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Walton

Matters

Putting Local Business First Keeping a Community Together

February 2020 Issue 17

FREE to 9000 Homes and Businesses in Walton on Thames

Or emailBlue paul@villagematters.co.uk Sustainability Fair : Walton’s Plaques 1

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Welcome!

Welcome to the February issue. 2019 is now long gone, and I have noticed recently that it is just starting to stay a little lighter longer as we go through the day. Things are on the up! Living by the river, as I do, yes my garden recently flooded, but nowhere near the levels of the floods of 2014. Relief. In this issue we learn of the of the history of the Anglers Inn, what the kids can get up to during half term, and hear from the newly formed Elmbridge Climate Emergency Group. We continue our look at Walton s Blue Plaques, and Dominic Raab is back, fresh from his election victory.

February 2020 Don t forget both Valentine s Day on the 14th, and Pancake Day on the 25th. Take care, wrap up, and I will see you again in March.

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Published by:

Village Matters Ltd

Contents C t t

Walton Director: Paul Chard Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematters.co.uk Website :www.villagematters.co.uk Cover Photo by the Editor

Inns and Taverns of Walton The Walton Society Sustainability Fair Walton's Blue Plaques Pancake Day There is a Climate Emergency History of Valentine s Day Boomerang Bags Half Term Activities Right to The Core Recipe of The Month Garden View Dominic Raab Events Coming Up Index of Advertisers

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4 6 10 12 14 16 20 23 24 26 30 32 35 36 38


Inns and Taverns of Walton The Anglers

For travellers on the Thames, the Anglers is one of the most recognisable landmarks heralding their arrival at Walton. It has been so for a hundred and fifty of years, standing in a prime location by an ancient wharf sometimes known as Anglers Wharf or Riverside.

By John C Pulford

directories show that it was known as the Anglers Hotel and was advertising luncheons and teas. Mr Alfred Pryor is listed as the proprietor in 1895 and 1915 and the West Surrey Times reported in October 1903 that, at an annual dinner of the Walton-on-Thames Angling Association, dinner was excellently served by Mr A. Pryor and there was a large company of anglers present . In the 1934-5 N.W. Surrey directory it is still listed as a hotel, with E.J.Conway as proprietor. In 1997 its name was changed to the Slug and Lettuce but soon afterwards was changed back again. The building has been extensively altered over the years. References: Inns and Taverns of Walton and Weybridge; A.G.Martin. Walton and Weybridge Local History Society 1999. Local directories. Photos; The Anglers Hotel c.1930, private collection. The Anglers, January 2020, by the author.

A cottage on the site known as Angler s Cottage was purchased in 1864 and in 1870 leased for use as a public house. In 1871 the innkeeper, James Rogerson, was also listed as a fisherman. John Trotter leased the inn to Jason Gurney, a local brewer, in 1887 but sold the freehold ten years later to Brandon s Putney Brewery who were eventually taken over by Mann Crossman & Paulin. By the beginning of the 20th Century, postcards and To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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The Walton Society

(Walton Residents Association) Borough Elections The Borough of Elmbridge is divided into 16 wards and three councillors represent each ward on the council, so there are 48 councillors in total. Councillors are elected for a four year term, and are elected "by thirds". That is to say that each year, for three years, one councillor per ward finishes their term of office and must then stand for re -election if they wish to continue to represent their ward. Candidates for election must live in the Borough but not necessarily in the ward where they stand. Walton-on-Thames has three wards, Central, North and South and each has between 6,000 and 7,000 registered voters. In the fourth year of the cycle there is no Elmbridge election, but the election of Surrey County Councillors takes place instead. Elections normally take place on the first Thursday in May. This year the Elmbridge election will be held on Thursday May 7th. This is the day before the May Bank Holiday which has been moved from its normal Monday "slot" in Celebration of the 75th Anniversary of VE day, the day when the Second World War ended in Europe. The next S.C.C. election will be held in 2021. Elmbridge Future High Streets Group This group has been set up by Elmbridge in order to see if new ways to improve the popularity of our high streets across the borough can be found. Retail has, of course, been hit very hard by internet sales. However, the group discovered that of nonfood sales, only 20% of Walton residents' shopping (by value) is done on the internet. Forty percent of their spend is done in Walton, but an equal amount is spent outside the area, often in large centres like Kingston, Woking and Staines. It is difficult to reverse the decline in retail sales. Although it is understood that rents demanded by landlords for trading premises on the high street have reduced, this is not enough. Business rates collected by Elmbridge for central government, which retains the vast majority of the revenue, also inhibit the revival of the retail sector. But the group has tried to imagine new ways of attracting footfall in the High Streets. For example it is possible that with falling rents and commercial property prices it might be possible for the local Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG's) to obtain high street accommodation. The relevant Group in Walton's case is currently the North West Surrey CCG which is To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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working with Elmbridge Council to try and find new accommodation to increase the capacity of Walton GP surgeries. This is particularly urgent given that the CCG's appeal against the rejection of the application to use the empty ward in Walton Hospital failed. However some relief for the pressure on GP's has been provided by the phone app which allows video consultations. "Livi" as it is known provided 22,000 video consultations in our CCG's area during the last year. In one respect Walton has a head start over many high streets. It has it has a mass of residents on its doorstep as well as those within easy walking distance. Apart from the roads leading off the High Street and Bridge Street shopping areas, there are 279 apartments in The Heart. It is a relatively short walk from Bowes Road in the South or Dudley Road in the North to take advantage of Walton's shops and services. In addition many new flats in the immediate area of the High Street have added more local shoppers. In the High Street itself we have additional residential properties in Crown House, the Dairy Crest site, The Wellington and planned applications for the Boots/W H Smith site and the Burton's site. In Bridge Street we have the addition of Bridge House. In the New Zealand Avenue area we have new flats in Brassey House as well on Colby Road behind Lloyds Bank and approval of two new floors on Auckland House. There is also a plan for more flats opposite Ashley School. So, whatever ideas the Group comes up with many Walton residents will hope that more high density high rise flats in the High Street/Bridge Street/ New Zealand Avenue, supposedly to increase footfall in the area will not be one of them. Graham Woolgar for The Walton Society walton.society@btinternet.com

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Ashford Kitchens & Interiors 85 Church Road Ashford, Middx TW15 2PE 3QJ 01784 245964 www.ashfordinteriors.co.uk


Funding Retirement As We Live Longer Advertorial What would you think if I were to say to you:

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It is currently possible to borrow at below 3% interest (rate fixed for life) and that in order to qualify you do not need to provide proof of income? You could choose a drawdown facility, if you like, and no need to make monthly interest or capital repayments, unless you choose to? To qualify you have to be over 55 years-ofage and a property owner – with or without a mortgage attached. Too good to be true? On the contrary, this is the reality of the equity release market today. In an ageing population, where many of us are property rich but cash poor, it makes financial sense for many of us to access some of the cash locked in our homes in later life. Later life lending has boomed in recent years but awareness of the facts about equity release is still relatively low. Did you know, for example, that it is possible to have a No negative equity guarantee ? Are you aware of the ability to move home, downsize, drawdown facilities, pay for what you use, monthly income and protected inheritance plans? Perhaps it is time to find out more. Good advice from an independent adviser can be a great way to investigate the options open to you. It can also help us to ensure that the choices we make today are suitable for the future. Reassuringly, anyone considering equity release must take advice from a specialist. Equity Release is regulated by

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Using wealth from your property at today s low rates can provide an excellent solution for many people. Today s typical release is around £75,000. The money can be used as you wish, such as home improvements, holidays and clearing other debts. You can investigate how suitable this option is for you. Start by meeting with a qualified adviser - a specialist with experience in equity release. You may wish to discuss your options with your children and involve them in the process. Note that not all advisers are independent – some are restricted to a panel of lenders. Independent advisers can give advice on a wide range of products. Why not equip yourself with all the facts, all the options and decide how best to proceed for your future? You have earned the right to take control of the later years of your life. Make them the best years of your life. Find out if equity release is suitable in your circumstances. Martin Wade, CeMAP, CeRER Martin Wade is a Director of Access Equity Release, independent advisers for Later Life Lending. Access Equity Release is a trading name of Your Mortgage Decisions Ltd which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority, FRN 459763

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Sustainability Fair Draws Crowds Interest in climate change and adopting a more sustainable lifestyle was obvious by the amount of people who attended the Sustainability Fair at the Riverhouse Barn in Walton last month. There were talks throughout the day on energy efficiency, electric vehicles, chemical free beauty, organic grow your own and plastic free choices. There were stalls selling wares and giving advice. We learned a lot. When you really start thinking about the choices we make and the footprint they leave behind it is quite shocking. Take nappies for example. A necessity, of course. Did you know that 7 million trees are cut down in the UK each year to make disposable nappies? Did you know that 8 million nappies go to landfill in the UK every day? Or that it takes anywhere up to 500 years for a disposable nappy to break down? So, surely we need to look for an alternative? What about going back to the old ways of cloth nappies? It served us well. So introducing Eco Mama and Baby products which you can try for free before buying www.ecomamaamdbaby.co.uk). You can buy reusable nappies, wipes and even sanitary products. Molesey Clothing Exchange had a stand. We covered clothes swapping last month. This group does bi-monthly swapping events. The next one is March 14th at the Refresh Centre on Walton Road, Molesey. Take clean, quality clothes, shoes and accessories that you don t wear any longer and swap them. Genius! To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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Have you heard of Boomerang Bags? No, neither had I. They are all the rage in parts of Elmbridge. Made by volunteers with donated fabric, they are supplied to shops in high streets to use instead of plastic bags. One rather attractive bag had been made from Molesey rowing club s curtains! What a way to give to leave a legacy and help recycling. The event came to a rousing conclusion when the WeAreTheVoice, children s environmental choir performed to the crowd. The song of the same name is written by teacher Niamh Clune and spearheads a new children s plastic awareness campaign. The children are from several local schools. They have already recorded the song, which highlights the plight of the planet and laments its demise. It poses questions about who will fight for changes. It is worth listening and do pay attention to the images towards the end. The song is on the website: wearethevoice.org.uk or you can find it on YouTube. These guys rock. The lead singer is 11 years old and simply incredible. Britain s Got Talent watch out! Advice on recycling a huge variety of things from the Surrey Environment Partnership at www.surreyep.org.uk By Monica Chard

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Walton's Blue Plaques Part 4 of 7 - Jerome Kern

Firstly what is a Blue Plaque? A blue plaque is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person, event, or former building on the site, serving as a historical marker. To be awarded an official English Heritage plaque, the proposed recipient must have died at least 20 years ago. This is to help ensure that the decision about whether or not to shortlist a candidate is made with a sufficient degree of hindsight. However, plaques are as much about the buildings in which people lived and worked as about the subjects being commemorated – the intrinsic aim of English Heritage blue plaques is to celebrate the relationship between people and place. For this reason, English Heritage only erect a plaque if there is a surviving building closely associated with the person. In the past, different criteria were sometimes used: some plaques were put up to mark the site of a house which has since been demolished, and the 20-year rule did not always apply. The plaque to Napoleon III, for example – the oldest to survive – went up when he was still alive. However, the criteria are now applied without exception. Walton on Thames has seven, and here is number 4in the series. Jerome Kern was one of the most important and successful composers of the first half of the 20th century, writing more than 700 songs, dozens of Broadway musicals and collaborating with many eminent lyricists, including Oscar Hammerstein II, Johnny Mercer, Dorothy Fields, PG Wodehouse and Ira Gershwin. Born in New York, he came to England in 1909 and with some friends took a boat on the Thames. Mooring at Walton, they walked up to the Swan in Manor Road for a drink. Kern played the piano, met Eva Leale, the landlord s daughter and fell in love. He returned to the States but was soon back to pursue the relationship, Eva and Jerome getting married in St. Mary s in Church Street on

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October 25th 1910, the vicar at the time being W. Kemp Bussell, and when in England they stayed at the Swan. Kern won many awards and was posthumously inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970, twenty-

five years after his death and in 1985 was featured on a US postage stamp. Three of Jerome Kern s classic songs, Ol Man River, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, The Way You Look Tonight are featured on the blue plaque which was unveiled by Les Miserables lyricist, Herbert Kretzmer and Bee Gee Robin Gibb in October 2010.

A series written by local resident Mike Read Please mention Walton Matters when responding to adverts


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Pancake Day February 25th Pancake Day, or Shrove Tuesday, is the traditional feast day before the start of Lent on Ash Wednesday. Lent – the 40 days leading up to Easter – was traditionally a time of fasting and on Shrove Tuesday, Anglo-Saxon Christians went to confession and were shriven (absolved from their sins). A bell would be rung to call people to confession. This came to be called the Pancake Bell and is still rung today. Shrove Tuesday always falls 47 days before Easter Sunday, so the date varies from year to year and falls between February 3 and March 9. This year, Shrove Tuesday will fall on February 25th Shrove Tuesday was the last opportunity to use up eggs and fats before embarking on the Lenten fast and pancakes are the perfect way of using up these ingredients. The pancake has a very long history and featured in cookery books as far back as 1439. The tradition of tossing or flipping them is almost as old: And every man and maide doe take their turne, And tosse their Pancakes up for feare they burne. (Pasquil s Palin, 1619). In the UK, pancake races form an important part of the Shrove Tuesday celebrations – an opportunity for large numbers of people, often in fancy dress, to race down streets tossing pancakes. The object of the race is to get to the finishing line first, carrying a frying pan with a cooked pancake in it and flipping the pancake as you run. The most famous pancake race takes place at Olney in Buckinghamshire. According to tradition, in 1445 a woman panicked when she heard church bells ringing from her kitchen and, fearing she would be late for a Shriving service to confess her sins before Lent, she ran through the town. After

arriving at the Church door in her apron and carrying her frying pan, so began the race local women still take part in today. The race has become a firm tradition in the town, with generations of the same family taking part. The race still takes place today 575 years later The Olney pancake race is now world famous. Competitors have to be local housewives and they must wear an apron and a hat or scarf. Each contestant has a frying pan containing a hot pancake. She must toss it three times during the race. The first woman to complete the course and arrive at the church, serve her pancake to the bell ringer and be kissed by him, is the winner

A Basic Pancake Recipe 120gPlain White Flour Pinch of Salt 2Egg(s) (Free Range) 300mlMilk (Whole) Mix the flour, salt, eggs and milk to form a batter. Ideally leave to stand for 30 minutes. Grease an 18cm/7 inch pan with butter lightly. Spoon 2 tablespoon of batter in a heated pan for each pancake and swirl the pan so that the batter covers the pan. Cook for 1 minute each side. Transfer to a plate and keep warm while you cook the remaining pancakes. Serve warm sprinkled with your choice of butter, sugar and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Enjoy!

The Olney Pancake Race

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Through The Keyhole

Now's the time to give your home a cosy, brightening makeover for the year ahead. Instead of buying into all six trends for your home, you could pick a favourite, investing in a single product that you feel will stand the test of time. 1. Curve-edged furniture From next year it will be a full century since the Roaring Twenties and furniture designers are revisiting that decade with Gatsby-esque curves. Opt for an Art Deco-inspired curved cocktail chair or a stylish storage cabinet with a round top. 2. Statement rugs Rugs are a great way to add personality to a home, particularly if you don t want the commitment of bigger-ticket items. Art doesn't have to be limited to walls with statement rugs in all manner of shapes and patterns transforming the spaces around them. 3. Sculptural side tables If you're looking to introduce a talking point into a room, a side table is a great piece to invest in. The shift to more design-led, sculpted tables is really refreshing with key materials including glass, resin and ceramic. 4. Striped design Not just for sailors and bank robbers, stripes are a trend which return year after year. Stripes will elevate velvet, a modern-day staple, to a new level, while hand-painted stripes will bring a more artisan feel to ceramics. 5. Bamboo and woven cane If you fell in love with bamboo last season, rest assured - it's not going anywhere for a while. The Seventies throwback has shrugged off its dated image and become a great way to introduce a bohemian vibe into home decor. 6. Handmade textures Next time you go shopping for ceramics, look for crockery that looks like you made it in a weekend pottery class. Matching plates and bowls are old hat. Now it s all about mixing and matching, to inject personality into your dinner party. Georgina Broadhurst, Just Shutters. Just Shutters Winter Sale offers up to 20% off the full range of plantation and solid wood shutters. For a design visit Call 01932 500 270 or visit JustShutters.co.uk. To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

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There is a Climate Emergency! High-profile campaigns by people such as Greta Thunberg and David Attenborough and the actions of groups such as Extinction Rebellion – have led the UK government to declare an environment and climate emergency and set a target to reduce carbon emissions to zero by 2050. But did you know that last year Elmbridge Borough Council also declared a climate emergency and pledged to make the council carbon neutral by 2030 and the area by 2050. Climate change is primarily a problem of too

much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (caused mainly when we burn fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas or cut down and burn forests), and the Council will be taking into account the carbon that it produces. Whilst the Council has been auditing its carbon footprint and planning its reduction, a working group of local people, organisations and businesses has been set up (the Elmbridge Climate Emergency Working Group) to work alongside them and monitor their progress and achievements. But it s not just the responsibility of the Council to make Elmbridge carbon neutral by 2030. We all have a role to play

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When any of us sees an emergency such as an accident, fire or a flood, we automatically move into emergency mode and stop business-as-usual - because nothing else matters as much as the crisis at hand - and we all speedily help out to protect ourselves and others and get to safety. Climate change is such an emergency - but on a global scale - and it s going to require all of us to play a part in helping to address it. Whilst it s hard for us as individuals to imagine what we can do to help in this global emergency – especially when we know that the fossil fuel industry is responsible for most carbon emissions – we can all play a part in reducing our carbon footprint i.e. the amount of carbon that our lifestyle puts into the atmosphere. How about: walking or cycling to school or work instead of taking the car; always taking a re-usable bag with you when you go shopping to reduce the number of plastic bags; reducing the amount of meat that you eat each week; recycling your unwanted clothes, books or furniture? These may sound like small actions but imagine if we all did something : just as we would if we could see an immediate emergency in our street? In future editions we ll be telling you about what some Elmbridge schools, businesses, community groups and individuals are doing in response to the climate emergency and how you too can get involved. If you d like to find out more about the Elmbridge Climate Emergency Working Group please contact Nick on nickjdavis25@gmail.com Please mention Walton Matters when responding to adverts


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Across 1 Accomplishment (4) 3 Infrequent (8) 9 Reasonable, coherent (7) 10 Children's comic (5) 11 Conference (5) 12 Revere, venerate (6) 14 Bureaucrat (13) 17 Sausage (coll) (6) 19 American actress and activist Ms. _____ Sarandon (5) 22 Avoid, dodge (5) 23 Definitely, absolutely (2,5) 24 Unlit, gloom (8) 25 Aftermath (4)

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7 Chicken pen (4) 8 Shrewdness, intelligence (6) 13 Dark-haired (8) 15 Wander, ramble (7) 16 Dwell, settle (6)

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18 Deduce (5) 20 Steam bath (5) 21 Short for Charles (4)

Solution on Page 27

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The History of Valentine s Day We do know that February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and that St. Valentine s Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred. One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons, where they were often beaten and tortured. According to one legend, an imprisSt Valentine oned Valentine sent the first valentine greeting himself after he fell in love with a young girl–possibly his jailor s daughter–who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter signed From your Valentine, an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories all emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic and– most importantly–romantic figure. By the Middle Ages, perhaps thanks to this reputation, To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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Valentine would become one of the most popular saints in England and France. The Christian church may have decided to place St. Valentine s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to Christianize the pagan celebration of Lupercalia. Celebrated at the ides of February, or February 15, Lupercalia was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman god of agriculture, as well as to the Roman founders Romulus and Remus.To begin the festival, members of the Luperci, an order of Roman priests, would gather at a sacred cave where the infants Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were believed to have been cared for by a shewolf or lupa. The priests would sacrifice a goat, for fertility, and a dog, for purification. They would then strip the goat s hide into strips, dip them into the sacrificial blood and take to the streets, gently slapping both women and crop fields with the goat hide. Far from being fearful, Roman women welcomed the touch of the hides because it was believed to make them more fertile in the coming year. Later in the day, according to legend, all the young women in the city would place their names in a big urn. The city s bachelors would each choose a name and become paired for the year with his chosen woman. Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages, though written Valentine s didn t begin to appear until after 1400. The oldest known valentine still in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt. Valentine s Day began to be popularly celebrated around the 17th century. By the middle of the 18th, it was common for friends and lovers of all social classes to exchange small tokens of affection.

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Boomerang Bags. Not Plastic Bags In the quest to reduce plastic, we were thrilled to hear about a local initiative called Boomerang Bags which has taken off in some local areas, but which has huge scope to spread. The fact from one of the Blue Planet programmes stating that by 2050 there would be more plastic

in the sea than fish was enough to shock Tricia Bland. More than 300 million tons of plastic are produced every year, 50% of which is for single use. This has to change. Plastic bags are such an obvious lifestyle change. The 5p single use plastic bag charge introduced in 2015 is estimated to have taken 15 billion plastic bags out of circulation. The plan to increase it to 10p this year is still not high enough. Ban them altogether in my opinion! So, in looking for an alternative, the Boomerang Bags are simply brilliant and a great example of a community pulling together to make a difference. The idea started took shape in the UK in Tricia Bland s village of Thames Ditton, although the concept came originally from Australia. Sales of sewing machines have soared since the Great British Sewing Bee and there is a huge increase in crafters and make do-and-menders . Thames Ditton s crafty ladies took to the idea with glee. They had books of upholstery fabric samples donated which were just the size of a tote, were given a community room in the local pub to set up and started sewing in earnest. Local shops agreed to stock the bags and give them out free to customers. The community saw an official launch at their farmers market one weekend when Boomerang Bag kits were given out, complete with instructions and enough fabric for 5 bags. Word spread and the To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

bag making community grew. Local schools were recruited, taking the activity up as extra curricular or as part of a sustainability project. Youngsters learned a useful skill as well as focusing on helping the environment. Funding was secured from the local council to fund more sewing machines and the Boomerang Bag club grew. Think how much fabric is discarded into landfill. One bag I was shown at the recent Sustainability Fair I attended was made from the curtains of the Molesey boat club! In Thames Ditton the local community centre, a pub and a dry cleaners have offered to be drop off places for fabric donations. Every bag carries a logo and tag (hand made from cereal boxes) explaining that on average one Boomerang Bag replaces 700 single use plastic bags because they are used time and again. The idea now is to extend this idea. Molesey already has it. Why not start a group in Walton on Thames? Who is up for it? You can get the template and information from the BB ladies in Thames Ditton and get going. What a great concept for the high street. See boomerangbags.org for more information. Email Tricia tdwgra@the-blands.co.uk Or call 0208 339 0485

By Monica Chard

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Free February half-term and spring activities for children and families Looking forward to spring? So are we! We have planned lots of free fun activities to do outdoors and indoors for the whole family. They are suitable for all ages, so everyone can get involved and find something exciting to do.

sions: 10am-11am / 12pm to 1pm and 2pm3pm. Walton Library, The Heart Centre, 54 Hepworth Way, Walton-on-Thames KT12 1GH. For children aged 5 to 13 years. Learn about some truly rotten remedies used in the Middles Ages and create your own medieval pouch to fill with healing herbs. Handle some objects from the museum collection and design you own stained glass window and medieval bookmark. Free event but register your interest at : ebcmuseum@elmbridge.gov.uk

February half-term holiday: Monday 17 February – free Shout! drop-in play session – 10am to 2pm - King George s Hall, High Street, Esher KT10 9RA We will be celebrating spring with seasonal arts and crafts, colourful lanterns and baskets and making wildlife crafts and puzzles with natural materials from the commons. No booking required – just pop along and stay as long as you want. MOUSE Monday 17 February – *back by popular demand* Museum Explorers WWII interactive and educational workshops, bookable events – cost: £5 per child. 10am to 11.30am and 12pm to 1.30pm - King George s Hall, High Street, Esher KT10 9RExperience life in Elmbridge in WW2. Go through gas mask training and an air raid drill. Discover where bombs fell. Handle real WW2 artefacts. Booking essential at elmbridgemuseum.org.uk/learning/families Tuesday 18 February – Build your own bird box – 2.30pm to 4pm – Civic Centre, Off High Street, Esher KT10 9SD. Help our feathered friends by making a nest box in time for spring. Free event. Spaces limited. Booking essential at countryside@elmbridge.gov.uk Spring events: Saturday 14 March - Elmbridge Museum s deadly diseases and rotten remedies – 3 ses-

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Enjoy day outdoors with the countryside team on Saturday 21 March with 2 different free activities: Pond dip. Drop in 10am to 12pm. Meet by Littleworth Common pond, Portsmouth Road, opposite Café Rouge, nearest postcode KT10 9AD. Local ponds are full of life, and now s the time to come and find out what s living there! Orienteering. Start the challenge between 1pm and 2.30pm. Meet in Horsesehoe Clump car park, Portsmouth Road, opposite Blackhills, Esher, nearest postcode KT10 9JL. Show off your map reading skills and explore the wildlife in your local woodland. No booking required. Just turn up. Councillor Janet Turner, Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture, said, There are plenty of family fun events and activities taking place in Elmbridge during February half-term and spring. There will be a chance to do seasonal arts and crafts, observe wildlife on the commons and explore life in Elmbridge in WW2 with the Museum explorers fun interactive workshops. Most of it is free so come along and share some family fun! We look forward to seeing you there!". For further information, please visit elmbridge.gov.uk/leisure, email shout@elmbridge.gov.uk or call 01372 474 634. Please mention Walton Matters when responding to adverts


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Right to The Core

Why core exercises are important We know that getting fit is important for a healthy life. Often, we equate fitness with running, cycling, walking or some other form of exercise. But there's one aspect of fitness that is almost always overlooked; our core muscles.

would simply flop over. What Are the Benefits of Core Strength? Building a strong core provides a firm and flexible support for every activity your body performs. The stability provided gives you better balance and better posture which in turn helps prevent falls and injuries in your day-to-day life. The support from your core muscles takes the strain away from your skeleton and helps hold it in place alleviating some forms of back pain, stiffness and soreness when you move your body. Any time you move whether it's for exercise or doing the housework or gardening, a strong core will help you perform better and reduce muscle fatigue in the other parts of your body by giving them a firm base to attach to. How Can I Build My Core Strength?

Whenever I talk about building muscle everyone pictures someone at a weight bench pumping iron until their biceps bulge out of their shirts. But strengthening and toning your muscles can be much more subtle. And even a small amount of work on your core strength can dramatically improve your overall fitness and well-being. What Are Your Core Muscles? Your core muscles form a ring around the middle of your body. Most people think of the six pack muscles in the abdomen, but the core includes a range of muscles in your sides and back as well. Their job is to keep the top and bottom halves of your body connected together whilst allowing them to move independently. They form a strong foundation that the majority of your other muscles depend upon when you move your body. When Do I Use My Core Muscles? Practically every movement you make and every position you put your body into involves your core muscles. They are really important. Bending over to pick something up, twisting to look behind you and sitting up in bed are more obvious moments your core is activated. But running, walking, sitting in a chair and even standing still all rely on core strength. Without it the top half of your body

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One of the best things about core strength is that you don't need a gym or expensive equipment to improve it. There are lots of exercises you can do at home. Make sure you seek medical advice before attempting any new exercise regime. Most people think of sit ups as the prime core exercise. I advise people not to do sit ups as they are not particularly effective and the continual flexing of the base of your spine can lead to lower back injuries. My top tips are planks, leg raises and mountain climbers. If you're not sure what these are have a chat with your local personal trainer or gym instructor, or search on YouTube for easy-to-follow tutorials. Take your core strength seriously and it will improve every aspect of your fitness as well as provide the central support essential for your body.

By Robert Grant

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F A L L F L A T C H A D

E A T S P O N A U O G I C A L E U L E S O R U M E D D M I N I S T E T B A N G E R N L I N O E D G E E A G A R K N E S S

R A D I C O E O B E A N O O R P T E E M S B R A T O R E U S U S A N I A E D O U B T E N T W A K E

Solution to February Quick Crossword

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Local Artist s Success in Major National Art Exhibition Work by local artist Corinne Manches has been selected from over 1,500 entries to appear alongside artworks by some of Britain s leading artists at The Royal Society of British Artists Annual Exhibition at the Mall Galleries from 20 to 29 February. Her mixed media art work, Handmaid s Tea was created on a tea bag. See photo. Corinne has lived in Walton on Thames for many years. She produces art works in painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, and mixed media. She has worked at Riverhouse Art Centre for many years with children s art, and more recently Claremont School, as well as teaching a sculpture for adults course, at the Kingston Adult Education centre.She has twice been shortlisted for the BP Portrait exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery and has been funded by Elmbridge Arts and the R.C.Sherriff Trust for work across the borough, recently exhibiting in the Elmbridge Moving Art Exhibition. She also has a cycle painting hanging in St Peter s Hospital rehabilitation gym which Walton s mental health group took part in making. Royal Society of British Artists Annual Exhibition 2020 Mall Galleries, The Mall, London SW1 www.mallgalleries.org.uk Open 20 to 29 February, 10am to 5pm Admission ÂŁ5, Free to Friends of Mall Galleries and Under 25s.

Free Entry for Two when you mention Walton Matters at the Gallery Desk.

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Dedicated to Dementia Care The Burlington provides dedicated dementia care to ensure your loved one remains safe and well cared for 24 hours a day. Our friendly and compassionate team

understand the specific needs of those living with dementia associated conditions and help them live a meaningful life here at The Burlington.

✓ Dedicated 24 hour care ✓ Safe and specially designed environment ✓ All inclusive care & living ✓ Stimulating activities and outings ✓ Fresh home cooked food To discuss your loved one’s care needs, contact us today

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BURLINGTON Residential - Dementia - Respite 01932 220 338

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Recipe of The Month Nut Bites

The Community Café @Riverhousebarn in Walton on Thames continues with recipes showing how you can use leftovers. They create wonderful food from surplus, donated by a local supermarket. Go and try their surplus lunch for £5 and they will donate the proceeds to local charities feeding those on low incomes and who are struggling.

These tasty treats were introduced by our talented volunteer Erica. (You ll find her most Thursdays at the Barn conjuring up a curry from whatever she can find in the fridge). The recipe is completely made up, and the idea is to use as many left overs or slightly past their best vegetables you might having hanging around. The base is made from breadcrumbs, peanuts and onions and the rest is up to you! 300g breadcrumbs (make from stale crusts, combination of rolls, ends of loaves – rye bread or seeded bread works best) 250g salted peanuts (or any nut) 2 onions – peeled and chopped roughly 2 cloves garlic crushed 2 peppers (any colour) Any leftover cooked or raw veg (carrots/ Kale/cabbage/cauliflower/greens etc) Seasoning/chilli flakes 1 or 2 eggs (to bind) Chopped herbs Spices – fennel seed/crushed toasted coriander seeds are good Gently fry the onion until it is soft and translucent. Blitz peanuts in a food processor until they are small crumbs .. not too fine as you still want to have texture. Put aside in a bowl with the breadcrumbs. Then blitz the peppers and onions to a rough paste. Add this to the breadcrumb mixture. Then do the same with any left over veg you have. When you have To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

everything in a large bowl, season well – don t be scared of using lots of salt and pepper, teaspoon of cumin, chilli flaxes, add 1 egg and mix thoroughly with your hands squeezing the mixture so it is well blended (it should be damp and sticky – not too wet) Form into round balls, or patties, or sausages (you can roll them in extra seeds or herbs at this stage if you wish) and put on a greased baking tray. Pop in the oven for around 20 mins at 180 C or until golden brown on the outside. Serve with a dipping sauce – can be yoghurt and cucumber, or mango chutney.. or with a fresh tomato sauce in a wrap. The possibilities are endless.. Come and see what we do with ours at the café

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HAMPTON COURT HOUSE

cultivating a lifelong love of learning

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND GIRLS AGED 3-18

Contact Rachel Bowles, Registrar, to book a tour on 020 8614 0857 or visit our website at www.hamptoncourthouse.co.uk


Garden View This month - A game of two halves By Rachael Leverton

For me February is where the gardening year begins...twice! First - Reaping last year s rewards: If you were industrious in the autumn, you could now be benefiting from a lovely display of snowdrops (Gallanthus) and Irises. My favourite snowdrops are G Atkinsii , which are tall with long, graceful flowers and G. nivalis Viridapicis with sweet, green tipped flowers. It s said they re best planted in the green in Spring but I ve had lots of success with packaged bulbs planted in the autumn so they re definitely worth trying. As for irises, the deep blue Iris Joyce is hard to beat especially on my poor, free draining soil. I planted a witch hazel as soon as we moved into our present house; Hamamelis x intermedia Pallida . I can t live without fragrance in my garden and at this bare, drab time of year the wonderfully scented pale-yellow flowers lift my spirits.

Perhaps you didn t manage to plan ahead last year. But don t panic; the beauty of gardening is that the seasons keep rolling round so make sure you use February to ensure your summer display is top notch. February is definitely the month to start sowing seeds. Fill pots or seed trays with seed compost then firm and level the surface. Sprinkle seeds on to the surface of the compost then cover with a layer of fine grit. Water well with a fine spray. Cover with clear plastic (a polythene bag will do nicely) and remove it once the seeds germinate. Learn from my mistake one year and don t forget to label the pots! Potting up summer bulbs is generally left until late spring, but I always pot up one or two pots in February. It allows them to get established and provides a nice early display for my patio.

Happy gardening.

I discovered we d inherited an evergreen Clematis (C. armandii). I d never grown it before but it s worth seeking out. It needs a warm wall or fence and well-drained soil then rewards you by being frost-hardy and producing lovely creamy, scented flowers at this time of year. Second - Planning this year s display

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Dominic Raab Our Local MP

I am grateful to everybody who voted for me in the recent General Election, and was delighted to be returned once again as the Member of Parliament for Esher and Walton. With the election behind us, at the national level the Government is getting Brexit done so we can focus on your priorities. At the local level, I m getting straight back into delivering for local residents in Elmbridge.

ough Council begin the process of introducing a PSPO without further delay. This is particularly important as further consultation would be necessary before it comes into force. I look forward to working with local residents to address this issue for young families and retired residents, who enjoy using the pathways along the river.

I know that illegally moored boats have been a recurrent source of frustration for many Elmbridge residents. Illegally moored boats bring littering and anti-social behaviour – so it is a quality of life issue for residents enjoying the riverside. And it has been getting worse. It is time to tackle it. An Elmbridge Borough Council consultation, which closed in July last year, presented four options for dealing with the problem. One of these was introducing a Public Space Protection Order (PSPO), designed to stop antisocial behaviour which is unreasonable, persistent, and is having or is likely to have a detrimental effect on peoples quality of life.

Dom by the River Thames at Hurst Park .

Introducing a PSPO could allow the council to prohibit certain activities, or place requirements on people carrying them out. Importantly, it was clear that only a PSPO would really help in tackling illegally moored boats.

MP for Esher & Walton

I strongly supported the introduction of a PSPO in my response to the consultation. Now, over five months later, it is time for action. I would like to see Elmbridge BorPlease mention Walton Matters when responding to adverts

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Events Coming Up Some we like...

Esher & District Amnesty International Group (which includes Walton & Weybridge) meet on 2nd Weds of every month to sign letters. Small friendly group - please contact Cherry Eddy 0208398 4377 for details. The PHOENIX FOLK & SQUARE DANCE CLUB is a friendly and informal English Folk Dance Club. Why not call in at one of our Thursday evening Club nights, meet us and enjoy a complimentary evening of dancing and a cup of tea. We start at 8pm and finish at 10.15pm. Oatlands Village Hall St Mary s Road Oatlands Village Weybridge, Surrey KT13 9PT you to trace your family history. For more details, email walton@wsfhs.org or phone 07932 062056 Walton-on-Thames WI We meet at 7.30 pm on the third Tuesday of each month in St Erconwald s Church Hall, Esher Avenue, Walton-on-Thames and you are most welcome to come and see who we are and what we do. If you cannot make our meeting there are other WIs but for further information on Walton WI please contact our Secretary, Hilary Cartwright on 01932 248071 or email us at waltononthameswi@gmail.com Silver Swans Adult Ballet Class - held at St Mary s Church Hall , Walton - all levels welcome in this basic level class with stretching . Develop muscular strength, balance , coordination , cardio fitness, correct posture and mental agility in a friendly environment. Contact Suzanne on 07985520378 suzanne.vnad@gmail.com John Coltrane: The Impulse Years feat. Julian Costello on saxophone This month Riverside Arts Jazz will be celebrating John Coltrane's Impulse Years featuring Julian Costello on saxophone with Terence Collie on piano, Mark Rose on bass and Paul Cavaciuti on drums. The evening is run by a friendly team and the Riverside Arts Centre is a comfortable concert venue with a grand piano, good acoustics and lighting plus a reasonably priced bar run by Arts Centre volunteers. Door/Bar 7.15pm, Music 7.45. Tickets £12 via website or £15 on the door. Riverside Arts Centre, 59 Thames Street, Sunbury on Thames, Surrey TW16 5QF Sun 2 Feb 2020Contact telephone: 07940731490 Made In Molesey art and craft evening Once a month get together for men and women. Bring your own craft project or book on to the workshop for an extra fee. Chat with others, share tips and make stuff. We have free tea and coffee but feel free to bring a bottle of wine or other drinks if you'd like. £2. 7.30-10.30 pm on the second Friday evening of the month St. Marys Church, St Marys Road, East Molesey, Surrey KT8 0ST Fri 14 Feb 2020 Contact telephone: 020 8941 5901 The Giant Houseplant Takeover Step into a house reclaimed by its plants long after its human inhabitants have left. A banana has pushed through the roof, carnivorous plants feast in the dining room and cacti play chess. A few plants have grown rather too large and tower over their relatives. The Glasshouse is open 10am – 3:45pm daily. This event is included in normal Garden admission. Book online for 10% discount. RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey GU23 6QB Sat 25 Jan 2020 to Sun 1 Mar 2020 Contact telephone: 01483224234 Timber Hill - Open Garden for NGS 16 acres of garden, park & woodland giving an undulating walk with views to North Downs. Stunning winter garden available to view most Wednesdays from January March. Lonicera & witch hazel walk, abundant snowdrops, aconites & a sea of crocuses, spectacular camellias (featured in Surrey Life) followed by magnolias & wild cherries. May brings bluebells, azaleas, rhododendrons. Please call. Timber Hill, Chobham, Surrey GU24 8JF Mon 10 Feb to Thu 13 Feb Contact telephone: 01932 873875 Phoebe Gorry presents a Valentine's Day Special Riverhouse Barn Manor Road Walton-on-Thames Surrey KT12 2PF 01932 253354 Currently writing her debut album, Phoebe is an artist in high demand performing at venues and festivals all over the world. Her breathy voice flirts with the cloying depths of Lady Day and adopts a crisp and clear passionate tone for classic jazz standards and jazzy reworks of modern hits, guaranteed to make the hairs on your neck stand up. This exclusive concert is a perfect way to celebrate Valentine s Day – expect to hear unique renditions of all your favourite jazz and soul love songs. Phoebe will be joined by her live band made up of some of the most in demand musicians working on the UK jazz and sessions scenes, including special guest Saxophonist Duncan eagles. Friday 14 February, 8pm Tickets: £15 (£7 Concession)

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Mrs Kaye Patel

(fully insured & DBS checked. Based in Shepperton)

www.purrfectathome.co.uk purrfectathome826@gmail.com call on 07903 657539

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Index of Advertisers Building W Brown and Son 25 Care Age UK 25 Adelaide House 21 The Burlington 29 Cat Sitting Purrfect at Home 37 Cleaning Nick Lewis Cleaning 21 Estate Agents/Housing Harmes Turner Brown 40 PA Housing 13/17/19/37 Electrician Boss Electrics 23 Events Elmbridge Youth Theatre 11 Life is For Living 9 Finance Access Equity Release 39 Harvest Financial Mgmt 11 Funeral Services Alan Greenwood 33 Lodge Bros 22 Furnishings John Miller 17 Garage Doors Garolla 13 Garden Services/Supplies Easicut Mowers 33

Squires Garden Centre Glazing/Windows/Doors House of Surrey Village Windows Kitchens Ashford Kitchens Pharmacy/Travel Clinic Trio Pharmacy Plumber Peter James Plumbing Restaurants Sakura Yakiniku Roofing Aldridge and Sons Schools/Education Halliford School Hampton Court House Hampton Prep Sell for Cash JC Stamps Shutters House of Surrey Just Shutters White Goods Rental RMTV Will Writing Harvest Wills

19 5 37 7

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March 2020 Issue Closing on 17th February

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Disclaimer: Whilst every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information included in this publication, neither the publisher nor the editorial contributors can accept any liability to any party for loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. Walton Matters does not endorse any advertising material included in this publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval systems or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the publisher.

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Profile for Village Matters

Walton Matters February 2020  

The only dedicated local community magazine for Walton on Thames

Walton Matters February 2020  

The only dedicated local community magazine for Walton on Thames

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