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Molesey

Putting Local Business First

Matters

Keeping a Community Together

October 2017 Issue 13

FREE to 9000 Homes and Businesses in East and West Molesey

Watercraft Sir Julius Vogel To advertise callLtd Paul :on 07946 494288

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Welcome! Welcome to the first issue of our second year together. Summer has gone and now Autumn is here. Fittingly the front cover photo, taken by my wife, is a sight that we all will be seeing a lot of over the coming months. I hope you all had a fun and healthy summer and are looking forward to what is one of our most beautiful seasons. Wellies on and head to Bushy Park! In this month’s issue we look at the 100th anniversary of the Esher Molesey Garden

October 2017 Society, the real heroes behind the breaking of the Enigma Code, and the early beginnings of Hampton Court Station. We also learn about the Danish concept of “Hygge”, perfect for the coming months. Della continues her wildlife blog, and Dominic Raab updates us on flood insurance. See you all in November !

Reader Offers Longacres - £5 Discount Voucher Village Windows - 20% off until 31st October LuxEBootcamp - Free Trial Smilessence - 10% off in October Esher Tyres - 15% off until 31st October The Oven Man - Free Microwave Safety Test Lodge Bros - £100 off pre paid Funeral Plan

Published by:

Village Matters Ltd

Contents

Molesey Director: Paul Chard Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematters.co.uk Website :www.villagematters.co.uk

Esher Molesey Garden Society Watercraft Ltd The Enigma Heroes A Life of Success Hampton Court Station Passive Aggression Impossible Questions The Best Pumpkin Put Your Clocks Back Hygge Recipe of The Month Urban Wildlife Garden Help the Hedgehogs Friends of Fleetside Dominic Raab Events We Like Index of Advertisers

Cover photo. Gathering nuts for winter by Monica Chard Send any photos (300dpi) for consideration to: paul@villagematters.co.uk Check us out on Facebook. @moleseymattersmagazine

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Let’s not forget… One hundred years of Esher Molesey Garden Society By Anthony Barnes, Molesey Local History Society

Readers will remember the report in August’s Molesey Matters celebrating Esher Molesey Garden Society’s successes in their centenary year at Hampton Court Flower Show. It has been a splendid year… A bumper number of entries at the Society’s own Flower Show in St. Nicholas Church Hall in Thames Ditton… A successful plant stall at Molesey Carnival in the Society’s favourite pitch by the entrance to the recreation ground (to catch people as they come in!)...

The Flower Show Giggs Hill Green in 1964 MOUSE

More coach outings planned… A varied programme of talks (on topics such as contemporary art metalwork and Italy’s oldest seed company)… and the trading depot continues to offer big discounts on seeds, fertilisers and garden sundries through the season. How different it all was a hundred years ago. The fourth year of the Great War was very hard on the home front. The government urged people to eat less bread and grow more of their own produce to ease food shortages. In these dark times, a group of local men including Charles Clayton, William Foster, Harry Strong and Jack Mager got together to form the Esher District Allotments and Home Produce Association with the backing of the District Council. In the early years, the Association’s public lectures and committee meetings were held at the Council offices in Brabant Villa in Ditton Marsh (on the Portsmouth Road). How interestTo advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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ing it would be to discover the minutes book from that time. We only know that the Association lost touch with Mr Compton, the secretary, who had it! The urgency of war was felt again in the famous ‘dig forSource victory’Various/Paul campaign in the Second World Chard War; but in the late 1950s, a reaction to the grind of growing your own food set in and people wanted to feel that they were more of a garden society or club than a home produce association. Changing the name of the Association to stave off a slump in membership worked. The current name adopted in 1998 was chosen in part because it was selfexplanatory and less of a mouthful when booking speakers for the talks programme! A society should never forget its roots (pun intended!), not to resist change, but to remember what brought people together in the first place. Ordinary people coming together to share and pass on their passion for gardening and allotment holding is what sustains the society. Each generation has to re-interpret what that means for their era. In the coming years, we may face food insecurity again. Gardening in greener ways will become more important for many. Reaching out to people who have lost touch with the 2017 Flower Show land or do not yet feel connected to the local community could become part of the Society’s mission. It is this spirit of renewal that we hope will keep the Society going for the next hundred years.

‘Let’s not forget’ is an appeal to anyone who knows of a family link that could shed light on the early years of the Society to get in touch so that we can piece together the history of the Society. New members are welcome at any time! Find out more at : www.eshermoleseygardensociety.org.uk Or call Paul on 07946 494288


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Watercraft Ltd and The ASCO By Paul Chard Watercraft Ltd was formed in the 1920s in a building next to The Molesey Boat Club that was previously home to the Taggs Members Club. The company made lifeboats for famous ships such as the QE2 as seen in the advert below. The building was finally demolished to make

was adopted by Fleet Air Arm personnel and then went on to serve at RNAS Condor in Arbroath during the Second World War. She is known as the only remaining FSMB (Fast Seagoing Motor Boat) and, as such, is a significant part of Britain’s naval heritage. We know that extensive renovation was done

way for "The Riverside" housing development. The company also built war time fighting vessels, with one such boat being the ASCO. This vessel was ordered by the Admiralty from Watercraft Ltd in March 1941 and was known as number 4195. Once complete, 4195

between 2000 and 2005 and in 2008 ASCO was awarded a grant from the Strategic Development Fund of National Historic Ships. She was then sold c 2013 by Woodenships of Dartmouth. If anyone knows of her whereabouts do please get in touch. Would be great to know how she is doing!

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The Real Enigma Heroes An October Story of Bravery Souces: Wiki/Various On 30th Oct 1942 Royal Navy Officer, Lt. Tony Fasson, Able Seaman Colin Grazier and canteen assistant Tommy Brown from HMS Petard boarded the German U Boat, U-559, retrieving material which would lead to the decryption of the German Enigma code. In early 1941 Fasson was posted to HMS Nile, the naval headquarters in Alexandria, Egypt, finally returning to sea duty in March 1942 as first lieutenant of the destroyer Petard.

Lt Fasson

On 30 October 1942 Petard, in conjunction with the destroyers Pakenham and Hero, the escort destroyers Dulverton and Hurworth, and an RAF Sunderland flying boat of 47 Squadron based in Port Said, attacked and badly damaged the German submarine U-559. The crew of the U-559 abandoned their vessel, with 7 dead and 38 survivors. Fasson and Able Seaman Colin Grazier, along with NAAFI canteen assistant Tommy Brown, swam naked to the U-559 and entered the sinking submarine, which had water pouring in through seacocks left open by the Germans. Working in complete darkness, fully aware that the submarine could sink without warning at any time, Fasson and Grazier located documents which Brown Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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carried up to the surface. They continued searching until the submarine suddenly foundered and sank like a stone, drowning Fasson and Grazier; Brown survived. Fasson and Grazier were subsequently awarded the George Cross, while Brown – as a civilian employee in the Navy – received the George Medal. The awards were published in the London Gazette on 14 September 1943. An Enigma Machine

The codebooks that Fasson, Grazier, and Brown retrieved were immensely valuable to the code-breakers at Bletchley Park, who had been unable to read U-boat Enigma for nine months. The captured material allowed them to read the cyphers for several weeks, and to break U-boat Enigma thereafter.

Hut 8

Hut 8 at Bletchley Park became part of a national tribute to the efforts of the men and women who worked so hard to break the "Enigma" codes. Our 3 heroes were given prominent recognition.

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A Life of Success Ending in East Molesey Poverty Sir Julius Vogel (1835-1899), journalist and premier, was born on 24 February 1835 in London, son of Albert Leopold Vogel, a Jew of Dutch origin, and his wife Phoebe, née Isaac. Educated at home and at the University College School, London, at 16, on the death of both parents, he was employed by his grandfather, a merchant trading with South America and the West Indies. Attracted by gold discoveries in Victoria, Vogel emigrated to Australia in 1852 and became successful in business and journalism. He moved to Otago, N.Z., in 1861 after being badly defeated for public office and soon guided the Otago Daily Times to a leading position in the colony. Elected to Parliament in 1863, he led the opposition (1865–68) and became colonial treasurer in 1869 in the ministry of William Fox. This was the beginning of a “continuous ministry” during which Vogel, whatever office he held, was the real holder of power in the government of New Zealand. Where it suited his purpose, Vogel implemented policies that had been planned by others, such as the abolition of provincial governments. He also picked the men who formed ministries and headed the government for more than a decade. Vogel’s financial skills, particularly in negotiating loans from the British government, enabled him to develop his own policies. His development scheme, which he implemented

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as colonial treasurer (1869–72) and prime minister (1873–75, 1876), entailed the building of transportation and communication facilities and other public works. He was knighted in 1875.

A staunch advocate of the extension of British power in the Pacific, Vogel’s agitation helped persuade Britain to annex Fiji in 1874. From 1876 to 1880 he served as agent-general in London and re-entered New Zealand politics in 1884 as the real power in the ministry of Sir Robert Stout (1884–87). Vogel was unable to stave off economic depression in New Zealand, however, and he resigned his parliamentary seat. He returned to London early in 1888 suffering from gout and deafness, and lived in comparative poverty at East Molesey where he died on 12 March 1899. Source :B. E. Kennedy, 'Vogel, Sir Julius (1835–1899) /Various

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Hampton Court Station Source: H M Berry The London and South-Western Railway (L&SWR) opened its line to Hampton Court in 1849, as a branch of the main line from Nine Elms to Woking. For some ten or eleven years previously, passengers from Molesey wishing to travel to London had to first make their way to Surbiton Station (now Kingston Station).

Hampton Court Station at its opening

Mr Andrews as “the Mole”, writing in 1894 recalls the days when the railway first came. He says “when the railways first opened we used to be favoured with a sole, but very special train, leaving Hampton at 1pm. It consisted I believe, of a third-class carriage and was drawn by a flea bitten grey, belonging to the only fly proprietor in the village”. Perhaps we shouldn’t complain! The station was built on the island formed between the rivers Mole and Ember and access was via a wooden bridge from Creek Road. As we know from Mr Mole, for the first two years the carriages were pulled by horses. Regular steam locomotives then replaced the horses. By 1868 there were four lines and platforms and a railway turntable as Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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well as coal depot and ancillary buildings on the site. The peak capacity of this station was between 1912 and 1929 when over 10 sets of tracks fanned out at the site; four sets of tracks were designated for shuffle sidings (to augment services to the rest of the network); four were dedicated for the station itself and two lines were goods sidings for goods including bulk materials and the coal depot. During this period, a Thames side turntable was removed the foundations of which were revealed upon redevelopment by Gladedale in May 2013). It is believed the turntable was re-established adjacent to Summer Road and Hampton Court Way.

In the 1930s the bed of the mouth of the Mole was filled in and the stream combined with the River Ember to construct Hampton Court Way and the Edward Lutyens-designed, re-aligned Hampton Court Bridge.

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St Paul’s Welcomes New Priest St Paul’s Church in East Molesey is delighted to welcome Anne Farmer as its new priest. Anne is married with two grown-up children and is currently team vicar in a parish in Somerset. She is highly experienced and enthusiastic and excited at the prospect of her move to Molesey. Anne will be formally installed as priest at a service at St Paul’s on Thursday 19th October starting at 7.30pm to which all are invited to attend. Anne is very much looking forward to working with the Rev Richard Lloyd at St Mary’s and Alex Munro, the new curate at St Peter’s, in a recently formed group Ministry arrangement which will see all three Anglican churches in Molesey working closely together. This is encouraging and welcome news for our local community as a whole.

Walton and Weybridge Flower Club First Prize Esther Wood Class 3 RHS Wisley Flower Show 2017

We meet the first Thursday of the month, except January and August at 2pm at St. Andrews Church Hall, Hersham Road, Walton on Thames. First visit is free with a copy of Molesey Matters.

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Crossword 1

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Across 7 Remy Martin, Hennessy, Korbel (8) 8 Hand held tablet (4) 9 Totalling-up (6) 10 Item written in a diary or leger (5) 11 We stand on them (4) 12 Experiencing again (8) 14 Undergraduates (8) 18 Bedside light source (4) 20 Sound 15 down might make (5) 22 Removed the lid (6) 23 Body powder (4) 24 In a secretive manner (2, 3, 3)

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Walk laboriously (6) Joined the armed services (8) Vocalist (6) Also (2, 4) Present (4)

Down 6 Deep ravine (6) 17 Knee-length trousers (6) 13 Hit back before the ball 19 Cereal with oats, fruit and bounced (8) nuts (6) 15 Male feline (6) By the Molesey 21 Curved structure (4) Local History Society 16 Unit of force (6)

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Dealing with Passive Aggression By Sarah Davey I bumped into a friend in town. “Oh you’ve had your hair cut,” she smiled. “It’s nice. Usually it looks like a bird’s nest!” Ouch! That stung. It’s not the first time I’ve been on the receiving end of her barbed comments.

We all know someone who does this. Social media is rife with it. Does anyone recognise the friend who constantly posts vague statuses on Facebook such as, “I can’t believe SOME people.” or my favourite, “Goodbye! I can’t deal with the idiots on here any more.” Nice...am I one of the idiots to which you refer? If I ignore you, does that make me an idiot? Do you want me to ask what’s wrong? That’s the beauty of passive aggression; it works on lots of levels and like poison gas wounds many in one instant. And then...they don’t leave, someone always persuades them to stay! AAARGH! There isn’t a single cause of passiveaggression. It’s rooted in anger. Often the person grew up in a family that avoided overt conflict, but it’s also a behaviour reinforced by a society that tells us anger isn’t a healthy emotion, we’re taught not to rock the boat. Very few of us are taught how to deal with anger in a healthy manner and this particularly applies to women, who tend to be the main perpetrators of passive aggression. It’s an extremely difficult behaviour to deal with because it’s so hard to pin down. But here are some tips.

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Don’t take the bait - Don’t engage with the drama they try to create. One way to do this is to respond to the content of what they say and not the underlying aggression, so in the case of the hair comment I just said, “Thank you.” in a completely neutral tone and changed the subject, leaving her to wonder if I’d even noticed the barb. Online it’s even easier...just IGNORE. Stick to the here and now - If you decide to call them out there’s probably a history of similar behaviour. Stick to the immediate comment though, don’t rant about how she always makes you feel bad. Instead focus on how her comment made you feel in that moment, and use a neutral tone of voice. I could have said, “That was unkind and unnecessary and I’d prefer it if you didn’t say things like that.” Instigate consequences - Make them clear and proportional...try not to lead with a punch in the throat while screaming, “I’m never talking to you again!” no matter how tempting. Let’s say that in spite of my request my friend had followed up her comment with another, “You sit in the armchair, it’s wider and you need the space.” (she actually said that to me once and no I wasn’t pregnant at the time!). I could have said, “I feel disrespected when you comment on my size in that way. It makes me not want to be around you so if you continue I will leave.” (You can throw in an imaginary throat punch if you like!) Do a cost-benefit analysis - The bad news is that most passive aggressive people will not change their behaviour just because you are bothered by it. If it’s your friend indulging in the behaviour and it annoys or upsets you, maybe call them on it, cool the friendship and find new, nicer companions. If it’s your boss, maybe put up with it in the short term while you look for other employment. Ultimately no-one can be passive aggressive without an audience, so don’t give them one.

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VOLUNTEER MOLESEY 2018

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Impossible Questions Source : ACS International Schools ‘What are black holes?’, ‘how did the world begin?’ and ‘how does the internet work?’ are among the questions parents struggle to answer, a study has found. A poll, of 2,000 parents, found 54 per cent are regularly flummoxed by the deep and meaningful or scientific questions put to them by their children. In fact, the average mum and dad face eight questions a month from their offspring which they find difficult to respond to, either because they don’t know the answer or are too embarrassed. And 53 per cent admit that the more scientific the question, the less likely they are to be able to answer it. Other questions parents struggle to answer include ‘why do people die?’, ‘why is the sea salty?’ and ‘how does the internet work? ’It also emerged the average parent will turn to Google six times a month to get the answer to a question their child has asked. A spokesman for ACS International Schools, which commissioned the research to mark the opening of the new Science Centre at its Hillingdon school, said: “Children are known for always asking questions, but it can be difficult when they want to know things parents themselves don’t know the answer to .“Sometimes mums and dads will stumble with their reply as it’s an awkward question or they know the answer is going to lead to more potentially embarrassing questions.“ But inquisitive children are also asking lots of questions about the planet, how things work and science which are leaving parents struggling to give them the right answer. “It’s important to encourage your children’s thirst for learning new

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things and even if you have to Google the answer yourself, it can help them develop an interest in an important subject as they get older.” The study, carried out through OnePoll, found ‘what does God look like?’ is the question most likely to leave parents stumped, followed by what came first, the chicken or the egg?’ and where do you go when you die?’. ‘What are black holes?’ came fifth with ‘why is water wet?’, ‘why do people die?’ and ‘how did the world begin?’ close behind. ‘Where do babies come from?’, ‘why is the sea salty?’ and ‘why is the moon sometimes out in the day?’ completed the top ten. Other questions from intrigued youngsters which leave parents scratching their heads include ‘why is the sky blue?’, ‘what makes the earth spin?’ and ‘how do planes fly?’ .But while 47 per cent of parents just respond with an honest ‘I don’t know’, 28 per cent admit to trying to cobble together an answer which sounds like it could be right while 35 per cent tell the youngster to Google it .Twenty-three per cent Google it themselves and then pretend they knew the answer all along while others tell the child to ask their teacher (14%) or a sibling or other parent (11%).Thirty-three per cent of parents even admitted to knowingly telling their children the wrong answer because they didn’t want to admit they didn’t know. But 80 per cent of parents admit this has back fired when their children have then repeated the wrong answer to other people because they believed it to be right. A spokesman for ACS International Schools added: “The extent to which science based subjects grab children’s interests is fascinating. It certainly underpins our commitment to equipping our teachers and students with the very facilities and skills they need to teach, learn and develop this obvious early curiosity. “It’s clear too that parents should be brought into the picture too as they are quite clearly struggling to cope with many of the questions posed by their inquisitive offspring.”

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Carve The Best Pumpkin By Louise Addison Carving Jack O' Lanterns dates back to an old Celtic holiday, Samhain. People carved scary looking turnip lanterns and lit them with candles to ward off spirits. When the Irish migrated to America, they found that pumpkins grown there were much easier to carve so adapted their custom. My children love to carve pumpkins. Oh who am I kidding, my husband and I love it too and over the years our designs have become more ambitious. Here are a few tips. Start with the right pumpkin. It should be fresh with a sturdy stem, no bruises and a flat bottom so it won't roll. A smooth one is easier to carve and if you can find one with a flatter 'face' so much the better. Use proper safety pumpkin carving sets. Noone wants to spend Halloween sat in the accident and emergency department dressed as Dracula's Bride. Ok that was the one year I did NOT use proper pumpkin saw and I was more at risk at dying from embarrassment than the blood loss but don’t risk it folks. Cut the lid using the saw angled in towards

the stem. That way the lid won't drop inside the pumpkin when you replace it. Scoop out all the pulp and some of the flesh an ice cream scoop works brilliantly. You can now download patterns from the internet. These are terrific if you have limited artistic skills like me. Tape the pattern to the pumpkin (make little cuts around the edge of the pattern if the pumpkin is a bit too round, Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

and that way it will fit better). Then use a pin or small nail to puncture the paper and the outer skin of the pumpkin at intervals of around 1/4 inch / 0.5 cm, or even closer for intricate designs. If it's difficult to see your poked-out pattern, rub a little corn flour or baby powder into the

dots. The dots will turn bright white and your design will magically appear. Carve the tiniest sections first. Then carve the areas in the centre of the pattern, and then work outwards. That way you can rest your hand on the uncut bits of pumpkin, not your carved-out design. Rather than always cutting all the way through the pumpkin try just removing some of the skin. The yellow flesh underneath will glow when lit up from inside. Spread Vaseline on the cut edges to seal in moisture. If you have to carve it a few days in advance and it shrivels you can revive it with a face-down soak in cold water. Pumpkin carving is a great activity for all the family. You can make it competitive, or have a theme for your pumpkins, or invite friends over for a pumpkin carving party. Just don't end up in casualty wearing a wild wig and face paint. A safe Halloween is a Happy Halloween!

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Don’t Forget to put your Clocks Back! If you don’t, blame Chris Martin and Coldplay!! The idea of summer time or daylight-saving time was first suggested in a whimsical article by Benjamin Franklin in 1784, But it arrived in the UK after Coldplay singer Chris Martin's great-great-grandfather, a builder called William Willett, thought it was a good idea too.

one hour from the spring to the autumn. Within a few years of its introduction, most countries reasonably north or south of the equator had adopted Daylight Saving Time. However, it has been controversial since the day it was first proposed. During the Second World War, British Double Summer Time (two hours in advance of GMT) was temporarily introduced and was used for the period when, normally ordinary summer time would have been in force. During the winter, clocks were kept one hour in advance of GMT. With

In 1907, he published a leaflet called The Waste of Daylight, encouraging people to get out of bed earlier. Willett was incensed at the 'waste' of useful daylight first thing in the morning, during summer. The year after Willett’s death in 1915, the Germans adopted daylight saving time and not to be disadvantaged at a time of war, so did the UK within a few weeks. Summer time was first defined in an Act of Parliament in 1916 that stated for a certain period during the year legal time should be one hour in advance of GMT. From 1916 up to the Second World War, clocks were put in advance of GMT by

the war over, Britain returned to British Summer Time as before except for a brief trial between 1968 and 1971 when the clocks went forward but did not go back. The trial was deemed unsuccessful and abandoned. The duration of British Summer Time was changed in 1998 to bring the date of the start of summer time into line with that used in the rest of the European Community. According to an EU directive, summer (or daylight saving) time will be kept between the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October, all changes taking place at 01.00 GMT.

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Hygge The Danish Art of Cozy By Paul Chard Whether you like it or not, the nights are drawing in and we are starting to think about getting cosy. Don’t get me wrong, I love the summer sunshine and sitting out into the late evening, but we don’t live in a country where that is how we spend the majority of our time. So we need to make the best of what we have.

You may not know that my wife is half Danish, so was brought up with a lot of Scandinavian influence. The best part of it, as far as I am concerned, is this wonderful thing called ‘hygge’. You will almost certainly have come across the word. Pronounced ’hue-guh’, it means more than comfort and cosiness. It conveys a warm sense of family, happiness, warmth, candle light and general feel good factor. (They need this in Scandinavia where the days are short and they live in hours of darkness and cold. Brrr..). Before the days of central heating, the hearth used to be the centre of the home where family gathered. These were also pre Ipad, TV and social media of course! So the family gathered, kept warm, read and talked. It is still possible to bring back some of those family

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values with a real wood burner pumping out warmth and hygge (although sadly I am not sure how realistic it is to make the area a mobile free zone!). And hygge is not just for the winter months – How about an outside pizza oven come stove for those warm summer evenings? You get the drift now. It is about attracting family and friends to a central focus, creating social interaction and feel good, come summer or winter. Just grab some candles and a coffee or beer and your scene is complete.

The World Happiness Report sees Norway, Denmark and Iceland taking the top three places in the 2017 report. The UK comes in at a distant 19th place! So dark and cold need not mean sad and miserable. Get some hygge into your life and feel good.

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Valid until 31st October 2017

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Sudoku 2 7 8

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9 2 4 7 6 5 1 4 1 9 7 5 3 1 7 2 3 1 8 5

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Solution on Page 38

How to play Sudoku It’s simple!

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Fill in the grid so that each row, column and 3x3 box, contains the numbers 1 through to 9 with no repetition. You don’t need to be a genius. These puzzles use logic alone.

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Watch out! Sudoku is highly addictive.

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MAYOR WILL BE HELPING OASIS CHILDCARE THIS AUTUMN The Mayor of Elmbridge. Cllr Rachael Lake, will be holding fundraising events this autumn to raise much-needed money for her Mayoral charity, OASIS, that is based in Cobham. The OASIS Childrens' Charity provides essential support to children in need and to their families across the whole of the Borough of Elmbridge. Helping on average some 250 vulnerable families each year, OASIS works closely with the family unit as a whole, with schools, GPs and Social Services, with the aim of keeping vulnerable children out of the social care system and within their own families. The charity was founded and run by Caroline Edwards for the past 20 years in the area. On Monday 2 October the Mayor will be hosting a Ladies Luncheon at the Woodlands Park Hotel in Stoke D’Abernon near Cobham, with a reception at 12.30 and lunch at 1.00pm. Tickets costing £45 each will include a

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welcome drink, two course lunch, wine and coffee. Lady Mayors and Mayoresses from other Surrey Boroughs and Districts will also be attending. Then comes the big event of the Mayor's fundraising year, the Mayor’s Charity Christmas Ball. It will be held at Sandown Part: Racecourse on Saturday 2 December and promises to be a very exciting evening, to be attended by councillors, residents, local companies and professional groups. Tickets costing £70 per person will include a welcome drink, three course dinner and lots of entertainment. The Mayor hopes that many of our readers will attend her events. Tickets and further information on both events are available from Derrin Gill, the Mayor's Secretary, Elmbridge Borough Council, Civic Centre, High Street, Esher KT10 9SD, by phone on 01372 414383 or by email from dgill @elmbridge.gov.uk.

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Recipe of The Month Chocolate Spider Cakes Black string liquorice cut into 5cm strips Method Preheat the oven to Gas 3 / 175C Place the flour, cocoa powder, caster sugar, baking powder, salt and butter into an electric mixer (or use a handheld whisk) and beat on a slow speed until the mixture looks grainy, like sand. In a separate jug whisk the milk, egg and vanilla extract together. Pour half into the flour mixture. Beat well to combine and make sure you get rid of any lumps. Add the second half of the egg and milk mixture and beat until the mixture is smooth (about two minutes).

Makes 12 Ingredients For the cakes 100g Plain flour 20g Cocoa powder 140g caster sugar 1 1/2 tsp baking powder Pinch salt 40g Unsalted butter (room temp) 120ml whole milk 1 egg 1/4 tsp vanilla extract

Spoon the mixture into 12 paper cupcake cases and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until cooked. Set aside to cool.

For the icing

To make the icing: Beat the icing sugar, butter and cocoa powder together by hand or in an electric mixer. Add the milk a little at a time then beat well until the mixture is light and fluffy. Use this to cover the cooled cakes.

300g Icing sugar (sifted) 100g Unsalted butter (room temp) 40g Cocoa powder 40ml Whole milk

To finish the spiders: Pour the chocolate sprinkles on to a saucer. Take each iced cake and dip the icing into the sprinkles to make the hairy spider's body. Place two 'eyeballs' on each cupcake.

For decoration

Use a skewer to poke 4 holes on opposite sides of each cupcake; insert liquorice strips into each hole.

Pot of chocolate sprinkles Sweets for eyeballs

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Urban Wildlife Garden You don’t need to live in the country to enjoy wildlife A Blog by Molesey Resident - Della Reynolds Hurt no living thing can be taken to extremes. In India, the Jains sweep the ground before them to avoid stepping on an insect. Knowing that others take this command seriously gives me some comfort as it is my habit to go to great lengths to avoid killing slugs and snails. But it doesn’t stop there. I’ll also intervene to prevent others from inadvertently taking a life. I can be seen diving along pathways removing slugs ahead of my fellow walkers and steering them away from

spiders or ants running across the path. I am aware of the sideway glances but I just can’t help myself. It could bring me good karma in another life and indeed should reincarnation be the natural order of things I may be saving an ancestor or two. And so it was that I spent three days rescuing a worm. On the first day I noticed the worm lying out in the pathway of the back alley when I went out to put some rubbish in the bin. His head was under an unfinished slap of concrete but his body was wiggling all over the path. To prevent fatal injury I bent down to pick him up but he refused to budge and simply pulled his head further into the hole. I guessed he knew what he was doing and left him to it, but tucked his tail along the concrete edge just in case. On day two he was still there. Not as wriggly as before but still with his body and tail exposed in a devil may care manner. Not like a worm I thought. My pesticide free garden is full of them

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and I only have to turn the earth with a trowel to bring a batch to the surface like tangled shoelaces. I’ve never seen one stay on the surface before, not even when the ground has been waterlogged. They will always find somewhere to hide. Why hadn’t this worm disappeared into his hole beneath the concrete, I wondered? I got a trowel and began to dig around the worm. I pulled gently at his body a couple of times but he was determined to keep his head buried. I couldn’t really dig out any more earth without hurting him so I tucked his body into the small dip I’d made and left him there. On the third day I woke with a sense of mission. I needed to rescue the worm. In my sleep I had understood that the only reason the worm didn’t move was because he was stuck. His head in the hole, his body outside, unable to move or call for help he was due to die a slow death. If he was still there and still alive I was determined to save him. Dressed in my pyjamas I got the trowel from the shed and started digging diligently round the worm. I could get very little earth out with the trowel which is why I had stopped the day before. The worm was still moving but in a subdued manner and I knew that time was running out. I put down the trowel and used my finger to pull away tiny amounts of soil from around the worm’s head. Just little specks each time until my nail flicked out a small stone and in that same moment the worm was free and lay by my feet in a bemused manner. It appeared to be undamaged though who knows what kind of mental state it was in. I picked it up, a quick examination showed all segments intact and I popped it into the soft soil of my flower bed where it gratefully burrowed out of sight. It may only have been a worm but that rescue gave me great comfort and hopefully racked up a few karma points. In any event it should make up for that cheeseburger I ate the other day.

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By Nicola Morgan/Author

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Robin painted by Evelyn Jones An opportunity to buy affordable art by local artists for Christmas presents. The Fair will feature botanical art, landscapes, portraits, still life and many more subjects by local talented artists. Crafts will include : jewellery, contemporary ceramics, sculptures and glass designs amongst others. And Christmas cards!! St Alban’s Catholic Primary School, Beauchamp Road, East Molesey Surrey KT8 2PG

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Solution to October Quick Crossword

Solution to October Sudoku

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A G S I W F E N T L L I V O S L H L O P E R Y T H E S D

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Garden View This month - Fall for Autumn Colour See what I did there in the title? Terrible pun I know but I couldn’t resist. Back in the Nineties I travelled to the White Mountain region of the USA to experience the Fall first-hand. My husband still jokes that it’s the only time in my life I’ve ever been speechless! Clear blue skies, golden sun and hypersaturated foliage colours gave the impression that the whole New Hampshire landscape was on fire. The effect was unutterably beautiful. Back home in the UK I was a woman on a mission. I had to capture some of that beauty for my own plot. Through research I discovered that the quality of autumn colour in the New Hampshire region depends on two things: the combination of tree species and the climatic conditions. The sugar maple, red oak, mespilus and viburnum are the trees responsible for the famous vivid red and purple hues of the Fall but their colourful magic is dependant on warm sunny days followed by cool nights where the temperature doesn’t drop below 7-8°C. So now I had two problems. No way could I guarantee perfect weather conditions in the UK and then there was the small issue of space...the smallness of the space being the issue! I would not be able to shoe-horn a Red Oak or a Sugar Maple into my suburban garden. So I hit the books and the garden centres and gradually I compiled a list of solid autumn performers which will put on a dazzling display regardless of the British climate. Now my garden is brim full of glorious, fiery autumn hues and with a little planning and my ‘approved’ list you too can bring a little of the Boston Falls to British suburbia.

Japanese maples Varieties of Acer palmatum - both green and purple colour well and are small enough for most gardens. They do prefer acid soil so if you live on lime they perform better in a pot. They need shelter from chilly winds, which can scorch their leaves. Dogwood, Cornus alba The leaves begin to turn pink in late September and you also have the benefit of bright red or yellow whippy stems afterwards, depending on the variety. Euonymus alatus A quirky plant which has corky, winged outgrowths on its stems. This is a quiet plant for most of the year but produces the most brilliant crimson leaves in autumn plus purple red fruits which split to form four winged lobes with a bright orange seed in the centre. There is also a compact variety which only grows to 1m so is suitable for small gardens. Berberis thunbergii and its varieties are around 2m tall, make a great hedge and take on spectacular hues around October just before the leaves fall. Coloured leafed heathers These work hard all year but are at their best when burnished by the autumn chill.

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How you can Help out Hedgehogs This Autumn Sharon Johnson has been caring for the local hedgehog population for the past 5 years from the Shepperton Hedgehog Sanctuary at her house. She has rescued over a hundred of them, from tiny orphaned babies to really sick hogs. They may have become overrun with parasites, had broken limbs, suffered nasty strimmer or dog injuries, or be blind. Some just need warmth, fluids and food for a while before being released into the wild again. Others might stay at the sanctuary for a while until they are strong, or the time of year is safe for them to go. Human beings are sadly very much responsible for the demise of the hedgehog; fake grass, fences which stop the hogs natural foraging pathways and of course the terrible pesticides and slug pellets we use endlessly.

Autumn is a very important time to keep an eye on hedgehogs. For one thing, do think to check under any piles of leaves which you may be about to burn. These make for a great autumnal bonfire in the garden, but piles of leaves are also a prime location for hedgehogs to take up residence in preparation for winter. Autumn is also the time when a late litter of hogs may leave juveniles little time to gain sufficient weight to see them through winter Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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months. Earlier litters will have had a summer of eating and fattening up. A hog needs to be at 600g in weight to stand a chance of making it through these lean months. They may not have enough immunity against parasites either so are at risk. Don’t go seeking them out, but if you happen to see any young hogs in daylight when the weather starts getting colder from October to February, think about weighing them and if they are under 600g alarm bells should ring. If around 450g then they definitely need help. The Shepperton Hedgehog Sanctuary will be happy to help the little fellas so do get in touch with her via the sanctuary website or Facebook page. You can do your bit to help hedgehogs. Opening up a CD size hole in a fence will allow them access to forage for food. Planting or conserving a wild area of garden will give them a safe habitat. You can leave shallow bowls of water or dog/cat/hedgehog food out for them -no fish variety though and no bread please! Mealworms are a favourite, but hogs will eat them over anything else and as they have little nutritional value should be either avoided or kept to the minimum. Hogs will come back regularly if they get access to some nice meaty pet food though but please watch your dog if you have one. They do attack hogs and that doesn’t bear thinking about. Do have a look at the link on the website: www.sheppertonhedgehogsanctuary.co.uk. Let’s look after these charming little creatures. By Monica Chard Photo thanks to the British Hedgehog Preservation Society www.britishhedgehogs.org.uk

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Nature Notes By Molesey Matters Reader - Patricia Caiger

Enjoying a BBQ at St Paul's Church recently, sitting under the lime trees, watching the wasps tasting the food, one flew up into the tree and suddenly plopped down on the table in front of me clutching a struggling grasshopper . It proceeded to chew off the head and then the legs. Perhaps having reduced it to a manageable size, it flew off with it to it's nest. A few moments later, apparently purposefully, it (or another) came back for the head! I have seen wasps taking small caterpillars infesting my roses (they are important pest controllers) but had no idea they took such large prey .

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Friends of Fleetside Update Friends of Fleetside enjoyed a lovely picnic recently, fun was had by all. We also saw a kingfisher and swans while enjoying our food. Lots of blackberries, pears and apples are now ripe. We plan to harvest the fruit soon if you would like to be part of this do get in touch there is plenty for everyone if you know where to look.

Molesey Heath has had 75 different species of birds recorded in a year, one being the Iberian Chiffchaff which is rare for this country, also a Corn Snake was spotted, this is not native to this country and is probably an escaped pet. Bee Orchids and Mugwort plus lots of other rare plants and butterflies also make up the diverse wildlife of the heath. Friends of Fleetside also organised a meeting with the Environment Agency, Elmbridge Council representatives and Bretts Aggregates concerning the overgrown state of the Dead River and the concern about flooding. Adding to this problem, rubbish and garden waste has been dumped on the banks and in the river, blocking the surface water outlets and the river, increasing the flood risk. The recent meeting held at the Community Allotment concerning its future planning and operation was attended by several representaTo advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

tives of FoF plus a number of other local residents. We are now waiting for the Housing Association to advise on the outcome and funds they have available. Two Fleetside residents entered the photo competition on the Countryfile television programme, one has been successful and her photo will be in next years Countryfile calendar. Two other photo's taken in Bushy Park will also feature. It just shows what a lovely area we live in. We also have a local lady on the Bake Off programme what talent we have in Molesey. A note for the diary, on the 22 October 2017 at 12.00 hrs. the unveiling of the Plaque, which was initiated by Friends of Fleetside with the support of the Molesey Residents Association, commemorating the opening of the new bridge to Nielsons Playing field earlier this year, will take place at the bridge. We look forward to seeing you there. Other events planned for later this year are bulb planting and litter picking for more details contact the Friends of Fleetside. friendsoffleetside@GMAIL.COM

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Dominic Raab Our Local MP In 2013 I led the Parliamentary debate which helped secure a new deal between industry and government to continue the availability of affordable insurance for home-owners living in high flood risk areas, such as Molesey. This led to the creation of Flood Re, a government-backed scheme which allows insurers to pool the risk of covering homes at a greater risk of flooding, cutting premiums for residents with vulnerable properties. This month, I caught up on the status of Flood Re to gauge its impact and see what benefits it has provided for our local area. Having opened last April, Flood Re now covers 1,093 properties across the Esher and Walton constituency, with many of these near the river in Molesey, out of a total of 127,326 homes nationally. This is important because the scheme allows insurers to offer policies on properties at a heightened risk of flooding which they would be otherwise unable to provide. By allowing insurers to pool risk it lowers the cost for consumers by up to ÂŁ500. It also provides certainty for the industry, with the government committed to supporting insurers hit by the costs of extreme flooding. Flood Re is one piece of the jigsaw when it comes to flood protection. I am in regular contact with the Environment Agency (EA) in order to monitor the status of the ongoing work underway to help minimise the risk of floods in Molesey and across the wider constituency. The EA are making good progress on the River Thames Flood Scheme, a ÂŁ302 million project designed to prevent local flooding. Due for completion in 2024, this scheme will add river channels upstream of our constituency, to help control river flow during floods, and increase the capacity of the weirs at Sunbury and here in Molesey, to help manage water levels during a flood. I also liaise with Elmbridge Borough Council (EBC) to help build up our local resilience. The Council are a part of the Major Flood Protocol and the River Thames Flood Scheme Board. These put local authorities, emergency services and government agencies in contact, allowing them to establish a coordinated response during a flood, including with a network of local residents. Additionally, EBC has its own contingency plans for a flood emergency. These include regular drills, training, and a vulnerable persons list to help check up on high-risk individuals and prioritise assistance as needed. On top of these flood mitigating measures, Flood Re is benefiting Molesey residents by making sure there is an insurance safety net in case of any loss or damage. Dominic Raab Member of Parliament for Esher and Walton To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

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Events Coming Up Some we like... Teddington Artists Art Fair Nineteen diverse and talented artists will be showing a fabulous range of original work at the 26th Teddington Artists annual Art Fair in the lovely Victorian theatre in Normansfield in Teddington, 10am - 6pm. £2 entrance (50% goes to the charitable Langdon Down Centre) Normansfield Theatre, Normansfield, 2A Langdon Park, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 9PS Saturday 7 Oct 2017 and Sunday 8 Oct 2017 The Esher Hall Antiques & Fine Art Fair This prestigious annual event is frequented by interior designers, international collectors and people seeking something unique. There is a good mix of disciplines: paintings, illustrations, photographs, luminograms, sculpture, lighting, glass, oriental ceramics and textiles, jewellery, silver, furniture, Tunbridge ware, clocks and furniture, for sale. Opening Hours: Friday 11 am – 6pm, Saturday 10.30am – 6pm, Sunday 10.30am – 5pm Tickets: £5, including catalogue (and re-admission) Esher Hall, Sandown Park Racecourse, Portsmouth Road, Esher, Surrey KT10 9AJ Friday 6 Oct 2017 to Sunday 8 Oct 2017 The Big Charity Comedy Show Comedy heavyweights Alistair McGowan, Sara Pascoe, Robin Ince, and Andy Hamilton come together at the Rose Theatre Kingston on Sunday 8th October in a packed comedy bill to raise money for Momentum Children's Charity. Doors: 7.00pm Show: 7.30pm £20 Seats, £10 Pit Cushions Full Line-up Alistair McGowan Sara Pascoe Robin Ince Andy Hamilton The Raymond and Mr Timpkins Revue Stephen Bailey Tamar Broadbent MC: Dan Evans £20 Seats, £10 Pit Cushions Doors: 7pm, Show: 7.30pm Rose Theatre, 24-26 High Street, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey KT1 1HL Sunday 8 Oct 2017 Molesey Local History Society Tuesday 14 November 2017, 8pm Educating Molesey: Memories of Schools and Schooling in Times Past St Lawrence School, Church Road, KT8 9DR Molesey Photographic Club 24th October 2017 The Arthur Mole Lecture: "Macro Photography" - Colleen Slater ARPS ATC is an acknowledged master of macro. Her talk will show us the equipment needed and various camera formats as well as proper techniques 8.00pm in the East Molesey Methodist Church, East Molesey, KT8 9JU The Barn Theatre Club "IF I WERE YOU” by Alan Ayckbourn Directed by Stephen Willis Wed 4th - Sat 7th October 2017. www.thebarntheatremolesey.co.uk Molesey WI meets at Imber Court on the first Wednesday of every month 7.30pm for 8pm, where we have a guest speaker or activity. Visitors are welcome for a £5 fee. First visit is free with a copy of Molesey Matters. Follow us on Facebook - Molesey Women's Institute (Molesey Crafty Ladies). Molesey Bridge Club Fancy a night out playing Rubber Bridge for the princely sum of £2? Yes, honestly and no hidden membership fees either. So, come along and meet the growing, very friendly membership. We cater for skill levels from relative beginners through to seasoned players. Arrive single or as a pair and games are guaranteed. A warm and friendly evening out with a hot drink & biscuits to boot! Come to Molesey Community Hall, Bishop’s Fox Way, West Molesey KT8 2AS Sessions held on Friday evenings 7:15 to 10:15 Contact Mark on 020 8547 2328 for further details. St Marys Church East Molesey Bell Ringing Tuesday evenings 7.45-9.15pm bell ringing at St Mary's East Molesey. Come and join our friendly band and learn to ring. Contact Jane Marsters - maljan@ic24.net - or just turn up ! To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

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Index of Advertisers Longacres Bathrooms Walton Bathrooms 16 Glazing/Windows/Doors House of Surrey Building W Brown and Son 17 Village Windows Care for The Elderly Health/Fitness Brigitte Trust 19 LuxEBootcamp/Zoe Pilates Moor House Care Home 32 Slimming World Surrey Homecare 15 Weightwatchers Car/Repairs/MOT Insurance Esher Tyres and Exhausts 30 Hard To Insure Council Ironing Services Adoption 22 Hate Ironing? Safeguarding 19 Kitchens Ashford Kitchens Cleaning Services Jackie’s Cleaning 28 Oven Cleaning Ovenclean Dentists Gentle Dental Practice 51 The Oven Man Smilessence 26/27 Restaurants/Bars/Pubs The Averna Electrical Services Lee McCarthy 43 Roofing Good Roofs Estate Agents Harmes Turner Brown 52 Schools Kinscheron Place 10 ACS Cobham Halliford School Events Hampton Court Palace 6 Hampton Court House Kempton Steam 43 Hampton Prep/ Pre Prep Mayor’s Ball 32 Sell for Cash JC Stamps Funeral Services Alan Greenwood 31 Singing Lodge Bros 44 Funeral And Weddings Garden Services/Supplies Stoves Easicut Mowers 46 Kindle Stoves

13 Tailoring Laura Alteration 37 Theatres 17 The Hammond Theatre Venues 24 Molesey Boat Club 24 Will Writing 41 Harvest Wills

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Disclaimer: Whilst every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information included in this publication, neither the publisher nor the editorial contributors can accept any liability to any party for loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. Molesey Matters does not endorse any advertising material included in this publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval systems or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the publisher.

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Molesey Matters October 2017  

The local community magazine for both East and West Molesey