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Molesey

Matters

Putting Local Business First Keeping a Community Together

September 2017 Issue 12

FREE to 9000 Homes and Businesses in East and West Molesey

Memories of Molesey School Days : Value of Dredging : Averna Review : History of Kempton Park To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288 Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk 1


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Welcome! Welcome to issue 12 of Molesey Matters. Yes, it’s our birthday!! Last September Molesey Matters was born, following in the footsteps of our other two magazines, Sunbury Matters and Shepperton Matters. I have to say I am thoroughly enjoying myself. I love my history, as you can probably tell, and I love meeting new people and making friends. What’s not to like. A big thank you must go out to all our supporters; the contributors and clubs, the advertisers who enable us to deliver Molesey Matters to you free of charge, and of course you, the readers, from whom I have had so many

September 2017 messages of encouragement throughout the year. This issue also represents our biggest of the year. I thank you all. Proof that community and being truly local does indeed matter! Please enjoy reading the issue as much as I have enjoyed putting it together for you. Year 2 beckons… Until October...

Reader Offers Esher Tyres and Exhausts - 15% off until 30th Sept The Handmade Fair - Free Glass of Bubbly Time For You - 15% off first clean with advert Village Windows - 20% off until 30th Sept The Oven Man - Free Microwave Safety Test LuxEBootcamp - FreeTrial Surrey Adult Learning - Courses for £5

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Contents Memories of Molesey School Days 4 The Princess and Claremont 6 Molesey Lock 8 The Great Fire of 1666 9 The Averna Review 12/13 Focus on Education 16 - 25 Brooklands Museum 26 The Value of Dredging 28 Where There is Muck…. 35 Recipe of The Month 42 Urban Wildlife Gardens 44 Historic Kempton Park 46 Your NHS 50 Garden View 52 Molesey Residents Association 54 Spelthorne Gymnastics 56 Dominic Raab 59 Events Coming Up 61 Index of Advertisers 62

Molesey Director: Paul Chard Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematters.co.uk Website :www.villagematters.co.uk Cover photo. Two of the Dunkirk Little Ships. Endeavour featured in the recent movie ‘Dunkirk’. Veterans Cruise 3rd September. Photo by Paul Chard Send any photos (300dpi) for consideration to: paul@villagematters.co.uk Check us out on Facebook. @moleseymattersmagazine

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Memories of Molesey School Days They say our school days are the happiest days of our lives. For most of us, it’s not as simple as that. We remember the head teacher we feared, and the teacher we adored, the lifelong friends we made and the bullies we despised, the subjects we loved and those we hated…Many long-term residents recall attending elementary schools in Molesey but going out of the area for their further education. In 1929, Cynthia Chandler (née Ayliffe) went to a dame school in Arnison Road for 47-year-olds run by Miss Catherine Smyrk. At the age of six, she started at Ion House, Mr. Parsons’ school at 30 Kent Road. “Each Christmas, Mr. Parsons would stand tall and imposing in his frock coat and winged collar in the doorway, vividly recounting parts of Dickens’ famous seasonal story A Christmas Carol.” At the age of 11, Cynthia changed schools again. She went to the newly MOUSE opened, St. Joseph’s Convent School in Seymour Road, run by the Sisters of the Christian Retreat (in photo). Sister Ignatius was very strict. “I remember having to kneel trembling at her side to recite St Joseph’s Convent Girls 1937 my Latin verbs. However, Sister Josephine was very sweet and taught us needlework and later on she made a beautiful christening robe for my first daughter.” She has a vivid memory of boarding for a few weeks. “Meals were not of a high standard and the only food I enjoyed there was treacle pudding and custard!” At the age of 14, her To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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parents decided that she should enter the examination for Kingston Day Commercial School which she passed and so in the momentous month of September 1939 her Molesey school were over. Doreen FreeSourcedays Various/Paul Chard man, née Hagan, remembers West Molesey Infants in 1943. “The concrete shelters in the playground were smelly with slated benches along the sides and a toilet behind a sack curtain at the end.” At the age of 7, she went to Miss Snow’s in School Road. “She was a tall lady and very strict. When she arrived at school the monitor of the day had to wait at the gate until she drew up in her car and open the door for her to get out. Whenever we passed her we had to genuflect and bob.” Doreen liked Mr Cook’s (West Molesey Junior School) much better. “I was ahead of my class for maths and when that lesson came up I went to Mr. Cook’s office which was upstairs in the turret and he gave me tasks to do in maths.” She also has fond memories of Ray Road School “as we were treated more like grown-ups.” This is despite “getting the cane in front of the whole school because I had disobeyed the orders not to go over the no man’s land dividing the girls school from the boys’ school next door. My father had no sympathy for me as he agreed with the discipline.” She left Molesey schooling in September 1952 after passing an entrance exam to Hinchley Wood Day Commercial School. If you would like to tell us your memories of Molesey school days, please get in touch and do come along to our ‘Educating Molesey’ evening on Tuesday 14th November at 8pm in the new St. Lawrence School building. By Molesey Local History Society Or call Paul on 07946 494288


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The Princess, Claremont and The Railings Source: Various/Claremont Landscape Garden

Princess Charlotte Augusta was the only child of George Prince of Wales, and Princess Caroline of Brunswick. Her father became Prince Regent in 1811 and was crowned King George IV in l82l. Charlotte was born at Carlton House in London on 7th January 1796. On 2nd May 1816, she married Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg. Charlotte became pregnant and the whole nation was eagerly awaiting the birth of an heir to the throne. However giving birth in the 1800s could be very dangerous for both mother and baby. Birth was seen as a natural process that should be allowed to take its course and medical intervention was rare. Unfortunately, their hopes were dashed when Charlotte gave birth to a stillborn son on 5th November 1817 at Claremont House in Esher and died the following day. Charlotte and Leopold The Princess and her baby were buried in St. George's Chapel at Windsor on 19th November. Her obstetrician, Sir Richard Croft, was criticised for not intervening in the difficult labour by using forceps during delivery - their use might have saved both the princess and the baby. The speculation and criticism were more than Croft could bear and he shot himself early in 1818. The premature death of Princess Charlotte changed the course of British history. If she or her baby had survived, then her cousin, Princess Victoria, would not have become Queen. If you've visited Claremont before, it's possible you may have missed the historic Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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black railings around the Camellia Terrace. Though just a small feature, the railings represent a significant part of history, both of Claremont and of the royal family of Britain. The railings are adorned with the monogram of Charlotte’s husband, Leopold of Saxe-Coburg, who owned Claremont from 1816-1865. Leopold became the first King of the Belgians in 1831, and his crown tops the railings on every section. The railings are a typical example of early nineteenth-century garden fashion and outline the site of a former conservatory, originally designed as a refectory and small library for Leopold and his bride Princess Charlotte. The royal railings have survived intact for at least 146 years, but are now in need of repair due to decades of exposure. As one of the few remnants of Claremont's tenure as a royal estate, we need to make sure the railings keep standing proud for centuries to come. That's why we're undertaking careful conservation work to remove the rust, repaint the metalwork in the original dark green, and re-gild the monograms and crowns. The work is taking place in stages over this year and next, at a cost of around £25,000. Claremont are only able to carry out important conservation projects like this with your support. If you'd like to help keep Claremont's rich history alive, please buy some raffle tickets or drop in your spare change at the kiosk on your next visit to the garden. Or if you're considering making a larger donation, please call Claremont directly on 01372 467806.

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Our Very Own Molesey Lock Source: Wiki/Visit Thames Our lock was first proposed in 1802 because of the shallows upstream. During droughts, the Thames was liable to become too shallow for river craft to pass through. The heavily

charged after incidents of pilfering from barges. In 1853 some changes were made to the lock in anticipation of lower water levels caused by the extraction of water upstream.

Molesey Lock 1883

laden barges were held up, sometimes for weeks at a time while the bargemen waited for the weather to turn. When it did, the higher water levels allowed the barges to float through. Nothing came of the suggestion. However in 1809 the proposal was resubmitted and the Act for the construction of Molesey Lock was passed by Parliament in 1812. Building began in 1814 and it opened in 1815 with an Italianate lock house. The first lock keeper was killed in a horse race at Moulsey Hurst and his successor dis-

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Fish ladders were added to the weir in 1864 and the boat slide built in 1871. Such was the popularity of boating in those days that in 1877 a boat and crew were stationed above the weir in case of accidents. The lock was rebuilt in 1906. The lock's 1906 rebuild was carried out to accommodate the long 200ft naval craft built at Platt's Eyot, just upstream of the lock. Between the 1800s and early 1900s, Molesey was probably the most popular lock on the Thames on summer Sundays.

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The Great Fire September 2nd 1666 Source: Various Only a year after London suffered the Great Plague, London was hit again. On September 2nd 1666, in a small bakery attached to the Kings household, a fire broke out. The fire in Pudding Lane was small and fires such as these were normally put out quickly, but a truly hot summer, combined with a lack of rain, added to the fire’s rage. With the timber houses incredibly dry the fire spread rapidly. More than 300 houses were soon destroyed fanned by a strong wind. The narrow streets of London acted as a funnel for the flames. Residents armed only with buckets were overwhelmed. Panic set in, many attempting to flee down river in an armada of

small boats. The monarch, King Charles II, commanded that any house that was standing in the path of the fire should be levelled to halt the firestorm’s path. This proved to be ineffective as the fire’s speed out-ran the human attempt. In just a couple of days more than half of London was engulfed. The King raised the stakes and ordered that any house in the path of the fire be destroyed by gunpowder to create the empty spaces where he hoped the fire would die. As if the fire wasn’t enough, the noise of the explosions sent the remaining population into even more panic, believing that the French were invading. Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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By the 6th September the fire had been brought under control and soon the flames were totally extinguished. 75% of the city had been destroyed, including tens of thousands of homes, together with the iconic St Paul’s Cathedral. The human cost, incredibly just six souls. A confession followed quickly. A Frenchman named Hubert, a watchmaker by trade, owned up to starting the fire deliberately. He paid the price with his neck. It was only after the hanging that it was proved he wasn’t even in the country at the time. The fire did however have a positive benefit. The disease infested streets were destroyed and a new path was laid down for a new and more vibrant London. If you get the chance take a trip to Pudding Lane. It’s off Eastcheap, near London Bridge and the Monument.

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AVERNA - Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria A Review Recently, my wife Monica (Mrs C) and I were once again treated to food heaven. Matteo Luciano, owner of The Averna Italian Restaurant in Walton Road had invited us both to lunch. As we walked through the door, greeted by Matteo and his engaging smile, we knew we were in for a treat. Beautiful black and white pictures depicting iconic Italian imagery adorned the walls. We were then ushered to our table to the dulcet tones of original “Rat Pack” megastar, Dean Martin. First impressions were of a traditional Italian restaurant intent on looking after both friends and families. The restaurant takes its inspiration from the Italian table approach, where people relax and enjoy both the atmosphere and food as well as each other’s company. Looking around, people were laughing and chatting and children were “ooohhing” in delight at the wonderful Italian gelato (ice cream) which was presented with a smile.

The Averna opened back in 2007 and fast became a favourite. Friends and regulars don’t seem to just walk past, but pop their heads round the door to give Matteo and his team a friendly “hello”, even if they are not stopping for a bite to eat - a true sign of a restaurant steeped in community spirit. The head chef has been with Matteo from the start and together they have created a menu packed with fresh and delicious home-made recipes. The restaurant also boasts its very own dedicated pizza chef, who hails from Naples where he owned his very own Pizzeria. You can’t get more authentic than that!! Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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By Paul Chard and the lovely Mrs C

So, a menu created with both skill and love, which includes beautiful fresh pasta, salads, seafood, pizzas, meats and of course scrummy Italian desserts. (I had the Tiramisu!! Of which more later.) The first thing to arrive was complimentary bread and olives. Averna make their bread fresh every day and it shows. Home-made bread is always a delight; warm out of the oven, crusty on the outside, soft inside and dipped in olive oil and balsamic. But it’s especially good when it’s made by a professional. Next up, Mrs C and I decided to share a ‘bruschetta’. The sense tingling freshness once more came to the fore. Home-made bread, sweet juicy sun ripened tomatoes, olive oil, pepper and topped with fresh basil. (Tomatoes are the backbone of Mediterranean cooking, where they are ripened in the sunshine. It is not so easy to get that taste of sunshine in the UK, but Averna buys their tomatoes already sun ripened from Spain, from the international fruit and veg market.) The bruschetta was so good I wish we hadn’t shared! Mouthwatering. Just like “mamma” used to make. A good bruschetta is always a pointer of good things to come. Other (primi) are just as tempting; carpaccio, calamari, and beautiful succulent king prawns being more of my favourites. It is clear from this moment we are going to have to pay Matteo another visit. Do be sure to check the specials menu too. The team love to create new exciting dishes with the wonderful fresh ingredients on offer that day. Mrs C chose a dish from the specials board: an oven baked pancake with crab meat in a rich sauce and gratinated. It arrived sizzling hot. The pancake was light as a feather encasing succulent crab and was a real hit.

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imaginable. Airy and unctuous, we could easily have managed a piece each. The Italian desserts are on show in a traditional dessert fridge ready to tempt you the minute you come in through the door so make sure you leave some room. Averna seems a popular choice of restaurant for all occasions. The restaurant seats 65 and is often full for dinner

I can’t remember the last time I went to an Italian restaurant and didn’t have pasta. Pasta in Italy is generally eaten as a starter dish but you can choose to have it as a starter or main at Averna. A variety of fresh home-made pasta dishes were on offer. As a lover of shellfish, I opted for the ravioli stuffed with crab meat, cooked with fresh vongole (clams), garlic, cherry tomatoes and olive oil. It did not disappoint. Beautifully cooked pasta parcels with soft tender crabmeat and fresh, just from the sea, clams. The chef can truly cook. Mrs C mopped up the residual sauce with envy. I suspect she will be choosing that dish on her next visit! The main dishes on offer include a great selection of pizzas and pastas as well as grilled meats and fish. It was a difficult choice (another reason to return); chicken dishes served stuffed with mozzarella, or served with aubergine and tomato, calves liver with bacon or veal escallops in white wine sauce. Mrs C opted for a medallion of fillet steak in red wine and peppercorn sauce (Medaglioni al pepe). The sauce was divine. I chose the lemon sole piled high with roasted cherry tomatoes. Both dishes were beautifully presented with a generous stack of steam broccoli and new potatoes. By this stage we were struggling a little but could not forgo desert. We chose to share a Tiramisu, the ubiquitous Italian coffee trifle. It was the lightest mouthful

with its regulars coming back time and again, quoting it as a true local favourite. As well as the A la Carte option, set lunch and dinner menus offer a great selection of dishes at very modest prices and there is a “piccolo” children’s menu for only £7.25 offering some crowd pleasers as well as free ice cream and soft drink. No wonder the children seemed so happy! Menu’s change seasonally, so expect to see some new dishes coming up for autumn. There are plenty of reasons to keep wanting to come back for more, that is for sure. Don’t forget that Averna also do takeaways. So now you don’t have to leave the comfort of your own home. Traditional Italian cooking, straight to your door!!

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Valid until 30th September 2017

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Crossword 1

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Across 8 Heedless, uninformed (7) 9 Capital of Egypt (5) 10 Soft, creamy confectionary (5) 11 Sharp pains (7) 12 Relinquishing (12) 16 Dismantle (4,2,6) 20 Harsh, radical (7) 23 Oppressor, persecutor (5) 24 Choice few, select (5) 25 Keep an eye on (7)

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1950s hairstyle (5) Ill fortune (4,4) Profession (6) Chair (4) Lively, agile (6)

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Serenade, croon (4) 17 Snigger (6) Formally deliver (7) 18 Badge, insignia (6) Sharp pinch (3) 19 Oven-proof glass (5) Visionary, optimist (8) Neutralized alkali (4) By the Molesey21 Local History by Society Scrutinised (7) 22 Wooden shoe (4)

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State vs Independent It’s that time of year again. The school holidays have come to an end and we hurtle towards colder, shorter nights and darker mornings. Children and parents all over the country are preparing for a new school year.

Many will be looking for a first or new school completely. One of the first questions in choosing a school is the “state vs independent” debate. By far the majority of children in the UK are educated in the state system, but the independent sector does account for 6.5% of the total. The question is, do students at independent schools perform better academically than their state school counterparts? Studies carried out in the UK tend to support the view that independent schools may confer higher academic ability on students than state schools. However, whilst reports mostly suggest independent schools have an academic advantage over state schools, is that advantage solely a result of school type? The jury is out about attendance at independent schools enhancing the academic achievements of students, once student and schoollevel differences are accounted for. Latest figures suggest that the proportion of state sector entrants at Cambridge had in fact risen from 54% to about 62% in a decade. So, state schools are clearly improving. The question of state vs independent seems to be dependent on many variables. The start point is to consider the individual child’s

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needs, options available in the area and weighing all that against family economics, as independents obviously incur fees. There are four main types of Independents, but if you are looking locally you will find your choices are largely in the third and fourth category below: Public schools: historically, the most exclusive Now often co-ed, attended by boys and girls aged 13 to 18. Boarding schools: schools with facilities for pupils to have a home from home on a termly, weekly or flexible basis, often offering superb facilities and a multitude of extracurricular activities. Most now include a large proportion of day pupils. Independent schools and private schools: essentially the same thing, ranging from grand public schools and highly selective day schools to tiny local ones and everything in between. The common denominator is that they have no state funding but rely on tuition fees, gifts and endowments. Prep and pre-prep schools: preparatory/ pre-preparatory schools – essentially independent primary schools for children aged 3 to 7/8 (pre-preps), or aged 7 to 11/13 (preps). They prepare pupils for entry to mainly independent secondary schools of all types. A good start for parents is to look at all background information available. For state schools, the most recent Ofsted report will give you a snapshot of the school and some of its strengths and weaknesses. For Independent Schools go to the Independent Schools Inspectorate website (www.isi.net) where you just search by school and view the report. Sources: Independent Schools Council/Good Schools Guide/ Sam Lucy Cambridge Director of Admissions

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Open Day Dilemmas What should parents be thinking of, and what questions should they ask when visiting and choosing a potential school?

At the start of the process of choosing a new school for your child you will need to decide on two basic things: Do you favour a single sex or co-educational environment for you child? There is no clear answer for this and each option has its advantages. What is most important for your child? Is academic achievement the main reason for choosing a school, or are you more interested in an education that is tailored to your child’s unique strengths and weaknesses? Schools may major in specific interests such as IT, Arts or Humanities. Some may offer an inclusive and supportive environment for learning disabilities. Think carefully what is going to bring out the best in your child. It is not just about aiming for A*s. It is crucial to visit the schools you are considering. It is the only way to assess whether the atmosphere and feel of the school offers a suitable learning environment for your child. Make sure you visit more than one school (but probably no more than 3 or 4 as it can become confusing). As well as the open day, it is a good idea to visit on a normal school day if you can. Open Days are when the school will look its best but you need to know Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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how it is on a normal day too. Take notes and ask questions so you can compare the schools in the calm of your own home. Also try to look at the long term academic profile of the schools and not just one year’s results. Is it moving upwards or downwards? Does the school have stable leadership? Find out what the head teacher stands for. What are their core values and do they really care about the pupils? There are SO many questions to consider…. Molesey Matters suggests below some of the areas you might want to cover. What is the schools academic view and vision? How long has the Head been in place? Is the school strong is sport, music or the arts?, How is the schools support of the children monitored and how are parents informed? Are there outside excursions which can help develop and widen the children’s interest? Do the children get grouped by ability? Is religion important to your child’s education? Does the school facilitate before and after school activities? How far away is the school? Is transport provided by the school? What are the school’s costs, compared to your budget? Does your child have special needs to address? These are just some of the questions you could raise. Do you own homework first. Work out a list of both yours and your child’s priorities and use these as a template to compare the schools. Be prepared. It doesn’t have to be as daunting as you think. Sources: Various/Greatschools

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Creating an Optimum Place to Study Homework will soon be a daily topic of conversation once more. You can make things easier with a little organisation and forethought, setting up a designated homework area where your kids will be happier and more productive. Finding the Right Place to Study. For children in primary schools who need help and support with assignments, find a centrally located space so you’ll be able to help them while you’re making dinner. Proximity is less crucial for junior school students, but limiting distractions is very important. What do you do with the gadgets that rule their lives? What about music or TV? When we were younger it was easy! Try to involve your children in the decision of where they’ll do their work. A homework area should have plenty of surface space so the child can spread out books and paperwork. Kitchen and dining room tables often become default homework areas because of this, but it is not ideal. You will need to clear the clutter each time you eat and considering competing needs for the space can become a disincentive to start homework. What Do You Need to Get Studying? Once you have found a sizable space, start thinking about the supplies your child will need and how best to store them. Although the size of the homework area is important, a fancy or expensive desk with built-in storage is not. A portable folding table will do but if you want to create a simple desk, companies such as Ikea allow you to mix and match table legs and table tops to create your own individualized work space without spending a lot of money. For young children, it is best to have supplies visible and easily accessible. Pencils, erasers, scissors, glue sticks and other accessories can be kept on the desk’s surface in recycled glass or plastic cups. Extra paper and ongoing or past assignments can be stored in vertical desktop files or in portable file drawers beside or beneath the desk. Other essentials include a trash can, clock, calendar and a pencil sharpener. To get their buy in, ask your children to help choose and organize their supplies. The Couch Will Not Do! Electronic gadgets allow older school students to be more mobile than young children; however, a permanent homework spot is still essential. Teenagers might prefer to sit on the couch or in bed with their laptop but sitting at a desk helps promote concentration and Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

alertness. Additionally, a desk will provide a space to store supplies, spread out papers and keep a docking station for chargers. Another advantage of a designated homework space is that you can have a set surface where you and your kids can post scheduling reminders and deadlines. You could hang a magnetic board or bulletin board, or use stick-on chalkboard or dry-erase boards that can be easily removed in seconds, without damaging the wall. A comfortable desk chair will make homework more tolerable and concentration more likely. Likewise, the work space should be well lit. At the end of each night, get your child into the good habit of tidying their workspace and putting things back in their proper place. Try Then Tweak Get the space set up before school starts. After the first month of school, you and your child can determine whether the space is working well and whether any additional materials are needed.

Sources: Various

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According to the Good School Guide there are ten reasons why parents choose an independent school, and although Independent schools charge fees they are favoured by many because:  Greater parental choice – though ultimately

 

extracurricular activities. Sport for all is usually encouraged. Most offer a range to ensure there is something for everyone.  Some are in very beautiful buildings and/or surroundings.  Facilities at some of the schools are amongst the finest in the world.  A choice of day, boarding or a mix of the two.  They provide good networking opportunities.  They may help with entry to top universities . 

the school decides who to admit. Academic standards are generally high. Fewer pupils per class - greater individual attention. Most offer an extensive range of

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By Tracey Anderson Could Private Tuition Benefit Your Child?

By Sarah Davey

Barely a day goes by without schools making the news in one way or another. Recent headlines have screamed: British Children bottom of the European League Table...and Crisis in the Classroom. Is it any wonder that as parents we have never been more concerned about our children’s schooling?

What sort of tutor should I choose? School is probably the best place to start. They know your child already and might be able to offer ‘in school’ help. Even if that isn’t an option good teachers will be happy to discuss what your child needs from a tutor. Some children require just a little extra attention and support with homework. Others benefit from learning study skills. Others might need to re-learn things they missed through absence or that they simply didn’t understand the first time around. What do I look for?

Many of us are so concerned that we are employing private tutors to help our children achieve their goals. How do I know whether my child might benefit from private tuition? Is your child struggling with course work? Are they stressed about certain lessons? Do they avoid certain subjects during homework sessions?

It sounds obvious but you really need someone who can teach! Being specialised in a subject area is great but teaching skills are everything. A tutor should be able to relate to a child and explain things at his level. Once or twice a week for two or three months is a good starting point. After this time you should have a good idea how much tutoring is helping your child. What questions should I ask? Check professional qualifications.

references

and

Does your child find course material too simple? Do they complain of boredom and does the teacher accuse them of being disruptive or a daydreamer?

Ask to see a copy of their CRB (criminal Records Bureau) check

Do you feel that your child is neglected by the system because they are neither special needs, nor especially gifted?

If the tutor is employed at a school you can ask for a reference from the head teacher.

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Ask about any career gaps on their CV

Introduce them to your child so you can see how they relate to each other The right tutor can boost results but more importantly they can also boost a child’s confidence and self esteem.

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At Halliford School we strongly believe that every young person should be seen as an individual with their own personality, talents and skills and it is this individuality that we seek to encourage and develop at all stages of their education. Our aim is to enable each of our students to become the very best version of themselves that they can possibly be. We seek to be both academically ambitious as well as academically sensitive. We offer a wide variety of co-curricular activities where we aim to provide our students with the chance to immerse themselves in a whole host of activities outside the classroom. We look forward to welcoming you to one of our Open Days. Please telephone the Registrar, Mrs Fran Clatworthy on 01932 223593 for further information or visit us at our next Open Morning on Saturday 7th October to hear the new Headmaster, Mr James Davies speak at 12 noon. Further information can be found at www.hallifordschool.co.uk Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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Brooklands Museum By Paul Stewart, Brooklands Trust Brooklands Museum is on the site of the world’s first purpose-built motor racing circuit and houses collections of cars, motorcycles and bicycles, particularly from the halcyon days of the track during the 1920s and ‘30s. In addition, as the location of one of the most prolific sites for aircraft production in Europe, there is a collection of aircraft spanning the last hundred years, all with a Brooklands connection. These range from a replica of the aeroplane in which A.V.Roe carried out pioneering flight trials in 1908 on part of the racetrack to Concorde G-BBDG, the first ever Concorde to carry 100 passengers at twice the speed of sound. Visitors can enjoy the half hour Concorde Experience for a small extra charge and see the original Concorde simulator that was used to train UK Concorde pilots. After walking through the Motoring Village, visitors will see the original Edwardian Clubhouse that stands in front of the Paddock. Inside are the Ladies Reading Room, Snooker Room, Sunbeam Café and Offices of The Clerk of the Course all in period detail. Also on site is London Bus Museum which houses the largest private-sector collection of London buses in the world dating from the 1890s to the 1970s. At the north east end of the Museum’s 30 acre site lies the famous Members’ Banking. This is part of the original race track and would have seen pre-war racing cars charging round there at speeds in excess of 130mph. There is a packed programme of events throughout the year that keeps the spirit of pioneering motorsport and aviation alive and includes everything from Classic Breakfasts, Club meetings and guided tours to bicycle and aviation events and the unmissable Brooklands Double Twelve Motorsport Festival – a weekend of activity held every June featuring speed trials, driving tests and challenges in and around the site boasting To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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some world class vehicles. Discover one hundred years of aviation at Brooklands from the Sopwith Camel with its original engine to the World War Two Wellington bomber ‘R’ fro Robert which was raised from Loch Ness. Over in the Aircraft Park, visitors will have the chance to go on board one of the airliners amongst what is the biggest collection of Vickers and BAC commercial aircraft in the world. Earlier this year Brooklands came alive to the sights and sounds of some of the most famous prewar cars as the Finishing Straight was opened and used for competition for the first time since 1939 on 17th June, the 110th Anniversary of the Race Track’s original opening. Just nine months earlier, the Track had been covered by the Second World War Bellman Aircraft Hangar that has now been restored and re-erected in its new position. This autumn the restored Hangar will re-open as the Brooklands Aircraft Factory which, together with the new Flight Shed, will tell the story of 80 years of aviation design, testing, manufacture and flight at Brooklands that was to influence the world. We will use these new facilities to tell the stories of the pioneering drivers, pilots, engineers and innovators who lived and worked at Brooklands and to inspire our visitors, young and old, and encourage them to think about how science, technology, engineering and mathematics changed and continues to change the world. The Museum is open every day, apart from a few days at Christmas, from 10am until 5pm in summer, until 4pm in winter. Located in Weybridge in Surrey, full details of special events, which include weekend motoring and aviation events and car rides on weekdays in the school holidays, can be found on the Museum website at : www.brooklandsmuseum.com Or call Paul on 07946 494288


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The Value of Dredging Treasure of the Thames The title is a bit cheeky. This is not a piece about flooding. But it is indeed about the value and benefit of dredging it. Please read on. Malcolm Head was Dredging Master on the Thames for 44 years. You may have seen him speak on the news during the flooding of 2014. A while ago I saw Malcolm speak at the Shepperton and Sunbury History Society. He started his talk with the cry “They stopped dredging the Thames! How could they do that?� He was not there to berate the EA that evening, however, but to show us part of his huge collection of treasures that he had found in the Thames during his regular dredging operations. It was quite fascinating and shows the history beneath our feet - surely much more to be unearthed yet. The dredger has two large grabs, which scoop up 2.5 tons each time, which is deposited with a thud onto the barge before being broken into smaller parts. It is miraculous that so many of these finds are intact, but indeed they are. 1000 tons a day were dredged and sorted. Much of what was removed was in fact used in the construction of Penton Hook marina. So what of these treasures? There was a huge array of bottles, jars and medicine bottles of all shapes and sizes. As well as showing that people have always been litter bugs, using the Thames as a giant dustbin, the bottles also showed how storage and transport of liquid had changed. Older bottles were bubble shaped which had to be stored on their side, meaning that the cork would be kept wet. Malcolm had also amassed a huge collection of clay pipes (over 600 in fact) which he had eventually sold to a collector for a princely sum apparently. Amongst the more mundane and modern pieces he had brought to show us there were tiles and candle holders from Chertsey Abbey and Viking loom weights which were found below To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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By Colin Tyler By Monica Chard

Chertsey lock. There were also thatch weights, giving us a glimpse into past industries and skills in the area. Many old ink pots had been picked up by the dredger near Eton College. Nothing new in naughty school boys! One of the most special pieces was a whey strainer dating back to the iron age. It was found with a heavy lime scale coating which Malcolm had painstakingly removed. Local archaeologists were gobsmacked that he had a fully intact example as they had found only pieces of such an item. These finds are not considered treasure trove, as coins and the like are , but what a nice job bonus not to mention a privileged look into our past..

Malcolm is doing another talk on 22nd September at St James’ Parish Hall, Weybridge. Do go along if you can to one of the most fascinating talks I have heard. See below for full details.

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A New Chapter Has Begun‌. A couple of months ago we lost our beloved little schnauzer Merlin to cancer. Our remaining dog Ruby was really down in the dumps. She was not herself, would not sleep in her bed, lay by the front door and was generally just sad. So were we of course. We have always taken on rescue dogs, being delighted to offer a home to a little creature who had not had such a great start in life. You may have seen the Animal Rescue Live on TV recently and realise how many animals are looking for homes. We went back to the rescue centre Mojo and Ruby we have used before, who take dogs on and place them in foster care so that they fully understand the quirks and needs of a dog before they are rehomed. This monitoring process means you have a good idea what you are getting before you select the dog for you. We selected a small hairy thing of dubious descent with dark eyes and a whole lot of character. At only 8 months old, she was probably an unwanted Christmas puppy. She and Ruby met and seemed OK with each other, so off we went. We had toyed with various names before we settled on the perfect one. Mojo! She literally has given our old collie her zest for life back. She is a little spark of naughtiness that brings a smile to our faces and she plays endlessly with Ruby. If you fancy giving a home to a rescue dog, we used the centre called the Diana Brimblecombe Animal Rescue Centre in Wokingham. www.dbarc.org.uk. To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

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Friends of Fleetside The flowers under the roads signs in Fleetside are blooming lovely and being enjoyed by everyone.. We had a successful litter pick on Molesey Heath with our youngest helper Ella helping us again. Ella is very interested in wildlife and is very aware of the dangers litter can cause to them. Our new path in the shade was appreciated by humans and dogs in the hot spell we had, with a nice seat to enjoy by the river and see the kingfisher. (See photo) Our apple tree has some lovely apples on it which will soon be ready next month to eat along with all the big blackberries which are now ripening.

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Other news, which the Friends of Fleetside have been invited to get involved in, is the community garden/ allotment scheme in Island Farm Road. There will be a meeting on 2nd September. More details email getinvolvedCH@pahousing.co.uk or phone: 01932 235962. Friends of Fleetside, with the help of Molesey Residents Association, were instrument in getting a new plaque for Nielson's Bridge across the Mole in Green Lane to commemorate the opening of the new bridge which will take place in October. Friends of Fleetside have more activities planed so if you would like to get involved send an email: friendsoffleetside@gmail.com

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Where there’s Muck there’s Brass By Rob Gant In the 1790s, the Board of Agriculture commissioned two qualified surveyors, Thomas Baird (1793) and John Middleton (1797) to report on the state of agriculture in Middlesex. Two reports General View of the Agriculture in the County of Middlesex and View of the Agriculture of Middlesex, respectively, were produced. They provide a snapshot of intensive farming in the pre-railway era when Kingston was the head of tidal navigation on the Thames. London depended on its surrounding countryside for fresh food and animal fodder.

In return, the growing city exported huge quantities of manure to 50,000 acres of farmland in adjoining counties. This trade supported intensive horticulture (nurseries) on the loam soils and brick earths that covered gravels in the parishes of Shepperton and Sunbury. The collection, marketing and transportation of manure had become a well organised and profitable business. City manure came in various forms. Middleton estimated that sweepings from 3000 acres of streets and squares, the dung produced by 30,000 horses and 8000 cows, and night-soil from 700,000 inhabitants amounted to 500,000 cartloads (each weighing up to 2 tons). About half of this was spread on agricultural land in Middlesex. With regret, however, Middleton notes that “…..ninety-nine parts in every hundred of the soil of privies, is carried by the common sewers into the Thames……… a very great loss to agriculture………” Until the 1760s, city wards had employed sweepers to remove horse (and other) manure and waste products from the streets; thereafter, street cleaners paid a levy for the privilege of To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

3d per cartload, increasing to 12d in the 1780s and averaging 2s in the 1790s!Established manure traders heaped waste material into dunghills to accelerate its decomposition. These were ‘bottomed’ on pond mud and road scrapings to prevent loss of ‘liquors’ and encased with ‘cleansings’ from ditches. Sale price per cartload was determined by the number of horses used by buyers. Dry ‘street-slop’ sold, at that time, for 1s per horse; and dry night-soil from privies at 1s 6d. Different measures applied to: bones – raw, boiled or burnt, and coal ashes – 6s a load; soot 8d per bushel; horn shavings from 6s to 7s a sack of 8 bushels; woollen rags 2s 4d to 3s a hundredweight; and hog’s hair, if wet, 15s a cartload! Chimney sweeps allegedly ‘spiced the soot’ with finely ground ash and earth! Vendors at riverside ‘dung wharfs’ charged by the ‘bargeload’ (up to thirty tons) according to distance and tidal reach. Transfer charges (even as back freight) on turnpike roads averaged 2s per mile per cartload; by barge, the equivalent cost was 6d. It required 20-24 loads of fermented dung (cold manure) or 36 loads of fresh dung (hot manure) to fertilise an acre. Baird

claimed that gardeners (nurserymen) manured land twice in every three years; farmers once. Evidence from correspondents indicates an average annual fertiliser cost of between £5 and £9 per acre depending on proximity to the Thames and cultivation practices.

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Sudoku

Solution on Page 48

5 4 7 9 4 6 5 7 3 1 2 6 3 4 6 9 3 5 2 1 8 9 2 6 3 8 2 6 1 2 3

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1 9 4

How to play Sudoku It’s simple! Fill in the grid so that each row, column and 3x3 box, contains the numbers 1 through to 9 with no repetition.

8

You don’t need to be a genius. These puzzles use logic alone.

6

Watch out! Sudoku is highly addictive.

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Don’t Forget!! Association of Dunkirk Little Ships Veterans Cruise Sunday 3rd September As mentioned last month, the Veterans Cruise unites Veterans from a number of conflicts but primarily from WWII with the Little Ships of Dunkirk. These vessels have been brought to prominence recently in the feature film ‘Dunkirk’ directed by Christopher Nolan. Several of the vessels appearing in the film will be carrying Veterans at this event. Little Ships will embark Veterans at Thames Motor Yacht Club near Hampton Court and vessels will depart from there at 10.00am. Vessels will head downstream, around Ravens Ait and pass through Molesey Lock between 10.45 and 11.15. Continuing upstream the flotilla of Little Ships will pass through Sunbury Lock

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between 11.30 and 12.00 arriving at Weybridge Mariners Club, Shepperton Lock Island from 12.30. We expect up to 20 Little Ships to join this event.

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Elmbridge Community Raceday incorporating The Mayor’s Pantomime Horse Race The Mayor of Elmbridge, Councillor Rachael Lake, attended the annual Elmbridge Community Raceday and Pantomime Horse Race at Sandown Park Racecourse. Funds raised at the exit collection were in support of the Mayor’s chosen charity, Oasis Childcare, whose services provide families with the tools to make positive life choices, giving the whole family the confidence and resilience needed to reach their full potential. The highlight of the day was the Mayor’s Pantomime Horse Race. A total of eleven horses were in the line up. As usual, it was a close run race, which saw the Elmbridge Borough Council

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horse, Bridle Gem, storming to first place across the finishing line. The Mayor was at the finish line to present the winners with the bottle of champagne. The weather was kind and the horses ran with enthusiasm. The field also included horses from Oasis Childcare, Brooklands Museum, Wingham Court Care Home, Sandown Park Racecourse, Kempton Park Racecourse, Surrey Advertiser, Daytona Motorsport and Jockey Club Live.The Mayor said, “I am thrilled that Sandown Park Racecourse have again included the Pantomime Horse Race in the Elmbridge Community Raceday. It is always a huge highlight in the year and a real pleasure to thank all of those who entered for their sense of fun and commitment. Congratulations to the winners! I would also like to thank the exit collectors from Oasis Childcare for collecting money for my chosen charity at the end of the afternoon.”

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Recipe of The Month Slow cooker Baked Apples with Nuts and Butterscotch Sauce Leave these apples in your slow-cooker and return home from an autumn walk to a tasty treat Drain the sauce into a small saucepan, bring to the boil then simmer for about 5 minutes.

Preparation Time: 20-30 minutes Cooking time: 2 hours thirty minutes Makes 6 baked apples Ingredients 6 apples

Stir continuously until it thickens. Pour the sauce over the apples and serve.

90g / 3.5 oz Butter – chopped into cubes 35g / 1.5oz slivered almonds 35g / 1.5oz chopped walnuts ½ tsp Ground cinnamon 225g / 8oz Light brown sugar 180ml / 6fl oz single cream 125ml / 4.5 fl oz apple juice Method Core the unpeeled apples but only go ¾ of the way through. Make the hole about 4cm / 1.5inches across. Then score the skin around the centre of the apple (to allow for expansion in the cooker). Mix 30g of the butter with the nuts and, cinnamon and 60g of the sugar. Press the mixture into the apple cavities. Into the slow cooker pour the cream, apple juice and remaining butter and sugar. Stand the apples in the sauce, cover and cook on the ‘high’ setting for about 2 hours 30 minutes, until the apples are tender. Remove the apples from the cooker and keep warm.

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The world’s biggest coffee morning will be on September 29th this year. Have you organised yours yet? Anyone can join in. Invite your friends around for coffee and cake and ask for a donation. All the money raised will go directly to help support those facing cancer. It is a magnificent charity. If you don’t want to host your own you can join one that is already set up near you. For all information, to sign up, or to find out more go to www.coffee.macmillan.org.uk Or call Paul on 07946 494288


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Urban Wildlife Garden You don’t need to live in the country to enjoy wildlife A Blog by Molesey Resident - Della Reynolds There is a snail under a cup in my back garden. Well, technically it is in the snail hospital isolation unit. Clearing up the garden I found two injured snails wandering about with their broken shells gradually falling away behind them like the dance of the seven veils. It seemed a shame that although the snails themselves were fine, without a shell they were basically just meals on wheels. So I wondered if I protected the snails would they be able to mend their own shells and survive. Shells are after all living organisms which grow over time.

I found the nearest thing to hand to protect the snails and put them both under a large cup with a couple of lettuce leaves for sustenance. The next morning the little one had gone. A small section of his shell remained and I figured he had either discharged himself or been eaten. I moved the remaining snail, which was by now just a naked, jelly blob, to a completely different part of the garden just to confuse the slugs. I knew he was vulnerable, so I decided to improve the snail hospital accommodation with a sense of urgency. I filled an old cutlery tray with damp soil and I put this inside a plastic box with some stones inside for hiding. I found an elastic cover for baby prams with small holes, which would keep the predators out but let the air in. When the hospital was ready I lifted the cup only to find that an enormous slug was now tucking into the snail with gusto. It was too late to save the patient and to be honest I had wondered whether this poor naked snail could make a shell Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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from nothing; so I allowed nature’s recycling system to take its course. The slug was so enormous by the time it had finished he sat there for some time looking not unlike Jabba the Hutt. So here I was with a fully functioning snail hospital and no patients. Then, as luck would have it I found a small snail with a cracked shell lying close to the back door. With this casualty it was possible to push the parts of his shell back together quite easily, so I felt sure that he would make a full recovery. I admitted him as an in-patient and put him down in the soft soil for comfort. He immediately decided to climb out, so I put on the stretchy cover and left him out in the garden. The next morning I had trouble finding him. He wasn’t in the soft soil, or behind the stones. Some of the lettuce had been eaten, which was a good sign. Then I saw him curled in a small dip at the top of the tray. He stayed there for a couple more days and I didn’t want to pick him up in case I broke his shell again. Looking closely I could see that the cracks were starting to mend. After four days I decided to lift the lid and let him take his chances. Just as well I did because that night we had a rainstorm and the hospital was flooded. I tipped out all the water and looked for him, but he was gone. The clever guy obviously bailed out and hopefully with a fully functioning shell, but I will never know for sure. As one patient is discharged another arrives. Putting the bins out I found a new invalid. He was a large chap with a cracked shell and he was clinging to a leaf. I popped him into the hospital with a piece of fresh lettuce. He has been there a week now and not moved a lot. He doesn’t seem to have much of an appetite either and so far the shell looks no different. The jagged edges have not fused together but stick out at angles like a snapped twig. Today when I checked a fly flew out from under the protective cover. An ominous sign I thought and sure enough round the edges of the shell I could see fine, white mould seeping out. The patient had passed away.

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By Nicola Morgan/Author

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Historic Kempton Park By Nick Pollard With all the current controversy about the future of Kempton Park Racecourse, and Redrow’s proposal for 3,000 new homes, I thought it would be a good time to look back over the history of the site. It may come as a surprise to hear that it was once the site of a royal palace, long before its nearby neighbour at Hampton Court. In 1086 the manor of Kempton was recorded in Domesday Book as belonging to the William the Conqueror’s half -brother, Robert Earl of Mortain, although as one of many estates he probably never lived there. After Robert’s son William rebelled against Henry I in 1104, the manor was forfeited to the Crown.

Manor of Sunbury. He was buried in the old church at Sunbury, and his memorial may still be seen inside the present church. A 1692 plan of the estate shows a three storey house with a central tower, topped by a cupola. Grand avenues of trees radiated out from the house. The Musgrave family lived at the house in the latter half of the 18th century, but by the early 19th century it had been rebuilt in the fashionable Gothic revival style of nearby Strawberry Hill House, for John Fish. This house was demolished for its materials after Fish’s death in 1815, but a suite of elaborate furniture from it is preserved at the Royal Pavilion in

Robert (Rotbert) Earl of Mortain sits at the left hand of William

It was let to various tenants for services rendered over the years, until in 1223 Henry III took it into Crown ownership again. It was no doubt a convenient stopping point between Westminster and Windsor, and a base for hunting deer. After the death of Henry, Edward I used Kempton occasionally, and restocked the park with deer, but thereafter the Manor was again leased out to various Crown retainers. Henry VIII incorporated Kempton into his large ‘Honour of Hampton Court’ estate in 1509. In the time of Queen Elizabeth I it was leased to the Killigrews, a well-known Cornish family, and in 1640 a family connection led to Carew Raleigh, son of Sir Walter, living there. By 1665 it was in the possession of Francis Phelips, who was also Lord of the To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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Brighton. In 1864 it was acquired by Thomas Barnett and Peregrine Birch, who in a foretaste of today planned to build houses on part of the estate, but in the event only a few were built along the Hampton Road. In 1876 Samuel Hyde leased the estate for his new racecourse. The first meeting was held at the new racecourse on July 18th, 1878, and for over a century it has been one of the country’s premier courses. What a shame it would be for all this history and open land to disappear. Photo Above : An aerial view of the old course at Kempton dating from 1971.

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5 9 1 6 2 7 4 3 8

8 4 2 9 1 3 7 5 6

3 6 7 8 5 4 2 1 9

1 5 8 3 9 2 6 7 4

9 2 6 7 4 1 3 8 5

4 7 3 5 8 6 9 2 1

7 3 4 1 6 5 8 9 2

6 8 5 2 7 9 1 4 3

Q H C U N A W A I R R F U D G E F L E S U R R S C T A K E T U I D R A S T I C T E L I T E D D R

2 1 9 4 3 8 5 6 7

E N I O P I C L O G

A S C C A I R O T N N I N G E S V I D E R I N G D N I E C E S M A P B U L L Y L I R V E R S E E M T X

Solution to September Quick Crossword

Solution to September Sudoku

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S R E A T W

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Your NHS Choosing what’s right for you By Caroline Sargent, Surrey Downs CCG Did you know that if your GP needs to refer you for a physical or mental health condition, in most cases you have a legal right to choose which hospital or service you go to? This includes NHS and many private hospitals that provide services to the NHS. You may also choose your clinical team led by a specific consultant or named healthcare professional, although that consultant may not be able to see you at every appointment. GP surgeries tend to refer to local hospitals and services, however if you want to be referred somewhere else in the country or if you want your doctor to see if there is another hospital that can see you more quickly, ask your GP. If your GP thinks there is a clinical reason why you should go to a specific hospital or clinic they will tell you. You can choose a hospital or service based on whatever matters most to you: waiting times, quality of service, your previous experience, the opinions of other patients, the location or your GP’s recommendation. Even if you don’t mind where you go, it is important to know that you have a choice. It may seem ridiculous to start thinking about winter health during the summer holidays but that’s what your clinical commissioning group is busy doing right now. The winter months are always challenging for the NHS, especially for urgent care services which tend to see a sharp increase in A&E attendances. This is often because of flu and other cold weather conditions but also because of preventable things like people running out of medications or opting to go straight to hospital instead of a GP, pharmacist or ringing NHS 111. The Stay Well This Winter campaign aims to ease this seasonal pressure by outlining simple choices people can make to keep them-

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selves well during the colder months. This includes having a flu vaccination, if you are eligible. Vaccination is free to those aged two – eight years, over 65s, anyone aged six months - 65 years in clinical ‘at risk’ groups (including people with asthma and respiratory conditions and those with heart and kidney problems) , pregnant women, those in long-stay residential care homes and carers. For children the vaccination comes in a quick, painless nasal spray and, contrary to popular belief, will not give you flu! Choosing to get vaccinated not only helps you stay well, but those around you. Flu is highly infectious and can be particularly nasty in small children and the elderly, leading to serious complications such as bronchitis and pneumonia. Make your appointment with your GP or pharmacist in early autumn before outbreaks of flu set in and don’t assume that if you were vaccinated last year you are safe the vaccination needs updating every year to be fully effective. www.nhs.uk/flujab

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Garden View This month - Beautiful blackberries Autumn’s scent is sweet and sour. There is a definite tang in the air which indicates that summer is drawing to a close. Don’t be sad though, autumn has its compensations, especially at harvest time: picking early apples, cold from the tree and dappled with dampness is one of life’s little pleasures. But if you don’t grow fruit in your own plot you don’t have to miss out, just look to the hedgerows. As kids we used to dig out an empty ice cream tub and go blackberrying in the autumn. It seems to have died-out a bit as a family pastime but that means there’s more for the rest of us! Don’t worry about breaking any laws. If the fruit is growing in the wild it is anyone’s for the taking.

Merton is a compact thornless which produces enormous blackberries and is very suited to a small space. I encourage you to plant a blackberry bush this year and in the future you will enjoy one of the purest pleasures autumn can offer. Happy gardening,

But why stop at wild blackberries. How about growing your own? It’s very simple. My dad used to grow them over two discarded wrought-iron gates he found in a skip! You don’t need anything quite that elaborate. Rig up a simple post and wire frame. Two 2m / 6 foot posts knocked into the ground 2m / 6 foot apart and joined together with horizontal strands of galvanised wire spaced about 45cm / 18 inches apart will do. You can also grow them over sheds and walls. Plant the blackberry plant in manure, or compost-enriched soil at the base of the frame and gradually train the plant up it, tying in the shoots as they grow. It will spread to cover the frame and provide an annual crop. Remember to cut out old fruited stems each autumn and tie in the new ones. If space is limited there are some lovely new compact varieties available. There are plenty of thornless, highly flavoured varieties. Ashton Cross produces a heavy crop of intensely flavoured fruit and Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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By Rachael Leverton

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VOLUNTEER MOLESEY 2018

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NEWS FROM THE MOLESEY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Saturday Car Parking The MRA successfully lobbied for the introduction of a period of free car parking on Saturdays in the Walton Road car park, and from April residents have been able park for up to 3 hours before incurring any charge. We would encourage shoppers to make use of this, and to support our excellent local shops and businesses. Please note that you will still need to get and display a ticket, even if you do not exceed the free period. Traveller Encampments There have been a number or unauthorised encampments by travellers throughout the Borough in the past year, most recently the unwelcome arrival of a number of caravans and vehicles at the Walton Road Recreation ground, where they cut through the padlock on the entry gate to secure access.

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Elmbridge Council must follow an established procedure for dealing with these situations, and although action is taken as soon as possible it inevitably takes a little time, much to the frustration of nearby residents. On this occasion MRA Councillors alerted senior officers at the Council urgently on the day the travellers arrived (16 August), and worked closely with them to secure an eviction as soon as possible. As a first step the Council’s Gypsy & Traveller Liaison Officer visited the site to carry out an assessment, a legal requirement, and on 17 August the Council served the intruders with a Notice of direction to leave by the end of the day under the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. As they did not leave in compliance with this Notice, the Council applied for a removal order from the Magistrates Court, and was granted the first available hearing for 23 August by Guildford Magistrates Court. At this hearing the Court was expected to grant the Council powers to secure the removal of the travellers and their vehicles, allowing it to serve a removal order authorising the removal of the intruders. (On past occasions travellers have often vacated a site shortly before forcible action to remove them is triggered. As the print deadline for this edition was 22 August we are unable to report the final outcome here, but you can find an update on the MRA website). www.moleseyresidentsassociation.org.uk In the event of future problems at this or other sites the best course of action is for residents to alert the Council, or one of your local MRA Councillors, immediately, so that the necessary action can be instigated as soon as possible.

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Spelthorne Gymnastics By Monica Chard Only a few miles away from KT8 you will find a world class state of the art £3m gymnastics centre and sports hub. It has been completed only recently and is the new home of Spelthorne Gymnastics which as produced champions galore. It will ultimately give 3,000 children a year in West London the chance to benefit from its fabulous facilities. Spelthorne Gymnastics Club represents 4 different elements of Gymnastics and is known worldwide for its excellence in Acrobatic Gymnastics. Founded in 1976 and originally based in Ashford, Middlesex, it was served with a termination notice in May 2013 so that the land could be sold for a housing development. For the next 2 years the Club remained under threat of eviction from the facility that its founders and friends had built themselves in 1990. In May 2015 the Club was told it had to vacate the site in a matter of days. At first it looked as though it would be the end of this world famous Club, as it needed permanent, specialist facilities to continue. It was saved initially and crucially by Inland Homes, the Ashford site developers, who generously provided £50k towards relocation costs and allowed the Club to remain on their site until a new gymnastics centre could be constructed. Founders Bob & Alison Cooper then set about the daunting task of finding a new site and raising over £3m in funding. In May 2013, after the initial termination notice, the Club had entered into discussions with Bishop Wand School in Sunbury (Layton’s Lane, TW16 6LP) and the London Diocesan Board for Schools who provided the site, also giving their 1,000 pupils access to the facility. Generous donations from a variety of companies and individuals led by significant grants from Sport England, The London Marathon Charitable Trust, Surrey County CounTo advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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cil, British Airways, British Gymnastics, Inland Homes and the Garfield Weston Foundation has meant that £2.75m was raised. Bob Cooper said, “we’re still hoping that we can raise the remaining £250k to save the Club opening with the liability of big loan, so if anyone reading this can help, we would be delighted to hear from them! “At the top end we’re looking to cement our position as one of the most successful Acrobatics Clubs in Britain and given, that for technical reasons the new Gym has to be bigger, we now have capacity to double our membership with a thousand new nursery and primary school children gaining their first experience of the fun, control, co-ordination, discipline and success that our Gymnastics Club has become so famous for. Skills the youngsters learn at this age, stay with them for the rest of their lives” said Alison Cooper. ‘Britain’s Got Talent’ winners Spellbound were a spin-off from the Club. In addition to Acrobatic Gymnastics where the Club, since it was originally formed in 1976, has produced Gold medallists at World and European level, the gym will initially offer 6 other sports and activities - tumbling, trampolining, dance, cheerleading, yoga and cycling. Several of the 40 coaches have now undertaken specialist training, so that the new facility will also be able to accommodate Disability Gymnasts. The official Opening included a Gala performance featuring all levels of the Club from the tiny tots, to the elite squad who were preparing for the World Games and then the European Championships in Poland in October, which lead into the World Championships in Belgium next April. The Opening Ceremony was performed by Kate Rose, herself a former International representative who trained at the Club, accompanied by her husband, Olympic Champion Golfer Justin Rose. She was also accompanied by World Gold Medallists Champions Emily Crocker and Sunbury based Lucy Pascoe.

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Dominic Raab Our Local MP I know that many people (not on holiday) will have been acutely frustrated by the recent disruption to South West Trains’ service at Hampton Court, Thames Ditton, Esher and Surbiton. As a fellow commuter, I well appreciate your concerns, and recognise that reduced peak-time services have caused inconvenience, disruption, and discomfort throughout August. However, once work is complete, residents in Molesey will enjoy the benefits. Network Rail’s work at Waterloo will allow the extension of platforms 1 to 4 and modify platforms 5 to 8 so that new minimum 10-carriage trains can operate across the network by the end of the year. The works will enable longer trains to Hampton Court, Thames Ditton, Esher and Surbiton stations, which I know many residents in Molesey use. The upgrade will also introduce 150 more-spacious and airconditioned carriages with improved facilities, free Wi-Fi, and better on-board train information. Dominic commutes to Westminster

The next phase of Network Rail’s improvement strategy for our trains is the planned ‘digitalisation’ of the signals. Once we have the longest trains practicable, the next best way to increase services and ease overcrowding is to digitalise the system to enable trains to run with greater frequency. Digitalisation is due to be introduced from 2020. Further positive news is that on 20th August, the South West franchise was taken over by FirstMTR. The joint venture will run trains operating to and from local stations until 2024. The consortium won the franchise back in March of this year, and has already set out plans to invest £1.2 billion to improve our services. This investment will increase the number of seats across the network on peak trains to Waterloo by 30% by 2020, introduce Wi-Fi at all stations, streamline the process for claiming for delays, and introduce more flexible ticketing structures to make some fares cheaper. These changes will bring tangible improvements for commuters. Looking to the longer term, Crossrail 2 will see more and train services connecting some of our stations to Central London. The really big advantage is that Crossrail 2 will take a large number of passengers off our other rail services, easing the pressure on existing lines. Crossrail 2 will also provide commuters direct access to wider destinations across London. Although still in its early stages, the project has the potential to greatly improve our local commuter experience into London. Best wishes, Dominic Raab Member of Parliament for Esher and Walton To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

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Events Coming Up Some we like... Ladies’ Day Join us for an afternoon of racing and fashion with an after party hosted by Heart FM DJ and television personality Mark Wright Kempton Park Racecourse Staines Road East Sunbury on Thames Middlesex Sat 9 Sep The Barn Theatre Club "IF I WERE YOU” by Alan Ayckbourn Directed by Stephen Willis Wed 4th - Sat 7th October 2017. Box office opens early September www.thebarntheatremolesey.co.uk/ Thursday 21 September 2017, 8 pm Surrey in the Great War: A County Remembers – Life on the Home Front Talk by Imogen Middleton, Hurst Park School, Hurst Road, KT8 1QS. This talk by Imogen Middleton, Surrey Heritage WW1 Project Officer at Surrey History Centre will provide a brief insight into the ‘Surrey in the Great War: A County Remembers’ project, interspersed with archival sources and discoveries. Then, discover more about how WW1 affected the local area, through stories about people, places and wartime activity, all of which has been uncovered and shared with us by volunteers and researchers. Molesey Photographic Club. 26th September 2017 Meetings normally begin at 7.45pm for 8.00pm "Feel the Land - Landscape Photography and Emotion" - Astrid McGechan LRPS (and a local photographer) will show some of her beautiful images of our landscape and will show us how we can make our own mark in this genre. We meet at 8.00pm in the East Molesey Methodist Church, East Molesey, KT8 9JU Kempton Park Toy, Train and Collectors Fair - More details - Kempton Park Toy, Train and Collectors Fair -Kempton Park Toy, Train and Collectors Fair is London’s largest Sunday Toy Fair. Kempton Park Racecourse - Staines Road East, Sunbury on Thames Sun 1 Oct Heritage Open Day Enjoy free entry to the Garden as part of the national Heritage Open Day. The Belvedere Tower will be open from 2 - 4pm - from the top you can see...National Trust - Claremont Landscape Garden Portsmouth Road Esher Sat 9 Sep Zippo’s Circus 2017 ’Jigit’ Britain’s Favourite Circus is back! For its 2017 tour, family favourite Zippo’s Circus presents a brand new production titled Jigit!... Twickenham Green, Thu 14 Sep to Tue 19 Sep Totally Thames 2017 From 1 September 2017 to 30 September 2017 See London’s river Thames brought to life in a month-long season of events along the river’s 42-mile (68km) stretch during the Totally Thames 2017 festival. This year’s 150 events fall under three main themes: the river Thames’ rich history, the 300th anniversary of Handel’s Water Music, and the issue of plastic pollution in rivers and oceans. Walk along the Thames to see large-scale art installations, exhibitions and live performances. Enjoy a concert below river-level or join an archaeological tour of the river's surroundings. Visit www.totallythames.org for details Molesey WI meets at Imber Court on the first Wednesday of every month 7.30pm for 8pm, where we have a guest speaker or activity. Visitors are welcome for a £5 fee. First visit is free with a copy of Molesey Matters. Follow us on Facebook - Molesey Women's Institute (Molesey Crafty Ladies).

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Index of Advertisers Adult Education Adult Community Learning 43 Art Classes Georgina Talfana 40 Wendy Clouse 30 Bathrooms Walton Bathrooms 11 Building W Brown and Son 58 Care for The Elderly Brighter Care 39 Brigitte Trust 53 Home Instead 29 Moor House Care Home 55 Car/Repairs/MOT Esher Tyres and Exhausts 14 Cleaning Nick Lewis Cleaning 58 Time For You 51 Dentists Gentle Dental Practice 2 Smilessence 32/33 Entertainment/Clubs Imber Court 8 Dance Parties Plus 15 Estate Agents Miles and Bird 36 Events The Handmade Fair 31 Hampton Court Palace 7 Funeral Services Alan Greenwood 38

Garden Services/Supplies Easicut Mowers 53 Glazing/Windows/Doors Hi Profile Windows 55 House of Surrey 45 Novaglass 64 Village Windows 53 Health/Fitness LuxEBootcamp/Zoe Pilates 56 Slimming World 57 Weightwatchers 34 Insurance Complete Cover 63 Hard To Insure 48 Ironing Services Hate Ironing? 40 Kitchens Ashford Kitchens 5 Oven Cleaning Ovenclean 58 The Oven Man 55 Restaurants/Bars/Pubs The Averna 12/13 Roofing Good Roofs 49 Schools Claremont Fan 23 Cranmere Primary 19 Halliford School 25 Hampton Court House 20 Hampton Prep/ Pre Prep 16 St Georges Weybridge 22

St Lawrence C of E Sell for Cash Cash4Junk JC Stamps Stoves Kindle Stoves Tailoring Laura Alteration Theatres The Hammond Theatre Venues Molesey Boat Club Will Writing Harvest Wills

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Molesey Matters September 2017  

The only dedicated local community magazine for both East and West Molesey