brings new challenges for your business, it also brings tremendous opportunity. You just need to be thoughtful about your approach

Dolcelino World

and the voice of your brand. Other guidelines for finding your social media marketing voice include: • Don’t use profanity, ever. • Don’t air your dirty laundry: even if you have legitimate complaints about your personal or professional life, be careful about your tone and posts online. You can’t take them back once they are posted! • Remember, more people than your fans and friends can see posts • Be conversational, talk to your reader – share with them what makes your business or service different • Relate to your prospect – help them see how your business will HELP them • Create a balance between pushing your product and service and engaging with the audience • Look beyond your own page – engage in conversation beyond your own business page, find your customers and talk with them! Have fun!

Managing your reputation online

At Dream Local, we often hear concerns from businesses about information about them online. How can you know what is being said about you, where it is being said, and respond? We now have a service that businesses can use to monitor their listings in online directories that affect how they show up in search engines, and monitor what consumers are saying about them online – and the best news is, they are free to test! That’s right. You can visit http:// dreamlocal.steprep.com, enter in your business information, and test the system out for yourself. Let me know what you think!

Want to learn how to market your business online? Have questions about monitoring your online reputation? Have a question for Shannon or suggestion of what you’d like to see in the next issue? Send it to shannon@dreamlocal.com

Be “IN” with the Be-Cause IN NYC that is. Sogno Salon was one of the lucky ones to attend Millennium’s first-ever and hugely successful Be-Cause kick-off charity event. About 245 beauty professionals were invited to the fabulous Tela Design Studio in New York City to support the Be-Cause and celebrate being more. Guests were able to rub elbows with some of the industries biggest names including Ted Gibson, Gayle Giacomo, Brig Van Osten, Angie Katsanevas, George Ortiz, Donald Francis, Philip Pelusi, Carmen Depasquale, David Evangelista, Amy Michleb, John Harms and more. The event helped raise thousands of dollars towards scholarships for students who want to attend beauty school. Sogno team and Brig Van Osten, winner of The Shear Genius Show Season 2

Sogno Salon also attended the International Beauty Show taking classes with Nick Arrojo and Ted Gibson of TLC's show “What Not to Wear.” Remember to say”SAWN-YO” and Dream

If you are a frozen treat, nothing is better than relaxing outside on an overcast 35º spring day!

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457 Main Street • Rockland • 594-2422 sognosalon@gmail.com


Dancing With The Local Stars Seven local celebrities will take the stage at the Camden Opera House on Friday, April 15th at 7PM in what’s sure to be the most talked about event of the season, The Community School’s 3rd annual “Dancing with Local Stars”. From the cha-cha, waltz, foxtrot and tango to that old 1970’s favorite, The Hustle, Dancing with Local Stars promises a night of glitz and glamour and performances you won’t soon forget.

This year’s line-up of star dancers is impressive, and includes: Bettina Doulton, Chad Ridge, Peter Horch, Karen Grove, Nancy Schultz, Parker Laite and Raymond Brunyanszki. Kimberly Doll of Veloute Salon will be teaming up with Cyndi Clayton of From This Day Forward traveling makeup service to create Hollywood style glamour for our stars. Dancers will be transported to the Camden Opera House in style via limousine service donated by Absolute Elegance Limousine of Rockland. The competition will be fierce, but the dancers are taking it all in stride, thanks to expert instruction with Swing and Sway Dancing of Rockland. Instructors Christian Clayton, Tessa Antolini and Alysa Jackson have been hard at work with their “stars”, and excitement is brewing as they prepare for the big night. “I was—and continue to be—very excited and honored to have been asked to participate as a local star” exclaimed Nancy Schultz, Registered Investment Advisor Representative at Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. “Christian is a true professional, a very talented man. He is a great teacher and easy to dance with”. In addition to performances by these seven local stars, The Community School’s event will also include special numbers by professional dancers and dance troupes, including Hip Hop with Katie and Ryan Thompson, Sally Leighton with Rockport Dance Conservatory, Michele Cox with Atlantic Ballet Company, Kea Tesseyman with Kinetic Energy Alive, Helena Melone, a Tango with Swing and Sway Dancing owner and instructor Christian Clayton and his dance partner Kea Tesseyman, and of course our “C-School” kids will take the stage by storm performing a choreographed piece! Master of Ceremonies Terry Bregy will be on hand again this year to entertain the audience between acts, and refreshments will be available during intermission. Our event photographer, Elizabeth Stanley of E. Stanley Photography will be on hand taking pictures the whole evening and photos will be available on her website. This is the third annual Dancing with Local Stars event, to benefit the Community School in Camden. The Community School is Maine’s oldest alternative high school, and has helped hundreds of Maine teens realize their dream of graduating with a high school diploma. Dancing with Local Stars will be held Friday, April 15 at 7:00pm at The Camden Opera House.

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Photos courtesy of E. Stanley Photography

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1-Alysa Jackson and Peter Horch 2-Christian Clayton and Nancy Schultz 3-Christian Clayton and Bettina Doulton 4-Tessa Antolini and Chad Ridge Local stars who are participating but are not pictured, Parker Laite and Raymond Brunyanszki and Karen Grove.

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Go fly a kite!

The ups and downs of Maine’s spring weather provide many gusty days perfect for kite flying. One of the problems of living in the Pine Tree State is that all those pine trees sometimes make it hard to find a place to fly a kite. We have a couple go to spots in the Lincoln County area that are perfect to launch your delta, diamond, box, or sled. The Damariscotta River Association Farm: Belvedere Rd. The DRA offers a huge, wide open field right behind their farmhouse, perfect for kite flying. The rolling green hills and fields offer plenty of space for multiple kite fliers, and the view of the field, pond, woods and river can’t be beat. Check out their website for directions and additional information: http:// damariscottariver.org/

Fridays Slow Cooked Prime Rib Sundays Roast Turkey Dinner “Ask About Our Nightly Dessert Specials” with all the trimmings Year ’round Dining in the Heart of the Mid-Coast Happy Hour (207) 677-6771 “Maine Fare with a every day Wed.-Sun. Southern Flair” 4 - 6 pm 2477 Bristol Rd, New Harbor $1 off all drinks Only 3 miles from Pemaquid Point Light on Rt 130. Children’s Menu/Family Friendly Full Bar Open Wednesday-Sunday

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Fort William Henry: New Harbor. This historic site, maintained by Maine Bureau of Parks and Recreation has plenty of open space for flying a kite. The wind coming in off the Atlantic provides plenty of lift, even on days when it’s not as windy inland. The fort and museum are closed in the off-season but the grounds are still open, and there’s plenty of parking available. The state provides information on the history of the site, and directions on their website: http://www.maine.gov/doc/parks/parksinfo/colonialpemaquid/fortwh.htm Any local, public school: nearly all of the local schools in the area of plenty of space on their sports fields for flying a kite. Weekends are the best time to fly kites here, so you don’t interfere with any sports practicing. Flying a kite is not only a great way to get out and enjoy the outdoors, it can also provide an excellent opportunity to show your kids science in action. NASA has a fantastic website that explains a bit about the history of kites, how they work, and how the same principals of aerodynamics apply to airplanes: http://www.grc. nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/kite1.html.

Kate Kastelein Kate Kastelein is a mom, wife, writer, knitter, cooker, reader, and eater. A life long midcoast Maine resident, she’s been a freelance writer and editor for over 10 years, though she wrote her first book at age 6. You can find her on the web at katekastelein.com or follow her on twitter @mommyk8.

Make the best of our breezy spring, and try your hand at flying a kite. Check out some of the areas we’ve suggested, or find your own, but always check with the owner’s of any sweet, wide open spots you find in your travels, and when in doubt, stick to public areas.

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DIAMOND KITE

Materials: butcher cord or thin garden twine, scotch tape or glue, 1 sheet of strong paper (102cm x 102cm), 2 strong, straight wooden sticks of bamboo or wooden doweling 90cm and 102cm, markers, paint or crayons to decorate your kite.

5 SHEEPSCOT ROAD NEWCASTLE, ME 04553 207.563.2277 SPECIAL HOURS: MON - WED 10-6 THU - FRI 10-7 SAT 9:30-5

1. Make a cross with the two sticks, with the shorter stick placed horizontally across the longer stick. Make sure that both sides of the cross piece is equal in width. 2. Tie the two sticks together with the string in such a way as to make sure that they are at right angles to each other. A good way to ensure that the joint is strong to put a dab of glue to stick it in place. 3. Cut a notch at each end of both sticks. Make it deep enough for the type of string you are using to fit in to. Cut a piece of string long enough to stretch all around the kite frame. Make a loop in the top notch and fasten it by wrapping the string around the stick. Stretch the string through the notch at one end of the crosspiece, and make another loop at the bottom. Stretch the string through the notch at one end of the loop at the bottom. Stretch the string through the notch at the other end of the cross-piece. Finish by wrapping the string a few times around the top of the stick and cutting off what you don’t need. This string frame must be taut, but not so tight as to warp the sticks. 4. Lay the sail material flat and place the stick frame face down on top. Cut around it, leaving about 2-3cm for a margin. Fold these edges over the string frame and tape or glue it down so that the material is tight. 5. Cut a piece of string about 122 cm long. and tie one end to the loop at the other end of the string to the loop at the bottom. Tie another small loop in the string just above the intersection of the two cross pieces. This will be the kite’s bridle, the string to which the flying line is attached. 6. Make a tail by tying a small ribbon roughly every 10cm along the length of string. Attach the tail to the loop at the bottom of the kite. 7. Decorate!


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The Beer Labels

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Gearhead Ale

This was one of the first labels I did for Tim. It came out of a brainstorm session I did on my own. I was living kind of a lowbrow lifestyle above a tavern in Bangor, a really rowdy place. I was into hot rod art and stuff at the time. And I just sort of had this idea about putting this bear in the hot rod and I was pretty excited about it. I called Tim up and said, “Man you’ve got to see this.” Although, it had a little controversy around it. Much later someone pointed out to me, ‘Well I’m surprised that Mothers Against Drunk Driving aren’t all over this— but as you can see, the bear is not drinking. He’s just sitting in a hot rod.”

Pail Ale

This is a little black bear with his nose down in, drinking pail of ale, which was my play on words, but funny enough, people have said to me this is what it looks like when the bear has had too much ale. Some people are actually intrigued by this image and have said, “Wow that must be good beer.” This label was in Downeast Magazine.

Bluesberry Ale

This isn’t blueberry it’s bluesberry. It’s a bear playing a stand up bass surrounded by a blueberry bucket and rake. I made up this name wanting to tie something a little upbeat into Maine culture—and not be so conventional and tired. Something that gets people excited when they look at it, you know? I did kind of a symmetrical thing with the art—I drew everything in black and white. I’ve been playing around with this inversion technique of photocopying where I make a mirror image then use an Exacto knife and make a collage out of it.

Often featured in Flash Magazine, Isaac Wright is a both flash artist and a tattoo artist who has lived in the Belfast area about a year. In last month’s issue, he was the artist who created the tree frog mural in The Story Behind The Tattoo. In this issue, we’re talking about the logo artwork he did for Black Bear Brewery, based in Orono (www.blackbearmicrobrew.com). Tim Gallon, Brewmaster and Owner of Black Bear Brewery, contacted Wright to do a series of beer label logos and even left it up to Wright to name some of the beers himself. In his own words, here is the story behind each label.

Voodoo Porter

This is a stuffed “voodoo” bear with a big needle going through him and bones surrounding the logo. I actually drew that in a university library in Orono. I was dating a girl who went there and just kicked this out, killing some time. Tim gave me these flavors and these ideas and I’d just think of original things to go along with it to keep the product exciting. Beers like Magic Hat play a lot on the whole voodoo and magic theme, so I thought I’d take that theme and so something a little different and cutting edge.

Kay Stephens Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance writer, has covered both mainstream and underground events, people and scenes since moving to the Midcoast in 1993. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www.facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

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Custom Made Easter Baskets! We also have tons of Easter candy!!!

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Special Easter Brunch and Dinner Sun., April 24th • Lunch & Dinner • Oysters & Ale Buffet Brunch Every Sunday

Stop in to see our new selection of wines and to meet Lisa Tichy our new wine buyer

Corner of Rte 90 & Rte 1 Rockport

Live Music Wed. & Thurs. nights Open Year ’Round 52 Main St. • Newcastle

236-4371

Mon. - Fri. 7 am - 6:30 pm Sat. 8 am - 6:30 pm Sun. 9 am - 4 pm

563-3434

www.newcastlepublickhouse.com

Athens pizzeria Moody’s Walnut Pie

567-2035

http://thegoodkettle.com Fax: 567-2036 247 US Rt. 1, Stockton Springs, ME

3⁄4 cup margarine, melted 1 1⁄2 cups sugar 9 eggs 3 heaping Tbsp flour 3⁄4 tsp salt 1 1⁄2 tsp vanilla 2 1⁄2 cups dark corn syrup 2 cups milk 2 cups chopped walnuts In large bowl, beat together melted margarine, sugar, eggs, flour, salt, vanilla, and corn syrup. Beat well, then stir in milk. Spread 1 cup nuts in each uncooked 9-inch pie shell. Pour batter over nuts. Bake 30 to 40 minutes at 350 degree. Makes two pies.

Rustic French Cuisine Main St. in Rockland

New Bar menu and $8 Small Plates Serving dinner 7 days 207.594.4141 www.lilybistromaine.com

Offshore Restaurant Best in Local Seafood Daily Specials

Make your Easter Sunday Dinner reservations early!

Tuesday-Sunday Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Rt. 1, Rockport - 596-6804

“Have you had your slice today?”

EAT IN OR TAKE OUT 179 Main Street • Thomaston 354-0040 Mon.-Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

Pizza, Burgers, Salads Steaks, and more!

Come try our lunch time salad bar!

Pie Crust 1 heaping cup shortening 3 cups flour 1 tsp salt 3⁄4 cup cold water Cut shortening into flour and salt until mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. Add water, a little at a time, until the dough just holds together. Adding too much water will make the dough tough. Roll out dough on floured surface. Makes two double-crust pies.

Moody’s Diner 1885 Atlantic Highway, Waldoboro, ME 04572 Phone: 207-832-7785 Hours: Th-Sat 5am-10pm, Sun 6am-9pm, Mon-Wed 5am-9pm Email: info@moodysdiner.com

43 Mechanic Street, Camden

230-7135

FODORS CHOICE AWARD 2010

JOIN US THIS EASTER WEEKEND, SPECIAL EASTER MENU ALONG WITH REGULAR MENU. PLEASE CALL FOR RESERVATION

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A taste of France in the Maine countryside for the past 19 years

Shepherd’s Pie

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$5 Lunch Mon.-Fri. Serving Dinner 5-Close Mon.-Sat. 266 Main Street • Rockland 207-594-5770

18 Central St Rockport, ME open 4-midnight 7 days a week 236-8500

When I get hungry I get Moody! www.moodysdiner.com 832-7785 Rte. 1, Waldoboro

763-4290

AVAILABLE FOR WEDDINGS, REHERSAL DINNERS, PRIVATE FUNCTIONS

37 Main Street Belfast, Maine 338-4502


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Holy Mackerels

Mark Stover + Arthur Webster are from Boothbay, Maine, and have been playing music together for quite some time. Mark, the founding member of the “Holy Mackerels”, sings and plays acoustic guitar in the band and is the captain and owner of the charter boat “Redhook”, out of the Tugboat Marina in Boothbay Harbor. Arthur plays the upright bass and sings in the “Mackerels”. He also performs as a solo on acoustic guitar and harmonica and is part-owner of Orne’s Candy Store in Boothbay Harbor. Paul D’Alessio, from Palermo, Maine, plays fiddle and sings in the band. Paul also plays with contra and reggae bands and heads the Cuban “Son” band, “Primo Cubano”. Steve Jones lives in Hallowell, Maine and plays guitar and sings with the “Holy Mackerels”. He is a member of the “Boneheads”, performs as a solo, and with many other musicians, live and in the studio. Steve also teaches guitar four days a week at Musician’s Choice in Augusta, Maine. Together these four fellows play their favorite songs with the unique musical influences that each one brings to the “Holy Mackerels”. The result for the audience is listenable and danceable songs of artists such as Van Morrison, James Taylor, Mark Knofler and Guy Clark interpreted with an acoustic flair guarranteed to please. The “Holy Mackerels” will be playing at McSeagull’s Restaurant, Pier 1, Boothbay Harbor, on Friday + Saturday, April 29 + 30, 8PM, for Fisherman’s Festival Weekend.

The Holy Mackerels are ( Left to Right in Picture) Arthur Webster (Vocals, Stand-up Bass), Mark Stover (Vocals, acoustic guitar), Paul D’Alessio (Vocals, Fiddle) + Steve Jones (Vocals, Fabulous Lead guitar).

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Native Produce If it’s in season, we’ve got it Organic Fruit & Produce Huge Selection!

Join us at the

Taste of the Market

Saturday, April 16 , 9 a.m. - Noon th

featuring

• Dilly Dally Organic Farm • Emma’s Family Farm (vegetables, eggs, chicken, baked goods)

• Green Hollow Orchards (pies, cider, apples)

(chicken, turkey, beef, pork, sausage)

• The Chocolate Moose (specialty chocolates)

and so much more

Remember to stop by every Saturday morning for the Farmers’ Market

Route 1 • Rockport, Maine Open Monday through Saturday 9 - 5 www.cheese-me.com • 800-762-8895 • 207-236-8895

Maine Made Products Over 100 lines Vitamins, Herbs & Homeopathics Accomplish All Of The Above With “One Stop Shopping”! We Special Order Open Year ’Round Open Mon-Sat 8-6:30 pm Sunday 9-5:30 pm


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April 2011

Did someone say spring?

Yes, spring is right up the street, isn’t it? With temps reaching into the 50s the snow is quickly melting, leaving the pleasant mud behind. And spring brings many new styles of ales and lagers to fulfill our thirst for flavor. The heavy dark brooding beers of winter are behind us, well … almost. Spring and summer bring many beer styles to life, such as spring bocks, spring lagers, fruit beers, Kolsch and IPAs, or India Pale Ales, one of my favorites. The lighter color styles seem to stalk the spring and summer months, but beware, some of these styles pack a kick. Color does not determine the strength or body of most beers. The lighter color lagers and IPAs seem to be my favorites during this season. The IPA style of beers falls into the ale family. There are many styles of IPAs: English, American or West Coast style, and European. Almost every country has its version of this most popular style. But the IPA style takes its descent from Britain by way of India. During the British

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occupation of India during the 1800s, beer was given as a staple to the troops during occupation. Many of the heaver malty ales of Britain were too heavy to consume in the hot, humid climate that was so common in India; let’s face it, you got to have more than one! The British government petitioned the breweries to produce a lighter style of beer to be shipped over to the troops in India. But one problem presented itself, the lighter beers did not travel the long journey well, most went bad before they could be consumed. One of the oldest breweries in Britain, Bass on Burton on Trent, decided that hops, the bittering agent in beer, had a natural preservative quality that would help the fermented beverage survive the journey. The IPAs at the time were loaded up with hops late in the brewing process, making the style of beer dry with a big bitter bite. The style of beer later took on the name IPA, or India Pale Ale. The European versions tend to be a little more malty and fruity than the American West Coast versions, which are little dryer with less esters.

bite at the end. The mouth feel is medium to full, which is a good reservation for this style. This ale is very drinkable and smooth. Overall, Hallow Ale IPA is a good brewed beer by a great small brewpub in Hallowell, Maine. The next beer in the lineup is actually a lager brewed by Magic Hat Brewing Co. in Burlington Vt. Magic Hat has put the fun back in beer; any visit to the brewery in Vermont will tell you that just by seeing the outside. This lager-brewed beer is called Vinyl Lager, with the name “Lager” printed upside down on the bottle label. I told you they bring back fun! Lager beers are produced through colder fermentation temperatures than ales, causing a much more cleanly delicate brew. This lager pours into the glass finely carbonated, with a nice clear golden to amber color and two-finger head, with the aroma of toasted malts and nuttiness, and aroma of hops. As the beer passes over the palette, the taste is similar to the aroma, with a clean upfront palette and a slight hoppy dry finish. Overall, very pleasing. It’s a solid lager, full bodied and tasty. Spring has sprung. Cheers, Rich

Well enough history for now. The first beer in this month’s lineup is, of course, an IPA. This IPA is carefully handcrafted right here in Maine, at The Liberal Cup Public and Brewery in Hallowell.

By Richard Ruggiero

A graduate of Siebel Institute for Brewing Studies in Chicago, Ruggiero worked as a consultant across the east coast setting up micro-brewery on Long Island, N.Y. called James Bay Brewing Company. In 1995 he relocated to Rockland, Maine to build Rocky Bay Brewery which closed in 2007. He is now the brewmaster at the new Shag Rock Brewing Company in Rockland, located at Amalfi’s Restaurant on the water.

Old Hallow Ale IPA is appropriately named. Once poured into the glass, this ale has a slight dark copper color, with a nice off-white head, that laces nicely to the glass. The first aroma senses pick up notes of sweet malt and a wonderful aroma of citrus grapefruit hop nose. The two aromas seem to balance each other out, which plays nicely. Once consumed, you will notice this is a wellbalanced IPA, although the bitterness of hops makes itself known. The sweet malt character is well rounded and balanced with the spicy hop bitterness

VILLAGE TRAVEL “Making Dreams Become Memories!”

15 Years Experience Booking Tours, Travel & Cruises Ruth Etheridge • 207-529-2298 • rletheridge@roadrunner.com


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This month’s brew review comes from the same Black Bear Brewery that is featured in The Story Behind...The Beer Labels. This Orono family-owned and operated microbrewery prides themselves on making hand-crafted smallbatch beers. They’re not yet available in the Midcoast, but Brewmaster Tim Gallon (who added his own saucy spin to these reviews) hopes to expand his delivery area to Belfast in the near future. Keep in mind these are what you call “not real reviews.”

Gearhead Ale

This malt forward dark amber ale is a good beer for those Saturdays you are out in the driveway working on your muscle car while the wife is yelling at you from the kitchen window to either fix it or she’s calling the tow truck. The caramel and roasted notes with a slight English hop character are soothing and provide a Zen-like tranquility over the din of her voice. This is a very smooth beer for when you are wrenching on your ride.

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April 2011

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Gearhead Ale PHOTO BY: BLACK BEAR BREWERY

Available at natural food stores and other fine retailers and fundraisers

Pirate Bear

www.thesunriseguide.com | 207-221-3450

Unlike Shipyard and Sam Adams and other beers with patriotic New England-y themes, this hoppy pale ale with its big aroma and sweet malty backbone is all about the Bad Boy American Pirate. Aye, so when they tell you you’re drinkin’ like a pirate, that’s nothin’ t’ be ashamed of. Just brandish your sword, swill back a flagon and tell your parrot t’ go poop in their hair. Ye’ll ne’er get me buried booty!

Come see us for your spring tire needs.

B M

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Drop Dead Red Ale

First of all I’m so very flattered they modeled this logo after me. This malt forward dark amber ale is single-handedly responsible for the destruction of Orono’s city streets every March 17. Don’t be fooled by this sassy lassie and her smooth caramel and roasted notes — she’s not afraid to take on the biggest brute in the joint and unleash George Carlin’s 7 Dirty Words. . . in Gaelic.

Kay Stephens Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance writer, has covered both mainstream and underground events, people and scenes since moving to the Midcoast in 1993. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www.facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

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Studs need to be off by May 1st!

SKIP CAHILL TIRE Friendly Professional Service 207-882-6388 • 1-800-698-TIRE (8473) 236 ROUTE ONE EDGECOMB • MAINE


Festival will take place April 29 to May 1. See page 21 for complete schedule.

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1. Trap Hauling. 2. Bubble gum blowing contest. 3. Crate Race. 4. Shrimp Princess. 5. Dory Bailing. 6. Codfish Carry. 7. Tug of war. Photos Courtesy of The Boothbay Register

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38th annual Boothbay Harbor Fishermen’s Festival April 29 - May 1 Schedule of Events Times are Approximate and Events Subject To Change

Pot Buoy Decorating: By age groups: Young Children and Adults. Stop by The First, pick up your plain pot buoy, decorate it and drop it back off at The First in Boothbay Harbor. You’ll need to use your own supplies for the decorating. Buoys will be judged by the community downtown all weekend. Prizes awarded for different age groups. (Pot Buoys are $5.00)

FRIDAY, APRIL 29

7 p.m. Shrimp Princess Pageant Boothbay Region High School. Young ladies between the ages of 9 and 12 participate and show us their fine talents. Admission $5 adults and $2 children under 12. Tickets on sale at the door. Benefits the Fishermen’s Memorial Fund. 50/50 raffle with the winner announced during the pageant. Contact Brenda Blackman 633-6280 or 633-5149.

SATURDAY, APRIL 30

6 a.m. Pancake Breakfast Boothbay Region Lions Club Hall, Lakeview Road, West Boothbay Harbor. Pancakes, eggs, bacon, home fries. Tickets sold at the door. 7:30 a.m. Coffee and Doughnuts On sale at the Waterfront during morning events. 8 a.m. Cod Fish Relay Race Four-person teams from Boothbay Region High School’s four classes run a course beginning at the public parking lot (adjacent to Fisherman’s Wharf Inn) dressed in foul weather gear, including hip boots, and carrying some slippery fish. Contact Lesley and Brian Blethen at 633-0700. Maximum: 15 persons. Immediately Following: Small Fry Cod Fish Relay Race Boothbay Region Elementary School Students grades 5 thru 8. Contact – Kathleen Pearce at 6876677. Chalk Drawing, all ages welcome, on Boothbay House Hill, after the codfish relay races. Special Event: Bait Shoveling Race Contact Ryan Casey at 207-380-2404. 8:45 a.m. Trap Hauling Competition Race begins at the town dock, where competing lobster boats tie up. Captain and sternman race down the ramp, untie their boats and speed toward the string of traps in the inner harbor to haul, bait, and reset their traps, return to the dock, and race up the ramp, trying to turn in the fastest time. Contact Mark Carter 633-5762.

9 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts and Crafts Show The Boothbay Harbor Fire Station, 11 Howard Street (just up the hill from the morning events). Over 50 crafters participate in this popular craft show. Contact Vicki Huskins at 207- 633-2404. 9 a.m. on: McSeagull’s and Knot Gray’s Wharf will be offering activities throughout the day for both adults and children under a big tent set up on the dock. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Blood Pressure Clinic Courtesy Boothbay Region Ambulance at the Boothbay Harbor Fire Station, 11 Howard Street. 9:45 a.m. Lobster Crate Running Participants will demonstrate their agility in running along the tops of the lobster crates strung out between two floats. Contact Brandy Pottle at 633-2045 or 633-2222. Limit 15 contestants. 10:30 a.m. Dory Bailing Team’s of three will try to bail their dory the fastest. Contact Kathleen Pierce at 633-4194 or 207-687-6677. 11:15 a.m. Tug of War competition at the Waterfront. Ten men, women or co-ed teams vie for championships. Lively, spirited competition. Get your teams together to do a business-to-business challenge. Contact Sarah Brewer at 380-7722 or Ashley Lowery at 633-3913. Small Fry Tug of War competition immediately following (3rd and 4th graders). Contact Kathleen Pierce at 633-4194 or 687-6677. 12 noon Fish Fry at Boothbay Lobster Wharf All proceeds to benefit Fishermen’s Memorial Fund. Fish sandwiches served inside or outside until they are gone. Come join the fun with a couple of other exciting events as well at the Boothbay Lobster Wharf, located on the east side of Boothbay Harbor, just beyond Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church. 1 p.m. Bubblegum Contest For the youngsters, at the Boothbay Harbor Fire Station/Town Office, 11 Howard St. You won’t believe the size of these bubbles! Contact Vicki Slaughter at 633-0822. 2-6 p.m. Rock the Dock At the Boothbay Lobster Wharf. Celebrate the end of the day’s festivities by socializing or dancing to the dockside D.J. (Weather Permitting).

5-7 p.m. Meet the Lobstermen gathering with awards at McSeagull’s. A chance to rub elbows with the men and women of Boothbay Harbor’s lobster fishing community. Awards for certain events will be handed out during the gathering. Also enjoy a Maine lobster bake, cup of clam. chowder, steamed 1-¼ pound lobster, steamers, corn, new potatoes and top it all off with blueberry pie, offered all day and night Saturday for only $24. Or you can enjoy a steamed 1-¼ lobster, corn and potatoes for $16 with blueberry pie; half of the proceeds of either meal will benefit the Fishermen’s Memorial Fund. Geary’s will be offer $3 pints of beer and ale all day Saturday. Maine lobster will be available all day Friday, Saturday and Sunday. 5 p.m. Church Supper Congregational Church, Townsend Avenue, Boothbay Harbor. Two seating’s: 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Fabulous home cooking with great desserts. 633-4757.

SUNDAY, MAY 1

12 p.m. Burnt Island Lighthouse Tour. Board the Novelty at Pier 8. Scenic cruise to Burnt Island in the inner harbor to spend an hour touring the island and lighthouse buildings. The coordinator will talk about the lighthouse’s history and significance to our region. On the return the Novelty will be watching the blessing of the fleet service in the inner harbor. Space limited to 90, tickets must be purchased in advance. Advance tickets available Monday-Friday at the Boothbay Harbor Region Chamber of Commerce. Adults $7.00, children (under 6) $3.00. NO REFUNDS. Chamber Office at 633-2353. REMAINING TICKETS AVAILABLE AT 11:30 A.M. – PIER 8 FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED 1:30 p.m. Memorial Service Outdoor ceremony at the Fishermen’s Memorial on Atlantic Avenue (East Side of the Harbor across from Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church) in honor of area fishermen lost at sea. As the bells toll, the na.m.es of the lost fishermen will be read. Blessing of the Fleet Blessing of the commercial fishing fleet. Fishing boats circle the inner harbor and pass the Fishermen’s Memorial to receive the blessing for a safe and profitable year. The Shrimp Princess and area clergy will be in attendance. 4:30 p.m. Fishy Fest Finale and Bachelor Lobstermen Auction at Knot Gray’s Wharf with 50-50 raffle, half of proceeds to benefit Fishermen’s Memorial Fund. There will be stories told by some local fishermen. Come enjoy the humor and fun with special guests, open mic, gags, awards and karaoke.

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“I love this bar!”

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As Toby Keith sings in one of his hit songs, “I love this bar, it’s my kind of place.” The Black Bull, although it hasn’t served the community its delicious food, laid back, mellow atmosphere and the occasional guitar player and singer for decades upon decades - it’s still a staple. I know I’m not alone in my sentiment towards what others affectionately call the Bull. Just like I know I’m not alone with the sadness that this may be it for the establishment. Small towns talk a lot and at first words are usually meaningless, but when the quiet talk becomes loud talk, people start to listen. After calling the restaurant and talking with someone there, who confirmed they were closing for at least just a few weeks, panic hit. I started checking bank accounts, re-budgeting, seeing if there’s any possible way to eat at the Bull every single day up until March 19, the announced closing date. If only I hadn’t have bought a house last year.

I’ve eaten countless dinners there. Gotten their take-out and brought it back to work some afternoons. Spent many nights laughing away with friends at the bar. Watched various games on their televisions or listened to whoever set up in the bar side’s corner to sing or play music. The atmosphere is undeniable.

Holly Vanorse Got an idea for monthly photos? Each month, I’ll be out capturing a different theme for the monthly photo spread. Everything from the great outdoors, stock car racing to the small town night life. Call or e-mail Holly Vanorse at hvanorse@villagesoup. com or 594-4401 with your idea.

You can’t walk by without wanting to stop in and just hang out for a minute or two, which inevitably becomes hours without you even knowing it. It’s that type of place that has something for every body. On St. Patrick’s day, the Bull was filled with familiar faces, smells and of course - music. I snapped away with my camera, taking photos of what some have made a staple in their St. Patty’s day rituals over

the years since either the Bull opened for business or turning 21. Some stared cautiously at me after I snapped their picture, others asked if I was the media doing a negative write up. On the drive home, I realized, I couldn’t think of one negative thing to say or think about the Bull even if I wanted to. In the possibly hundreds of experiences I’ve had there, each and every single one has been a positive one. Then, after thinking of everything people have said since the hushed words in this small town became loud ones, I realized that again, I’m not the only one. The Bull has brought friends and families together over and over again since it’s opening whether it’s by lunch, dinner or after hours. It’s always good food, good people, and good times.


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“When we started this business 16 years ago, I thought we were crazy.” Says Dan Heydon of Oyster Creek Mushrooms in Damariscotta. Dan and his wife Candy started growing shitake mushrooms in oak logs back in 1989. Since then, they have expanded Oyster Creek to include not only mushrooms grown on site, but also foraged wild mushrooms and vegetables from Maine and California. As the popularity and acceptance of specialty and foraged items has grown, so has Oyster Creek. The rise of celebrity chefs, competition cooking, and amateur foodies, as well as awareness about food from niche and small markets has grown, so has business. Oyster Creek buys from over 100 local, Maine foragers during the busy season, and in the winter they ship in mushrooms from foragers in California in order to keep up with demand for fresh mushrooms at winter markets. Just because it’s off season for foraging in Maine, winter is still a very busy time for Dan and Candy. They have a very busy mail order and on line business, and spend a lot of time drying mushrooms and making salt and oils including their exclusive Candy Cap Oil. Oyster Creek also sells at a number of winter markets including Bath and Thopsham

Dried Mushrooms

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Oyster Creek Mushrooms

Kate Kastelein Kate Kastelein is a mom, wife, writer, knitter, cooker, reader, and eater. A life long midcoast Maine resident, she’s been a freelance writer and editor for over 10 years, though she wrote her first book at age 6. You can find her on the web at katekastelein.com or follow her on twitter @mommyk8.

during the winter months. In the summer they can also be found at the Damariscotta, Rockland, and Boothbay Farmers’ Markets. When asked what the next big thing would be in the mushroom/ foodie market, Heydon predicted, “King Oysters” and said, “They have a silky texture, but are meaty like Portabello. They have a very unique flavor.” Whatever the next big thing in the fungi world is, you can bet that Oyster Creek will be on top of it in no time.

Oyster Creek Mushroom Company is located at 61 Standpipe Road in Damariscotta. Phone 207-563-1076 mushroom@lincoln.midcoast.com oystercreekmushroom.com/

The darker mushrooms on the bottom are Black Trumpets, the lighter colored at the top are Hedgehogs.

Yellow Foot Chantrelles

CORSON’S AUTO SUPPLY

212 PARK STREET, ROCKLAND

Open 7 Days A Week!

M-F 7:30-5:30, Sat. 7:30-4:00, Sun. 9:00-1:00

596-6554


bar

Rainbow Warrior Reiki

Usui / Karuna / Violet Flame / IET RENEE SETARO, RMT

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Delvino’s Grill & Pasta house brings flavor and fun to Belfast

Reiki Master/Teacher

Usui and Karuna Reiki Master Also offering Reiki for All Pets

(207) 845-6068 • cell: (207) 701-1869 whitebuffalo0157@yahoo.com A multi-dealer shop representing over 70 of the area’s dealers. Step back in time with fine country, Victorian, and formal furniture, exciting smalls and engaging collectibles, displayed in attractive, room-like settings. Shipping is available.

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Mobile Service Reasonable Rates Call for appointment

207-548-2640 • searsportantiques.com

le’s Choice Voted the Peop do County Wal of Best of the Best

e 1st PlacSh op

Best Antique

Also available

Searsport Self Storage

at the Searsport Antique Mall 149 East Main Street (Route 1) Searsport, Maine 04974 Daily 9–5 June–Sept, 10–5 Oct–May OPEN YEAR ’ROUND

Common Kids Child Care & Preschool

Delvino’s brings flavor and fun to Main Street in Belfast with a vision of serving homemade eclectic food and drinks that they carry out well. Opened in June of last year, the restaurant’s ownership team gutted and renovated the historic location creating a warm and hip atmosphere welcoming their patrons. The theme on the menu? Delicious and homemade. From the fresh garlic baked into the olive oils and bread to the desserts, and much of it in between, Delvino’s takes pride in creating unique and hearty food. But it doesn’t stop with the food – they have their own infused alcohols. Currently, they are featuring a fresh ginger infused rum, delicious! Their menu features a variety of homemade soups, salads, and fresh grilled seafood and meats, delicious pasta dishes and many vegetarian options. They also feature a terrific variety of Maine made beers, wines, and liquors. But our favorite, by far, (or course) is the signature drink, Delvino’s Raspberry-tini. Stop in for happy hour (4-6 daily) to try one yourself!

Now Accepting Applications!! 54 Depot Street Union, Maine 04862 (207) 790-0518 commonkidsfcc@hotmail.com www.commonkids.webs.com

Amalfi on the Water going strong in Rockland Despite some closings at other local restaurants, Amalfi on the water is going strong after 13 years in Rockland serving delicious local fare with a Mediterranean flair. At Amalfi, they believe the best food begins with the most wholesome products and purchase organically and locally whenever possible. They also believe that a local emphasis is an important part of their success, with the motto Buy Local, Eat Local, Support Local. The menu and daily specials are loaded with fresh, unique and delicious options. Some of my favorites include their famous haddock chowder and the haddock and crab citron. (Can you tell I love fish?) They also feature several pasta and meat dishes, and for lighter fare: sandwiches and a bar menu with more than ten options under $12. Their extensive wine list has options to compliment any meal, and they also serve their own Shag Rock Brewery beer.

FULL SERVICE HAIR SALON

Walk-ins welcome color specialists 10% off

All Color Services on fridays only

175 Main Street Thomaston, Maine 354-2755

The beautifully renovated location cannot be beat – they have created an atmosphere and menu for patrons to enjoy on any occasion. The dining room itself is a terrific place for a special meal, celebration or date night out, while both the bar and outside dining area offer casual and comfortable options to What’s enjoy a pint and a meal. And, of course, no Shakin’? matter where you are at Amalfi you have the By Shannon Kinney beautiful view of the water! This is a series of articles profiling some of the area’s hippest bartenders and their signature drinks. Look for it in each issue of thescene! Have comments, ideas or suggestions for the next bartender or fun drink? Just email shannon@dreamlocal.com. Cheers, Shannon

Co-owners David Cooke & Nancy Wood met at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY in 1994 while attending the culinary program, and came to Maine to open Amalfi 13 years ago.


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Signature Drink At Delvino’s Delvino’s Raspberry-tini This refreshing treat is one not to be missed when you visit Delvino’s. The secret, of course, is in the sauce. 1.5oz Vodka .75oz Triple Sec Splash Sour Squirt homemade raspberry sauce made with Maine raspberries Shake with ice and strain into a martini glass.

April 2011

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This joint venture of David and Nancy’s has brought together years of training, education and experience to the coastal waters of Maine where their energy and reputations are well regarded. Amalfi on the Water is a dream they live – and it is a delicious experience for their customers.

If you enjoy the convenience of electronic banking, E-Choice Checking is the perfect account for you.

Delvino’s Grill and Pasta House is open 7 days a week lunch and dinner 11am9pm and is located at 52 Main Street in Belfast Maine. You can call them at (207) 338-4565, or you can find them online on Facebook.

With E-Choice Checking you can earn a premium interest rate* and receive ATM fee refunds** just by doing some simple activities each month.

Amalfi on the Water is open Tuesday through Sunday, serving lunch from 11:30 and Dinner from 5pm. They are located at 12 Water Street in Rockland Maine, you can call them at 207-596-0012; find them online at www.amalfionthewater. com, and on Facebook.

This is a series of articles profiling some of the area’s hippest bars, restaurants and their signature drinks. Look for it in each issue of thescene! Have comments, ideas or suggestions for the next bartender or fun drink? Just email Shannon@dreamlocal.com. Cheers, Shannon

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Benefit Dance for

S.A.M.s

A Stand Alone Marine is a young man or woman graduating from Parris Island who does not have any loved ones or family able to attend.

(This Benefit is for those in the 4/22/11 graduation class and for morale tents for our soldiers already overseas.)

Rave On!

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Fundraiser for Phyllis Burrell

Classic, Southern Rock & hits from the 80’s!!!

PUT ON THOSE DANCING SHOES FOR A GREAT CAUSE

Saturday, April 9 8pm -11pm

at the Wedding & Event Center at ECHO HILL Rt. 131 St. George Tickets $10 each or $5 w/bag of Beef Jerky or FREE with a calling card ($10 value or more)

Service men & women get in for FREE with military I.D. Public Invited • 21+ Event NOT BYOB • 50/50 Raffle

The Waterworks Restaurant will be hosting our cash bar, serving great drinks! Sabrosa Cupcakes have donated some yummy cupcakes to raise money as well!

S.A.M. stands for: Stand Alone Marine A Stand Alone Marine is a young man or woman graduating from Parris Island who does not have any loved ones or family able to attend. Many of these graduates leave almost immediately for combat training and then off to war. At each graduation from boot camp, there are about 350 recruits who graduate to become Marines. The average number from each company who are not fortunate enough to have a love one attending is about 50. A wonderful small group of mothers and family, from the 4/22/11 graduating class, have volunteered to help with the SAMs bag project for that date and are asking for donations. We are so very proud of our young men and women who undertook the challenge to become United States Marines and rightfully so. Therefore, much like our Marines who never leave a Marine behind, we let no Marine graduate from Parris Island without the well deserved recognition of their great accomplishment. We do this by surprising them with a goodie bag/S.A.M. to take as they leave Parris Island. ALL money raised will be used to purchase items like calling cards, disposable cameras, and simple snacks like beef jerky, candy, cookies, and personal items! The beef jerky & calling cards collected at the event will travel directly to Parris Island with a local mother from Waldoboro, Dawn Burns. Dawn will also assist in handing out the bags. All bags will be filled the day before graduation for the Marines in need, and any extra items will be shipped overseas to refurbish a morale tent that has recently been destroyed.

Please help us support these young Marines who are so willing to give their lives to keep us free!!!

Through Midcoast Gym, Phyllis Burrell has tirelessly helped many people in the area reach their fitness goals, and now as she faces her latest challenge, the community is rallying around her creating a benefit 5K road race and walk to raise funds for her healthcare. The race begins and ends at Trackside Station Restaurant on Pleasant Street in Rockland. The course is a pleasant, easy run through Rockland – perfect for all levels of runner and walkers. Anyone can participate for a minimum donation of $15.00. The first 100 registrants will receive a 5K for Phyllis reusable shopping bag, and there are many more prizes including 1 year memberships to the Camden YMCA and Midcoast Gym, massages, personal training sessions, lobsters, and more. Also, all registrants will receive a raffle ticket to win a remarqued print of Artist Ronald Frontin’s “Blueberries”, worth over $2,000. Prizes will be awarded to the first and second place runners for a variety of age groups.

Race details:

April 16, 2011 Registration starts at 7am Race starts at 9am Walkers start early at 8:30 am For more information, contact Judy Tibbets at Midcoast Gym, 44 Park street in Rockland, or call 596-0141.

Happy Spring! Monday-Saturday 8am - 5pm Fridays open ´til 6pm Sundays 9am - 4pm Visit our website www.mainecoastbookshop.com

158 Main St. Damariscotta, Maine 04543 207-563-3207


etsy?

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you

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April 2011

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Chip, Split & Drive

betsy!

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April 30th

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16,490

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Please visit www.unionfarmequip.com for a complete list of Events & Demos Customer instant rebates (C.I.R.) of $1,000 are available on cash or standard rate finance purchases of eligible Kubota equipment through Kubota Tractor Corporation. C.I.R. not available with 0% A.P.R, or low rate financing offers. Financing is available through Kubota Credit Corporation, U.S.A., subject to credit approval. Dealer subtracts rebate from dealer’s prerebate selling price on qualifying purchases. Subject to dealership inventory. Sales to governmental agencies, independent rental centers, and dealer owned rental fleets do not qualify. Some exceptions apply. Customer instant rebates are not available after completed sale. C.I.R. availability ends 3/31/11. Customer instant rebates (C.I.R.) of $300 to $500 are available on cash or standard rate finance purchases of eligible Kubota tractor/loader packages through Kubota Tractor Corporation. Financing is available through Kubota Credit Corporation, U.S.A., subject to credit approval. Dealer subtracts rebate from dealer’s pre-rebate selling price on qualifying purchases. Subject to dealership inventory. Sales to governmental agencies, independent rental centers, and dealer owned rental fleets do not qualify. Some exceptions apply. Customer instant rebates are not available after completed sale. C.I.R. availability ends 3/31/11.

Union Farm Equipment

PHOTO BY: NOADI

This feature highlights all the crafties in Maine who don’t necessarily have a physical shop or an online presence other than Etsy (www.etsy.com) which is like an online open craft fair that allows users to sell vintage items, handmade items that are modified, as well as unique, (sometimes downright wacky) handcrafted art

Celebrating Over 60 Years of Quality Sales and Service “The Friendly Folks” • Established 1949 1-800-935-7999 or 785-4451 • 1893 Heald Highway (Rte. 17), Union Mon.-Sat. 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. • Open ALL Day Saturday • www.unionfarmequip.com

Brass Steampunk Cuttlefish Necklace Handmade Jewelry

Checking in with “Noadi” the Maine artist who created this piece, she says, “this piece is inspired by my love of marine animals, fantasy, and all things weird and wonderful. I’ve always been a science geek as well as an artist, so my jewelry lets me combine these two passions. I get asked a lot why I make so many cephalopods. Do they have some special meaning to me? The simple answer is that they are my favorite group of animals and I find them fascinating. The only ‘message’ I want my jewelry to send to people is that cephalopods are amazing animals and not scary sea monsters.”

Description

Gliding through the ocean the clockwork cuttlefish quietly whirred and clicked as it swam. Where this creature came from no one knows, some strange creation of a mad scientist perhaps? It has been traveling the ocean for years along with its brethren, the mechanical squids, octopuses, and nautiluses until the day their mechanisms finally slow down and they wash ashore to be marveled over by curious beachcombers.” This clockwork cuttlefish is a rich brass color with a cutout area containing tiny watch gears sealed under a bubble of ice resin. A great gift for the cephalopod obsessed, science fans, and sea lovers. Cuttlefish are not fish at all, but are cephalopods. Their closest relatives are squid and octopus. They have eight arms and two tentacles with suckers that they use to capture their Kay Stephens prey. Some cuttlefish are brightly Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance colored and many can change the writer, has covered both mainstream color and the texture of their skin and underground events, people and as camouflage, mating display, or scenes since moving to the Midcoast in 1993. She helps small Maine businesses in warning. This story was generated from searching items through the Maine Etsy Team. For more of Noadi’s work go to: http://www.etsy.com/shop/ noadi

the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www. facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

A Tote for Any Season · Any Reason

Uptown Studio

Clothing · Home Décor · Gifts

www.uptownstudio.net

371 Main Street · Rockland, Maine 04841 207-594-1100


Q & A with poet Jacob Fricke

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Belfast poet Jacob Fricke recently published “This Book of Poems You Found” which was styled as an antique discovered by accident. Billing itself as “A mosey from the mundane to the baroque and back again, Fricke’s poetry is a 116-page “platter of candy for adults.” Here is a romp of a Q & A with Mr. Fricke.

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Q: What inspired the idea of making this look like a book of “found writings?” A: You! No, I didn’t mean . . . please stop doing that. What I meant was, the reader! You, the person discovering it. You see, the book isn’t about my life; it’s poetry; it’s abstracted—it’s about anybody’s life. A good poem rings beyond the original story. And when you’re the judge of things—you, the reader, rather than some famous genius guy who told you how brilliant it was and what everything means—you get to use your imagination in a different way. For example, overheard conversation is always spicier. A life that has the stamp of some other era on it, comes from some other time, is always more mysterious. You fill in the blanks. You pry further. You get to asking different kinds of questions. So why not ask these questions about right now? Because sooner or later, we’re all some other era, we’re all overheard conversation. You are recording this, right?

Q: A lot of people find poetry to be ultra serious. Where do you find humor in it, say the baroque that comes out of your lines? A: From love of life. That is all. Basically, poetry is supposed to be fun. In poetry, words do things they’re not supposed to. They rhyme. They scan. They razzle. They alliterate. They stomp on syntax. Poetry is where language dances, where it breaks free of gravity. Poetry is an escape from prose, and the prosaic—a back door exit out of ordinary speech. And, as with any good art, it can transform a thing right before your eyes. You think you know what the deal is, walking down the sidewalk all confident-like, and then—shazam. Poetry, right there. With that kind of fluidity, it’s probably best to be lighthearted. You have to take yourself with a grain of salt. Because one minute you think you’re a top actor, and the next minute you’re Charlie Sheen crouching behind your desk, trying to conceal the brand name of your vodka until they pay you for product placement.

Q: From the platter of candy that each poem represents—describe the type of candy the following poem would be… if it were actually candy. Photograph

PHOTO

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OB FRIC

BY: JAC

Q: What form or structure are your poems in? Give us a mini lesson on how it works. Is that your favorite way to write or do you have a variety of meters or verses you play with?

of all the visions pulling me there was only one of all the planets I did chase the greatest was a Moon of all the specters I did fear that ever showed their face of all the failures I did wear a certain one holds place for in all the plays and tragedies the stage was yet refilled except that one square Mystery of one thing unrevealed of all the dreams above me hung a single one I chase A: Something with lemon and liquor in it, that melts away. Made from an old favorite recipe. By your once best friend. Whom you betrayed. And never saw again. Also, hanging in the sky in place of the moon would be nice. But that’s kind of high-budget for a book of poems. I admit that I’m kind of a Surrealist.

A: Quatrains, in lines of alternating iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter, with assonant rhyme, slant rhyme, and too many substitutions. My thoughts on rhyme and rhymed stanzas in general are to go easy. When things are too exact, they feel like a grammar-school exercise. When form is suggested, subtle, and not a restriction—and this is kind of paradoxical—it feels inevitable, it feels necessary, it carries you along. That’s the point where you enjoy it—or, even better, don’t even notice it.

“This Book of Poems You Found” is available at The Owl & Turtle Bookshop in Camden and The Reading Corner in Rockland.

I don’t always write in quatrains. The poems in this one are in dozens of different poetic styles—classical, British and late American Romantic, Whitmanesque, Beat, 60’s Pop, epigrammatic, forms of my own devising . . . one poem doesn’t even have any words in it. Whatever the style, the one thing that I can’t escape is meter. Rhythm is second nature to me. Which can make day-to-day conversations slightly awkward, at times.

Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance writer, has covered both mainstream and underground events, people and scenes since moving to the Midcoast in 1993. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www.facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

Kay Stephens


COFFEES & TEAS FROM AROUND THE WORLD SOLD BULK OR BY THE CUP!

Spices from A to Z, sold by weight

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Food, Spirits, Dancing, and Pool

Inquire about handmade chocolates 13 PASCAL AVENUE, ROCKPORT 236-8327 Monday - Saturday 6 am - 6 pm Closed Sundays for the Winter

37b Front Street, Belfast, Me 04915 207-338-8900 Open 7 days 11:30am-1pm

Happy Hour 7 Days - Noon to 6PM Free Eats! $2 Domestics

Fourteen beers on tap!

ALWAYS THE BEST DRINK PRICES IN ROCKLAND

Check our new menu items

BEST KARAOKE ON THE COAST EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE BANDS SATURDAY NIGHTS

CALL FOR INFO: 596-6250

43 Mechanic Street, Camden

230-7135 Come see our selection of

BEER & WINE! Grab & Go!! Great Italian food since 1902

594-7760 77 Park St., Rockland

Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 - 6:00

“The Pickler”

67 Pascal Avenue Rockport, Maine 207-230-7009

Rim a well chilled martini glass with coarse salt add: 3 oz of Maine made 22 Vodka 1 oz of pickle brine from Morse’s of Maine mustard pickle shake vigorously, should form ice crystals that float on top when poured into glass. garnish with a small whole Morse’s mustard pickle. variation is to sugar the rim of the martini glass.

12 Water St. on the Boardwalk, Rockland • 207 596 0012

Three Tides

40 Marshall Wharf, Belfast Phone: 207-338-1707 Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 4pm - Close, Closed Sunday and Monday 3tides.com david@3tides.com

UPSTAIRS BAR Pool Table Darts • Jukebox Same Great Menu Live Entertainment • BRICK OVEN PIZZA • JUICY STEAKBURGERS come visit • FRESH SEAFOOD us! • FAMILY DINING WITH A GREAT KID’S MENU

New Menu • New Chef 207-236-3272 21 BAY VIEW STREET • CAMDEN

CHECK OUT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE FOR OUR FULL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

SATURDAY, APRIL 9 Trackside Turns 2! Anniversary Dance Party with DJ Andy MONDAY, APRIL 18 Pints for Paws Benefit for Humane Society 5 to 8 p.m. with Paddy Mills SATURDAY, APRIL 30 Stella Artois Promo Party with DJ Andy

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marshall wharf beers on tap belfast harbor

37 Main Street Belfast, Maine 338-4502 open tu-sa @ 4pm serving food till 9 3tides.com

now hiring summer staff

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM /TRACKSIDESTATION

At the Historic Train Station, 4 Union St., Rockland 207-594-7500

brewery store & tasting room open th, fri & sat 12 - 7 pm marshallwharf.com 338-1707

Where good drinking meets good living 2 Park Drive, Rockland • 596-6665 ext.606 Thursday-Saturday 8:30pm-1:00am

Your only local microbrew


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April 2011

Dead River Convenience Stores

2 OFF

$ 00

Any Chester’s Chicken Boxed Dinner (With this coupon only.)

Rockport Expires April 30.

Fresh Spring Flavors. A hint of crisp white pear. The delicate touch of peach. A taunting whiff of Jasmine. It’s time to tempt the taste buds with crisp whites and delicate sparkling wines to celebrate spring. New Beers: Fantome, Serafijn, Mikkeller Cigars, Sake, Fortified Wines Artisnal Cheeses Next Antipasti Items Chocolate Wine Cannoli Filled to Order Tasting

April 15th

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The White Hot Spotlight

APRIL DEAL

Special available in

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Look for more deli offerings this summer!

WINE MERCHANTS Route 1 in Waldoboro • 207-832-2221 mckeanandcharles.com Email special requests - info@mckeanandcharles.com

After having guessed the “How Well Do You Know Midcoast Maine” photo contest correctly, Elaine Abel has won a spot in this month’s feature: The White Hot Spotlight, which follows peoples’ creative professions or hobbies. Elaine has always studied design, both as a profession and a hobby. When she was younger, she wanted to be a graphic designer, but thought a more stable career would be in engineering. Today, she has found a way to combine both of her interests. She is a Construction Management Owner’s Representative by trade (www.elaineabel.com) and does small graphic design projects on the side for clients. But we’re not here to talk about that. We’re here to talk about Elaine’s passionate creative hobby: woodworking.

Q: I see by the pictures you have a fascination with ducks. What got you into wood decoy carving in the first place? I have always been a hobbyist bird watcher and, when we moved to Maine, I became involved in duck hunting. From there, I got interested in the history and art of the decoys. Some of the antique decoys are magnificent. And our local carvers have incredible talent. I took an adult-ed class at the Midcoast School of Technology for beginning carvers and loved it. The teacher was terrific and encouraging.

PHOTOS BY: ELAINE ABEL

Q: Do they float? What type of ducks? What are they used for? My decoys do not float. They are purely decorative. Having the decoy float is a whole other art – it has to be weighted correctly so that it floats properly. I’m not that precise.

Q: Describe the kinds of customers who want a decorative wooden decoy carving. What is going on in their heads?

I have never sold a decoy, but we have friends that collect them. Most people that I know collect because they appreciate it as art. They either collect American folk art or collect them because they are or were avid hunters and just appreciate the beauty and utilitarian use of the work.

Q: Tell me about the power tools you use to make them.

I use a Foredom flexible shaft power drill. For fine detailing I used a smaller finer flexible drill. And… for the finest details, my dentist provided me with some dental tools. As I’m getting older, I need to use magnifying goggles to get the detail that I like. I’ve tried to carve with traditional chisels, but I’m too impatient.

Q: You carved….a boot. Why did you carve a boot?

It is a woodworked boot. I took a class on how to make boots. No huge story there! But I chose a construction boot because of my other “job.” The winner of “How Well do you know Midcoast Maine” gets The White Hot Spotlight on The Killer Convo as a way to profile artists in the area.

Kay Stephens Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance writer, has covered both mainstream and underground events, people and scenes since moving to the Midcoast in 1993. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www.facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo


April 2011

rad

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� Dine-In, Take-Out & Delivery � Fresh Local Ingredients � Delicious Homemade Desserts � Family Friendly Atmosphere

Rad Happenings are the kind of events or scenes that are developing here that you will probably want to be hip to.

DELIVERY 236-0066 April 14-17, 2011 The 23rd Annual Bud Light Reggae Fest

Sugarloaf, Kingfield, ME You’ll have to travel inland a bit for this one, but it’s such a great outdoor festival, many Midcoasters make it an annual pilgrammage. Sugarloaf’s biggest springtime bash is the 23rd Annual Bud Light Reggae Fest with live music day and night. Reggae Fest is the biggest spring party in the East and the only East Coast festival to make SKI Magazine’s list of the Top Ten Spring Parties in North America in 2009. Festival headliners include: the Boston based Renegade Sound Station known for their dancehall reggae and Mighty Mystic, known for his refreshing musical diversity, plus a whole host of supporting Reggae bands. Ticket info and lodging can be found on the Events page of their website: www.sugarloaf.com

April 16, 2011 Spring Swing Fling with Three Button Deluxe

Okay, this winter we’ve done the ‘80s costume dance party, the ‘70s disco/funk party...so this spring, we going to keep tripping down the decades with a ‘40s/’50s dance party performed by Three Button Deluxe. These Midcoast musicians boast a guitar slinger, a bass man, a rhythm king and a splash of sax who all have a common love for the jumpin’ and jivin’ sounds of the ‘40s and ‘50s. Stir in zoot suits and retro-rocker threads, shake it up and pour the whole she-bang in a cocktail glass over ice-cool, vintage instruments. That’s how you make the Three Button Deluxe. The party starts at 8 pm at The Wedding & Event Center at Echo Hill in St. George. Cash bar & Appetizers Available. Prizes will be awarded for the best costume in the ‘40s /’50s era. $10 per ticket - $16 a couple. Tickets can be purchased online at www.eventsatechohill.com or at The Waterworks Restaurant.

Kay Stephens Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance writer, has covered both mainstream and underground events, people and scenes since moving to the Midcoast in 1993. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www.facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

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TAKE-OUT 236-2041

Open 7 Days! 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.

HAND TOSSED NEW YORK-STYLE PIZZA

Wraps, Wings, Salads, Subs & More! U.S. Route One

Ask About Our Catering Options!

Rockport, ME

Listen to what people are saying about your business online – for FREE

Visit dreamlocal.steprep.com and input your business name and information to try our Reputation Management tools. Any time your brand is mentioned online, you’ll hear about it right away. Try it today! Online Marketing • Advertising Planning & Strategy PR • Web Site Strategy • Social Media Reputation Management • Facebook • Twitter Blogs • Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Email Campaigns • Facebook Page Customization

Dreamlocal.com Facebook.com/dreamlocal info@dreamlocal.com 207-354-7073


Click!

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the social SCENE Click!80 was held February 23rd at the Hampton Inn & Suites, Thomaston. Food was provided by Cafe Miranda and Beverages were provided by Rockland Food Service. CLICK!80 continues to prove to be a successful forum for the Penobscot Bay Regional Chamber of Commerece and the Camden Rockport Lincolnville Chamber of Commerce memberships to work together, to “mingle with purpose,” and to stroll outside the box of the traditional Business After Hours model. CLICK!80 events are fun, upbeat, socializing opportunities designed to highlight your business by creating fresh and inventive ways to network over drinks and hors d’ouvres. Created for just for Chamber members, networking and meeting new people at CLICK!80 events are guaranteed to be light hearted and comfortable.

Photos courtesy of E. Stanley Photography


after

hours

Every month a local business (and Chamber member) hosts a “Business After Hours” that showcases their business by inviting other Chamber members to gather and network socially. March’s BAH was hosted by The Camden Opera House and Natalie’s. Wine was provided by The Cellar Door Winery. In addition to yummy food and drinks at least one door prize is given away, new members are introduced and members can announce upcoming specials and events that happening within the community. If you are interested in becoming a member of the Chamber, please visit: therealmaine.com. We’d love to have you join us!

Photos courtesy of E. Stanley Photography


book

NEED CA$H?

Walk in with Gold - Walk out with Cash * Compare Before You Sell * * Fair, Honest, Discrete * Available After Hours Anytime By Appointment (cell phone 207-691-7347)

Burnham’s Bloomers 14 Washington Rd.,

Waldoboro, ME

832-4222

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34 April 2011 * Free Appraisals Every Day * No Appointment Needed By Certified Jeweler/ Gemologist

Chamber’s Jewelers

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Q&A with Paul Joy, owner of Stone Soup Books

166 Main St., Thomaston

354-8500

www.chambersjewelers.net

* Spring Decorating Ideas * * Easter * * New Flags * * Country Curtains * * Table Squares *

www.burnhamsbloomers.com

BOGGS HOMES

1-800-649-6578 273-2610

Rte. 90, Warren, Maine

2 Story Colonial

$105,900

Stock model on lot for viewing

1768 sq. ft.

Discounted Price on All Lot Models ! “WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD!”

DOG BOARDING

Large, indoor/outdoor runs, convenient location, open seven days a week, affordable at $15.00 per day

Perry Greene Kennel Route 1, Waldoboro, 832-5227

Reservations on line at www.mainely-dogs.com

Lic.# F293

Paul Joy owner of Stone Soup Books in Camden. “Earthly Necessities to ADORN HEAVENLY BODIES “12ish & GRANDER’’

508 Main St., Damariscotta www.womenofsubstance.us 207-563-6809

Going on a trip? Come home to a clean house...and happy pets! - Professional housekeeper - Loving pet caregiver in your home in Midcoast & Central Maine - Insured

What is the history of your bookstore?

Stone Soup Books was started in 1982 by someone who obviously loved small, intimate bookshops, which reflect the seller’s taste and almost demand the sharing of one’s interests. The result is a rewarding learning environment. Any day, one might hear really useful tips, i.e., gardening, homeopathy, home building techniques, etc., not to mention which books would be best to carry. With a long learning curve to book selling, experience and persistence are invaluable. Furthermore, being a life long reader and frequenting other bookstores have helped shape me.

What books do you like to read?

Having one of those 60’s liberal arts educations, my tastes are purely eclectic. Among either fiction or non-fiction, there are books which point you toward another and then yet again another, informing passion as you follow. As a history major you tend to see things in broad terms leading to a taste for books, which both engage the life of the mind and may have buried within them or end with a universal truth.

Just call me - Betty McBrien! Home 785-4672 • Cell 701-8491

Country Creations Quilt Shop 696 Waldoboro Rd. (Rt. 32), Jefferson

207-549-7424 fabric, notions, patterns, books, gifts Largest selection of punchneedle supplies in the area

APRIL SPECIAL:

Shop Hours: Tues. - Sat. 10-4

30% OFF all Easter Gift Items 25% OFF all books


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What parts of your business are you most proud of?

Well, the obvious point of pride would stem from the challenge of successfully growing the tiniest of businesses over 26 years and eking out of it a living. Somebody named Butterworth once said, “Life should consist of love and work and only the love should show.” That could not be more evident than in a small friendly bookstore; but, to that I would mention that the fun should show, too. It’s fun when a student brings you a reading list and you’re able to fill most of it. It’s fun when someone discovers a long sought after book or one by a favorite author or one on a favorite subject. It’s fun when a stranger enters the store and asks for your recommendations and you get to ask up to twenty questions in order to unravel the mystery of what to put in their hands.

Funniest bookshop story

The funniest stories would take too long to relate and probably fall into the category - you had to be there. Most stories that come to mind would be more accurately defined as ironic, sometimes taking on the fiercer variety.

How did you get started selling books?

Wherever I’ve traveled or lived, I’ve found myself attracted to very small intimate bookstores. Some favorite memories include those in Provincetown, Woodstock, Madison, Connecticut, a little bookstore tucked in behind the old bowling alley in Boothbay Harbor. Our area here was really looking up when I discovered not only Stone Soup, but Lobster Lane Books in Spruce Head. When the opportunity arose, I acquired Stone Soup in 1985 and soon discovered that my diploma of years earlier had indeed prepared me for what would become my bliss..

Featured Book The featured book would be that which is in hand at the moment. Presently, that is Denise Mina’s third volume, Slip of the Knife featuring the Glasgow journalist, Paddy Meehan. Paddy comes alive as a struggling young, non-glamorous woman driven to make it in the sexist, teasing world of the good olé boys who dominate the newspaper world. The world of mystery writing just seems to get better and better with the likes of Norwegians (Jo Nesbro, Karen Fossom) and Brits, including Minette Waters.

Established in 1982, Stone Soup Books is a small secondhand bookstore owned by Paul and Agnes Joy in the coastal town of Camden in Maine. With 25,000 books we cater mainly to readers with a large selection of current and classic paperbacks. We also have large sections of nautical, exploration, Maine, gardening, cookbooks, photography, and art books. Our internet stock includes out of print hardcover books, older children’s books, and modern first editions.

Stone Soup Books

35 Main Street, Camden 207-763-3354

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April 2011

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Hop on over to see Check out our us!

SCENE

This is a random collection of things, ideas, trends and just weird stuff that Midcoast Maine has to offer. Obviously, this is subjective and can’t include everybody, or else it would be called...the phone book.

summer & sand toys from

207-563-2333

Open Wednesday-Saturday 10-4, or by appointment 157 Main Street • Damariscotta www.maineclothdiaper.com

Gift Registries Available This is a random collection of things, ideas, trends and just weird stuff that Midcoast Maine has to offer. Obviously, this is subjective and can’t include everybody, or else it would be called…the phone book.

Best Maine Pet Store by Downeast Dog News

Best Local Places To Get Stuff For a Tropical Themed Party

Try our self-serve dog wash!

We checked in with both the Camden-Rockport Animal Rescue League and the Humane Society of Knox County who both happened to throw a Tropical Theme Benefit the same night on March 5—which got us thinking— when you want to throw a Tropical Luau—where do you get this stuff? Here’s the lowdown.

We have the best selection of all-natural food and treats for dogs & cats! 442 Main Street, Rockland • 207.594.5269 www.loyalbiscuit.com • www.facebook.com/loyalbiscuit

Party goods, decorations, etc.

SAVE UP TO $1000.00! †

When You Purchase 2 Or More JD Implements!

NOTHING RUNS LIKE A DEERE™

$1000.00 OFF When you purchase a New John Deere 2320 or 2520 Tractor! » VISIT YOUR GOLD STAR CERTIFIED JOHN DEERE DEALER TODAY! www.JohnDeere.com

HAMMOND TRACTOR COMPANY 1110 MINOT AVENUE AUBURN, ME 04210 (207) 782-8921 TOLL FREE 1-877-HT-AUBURN

SOURCE: EHOW

HAMMOND TRACTOR COMPANY JCT. ROUTES 17 & 131 UNION, ME 04862 (207) 785-4464 TOLL FREE 1-877-HT-UNION

HAMMOND TRACTOR COMPANY 216 CENTER ROAD FAIRFIELD, ME 04937 (207) 453-7131 TOLL FREE 1-877-HT-FAIRFIELD

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FARRIN PROPERTIES

A74BUBD0802-00344944

“Representing Buyers and Sellers from the Capital to the Coast”

ROCKLAND - 1900’s colonial multi-unit. One 1 BR efficiency apartment & two 2 BR apartments. Vinyl siding, wood floors, 2 car garage and nice backyard. $169,000

UNION - Custom saltbox built w/quality in mind. Extremely well maintained both inside & out. First floor BR w/bath, huge MBR w/fireplace & full walkout basement. $295,000

WARREN - Enjoy the tranquility of living on the beautiful Oyster River. This 3 bedroom home offers 400 feet of frontage on this crystal clear flowing river. A great setting. $125,500

BRISTOL - Well maintained 3 bedroom 1800’s farmhouse on 20 +/- acres. Enclosed heated porch & detached 2 bay garage with lots of room for storage. $229,000

752 Main St., Damariscotta

563-2750 • 623-3350 www.FarrinProperties.com

Party Fundamentals www.partyfundamentals.com Along with all kinds of rentals, this unique party store in Camden also offers grass skirts, coconut bras, hanging palm trees, leis and other decorations. Reny’s Department Store www.renys.com Reny’s always has something and in this case, you can find leis for cheap, fishing net, star fish, a limbo kit, tiki torches, bamboo skewers, cups, plates, tealights, an entire row of hot sauces and real sandals made in Hawaii! iParty www.iparty.com If you feel like taking a drive to Augusta, I’m told this is the place to get even more elaborate stuff like grass huts and tiki huts, blow-up palm trees, parrots, hurricane glasses, leis, raffia table skirts, glass net candles, wooden tribal masks, beach balls, piñatas, and other tropical themed centerpieces.

Clothes/Adornment

Hawaiian shirts and other print muʻumuʻus—can be found at Good Will in Rockland and Belfast, at Reny’s or your hippie parents’ closet. Coconut bras (if you dare) and leis can be found at Party Fundamentals.

Food

We asked the CRARL tropical party planner about what she recommended for a dish. “Prism catered our event and they had a killer pineapple salsa recipe. We kept it simple with chips and salsa and guacamole, shrimp cocktail, and lots of fresh fruit,” said Administrative Director Lisa Dresser. But there are so many other recipes to be found at allrecipes.com; just look up “luau party” for ideas. For raw ingredients, the best places to go include:

Hannaford Supermarket in Belfast www.hannaford. com Here you’ll find exotic fruits such as: coconuts, pineapples, star fruit, bread fruit, mangoes, papayas, cactus pears, kumquats and sugar cane.


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April 2011

Jess’s Market www.jessmarket.com Jess’s Market in Rockland sells coconut shrimp, stuffed clams, macadamia nut Panko crumbs for lightly breaded island fish and even will special order conch for you if you want to make a sauce, salad or chowder. Curtis Custom Meats 207-273-2574 Luaus typically offer Ah, paradise. PHOTO BY TOM WRIGGINS traditional pig roasts with pineapple, other tropical fruits and rice with vegetables. Curtis Custom Meats sells any size pig you want roasted (as well as the raw pig before roasting). 50 lbs and under is $3.25 a pound. 55 lbs and over is $2.30/lb. The Salt Pig www.thesaltpig.com If you don’t want to roast the pig yourself, ask Tom Wriggins of The Salt Pig. He has been roasting whole hogs/pigs for community events, weddings and family gatherings for about four years. He uses the Cuban method called “La Caja China” or the Chinese Box where you place the pig in the box and roast it for around six hours using charcoal on the top of the box.

Specialty Drinks

Mainely Bartenders www.mainelybartenders.com Many people will choose to set up their own bar (and we recommend getting your liquor at Rite Aid and making a Mango Mojito garnished with real sugar cane) but if you need professionals, Matt Brennan (of Mainely Bartenders) has a concoction called, appropriately enough, an Island Getaway. Not sure what it had in it besides five different kinds of rum and some pineapple juice, but it will have you doing the Polynesian two step in no time.

Sweets & Meats Market is a locally owned grocer/ bakery in the South End of Rockland, Maine SWEETS & MEATS IS ALSO A WARM PLACE TO COME SIP TEA OR CHAT ABOUT FOOD – WE WILL PROVIDE ANSWERS TO AS MANY FOODIE QUESTIONS AS WE CAN! The wine is chilled, the oven is warm and our doors are open. Please drop in and say hello and check out our market!

218 Main St. | Rockland, Maine 04841

207.594.2070

The Mango Mojito. SOURCE FUNANDFOODCAFE.COM

sweetsandmeatsmarket.com

DJs/Bands

Nathaniel Bernier, of Wild Rufus, now does a killer reggae DJ sets for parties (www.wildrufus.com). CRARL also recommended two live steel drum bands that played at their party. One was the well-known band, Atlantic Clarion (www. atlanticclarion.com) and the other was Planet Pan (http:// peninsulapan.org) made up mostly of high school kids. “They are amazing! Planet Pan practicing on steel drums. PHOTO BY ATLANTIC CLARION They had so much fun up there on the stage and their energy was contagious,” said Dresser. Steelin’ Thunder has also won a lot of praise in the Midcoast for their local performances. (http://steelinthunder.com)

Sand

Plants Unlimited www.plants-unlimited.com The kind of white play sand you can dump all over your apartment floor is only $5.99 for a 50 lb bag. Cost of cleanup, (not included)

OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 10 TO 5 389 MAIN STREET ROCKLAND TEL. 594-9830

SARAH IRVING GILBERT Attorney at Law Elliott & MacLean, LLP

Hula Hoop Entertainment

Judith Tingley: www.HoopMainiac. com HoopME!: www.hoopmeonline.com If you want hula contests or a hula demonstration, check out Judith “The Hoopmainiac” Tingley of is from Belfast who does parties. Also check out newcomer Maria Randolph with her hula hoop skills and classes in HoopMe!

37

Kay Stephens Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance writer, has covered both mainstream and underground events, people and scenes since moving to the Midcoast in 1993. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www. facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

General Practice Including: Divorce/Family Law, Wills, Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Landlord/Tenant, Real Estate

(207) 939-4276 or (207) 236-8836 Gilbert@camdenlaw.com

NO FEE FOR INITIAL CONFERENCE

20 Mechanic Street, Camden


music

Whitney Carpentier is STILL the revolving music reviewer of the month because no one else has requested to be and anyway, her music picks are fun to read. If you’re interested in doing a music review contact The Killer Convo.

movie

Kay Stephens is subbing in for Sean Ames this month. She would love to find the time to see a dang movie, but has been content to discover all that streaming Netflix has to offer.

Beth Ditto Have you heard the Gossip? No, no, no. Not about that girl being married to so-and-so but having that other guy’s baby. There would need to be an entirely different monthly publication to cover all the gossip on the coast. I’m talking about the Gossip as PHOTO BY: MISS DITTO in the band from Washington. If you haven’t yet, you certainly should, but for a second I will just tell you about the solo project that the singer Beth Ditto has just released. Slightly different from recording with her band, and totally reminiscent of early 1990s female pop, Ditto’s voice and “this is what I do, so eff you” lyrics are enough to turn this EP into a summer soundtrack, without feeling as though you need to heat up your crimping iron. Four songs is all it takes for Miss Ditto to sing about love, loss, revenge and going out all night. Upbeat and made for dancing, its no wonder that Ditto is known for her stage presence. Larger than life in more ways than one, watching Ditto preform, either solo or with Gossip is a fun experience that brings crowds together and entertains all. Now, about that other entertaining gossip... You’re going to have to go on Facebook for that.

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Books, Movies, and Music reviews by people who are obsessed with books, movies and music.

herd

April 2011

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“What Easter candy do you crave so much, you’d actually yank it from your kid’s basket when he wasn’t looking?”

The Tudors I am no history buff, but Showtime’s The Tudors, which I’ve been greedily watching through Netflix has gotten me hooked on the intrigues, scandals and betrayals that made up King Henry VIII’s royal dynasty. In real life Henry was a fat, bloated red head but Jonathan RhysPHOTO BY: SHOWTIME Meyers and his hotsy six-pack make for some good viewing. Right now I’m at the point where The Pope is condemning King Henry for proclaiming himself the head of the Church of England and Anne Bolelyn is being accused of witchcraft. Will he or won’t he cut off her head? (This is only a spoiler alert if you slept through all your history classes.) The New York Times called The Tudors a “steamy period drama ... which critics could take or leave but many viewers are eating up.” Right now you couldn’t pry me away from it.

Crystal McLain

First, I purposely do not have children so I can have all the Easter candy for myself. Second, my answer would be those Mini Cadbury Eggs — the ones with the milk chocolate center and crisp candy coating... Back off, kids.

Holly Hendrick

Definitely the Cadbury Creme Egg! I don’t even bother to put them in the basket. I get them for myself and hide them from the kids.

Bossypants by Tina Fey

Lacy Simons,

book

the bookstore manager at Rock City Books & Coffee, is a reader, a maker, and a collector of finepoint pens and terrible jokes. To find more picks and reads: Facebook: facebook.com/ rockcitycoffee Twitter: @rockcitybooks

At long last, it’s April. More daylight! Flowers! Robins! Temperatures all the way in the 50s! Whatever to all that. This year, the arrival of April means but one thing: Tina Fey’s long-time-coming book Bossypants. For the (hopefully) jajillions of you out there who think Fey is one of the smartest, funniPHOTO BY: est people this planet has ever REAGAN ARTHUR BOOKS offered up, welcome to your new bible. Commandment number one: “You’re no one until someKay Stephens one calls you bossy.” Kay Stephens, a Maine freelance If you have a conversation with me this writer, has covered both mainstream month, I will probably find a way to talk and underground events, people and about Bossypants. You’ve been warned! scenes since moving to the Midcoast in

1993. She helps small Maine businesses in the creative fields get media exposure through www.kaystephenscontent.com To get daily A & E updates, follow The Killer Convo through Facebook: www. facebook.com/killerconvo and Twitter: http://twitter.com/thekillerconvo

Bill Ronalds

A chocolate crucifix. Always found something “interesting” about biting Jesus’s head off. Haven’t seen them for years. Maybe somebody finally got the kinkiness of it all.

Kiai Monson

Malted Milk Eggs..I like to lick them then use them as lipsticks...it’s awesome!


Fri 1

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6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking

Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org. n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday

Theater, 43 Front St. n

7 to 10 p.m. I Pity the Fool Benefit Dance, Second annual ‘80s dance with Nikki Hunt Band at Lincoln Street Center for Arts and Education, 24 Lincoln St., Rockland. Cost: $15 advance; $20 at door. FMI: 594-221. Benefits Youthlinks, a program of Broadreach Family & Community Services (youthlinksonline.org).

Night Film Series, Friends of the Thomaston Public Library screen “Love Among the Ruins” (1975, USA-TV) in Room 208 of Thomaston Academy Building, 60 Main St./Route 1. Free/donations. FMI: 354-2453. Doors open 6 p.m. April Antics month, hosted by Erika Pfander.

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6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Jazz for

Meals Benefit, Third annual evening of cabaret style entertainment, featuring traditional and modern jazz dance tunes by Belfast Area, Medomak Valley, Camden Hills Regional and Wiscasset high school bands at Owls Head Transportation Museum, Route 73. Cost: $8; $5 students; $15 families, includes admission to museum exhibits. FMI: 542-7644. All proceeds benefit Midcoast Meals on Wheels programs. Big Band to ‘60s, includes vocal numbers. n

6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Round Top Coffee House, open mic; Damariscotta River Association’s Round Top Farm, Business Route 1, Damariscotta. Cost: $6; $3 senior citizens; free for children. FMI: 5631393. First Friday of each month.

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6:30 to 11 p.m. Belfast Flying Shoes Contra Dance, Community Dance for all ages led by caller Chrissy Fowler with music by The All-Comer’s Band, followed by 7:30 p.m. Tasty Treat Potluck of savory or sweet finger snacks and 8 p.m. contra dance with Perpetual e-Motion, Fowler calling, at American Legion Hall Post #43, 143 Church St., Belfast. Cost: $2 adults, $1 children community dance; $8 adults, $6 teens/those who attended Community Dance. FMI: 338-0979 or belfastflyingshoes.org. n

7 p.m. “Pinocchio”, CLICK Youth presentations of a classic. Family appropriate show at the Boothbay Opera House, 86 Townsend Ave., Boothbay Harbor. FMI and tcikets 633-5159, boothbayoperahouse.com. n

7 to 9 p.m. “April Foolishness” Staged Reading, Belfast Maskers present short plays by David Ives at Maskers Waterfront

7 to 10 p.m. Open Mic

at The Rig, 56A Elm St./Route 1, Camden invites all 9th-12th graders to perform; sign up; e-mail therigcamden@gmail.com. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Ballroom dance, East Belfast Elementary School on Swan Lake Ave, Belfast. Casual, relaxed atmosphere, dancers of all abilities are welcome. No formal lessons are provided. Singles are welcome. FREE. FMI, call Chuck at 505-5521.

n 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum”, Lincoln County Community Theater presents spring musical at Lincoln Theater, Theater and Elm streets, Damariscotta. Cost: $12; $7 children. Tickets at Maine Coast Book Shop or call 563-3424. Friday and Saturday evenings and 2 p.m. Sundays through April 3. n 7:30 to 10 p.m. “Romeo and Juliet”, Camden Civic Theatre presents Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy at the Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: $16 middle orchestra, $12 elsewhere; $2 discount for students, senior citizens. n

7:30 to 9 p.m. “The House of Bernarda Alba”, Heartwood Regional Theater concludes its Page to Stage festival with staged reading of Garcia Lorca play in atrium of Skidompha Library, Elm Street entrance, Damariscotta. Cost: $9 advance, $12 at door; $5 students. FMI: 563-1373.

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8 to 10 p.m. Farnsworth Films at The Strand, First Friday series screens “In the Realms of the Unreal” (2004, USA) at Strand Theatre, 345 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $8.50; $7 Farnsworth Art Museum members.

Sat 2

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9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Point Lookout Free Open Court, Point Lookout Fitness Center, 67 Atlantic Highway/Route 1, Northport.FMI: 789-2016, dhendrix@visitpointloo kout.com.

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9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Life drawing groups, Tuesdays 6:309 p.m. and Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Non-Instructional, bring your own materials. $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, or call 338-2222.

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10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Green Beginnings, Citizens Offering New Alternatives and Rising Tide Community Market host spring celebration at Round Top Farm, Business Route 1, Damariscotta. Free/donations. FMI: 563-1216. Music, poetry, art, gardening activities and snacks for all ages.

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1:30 p.m. Rockland High School History, Rockland humorist Ben Perry, historian and curator of the Rockland High School Alumni Room at the Lincoln Street Center for the Arts, will share the history of Rockland High School along with humorous stories in a program. In the Friends Community Room, Rockland Public Library.

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4:30 to 7 p.m. 1950sthemed dinner, Unity Cub Scout Pack 233 will host a 1950s-themed dinner to raise money for a trip to Battleship Cove with a sleepover on the USS Massachusetts battleship. Tickets: $5 per person or $15 per family. Dinner includes two hot dogs, chips and a soda. The scouts will also collect bottles and cans during the event. Anyone interested in making a donation may mail it to: Unity Pack 233, PO Box 75, Unity, ME 04988.

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5:30 p.m. ‘Le Café de l’ Église’ - Public Supper, A public supper will take place at Monroe Church on Saturday, April 2.“Le Café de l’ Église” - French Cuisine featuring an appetizer of Brie cheese, fruit, grapes and breads, a Crème d’ Epinards soup, Beef Bourguignon, potato gratin, Haricots Verts and for dessert, crepes Suzette with vanilla ice cream with orange butter sauce. Cost is $10 per person. Reservations required; call Joyce Hillman at 525-9908 or e-mail jhillman@wildblue.net

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6:30 to 10 p.m. ContraGrooving for Earth Improving, Camden Hills Regional High School’s Earth Vision group hosts community and contra dance in the Wave Café of Camden Hills, Route 90, Rockport. Begins with community dance for all ages led by caller Chrissy Fowler with music by The All-Comer’s Band, followed by 7:45 p.m. contra dance

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with the Kitchen Hounds. Cost: $2 adults, $1 children community dance; $8 adults, $6 teens/those who attended Community Dance. FMI: 322-6273. Benefits Earth Vision.

presents Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy at the Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: $16 middle orchestra, $12 elsewhere; $2 discount for students, senior citizens.

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n 9 p.m. Black Light Dance Party, with DJ Andy. Trackside Station, 4 Union St., Rockland. Age 21+, no cover. FMI 594-7500.

7 p.m. “Pinocchio”, CLICK Youth presentations of a classic. Family appropriate show at the Boothbay Opera House, 86 Townsend Ave., Boothbay Harbor. FMI and tickets 633-5159, boothbayoperahouse.com. n

7 to 9 p.m. “Lady”, Washington County troupe The Magnificent Liars presents dark comedy at Lincoln Street Center for Arts and Education, 24 Lincoln St., Rockland. Cost: $10; $8 younger than 18. Not suitable for those younger than 15.

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7 to 9 p.m. Singers’ Spring Concert., Penobscot Bay Singers and Mount View Chamber Singers present a cappella pieces and works by Brahms at United Methodist Church, 23 Mill Lane, Belfast. Cost: $12 suggested donation

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Sun 3

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12 to 2:30 p.m. Bike 101: presented by the Belfast Bicycle Club, Belfast Bicycle Club free series of bicycle maintenance mini-seminars for age 17+ . Waldo County YMCA. FMI e-mail belfastbikeclub@gmail. com.

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1 to 5 p.m. A Glimmer of Glamour Benefit, Annual Teen & Young Parent benefit day of spalike experiences at Berry Manor Inn, 81 Talbot Ave., Rockland. Cost: $75 for Gold Ticket (preregistered for four spa stations); $55 or two for $100 for Silver Ticket (three spa stations on first come/first served basis); $20 for 2 to 5 p.m. food and silent auction only. For tickets or special accommodations, call 5941980 or send e-mail to cynthia. staples@maine.edu.

7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, Side Kick. 50/50 raffle, snack bar, door prizes, BYOB. Cost: $10 per person. Union Masonic Lodge, Sennebec Road, Union. FMI: Abraham at 712-1314. n 1 to 3 p.m. Music Jam at the Museum, Musicians, bring n 7:30 to 9 p.m. Occidental instruments and voices and make Gypsy, Hot swing gypsy jazz music together informally at Sail, at Unity College Centre for the Power and Steam Museum at Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: Sharp’s Point South, 75 Mechanic $15. FMI: 948-7469. St., Rockland. Coffee and cookies n 7:30 to 9 p.m. “The House provided. Every Sunday. of Bernarda Alba”, Heartwood n 2 to 4 p.m. “A Funny Regional Theater concludes its Thing” Matinee, Lincoln County Page to Stage festival with staged Community Theater presents “A reading of Garcia Lorca play in Funny Thing Happened on the atrium of Skidompha Library, Elm Way to the Forum” at Lincoln Street entrance, Damariscotta. Theater, Theater and Elm streets, Cost: $9 advance, $12 at door; $5 Damariscotta. Cost: $12; $7 chilstudents. FMI: 563-1373 . dren. Tickets at Maine Coast Book n 7:30 to 9 p.m. Bluegrass Shop or call 563-3424. Fridays and Concert, The Muellers family Saturdays 7:30 p.m. and Sundays 2 band performs at the First Conp.m. through April 3. gregational Church of Camden, 55 n 2 to 4:30 p.m. “Romeo and Elm St./Route 1. Free/donations. Juliet” Matinee, Camden Civic n 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. “A Funny Theatre presents Shakespeare’s Thing Happened on the Way to romantic tragedy at the Camden the Forum”, Lincoln County Com- Opera House, Elm Street/Route munity Theater presents spring 1. Cost: $16 middle orchestra, musical at Lincoln Theater, Theater $12 elsewhere; $2 discount for and Elm streets, Damariscotta. students, senior citizens. Cost: $12; $7 children. Tickets at n 3 to 5 p.m. Singers’ Spring Maine Coast Book Shop or call Concert, Penobscot Bay Singers 563-3424. Friday and Saturday and Mount View Chamber Singers evenings and 2 p.m. Sundays present a cappella pieces and through April 3. works by Brahms at First Church n 7:30 to 10 p.m. “Romeo UCC, 8 Court St., Belfast. Cost: $12 and Juliet”, Camden Civic Theatre


suggested donation. n

3 to 5:30 p.m. Monthly Jazz Jam, Midcoast and visiting musicians gather at the Waldo Theatre Annex, 47 Glidden St., Waldoboro. Cost: $5; free for playing musicians. FMI: 593-7445.

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3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. FMI: 354-1177.

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4 to 6 p.m. Sunday Mati-

nee Series, Weekly series screens “Made in Heaven” (1987, USA) in Abbott Room of Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Free. The Great Beyond Month.

Mon 4

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6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking

Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org. n

7 to 9 p.m. Documentary

Screening, Belfast Co-op, Environmental Health Strategy Center and the Maine Organic Farmers & Gardeners Association screen “Living Downstream” (2010, USA) at the Colonial Theatre, 163 High St., Belfast. Cost: $5. FMI: 338-2532. n 7 to 10 p.m. Monday Night

Blues, Junior Watson performs in the upstairs music room of Time Out Pub, 275 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $15. FMI: 593-9336.

Tue 5

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4 p.m. Children’s Art Time, Art instruction with Catinka Knoth. Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

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7 to 10 p.m. Tuesday Night

Blues, Lucky Peterson performs in the upstairs music room of Time Out Pub, 275 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $15. FMI: 593-9336. Series promoter Paul Benjamin’s birthday bash. n

7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4

Fun, Weekly night of free style, any style, Lincoln Street for Arts and Education, 24 Lincoln St., Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931, dancing4fun.org.

Wed 6

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6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking

Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org. n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy

Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org.. n

10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Also on Saturdays.

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10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Rhymetime Storytime, Children’s Room of Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI594-0310. .

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12 to 1 p.m. Fireside Lunchtime Poetry, Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI 594-0310.

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2011 April 2011 40 March n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Open clay studio, $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org or call 338-2222.

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7 to 9 p.m. Open Jazz Jam, Waterfall Arts Belfast, 256 High St. Free. FMI: 338-2222, or visit: waterfallarts.org.

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7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open

Mic Night, Weekly performance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland. n

7:30 p.m. Shipwrecks of

New England, Presented by Union Historical Society. Held in the sanctuary of People’s United Methodist Church, Depot Street, Union. New England shipwrecks from the loss of the circus ship Royal Tar in 1836 to the sinking of the SS Andrea Doria in 1956. FMI: 785-5444, midcoast.com/ comespring.

Thu 7

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9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org..

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12:15 to 1:15 p.m. Pranzo

Italiano, Bring your lunch and listen to/practice speaking the Italian language with Alessandra Baldetti, Italian exchange teacher, and other students and friends every Thursday. n

6:30 p.m. Bird Migration discussion, With naturalist Bill Goodwin. Children’s Room of Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI594-0310. .

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7 to 9 p.m. Library Cof-

feehouse, Popular folk series features singer/songwriter David Dodson, Peter Herson opening, in the Picker Room of Camden Public Library, Atlantic Avenue. Cost: $8; $6 senior citizens, students.

Fri 8

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6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking

Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org. n

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fabric

Arts Workshop, Coastal Quilters sponsors,“Journal Cover Creation” at the Camden Lions Club on Lion’s Lane in Camden. Led by Carol Boyer.Preregistration required, $25 fee by Friday, April 1. Bring brown bag lunch. FMI Barb Melchiskey, email smelchiskey@roadrunner. com or call 236-9665. n

10 a.m. Baby Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

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4 to 6 p.m. Book Launch,

Camden author and Realtor Vicki Doudera launches “Killer Listing,” second murder mysteries involving real estate agent Darby Farr, at Owl & Turtle Bookshop, 32 Washington St. in the Knox Mill complex, Camden. FMI: 236-4769. n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday

Night Film Series, Friends of the Thomaston Public Library screen

“Enchanted April” (1991, UK) in Room 208 of Thomaston Academy Building, 60 Main St./Route 1. Free/ donations. FMI: 354-2453. Doors open 6 p.m. April Antics month, hosted by Erika Pfander.

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7 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Talent Search, round one, Belfast Maskers host inaugural competition at Maskers Waterfront Theater, 43 Front St., Belfast. Cost: $5. Limited seating; for tickets, call 338-9668.

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7 to 9 p.m. Friday Night Flicks, Weekly series screens “Sunset Boulevard” (1950, USA) in Abbott Room of Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Free. Movies About Movies Month.

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7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Ballroom dance, East Belfast Elementary School on Swan Lake Ave, Belfast. Casual, relaxed atmosphere, dancers of all abilities are welcome. No formal lessons are provided. Singles are welcome. FREE. FMI, call Chuck at 505-5521.

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7:30 to 10 p.m. “Romeo and Juliet”, Camden Civic Theatre presents Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy at the Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: $16 middle orchestra, $12 elsewhere; $2 discount for students, senior citizens. .

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7:30 to 9 p.m. “The House of Bernarda Alba”, Heartwood Regional Theater concludes its Page to Stage festival with staged reading of Garcia Lorca play in atrium of Skidompha Library, Elm Street entrance, Damariscotta. Cost: $9 advance, $12 at door; $5 students. FMI: 563-1373.

Sat 9

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9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Point

Lookout Free Open Court, Point Lookout Fitness Center, 67 Atlantic Highway/Route 1, Northport.FMI: 789-2016, dhendrix@visitpointloo kout.com. n

9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bride &

Prom Showcase, Sale of gently used bride and prom gowns. Past and present sea goddesses volunteer, drawings and more. Goodwill Industries, 202 Camden Street, Rockland. n

9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Life drawing groups, Non-Instructional, bring your own materials. $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, or call 338-2222.

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10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Also on Wednesdays.

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1 to 4 p.m. The Met: Live in HD, Strand Theatre, 345 Main St., Rockland, screens Rossini’s “Le Comte Ory” live via satellite broadcast. Cost: $27; season tickets available. FMI: 594-0070 or rocklandstrand.com. Encore 1 p.m. April 19, $23.

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2 p.m. Kite-making Workshop, “Kites for Children and Adults” in the Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

7 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Talent Search, round two, Belfast Maskers host inaugural competition at Maskers Waterfront Theater, 43 Front St., Belfast. Cost: $5. Limited seating; for tickets, call 338-9668. 7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, Country Aces. 50/50 raffle, snack bar, door prizes, BYOB. Cost: $10 per person. Union Masonic Lodge, Sennebec Road, Union. FMI: Abraham at 712-1314.

7:30 p.m. Caribbean Night, Island sounds of the Pan Fried Steel Drum Band. Boothbay Opera House, 86 Townsend Ave., Boothbay Harbor. FMI & tickets 633-5159, boothbayoperahouse. com. n

7:30 to 10 p.m. “Romeo and Juliet”, Camden Civic Theatre presents Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy at the Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: $16 middle orchestra, $12 elsewhere; $2 discount for students, senior citizens.

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7:30 to 9 p.m. “The House of Bernarda Alba”, Heartwood Regional Theater concludes its Page to Stage festival with staged reading of Garcia Lorca play in atrium of Skidompha Library, Elm Street entrance, Damariscotta. Cost: $9 advance, $12 at door; $5 students. FMI: 563-1373.

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8 p.m. King’s Jazz, Live

jazz at Hatchet Mountain Publick House in Hope. $5 cover. Reservations for dinner encouraged. FMI: 763-4565. n

8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Rave On Benefit Dance, SAMs Bag Project Fundraiser with Rave On at the Wedding & Event Center at Echo Hill, Route 131, St. George. Cost: $10/$5 with donated bag of beef jerky/free with donated phone card of $10 or more; free for those with military ID. Benefits Stand Alone Marines (those graduating from Paris Island April 22 with no loved ones attending) and A Destroyed Morale Tent. Cash bar; 21 and older. See also page 26 n

9 p.m. Trackside Turns 2!, anniversary dance party with DJ Andy. Trackside Station, 4 Union St., Rockland. Age 21+, no cover. FMI 594-7500.

Sun 10

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1 to 3 p.m. Music Jam at

the Museum, Musicians, bring instruments and voices and make music together informally at Sail, Power and Steam Museum at Sharp’s Point South, 75 Mechanic St., Rockland. Coffee and cookies provided. Every Sunday. n

2 to 4:30 p.m. “Romeo and Juliet” Matinee, Camden Civic Theatre presents Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy at the Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: $16 middle orchestra, $12 elsewhere; $2 discount for students, senior citizens.

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2 to 3:30 p.m. “The House of Bernarda Alba” Matinee,

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Heartwood Regional Theater concludes its Page to Stage festival with staged reading of Garcia Lorca play in atrium of Skidompha Library, Elm Street entrance, Damariscotta. Cost: $9 advance, $12 at door; $5 students. FMI: 5631373. n

3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. . FMI: 354-1177.

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4 to 5:30 p.m. Classical and Contemporary Concert, Midcoast Brass Quintet plus Tom Mueller on piano and organ perform benefit concert at First Congregational Church of Camden, 55 Elm St./Route 1. Donations to benefit the Shields Mission. Reception follows.

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4 to 6 p.m. Sunday Matinee Series, Weekly series screens four episodes of “The Twilight Zone” (1960-62, USA-TV) in Abbott Room of Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Free. The Great Beyond Month.

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7 to 9 p.m. Midcoast Talent Search finale, Belfast Maskers host inaugural competition at American Legion Hall, 143 Church St., Belfast. Cost: $10; for tickets, call 338-9668.

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7 to 10 p.m. Sunday Night Blues, Mark Hummel’s Harmonica Blowout featuring Kenny Neal, James Montgomery and Bharath takes over the upstairs music room of Time Out Pub, 275 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $30. Limited to 100; call 593-9336.

Mon 11

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6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org.

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7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Bruce Molsky, Old-time fiddler plays at Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: $15. FMI: 948-7469.

Tue 12

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10 a.m. Children’s Story Hour, Children’s Story Hour. Reading, arts and crafts. Free. Gibbs Library, 40 Old Union Rd., Washington.

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4 p.m. Children’s Art Time, Art instruction with Catinka Knoth. Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

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6 p.m. Belfast Bicycle Club, open meetings. Everyone welcome. Held at The HUB / Bay Wrap in Belfast. Club website: belfastbikeclub.blogspot.com/

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6:30 to 8 p.m. Documentary Screening, “At Home in Waldo, Maine” by local filmmaker Nicolle Littrell screened in the Abbott Room of Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Free. FMI: 338-3884, ext. 10.

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6:30 to 9 p.m. Life drawing groups, Non-Instructional, bring


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your own materials. $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, g, or call 338-2222. n

7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Author

T Talk, Midcoast author Paul Doiron presents his debut novel, “The Poacher’s’’s Son,” at Waldoboro Public Library, y, 958 Main St./Route 220. Free. FMI: 832-4484. n

7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4

Fun, Weekly night of free style, any style,Lincoln ,Lincoln Street ffor Arts and Education, 24 Lincoln St., Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931, dancing4fun.org. n

7:30 to 9 p.m. Spring Band

Concert, Camden Hills Regional High School Band, directed by Nancy Rowe, performs rforms in Strom rf Auditorium uditorium of the school, Route 90, Rockport. Free. Features Concert and Jazz bands plus small ensembles.

Wed W ed 13 n

6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking W

Program, Free indoor walking ing ffor adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. y. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org. n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy

Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, hurch, White Street, Rockland, FMI: inf info@midcoasttoylibrar o@midcoasttoylibrary.org.. n

10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s’’ss Room, Rockland Public Library. y. Also on Saturdays. n

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Rhyme-

April 2011

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time Storytime Storytime, Children Children’s’s Room of Rockland Public Library, y, 80 Union St. Free. FMI594-0310. .

modations with 48 hours notice; call 594-0310. Part of Poetry Month Rockland.

$20; $10 younger than 12. FMI and tickets: 236-3000. Benefits the Community School.

$10 per person. Union Masonic Lodge, Sennebec Road, Union. nion. FMI: Abraham at 712-1314.

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Fri 15

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12 to 1 p.m. Fireside Lunchtime Poetry, Rockland Public Library, y, 80 Union St. Free. FMI 594-0310. . n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Open clay studio . $12/session. Waterfall studio, Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org or call 338-2222. n

oin Club Club, 7 p.m. Pen Bay Coin

Stockton Springs Town Offi Of ce. Buy, sell, trade, free appraisals. FMI: 3422801. n

7 to 9:30 p.m. English country dancing, Live music accompanies instruction and dancing at Thorndike Masonic Hall, 60 Gordon Hill Road. Suggested donation: $5. No partner needed, everyone welcome. n

7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open Mic Night, Weekly performance rf rformance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator vigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland.

Thu 14 n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrar inf y.org.. n

6:30 to 8 p.m. Poetry Reading, Dave Morrison and Dawn Potter read from their work at Rockland Public Library, y, 80 Union St. Free. Special handicap accom-

n

W 6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking Pr Program, Free indoor walking ing ffor adults at Rockland Rock District Middle School, 30 Broadway. School y. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org. mmajunk n

10 a.m. Baby Story Time, Children’’ss Room, Rockland Public Children’s Library. Librar n

5 p.m. 9th annual Public Fish Chowder der Supper Supper, Searsport Congregational/Methodist Food Cupboard will host their 9th annual Public P Fish Chowder Supper at Curtis Cur tis Hall. Come and enjoy delicious chowder chowder, fresh hot biscuits and homemade pies ffor only $7. n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday Night Film F Series, Friends of the Thomaston Public Library screen “Holiday”” (1938, USA) in Room 208 of Thomaston Academy Building, 60 Main St./Route 1. Free/donations. FMI: 354-2453. Doors open 6 tions p.m. April Antics month, hosted by Erika Pfander. Erik n

7 to 9:30 p.m. Dancing With the Local Stars, Third annual benefit bene pairs Raymond Brunyanszki,i, Bettina Doulton, Brun Peter Horch, Parker Laite Sr.,., Chad Pe Ridge, Nancy Schultz and Karen Ridge Grove with Swing ‘n’’ Sway dance Gr instructors plus numbers by local instruc troupes at the Camden Opera House, Elm Street/Route 1. Cost: House

7:30 to 9 p.m. Moose Mountain Jazz Band, Maine band plays Dixieland at Lincoln Theater, Theater Street, Damariscotta. amariscotta. Cost: $15. Tickets at 563 3424 or adjacent Maine Coast Book Shop. Benefits future bandstand in Harpswell.

n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Ballroom dance, East Belfast Elementary School on Swan Lake Ave, e, Belfast. Casual, asual, relaxed atmosphere, e, dancers of all abilities are welcome. No formal lessons are provided. Singles are welcome. FREE. FMI, call Chuck at 505-5521.

8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Spring Swing Fling, Three Button Deluxe returns to Echo Hill Event Center, nter Routee 131, St. George. Cost: nter, $10; $16 couple. Admission only by advance sale tickets, available at WaterWorks Restaurant & Pub, Rockland; land; online at eventsatechohill.com; and between 7:45 and 8 p.m. .m. at door door,, if available. Cash bar and appetizers; 21 and older prizes ffor best ‘40s/’50s costume. n

9 p.m. Dance Party, with DJ Andy Andy. Trackside ackside Station, 4 Union St., t., Rockland. Age ge 21+, no cover. FMI 594-7500.

PALM SUNDAY

n

8 p.m. Bruce Molsky in concert, Boothbay Opera House, 86 Townsend Ave., Boothbay Harbor. FMI & tickets 633-5159, boothbayoperahouse.com.

Sat 16

n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Point Lookout ok Free Open Court, Point okout Lookout Fitness Center, nter 67 Atlantic nter, Highway/Route y/Route 1, Northport.FMI: 789-2016, dhendrix@visitpointloo kout.com.

Sun 17 n

1 to 3 p.m. Music Jam at the Museum, Musicians, bring instruments and voices and make music together inf informally at Sail, Power and Steam Museum at Sharp’s’s’ Point int South, 75 Mechanic St., t., Rockland. Coffee offee and cookies off provided. Every Sunday. n

9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Life drawing groups, Non-Instructional, bring your own materials. $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, g, or call 338-2222.

3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s’s’ Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. y. Musicians encouraged to bring their instruments and join in; listeners welcome too. FMI: 3541177.

n

n

n

’’s Story 10:30 a.m. Children’s Time, ime Children’s’’ss Room, Rockland ime, Public Library. y. Also on Wednesdays.

n

10:30 a.m. & 11:15 a.m.

Puppet uppet Show Show, Primrose Puppets is delighted to present “The Red Sheep,”” a humorous ffolk olk tale from Finland. Suited to any age. Children’s’’ss Room, Rockland Public Library. n 2 to 3 p.m. “Cupid & Psyche”, Farnsworth Art Museum presents puppet show by Figures of Speech Theatre at the Strand Theatre, e, 345 Main St., Rockland. Free; ee; reserve space at 596-0949. Rescheduled from Feb. b. 25. n

7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, True Country. y. 50/50 raffl f e, snack bar bar, door prizes, BYOB BY . Cost:

4 to 6 p.m. Sunday Matinee Series, Weekly series screens “Resurrection”” (1980, USA) in Abbott Room of Belfast Free Library, y, 106 High St. Free. The Great Beyond Month.

PATRIOT’S DAY

Mon 18 n

W 6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking Program, Free indoor walking ing ffor adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org. n

5 to 8 p.m. Pints for Paws Benefit For The Humane Society Of Knox County, ounty Paddy Mills performs, s, raffl f es, giveaways. Trackside Station, 4 Union St., Rockland. All ages, no pets. FMI 594-7500. See also page 6

We believe that your pet deserves a pet vacation too! We have several cottages and rooms in the main building designated as pet rooms and four pet cottages open during the warmer months. We provide pet bed and dishes, paw wiping towels and all natural treats.

Like Us on Facebook!

www.facebook.com/CountryInnatCamdenRockport or telephone: 207.236.2725


Tue 19

n

10 a.m. Children’s Story

Hour, Children’s Story Hour. Reading, arts and crafts. Free. Gibbs Library, 40 Old Union Rd., Washington. n

1 to 4 p.m. The Met: Live in

HD Encore, Strand Theatre, 345 Main St., Rockland, screens April 9 performance of Rossini’s “Le Comte Ory.” Cost: $23. FMI: 5940070 or rocklandstrand.com. n

4 p.m. Children’s Art Time,

Art instruction with Catinka Knoth. Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. n

6:30 to 9 p.m. Life drawing

groups, $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, or call 338-2222. n

7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4 Fun, Weekly night of free style, any style, Lincoln Street for Arts and Education, 24 Lincoln St., Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931, dancing4fun.org.

the

April 2011 2011 42 March GOOD FRIDAY

Fri 22

n

6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org.

n

10 a.m. Baby Story Time,

Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. n

3:30 p.m. Children’s

Poetry Reading, Rockland Poet Laureate Kendall Merriam will read four new poems written just for the Rockland library children! Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Treats too for polite listeners… n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday

Night Film Series, Friends of the Thomaston Public Library screen “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961, USA) in Room 208 of Thomaston Academy Building, 60 Main St./Route 1. Free/donations. FMI: 354-2453. Doors open 6 p.m. April Antics month, hosted by Erika Pfander.

Wed 20

n

Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org.

Flicks, Weekly series screens “The Player” (1992, USA) in Abbott Room of Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Free. Movies About Movies Month.

n

n

6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy

Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org.. n

10:30 a.m. Children’s Story

Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Also on Saturdays. n

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Rhyme-

time Storytime, Children’s Room of Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI594-0310. . n

12 to 1 p.m. Fireside Lunchtime Poetry, Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI 594-0310. .

n

4 to 7 p.m. Game Night, hosted by The Game Loft. Nonelectronic traditional and new favorites. Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI 594-0310..

n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Open clay

studio, $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org or call 338-2222. n

7 to 9 p.m. Open Jazz Jam,

Waterfall Arts Belfast, 256 High St. Free. FMI: 338-2222, or visit: waterfallarts.org. n

7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open

Mic Night, Weekly performance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland.

Thu 21

n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org..

n

3 p.m. Lego Day, Come en-

ter a contest; four tables of Legos, prizes for winning creations, new Lego books, music and snacks! Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

7 to 9 p.m. Friday Night

n 7:30 p.m. University of Maine Orchestra & Chamber Ensemble, Boothbay Opera House, 86 Townsend Ave., Boothbay Harbor. FREE. FMI 633-5159, boothbayoperahouse.com. n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Ballroom

dance, East Belfast Elementary School on Swan Lake Ave, Belfast. Casual, relaxed atmosphere, dancers of all abilities are welcome. No formal lessons are provided. Singles are welcome. FREE. FMI, call Chuck at 505-5521. n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. OLAS,

Original, all-acoustic mashup at Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: $15. FMI: 948-7469. Benefits Unity Barn Raisers. n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. “The

Miser”, Everyman Repertory Theatre presents Molière’s comedy at the Rockport Opera House, 6 Central St. Cost: $18; $10 students, children. FMI: everymanrep.org. .

Sat 23

n

9 a.m. Eggs Hunt & Bake Sale, to benefit MakeA-Wish Foundation. Egg hunt, pictures, bake sale and more at The Wedding and Event Center At Echo Hill, St. George. FMI echohillevents@yahoo.com.

n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Point Lookout Free Open Court, Point Lookout Fitness Center, 67 Atlantic Highway/Route 1, Northport.FMI: 789-2016, dhendrix@visitpointloo kout.com.

n

9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Life

drawing groups, $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, or call 338-2222.

n

10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

n

11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bunny Train, Maine Eastern Railroad offers two special round-trip trains departing 11 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. from Rockland’s historic Union Street depot. Cost: $17, $9 for children age 2 through 9, in advance; $2 more day of trip. Early purchase recommended (beginning April 4); call 596-6725. Costumed bunny hosts 35-minute ride.

n

7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, Bob Elston and the Road Rangers. 50/50 raffle, snack bar, door prizes, BYOB. Cost: $10 per person. Union Masonic Lodge, Sennebec Road, Union. FMI: Abraham at 712-1314.

n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. “The Miser”, Everyman Repertory Theatre presents Molière’s comedy at the Rockport Opera House, 6 Central St. Cost: $18; $10 students, children. FMI: everymanrep.org.

n

8 to 11 p.m. Monthly Contra Dance, Live music and calling at Simonton Corner Hall, corner of Park and Main streets, Rockport. Cost: $8. FMI: 832-5584. n

9 p.m. Toga Party, with DJ

Andy. Trackside Station, 4 Union St., Rockland. Age 21+, no cover. FMI 594-7500.

EASTER SUNDAY

Sun 24

n

1 to 3 p.m. Music Jam at the Museum, Musicians, bring instruments and voices and make music together informally at Sail, Power and Steam Museum at Sharp’s Point South, 75 Mechanic St., Rockland. Coffee and cookies provided. Every Sunday.

n

7:30 to 9 p.m. Dancing 4 Fun, Weekly night of free style, any style, Lincoln Street for Arts and Education, 24 Lincoln St., Rockland. Free/donations. FMI: 354-0931, dancing4fun.org.

Wed 27

n

6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org.

n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org..

n

10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library. Also on Saturdays.

SCENE

Building, 60 Main St./Route 1. Free/ donations. FMI: 354-2453. Doors open 6 p.m. April Antics month, hosted by Erika Pfander. n

7 to 9 p.m. Friday Night Flicks, Weekly series screens “Ed Wood” (1994, USA) in Abbott Room of Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Free. Movies About Movies Month.

n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Ballroom dance, East Belfast Elementary School on Swan Lake Ave, Belfast. Casual, relaxed atmosphere, dancers of all abilities are welcome. No formal lessons are provided. Singles are welcome. FREE. FMI, call Chuck at 505-5521.

n

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Rhymetime Storytime, Children’s Room of Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI594-0310. .

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. “The Miser”, Everyman Repertory Theatre presents Molière’s comedy at the Rockport Opera House, 6 Central St. Cost: $18; $10 students, children. FMI: everymanrep.org.

n

n

n

12 to 1 p.m. Fireside Lunchtime Poetry, Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI 594-0310.

n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Open clay studio, $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org or call 338-2222.

n

7 p.m. Pen Bay Coin Club,

Stockton Springs Town Office. Buy, sell, trade, free appraisals. FMI: 3422801. n

7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Open

Mic Night, Weekly performance night at Gator Lounge of The Navigator Motor Inn, 520 Main St., Rockland.

Thu 28

8 to 10 p.m. Shawn Mullins, Grammy-nominated singer/ songwriter performs at the Strand Theatre, 345 Main St., Rockland. Cost: $20 advance; $25 at door. FMI: 594-0070 or rocklandstrand. com.

Sat 30

n

. Boothbay Harbor Fishermen’s Festival, April 29 - May 1, FMI see page 20-21.

n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Point Lookout Free Open Court, Point Lookout Fitness Center, 67 Atlantic Highway/Route 1, Northport.FMI: 789-2016, dhendrix@visitpointloo kout.com.

n

Library, St. Peters Episcopal Church, White Street, Rockland, FMI: info@midcoasttoylibrary.org..

9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Life drawing groups, $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, or call 338-2222.

n

n

n

n

Swarm, Poetry Month Rockland wraps up with readings by local poets, including winners of the annual poetry contest, at Rockland Public Library, 80 Union St. Free. FMI: rocklandlibrary.org.

2 to 4 p.m. “The Miser” Matinee, Everyman Repertory Theatre presents Molière’s comedy at the Rockport Opera House, 6 Central St. Cost: $18; $10 students, children. FMI: everymanrep.org

3 to 6 p.m. Traditional Bluegrass Jam, Billy’s Tavern, 1 Starr St., Thomaston, hosts traditional bluegrass jam every Sunday. FMI: 354-1177.

Mon 25

n

6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org.

Tue 26

n

9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Toy

6:30 to 8 p.m. Poetry

n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Cape Breton kitchen party, Colin Grant with Jason MacDonald and Adam Young perform at Unity College Centre for the Performing Arts, 42 Depot St. Cost: $15. FMI: 948-7469.

Fri 29

n

. Boothbay Harbor Fishermen’s Festival, April 29 - May 1, FMI see page 20-21.

n

Hour, Children’s Story Hour. Reading, arts and crafts. Free. Gibbs Library, 40 Old Union Rd., Washington.

6 to 7 a.m. Winter Walking Program, Free indoor walking for adults at Rockland District Middle School, 30 Broadway. FMI: 5962018 or mmajunka@rsu13.org.

n

4 p.m. Children’s Art Time, Art instruction with Catinka Knoth. Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

n

n

Night Film Series, Friends of the Thomaston Public Library screen “Without Love” (1945, USA) in Room 208 of Thomaston Academy

n

10 a.m. Children’s Story

6:30 to 9 p.m. Life drawing groups, $12/session. Waterfall Arts, 256 High St., Belfast. FMI, visit waterfallarts.org, or call 338-2222.

10 a.m. Baby Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

n

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday

10:30 a.m. Children’s Story Time, Children’s Room, Rockland Public Library.

n

7 to 11 p.m. Country Dance, The Frye Mountain Band. 50/50 raffle, snack bar, door prizes, BYOB. Cost: $10 per person. Union Masonic Lodge, Sennebec Road, Union. FMI: Abraham at 712-1314.

n

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. “The Miser”, Everyman Repertory Theatre presents Molière’s comedy at the Rockport Opera House, 6 Central St. Cost: $18; $10 students, children. FMI: everymanrep.org.

n 9 p.m. Stella Artois Promo Party, with DJ Andy. Trackside Station, 4 Union St., Rockland. Giveaways, Age 21+, no cover. FMI 594-7500.

SEND YOUR EVENTS TO theSCENE

@VILLAGESOUP.COM Deadline is the 15th of the month FMI Call 594-4407 x 288


STUDIO CLASSSES

FARNSWORTH ART MUSEUM

Making Quilts Together with Richard Caro Sundays, April, 3, 10 and 17, 12:30–4:30 p.m. This intensive quilt making class empowers students to become quilt makers as they learn simple yet effective techniques to make a quilt-top with provided fabric and sewing tools. Cost: $136 members, $160 nonmembers Figure Drawing with Martha Miller Fridays, May 6 through June 24, 1–4 p.m. In this eight-week course, students will focus on drawing the human form from direct observation of a live nude model. Cost: $240 members, $288 nonmembers The Poetry of Art with poet Ellen Goldsmith Wednesday, April 6, 1:30–3 p.m. In this free workshop, students will make a connection between poetry and art. This program is part of Poetry Month Rockland, a city-wide celebration of poetry as an art form, produced by the Rockland Public Library in conjunction with National Poetry Month. Cost: free of charge Gouache Painting with Jessica Stammen Fridays, May 7 through June 11, 1–4:30 p.m. In this five-week class instructor Jessica Stammen and her students will work with gouache, a water-based medium heavier and more opaque than watercolor, has great color saturation and is suitable for quick ideation or finished works. Cost: $175 members, $210 nonmembers

Creating a Surrealist Book with Erika Manning Saturdays, April 23 through May 28, 9–11:30 a.m. In this six-week class, students of all abilities will be invited to step out of their comfort zones and court random acts of chance that result from “the exploitations of the chance meeting of two remote realities on a plane unsuitable to them.” Techniques include, but are not limited to, Decalcamania, Cubemania, collage, paper bag poetry, automatic writing and drawing, poetry and dreamwork. Cost: $120 members, $150 nonmembers Painting the Landscape on Site with Colin Page Saturday and Sunday, May 14 and 15, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Join artist Colin Page for a weekend workshop exploring the fundamentals of good picture making, focusing on oil painting the landscape outdoors. Level: some experience with oil painting required Cost: $140 members, $168 nonmembers For further details or to register: • call the Farnsworth Education Department at 207-596-0949 • or visit farnsworthmuseum.org/education

FARNSWORTH ART MUSEUM 16 Museum Street, Rockland, Maine 207-596-6457 • farnsworthmuseum.org (Right: Colin Page, Friendship Harbor, 2010, 30 x 36 in., oil on canvas)

Shell’s

SOUTHWEST GRILL “A Different Kind of Take-Out”

Opening May

Shell’s Famous Pulled Pork, In Fresh Fish Tacos, Fresh Seafood, Quesadillas, Lobster and Crab Rolls

Buoy Park (next to lobster cooker), Rockland, ME 04841

207-344-4512

Hours: Daily 11a-4p & Fridays until 8p

Try Our Wraps & Focaccia Sandwiches! Italians, Salads, Pizza, Pasta and More!

594-7760

Hours: Mon-Sat 9a-9p Sun 9a-8p


Every day is

Science Day at the University of Maine Hutchinson Center! The University of Maine Hutchinson Center is offering a new live lab science course this summer - Concepts in Oceanography (SMS 110/111). This course has been offered at the Hutchinson Center in past summers, but this year it includes a laboratory section, and fulfills a general education lab science credit. Oceanography students will study physical, chemical, and biological aspects of oceans, and how these components interact to function as a system. Students will investigate

Meet the Hutchinson Center Science Team!

• Intertidal habitats • Dynamic physical properties of marine ecosystems • Behavior of marine zooplankton • The science behind current events related to the Gulf of Maine and global oceans • Coastal waters on a one-day voyage aboard the Darling Marine Center research vessel the Ira C. This course is for students, teachers, fishermen, naturalists, and any citizens who would like to understand the science of Earth’s oceans, and in particular, our local Gulf of Maine system.

Left to Right: Dr. Gaylen Jones (Biology), Dr. Jan Pitcairn (Biology), Susan Therio (Chemistry), Dr. Molly Schauffler (Environmental sciences), Jennifer Ditano (Lab Assistant), and Rebecca Ditano (Lab Assistant). Not pictured: Dr. William Ellis (Marine science) and Dr. Melanie DeLorenzo (Chemistry)

Kevin Davis and Danielle Mayer discuss chlorophyll in their bean plants.

Other lab science courses at the Hutchinson Center: • CHY 101/102 - Chemistry for Everyday Living • CHY 121/123 - Introduction to Chemistry • BIO 100 - Introduction to Biology • BIO 222/223 – Biology: The Living Science • BIO 208 – Anatomy and Physiology • BMB 208/210 Introduction to Physiological Chemistry

To register, please call the Hutchinson Center at 338-8000, or visit the Hutchinson Center website at www.hutchinsoncenter.umaine.edu

It’s as easy as that!

80 Belmont Ave., Belfast, Maine • 338-8000 or 1-800-753-9044

theSCENE April 2011  

theSCENE April 2011

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