Page 1

Molesey

Putting Local Business First

Matters

Keeping a Community Together

November 2017 Issue 14

FREE to 9000 Homes and Businesses in East and West Molesey

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY 12TH NOV 2017 To advertise call Paul 494288Jesse The Pheonix Clubon 07946 : Edward

email Factory paul@villagematters.co.uk : 1 TheOrPoppy : WRNS at 100


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

2

www.villagematters.co.uk


Welcome! Welcome to the November issue. The clocks have gone forward and we are hurtling towards Christmas. Don’t forget to put in your diaries the Bridge Road Winter Wander on 1st Dec and Magical Molesey in Walton Road on 6th Dec. There are also a variety of Christmas fairs and markets, some of which are featured on pages 48 and 49. It is also Remembrance Sunday on 12th November. As usual the parade will start at c 10.40 and end up at the West Molesey War Memorial on Walton Road. In this month's issue we learn of

November 2017 the Phoenix Social Club, which was started back in 1947. We celebrate the Queen and Prince Philip’s 70th wedding anniversary and hear the story of the Women’s Royal Naval Service a 100 years since formation. Also, if you are going to any fireworks displays please do be careful!! See you in December...

Reader Offers Longacres - £5 Discount Voucher Village Windows - 20% off until 30th Nov MiBody - Free Trial Session The Stables - New Years Day Carvery Free bubbly Esher Tyres - 15% off until 30th Nov Spine Central - Massive Discount with Code Lodge Bros - £100 off Pre Paid Funeral Plan The Gentle Dental - Special Discount Plan

Published by:

Village Matters Ltd

Contents

Molesey Director: Paul Chard Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematters.co.uk Website :www.villagematters.co.uk

The Phoenix Club Gunpowder, Treason and Plot 70 Years of Marriage Edward Jesse The Poppy Factory A Piece of Molesey History WRNS at 100 Brooklands Aviation Factory London to Brighton Run Recipe of The Month Urban Wildlife Garden Garden View Breakthrough for Pain and Sciatica Molesey Residents Association Dominic Raab Events We Like Index of Advertisers

Cover Photo : Poppies (courtesy of Pexels) Send any photos (300dpi) for consideration to: paul@villagematters.co.uk

Check us out on Facebook. @moleseymattersmagazine

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

3

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk

4 7 8 11 12 14 18 21 31 33 35 40 42 45 47 49 50


Out of the Ashes The Phoenix Club “The idea of a social club for returning men and women of the Forces after the Second World War, as well as ex-members of Molesey Youth Club and any other young person over the age of 18, was originally conceived by Terry Curtis, Ivor Pooley, Bill Dawson-Marsh and Mr. ‘Archie’ Albone,” recalls Donald Harmes.

The Phoenix Club with its black, yellow and blue flag and legend ‘Out of the Ashes’ started up MOUSE in April 1947. It soon became apparent that the old schoolroom (now the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses) was too small for the growing membership and so the Club asked for permission to renovate the large, derelict, corrugated iron building at the rear that had been used as a fire station during the war. Most of the work was done by members themselves with the help of some skilled tradesmen. “The volunteer roofers walked quite casually upon the somewhat ancient corrugated iron to do their work; nowadays health and safety would be appalled” says Donald who became To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

4

By Anthony Barnes

Chairman of the Building Committee. The new clubhouse was opened on 15th January 1949. Renee Goodsall (Assistant Secretary and editor of The Flame, the Club newsletter) and her Various/Paul husband,Source Peter (Treasurer and Chard President), who sadly died earlier this year, reckoned that over 300 people were Club members at one time or another. Although the Phoenix Club was only formally wound up about four years ago, its heyday was the 1950s. The club nights were Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7.30-10.30pm. There’d be table tennis, darts and snooker in the first part of the evening and then after tea (no alcohol!) gramophone music, talks, discussions, quizzes, team games, film shows, etc. At the weekends and at other times Club members went on rambles, cycle runs, supper hikes, treasure hunts, coach (‘charabanc’) trips to the seaside and theatre visits. Popular activities included cricket, amateur dramatics, photography, doing the carnival float, organising a Christmas party for the children and the annual dinner dances. The Club was even nicknamed the ‘marriage mart’! “The Phoenix Club was extraordinarily successful. In its day, it brought a great deal of happiness to a great many people” says Donald. Membership dwindled for amultitude of reasons. The increasing age of its members, changing social habits, theimpact of TV, members moving out of the district and the state of the clubhouse all played their part. In 1966, a campaign meeting to save the Phoenix Club was well-attended but only netted eight new members. The clubhouse eventually became the home of the Barn Theatre Club in late 1970. “I’m still in touch with two surviving members” says Donald “and it’s very nostalgic looking over the old photographs.”

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

5

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

6

www.villagematters.co.uk


Remember, Remember, the 5th of November Gunpowder, Treason and Plot! Source : Ben Johnson Fireworks can be seen all over France every July 14th as the nation celebrates Bastille Day. Across the USA some ten days earlier on

Their plan was to blow up the King, Queen, church leaders, assorted nobles and both Houses of Parliament with 36 barrels of gunpowder strategically placed in the cellars beneath the Palace of Westminster. The plot was apparently revealed when the Catholic Lord Monteagle was sent a message warning him to stay away from Parliament as he would be in danger, the letter being presented to Robert Cecil, James I’s Chief Minister. Some historians believe that Cecil had known about the plot for some time and had allowed the plot to ‘thicken’ to both ensure that all the conspirators were caught and to promote Catholic hatred throughout the country. And the Guy? Guy Fawkes was born in Yorkshire in 1570. A convert to the Catholic faith, Fawkes had been a soldier who had spent several years fighting in Italy. It was during this period that he adopted the name Guido (Italian for Guy) perhaps to impress the ladies! What we do know is that Guido was arrested in the early hours of the morning of November 5th 1605, in a cellar under the House of Lords, next to the 36 kegs of gunpowder, with a box of matches in his pocket and a guilty expression on his face! Under torture Guy Fawkes identified the names of his co-conspirators. Many of these were the relations of a Catholic gentleman, Thomas Percy. Catesby and three others were killed by soldiers while attempting to escape. The remaining eight were imprisoned in the Tower of London before being tried and executed for High Treason. They experienced that ‘quaint’ British method of execution, first experienced almost 300 years earlier by William ‘Braveheart’ Wallace. They too were hanged, drawn and quartered.

the 4th July, Americans celebrate their Independence Day. So who was Guy? And why is he remembered so fondly 400 years after his death? It could be said that the story started when the Catholic Pope of the day failed to recognise England’s King Henry VIII‘s novel ideas on separation and divorce. Henry, annoyed at this, severed ties with Rome and appointed himself head of the Protestant Church of England. Protestant rule in England was maintained and strengthened throughout the long and glorious reign of his daughter Queen Elizabeth I. When Elizabeth died without children in 1603, her cousin James VI of Scotland became King James I of England. James had not been long on the throne before he started to upset the Catholics within his kingdom. They appear to have been unimpressed with his failure to implement religious tolerance measures, getting a little more annoyed when he ordered all Catholic priests to leave the country. A group of Roman Catholic nobles and gentlemen led by Robert Catesby conspired to essentially end Protestant rule with perhaps the biggest ‘bang’ in history. To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

7

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


70 Years of Marriage Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip Elizabeth and Philip were distant cousins, and first met at a wedding! They were both in attendance at another royal wedding - Philip's cousin, Princess Marina of Greece to The Duke of Kent, who was an uncle of the then Princess Elizabeth, in 1934. She was 13 and he was 18. After meeting again in 1939, they began to exchange letters. The pair became secretly engaged in 1946, but the formal engagement was delayed until Elizabeth turned 21 in April 1947.

Sources : Various

Westminster Abbey in the Ball Supper-room at Buckingham Palace. The menu was Filet de Sole Mountbatten, Perdreau en Casserole (a braised partridge dish) and Bombe GlacĂŠe Princess Elizabeth. They spent their wedding night in Broadlands, Hampshire, the home of Philip's uncle, Earl Mountbatten. The rest of their honeymoon was spent at Birkhall on the Balmoral Estate. The Queen is the first British monarch to have celebrated a Diamond and Blue Sapphire wedding anniversary; a land mark which no other British monarch has achieved and one which may never be surpassed.

A young Princess Elizabeth gazes lovingly at her new husband Prince Philip. Credit: PA

Elizabeth and Philip were married at Westminster Abbey on 20 November 1947, in front of 2,000 invited guests. The ceremony was broadcast on radio, to 200 million listeners worldwide. Elizabeth famously saved up her ration cards to purchase the material needed for her wedding gown. The wedding dress was designed by Norman Hartnell - a duchesse satin bridal gown with motifs of star lilies and orange blossoms. More than 2,500 wedding presents arrived from around the world, and 10,000 telegrams of congratulations. The couple went to Buckingham Palace after the ceremony where they waved from the balcony to large crowds. The "wedding breakfast" was held after the marriage ceremony at To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

8

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

9

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

10

www.villagematters.co.uk


Edward Jesse 1780 - 1868 The Molesey Naturalist Edward Jesse (1780-1868) was a writer and naturalist. He became clerk in a government office in 1798, and for a time was secretary to Lord Dartmouth, when president of the Board of Control. In 1812 he was appointed commissioner of hackney coaches, and later he became deputy surveyor-general of the royal parks and palaces. He was also greatly involved with the restoration of Hampton Court Palace. As a Molesey resident he lived

in the house that later became West Molesey Vicarage, where he formed a close friendship with man of letters, John Mitford, editor of the Gentleman's Magazine. Mitford edited the magazine successfully until the end of 1850.

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

Since the death of George II in 1760, no monarch has resided in Hampton Court Palace. Following a series of renovations led by Edward Jesse, Deputy Surveyor of Royal Parks and Palaces, the Palace opened to the

public for the first time in 1838. The following year Jesse authored this illustrated guide, the first such guide to the Palace. In it he describes the journey from London to Hampton, briefly covers the history of the Palace under Cardinal Wolsey, Henry VIII, Charles I and William & Mary, and describes the works of art to be found in the Palace, including the Raphael Cartoons, which are now on permanent loan to the Victoria & Albert Museum. On the abolition of the post of surveyorgeneral of the royal parks and palaces he retired on a pension, and died in Brighton. His book is still available today. Sources : Various

11

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


The Poppy Factory By Tracey Anderson Major George Howson was an engineer. He was a man of great energy and determination. He won the military cross in WWl. He was addicted to strong Turkish cigarettes and bought them 10,000 at a time. He was also the founder of The Royal British Legion Poppy factory! Through the work of Anna Guerin of France and Moina Michael of the USA, both very practical women who took Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae’s famous poem, “In Flanders Fields”, and devised a way of raising vital funds for wartime charities. The British Legion had been set up the year before and the very first French Poppy Appeal – using

Edinburgh to supply poppies to Scotland, and the London factory moved to larger premises near the Thames in Richmond and was renamed The Poppy Factory. As time went on the needs of veterans changed. They wanted to work in their own communities, closer to their families and to use the many and varied skills they had acquired during their careers in the armed services, prior to becoming injured. In 2010, The Poppy Factory began to actively help disabled ex-Service find the work they wanted in the places they wanted to be. It continues to build on its strong historical foundations to provide an employability service that supports hundreds of ex-Service personnel with varying health challenges into meaningful employment with businesses across the country every year.

Moina Michael

silk poppies made by widows - had raised £106,000. In 1921 the first British Poppy appeal was held. In the first year the poppies were imported from France and there was huge demand as poppies quickly became the icons of remembrance. The Major made a connection; Remembrance Day needed poppies and wounded ex-soldiers needed work. In a letter to his parents he spoke of using a £2000 cheque he had been given to set up a factory to, ‘…give the disabled their chance.’ He wrote that he felt the project would probably not be successful but that he ought to attempt it anyway.

Walton Road, Don’t Forget!!

He set up The Disabled Society in London with just five injured ex-servicemen, and in spite of his initial lack of optimism, in few years that had grown to 350 men. He set up a sister factory in To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

12

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

13

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


A Little Piece of West Molesey History By H M Berry The real development of West Molesey only really began in the third decade of the twentieth century. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries it did include, however, many nationally known characters amongst its inhabitants. Mole Lodge, later renamed Mole Abbey and now no more, was the country seat of Sir Robert Carden, owner of The Times and at one-time Lord Mayor of London. Mrs Baker, who lived at “Ivy Lodge” West Molesey during the 1880’s, speaks of Sir Robert as being a “charming white-haired man with a greyhaired daughter” She relates that in their greenhouse they had a model village, with houses only two inches high, and a train that ran beside the village. It went very fast. When Sir Robert turned on a tap, off went the train and the village people walked. Another notable resident Robert Baddley, the actor, also lived in West Molesey. His house was incorporated into the Rosemary Simmons Homes. He was a contemporary of David Garrick and is chiefly remembered for the Baddley Cake.

was being acted at the time could partake of the cake and a glass of wine in his memory on Twelfth Night each year. Sir Robert Walpole, who was another nationally known individual. once lived at Molesey Grove, and a century later the house was occupied by the Rt. Hon. Wilson Croker, a political and literary character. His reviews went on to earn him the hostility of among others, Disraeli. Beyond Molesey Grove, though strictly speaking in the parish of Walton, is Apps Court, where Charles Montagu Earl of Halifax once resided He was influential in the formation of the Bank of England and initiated the much-hated window tax. This tax was levied on each window of a house if the number exceeded seven. It is not surprising that many of the windows were bricked up. In 1838 the tax for eight windows was 16/6d per annum.

Cutting the Baddeley Cake on the stage of Drury Lane in 1890

In his will he left £100 to the Drury Lane Theatre in order that the cast of whatever play To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

14

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

15

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Crossword 1

2

3

8

4

5

9

10

11

12

15

13

16

19

17

20

21

2 3 4 5

Astonish, surprise (5) Eyelash cosmetic (7) Emotional, moody (13) Valuable possession (5)

6

7 8 12

Solution on Page 38

Across 1 Spotty breed of dog (10) 6 8 Popular TV serials (5) 7 9 Ballistic weapon (7) 10 Take someone's breath away (7) 11 _____ wave, huge destructive volume of water (5) 12 Very poorly (2,1,3,3) 15 Return money (5) 14 17 A part of the body that's often pierced 18 (3,4) 19 Brides carry one of these (7) 20 Smoothly slip (5) 21 Exhibiting (10) Down Rapidly revolve clothes to 13 Lazy, disinclined to get a job remove water after washing. (4-3) (4-3) 14 In this place (4) Shout, holler (4) 15 Cloak, cape (4) Footwear (4) 16 Opposite of 'mine' (5) Bycustody the Molesey Local History Society Seize and take legal 18 Tear-inducing vegetable (5) of an item (7)

www.villagematters.co.uk

16

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

17

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Women's Royal Naval Service 100 Years Old This year the Naval Service will celebrate the centenary of the formation of the Women’s Royal Naval Service (WRNS). The Women's Royal Naval Service (WRNS; popularly and officially known as the Wrens) was the women's branch of the United Kingdom's Royal Navy. First formed in November 1917 for the First World War, it was disbanded in 1919, then revived in 1939 at the beginning of the Second World War, remaining active until integrated into the Royal Navy in 1993. WRNs included cooks, clerks, wireless telegraphists, radar plotters, weapons analysts, range assessors, electricians and air mechanics.. On 10 October 1918, nineteen-year-old Josephine Carr from Cork, became the first Wren to die on active service, when her ship, the RMS Leinster was torpedoed. By the end of the war WRNS had 5,500 members, 500 of them officers. In addition, about 2,000 members of the WRAF had previously served with the WRNS supporting the Royal Naval Air Service and were transferred on the creation of the Royal Air Force. It was disbanded in 1919.WRNS was revived in 1939 at the beginning of the Second World War, with an expanded list of allowable activities, including flying transport planes. At its peak in 1944 it had 75,000 people. During the war there were 100 deaths. One of the slogans used in recruiting posters was "Join the Wrens - free a man for the fleet." In the 1970s it became obvious that equal pay for women and the need to remove sexual discrimination meant that the WRNS and the Royal Navy would become one organisation. The key change was that women would become subject to the Naval Discipline Act 1957. Vonla McBride who had experience in human resource management became Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

18

Source Wiki/Various

the Director of the WRNS in 1976 and members of the WRNS had the same discipline as men in 1977. It remained in existence after the war and was finally integrated into the regular Royal Navy in 1993 when women were allowed to serve on board navy vessels as full members of the crew. In October 1990, during the Gulf War, HMS Brilliant allowed the first women to officially serve on an operational warship. Before 1993, all women in the Royal Navy were members of the WRNS except nurses, who joined (and still join) Queen Alexandra's Royal Naval Nursing Service, and medical and dental officers, who were commissioned directly into the Royal Navy, held RN ranks, and wore WRNS uniform with gold RN insignia. Female sailors are still known by the nicknames "wrens" or Jennies ("Jenny Wrens") in naval slang. The past century has witnessed changes that the ladies of 1917 could only ever have dreamed about. No longer in a supporting role, today’s women of the Royal Navy serve alongside their male colleagues at sea, under the sea, in the air and on land.

www.villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

19

www.villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

20

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Brooklands Aviation Factory to Open in November By Monica Chard I wonder if you were lucky enough to get a ticket for the Rotary lecture at Halliford School a month or so back. The speaker this year was Allan Winn, CEO and Director of Brooklands Museum who gave a fascinating overview of the Brooklands legacy; on our doorstep we have such a wealth of history. You may associate Brooklands predominantly with motor racing. Brooklands was the world’s first purpose-built motor racing circuit. Three world land speed records were set there and the fastest ever pre-war 500 mile race was held on the circuit. It was the site of the first ever British Grand Prix (1926) and was the birthplace of the great record breakers; Campbell’s Bluebird and John Cobb’s Napier-Railton. But at the outbreak of World War Two in September 1939, Brooklands closed as a racing venue and the site expanded its aviation production. In fact Brookland’s aviation legacy is greater than that of motor racing with a continuous history of design, testing and construction covering 80 years. More aircraft (nearly 19,000) of more types were first built or flown here than any other single site in Europe. It is this aviation history which is now being celebrated in style with the opening in November of the new Brooklands Aircraft Factory and Flight Shed. It was built with the help of a £6M Heritage Lottery grant and we were lucky enough to get a preview of the facility at the recent Aviation Day. The team have every reason to be proud; it is magnificent and a fitting setting for some of these incredible planes. Brooklands is home to the Vickers Vimy, the first to cross the Atlantic and the first to fly to Australia. In our modern day such flights don’t seem such a bid deal but when you see the plane you are truly struck by the magnitude of such an achievement. This was in 1919, almost 100 years ago. In case you are not familiar with it (I confess to not being very up to speed myself on aircraft), the Vimy is a bi-plane, but not just any bi-plane, it is HUGE! It was on display at Aviation Day and my jaw dropped when I saw it. With a 64 foot wingspan this aircraft is a giant. Imagine the bravery of the men who flew To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

her. These were truly the brave. The Aircraft Hangar is going to open the world of these flying machines to the wider public, with interactive displays as well as the chance to get hands on, feeling what it was like to work in an aircraft factory. This new exhibition is the culmination of a lot of hard work over a long time. The Museum wants people to feel like they were in an aircraft factory, and to

see how aircraft were designed, constructed and flown at Brooklands from the 1900s to the 1980s. One of the focuses of the new displays is on the people that worked and flew here. It was such a major industry in the area that local villages such as Weybridge, Addlestone, Byfleet and Cobham were built to house workers. The new facility opens mid-November. www.brooklandsmuseum.com

21

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


conform to British Standards. This means that they should have BS 7114 written on the pack. Don’t buy sparklers from anywhere you’re not sure about, such as the back of a van or from a temporary, unlicensed market stall. Read the instructions in daylight. Make sure you have:

Sparkler Safety

  

A torch A bucket or two of water Eye protection and gloves

Did you know? Fireworks in the garden can be great fun, as long as they are used safely. Each year, over half of all firework injuries are suffered by children. Did you know that sparklers get five times hotter than cooking oil? Sparklers are not toys and should never be given to a child under five. Always buy sparklers from a reputable shop to make sure that they

www.villagematters.co.uk

22

It is against the law to carry fireworks in public if you're under 18 Fireworks must not be sold to anyone who is under 18 It is an offence to let fireworks off during night hours (11pm to 7am), except on Bonfire Night (midnight), Diwali, New Year, and Chinese New Year (1am) Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

23

www.villagematters.co.uk


Friends of Fleetside Update A great harvest of eating apples was picked on Molesey Heath after cutting back all the brambles to get to them! The horseradish and rosehips are also in plenty of supply as are the hops. Lots of giant puffballs and other fungi are also evident, so much to harvest if you know where to look. We will be organising a walk in the near future to highlight the gems of Molesey Heath. The long grass has been cut and dried bailed up and transported to farms for food for cattle during the winter.

To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

24

For those less able, we have made a bench (photo) and with the permission of the countryside team placed it on a level path so if you need to rest a while you can perch there and enjoy the bird song . We again this year will be planting bulbs around our area for all to enjoy supplied by the MRA who have supported us in many of our projects. We visited the Walton Community Allotment to get some ideas on how we could implement their ideas in the community allotment which will be set up on Island Farm Road in the near future for all Molesey residents to enjoy. If you would like to join Friends of Fleetside to get in touch by email at friendsoffleetside@gmail.com

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

25

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

26

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

27

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

28

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Princess Alice Hospice Wedding Dress to be Auctioned At the recent Princess Alice Hospice Wedding Show at Shepperton Studios, one lucky lady won the first prize in the raffle which happened to be this stunning number. The lady, who is in her sixties, was not likely to be getting married, nor would she perhaps have chosen this dress, so she kindly donated it back to the PAH who have decided to auction it to the highest bidder in a silent auction. If you don’t have any experience of this, it is similar to sealed bids. You bid what you would like to pay and then all the bids are compared and the highest wins the dress. PAH have produced a simple form

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

that visitors to the shop in Shepperton can fill in to submit their bid for the dress. Forms are available now and the winning bid will be announced on 1st December. The dress itself is on display at the Shepperton Princess Alice shop. It is brand new and still carries the original price tag. It is by designer Roland Joyce and is worth approximately £1700. It is a size 12. (If you are interested they have a seamstress on call who can make adjustments.) Had the dress gone on sale in the shop, they would have sold it for £250 – so we are looking at a reserve price of £200. Good luck to prospective brides who are looking for a fairy tale dress at a fairy tale price. We will be reporting on how the silent auction went in the January issue. PAH 17 High Street, Shepperton, TW17 9AJ

29

www.villagematters.co.uk


Valid until 30th November 2017

To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

30

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


The London to Brighton Run By Sarah Davey In these days of motorway mayhem and congestion charges it’s difficult to imagine a time when owning a car was considered daring, a little eccentric and beyond the wildest dreams of most British people.

there were only around a hundred cars in Britain. Today we have around 500 million!33 cars took part in the original run but only fourteen made it to Brighton and it’s rumoured that one of those was taken by train and had mud splashed all over it before crossing the finish line! Part of the problem was the weather which was dreadful. Rain poured down and the roads became sodden and muddy. The rally has run every year since with the exception of the war years when petrol was rationed. It is one of Britain’s biggest motoring spectacles and attracts entrants from all over the world. Only cars built before January 1st 1905 are eligible to enter and this year 490 of them have been registered for the run, 85 of them from countries as far away as China, the USA and Australia. The 60 mile rally starts at sunrise on the 5th so why not have a day out and see British motoring history in action.

When Jean-Joseph Etienne Lenoir patented the internal combustion engine in 1860 he paved the way for the development of the modern motor car. Initially progress was slow...literally. The Government passed The Red Flag Act in 1865. Section 3 of this act required that one person had to walk 60 yards ahead of the vehicle and that he should wave a small red flag to warn others that a car was approaching. This meant that the speed of the new motor cars was reduced to 4mph in the countryside and just 2mph in town. Unsurprisingly this legislation stifled the progress of the motor industry for many years. In 1896 after much discussion The Locomotives on Highways Act was passed which did away with the need for the flag waver. In order to celebrate, the first London to Brighton Run was organised by Harry Lawson’s Motor Car Club. But Mr. Lawson had a hidden agenda. He wanted to control the fledgling motor car industry through master patents held by his British Motor Syndicate. The enterprising businessman managed to extract considerable sums of money from hopeful investors in his new companies. One of these was Daimler which today is Britain’s oldest car maker. It is estimated that at the time of the first Rally

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

31

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

32

www.villagematters.co.uk


Recipe of The Month Pear Tarte Tatin A slightly different take on a traditional tarte tatin Serves: 6 Preparation time: 1 hour 20 minutes Ingredients 125g caster sugar 40g cold butter, chopped 1/2 tsp ground ginger 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon 3 large pears, peeled, cored and cut into wedges 375g all-butter puff pastry Double cream, to serve Method Preheat oven to 200C/gas 6. Put a 21cm-diameter frying pan with an ovenproof handle (this bit is important!) on a hob over a medium heat. Add the sugar to the dry pan and heat, stirring constantly until it turns a lovely caramel coloury. Add the butter, ginger and cinnamon and stir well to combine. Place the pears in the caramel and spoon over the mixture. Turn the heat down and cook for 5–10 minutes until the pears are just tender and cooked but retain their shape. Remove from the heat and cool slightly. Arrange the pears to form an attractive pattern in the pan. Roll out the pastry to about 5mm thick and cut a disc slightly bigger than your pan (about 24cm). Place the pastry disc on top of the pears and caramel, then carefully tuck it snugly around the outside of the pears and down into the sides of the pan. Bake the pie in the oven for 30–40 minutes, or until the pastry is golden brown and puffed up. Remove from the oven and leave for 10 minutes. Run a knife around the edge, place a large plate over the top and carefully turn the tart onto the plate. Serve with cream.

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

33

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


www.villagematters.co.uk

34

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


Urban Wildlife Garden You don’t need to live in the country to enjoy wildlife A Blog by Molesey Resident - Della Reynolds During the balmy autumn days of October I planted out lots of spring bulbs in various tubs and troughs. Planning for spring before winter has even got its coat on is a good way to lift the spirits. As I pushed each bulb down into the soft soil I knew that in a few short months these little guys would be lifting their heads and bringing colour back into my grey, urban garden. Well, at least all the ones who survived the quality assurance check from an overly helpful squirrel. No sooner had I moved indoors and he was rummaging through the troughs rejecting all the bulbs which didn’t come up to spec. No doubt he’ll be checking on them regularly throughout the winter months; I just wish he wasn’t quite so picky. My efforts at tidying the garden must have been really aggravating for all the little creatures who’d found a winter hide-away only to find me pulling it up or cutting it back. Nature hates a tidy gardener. Just like we urban dwellers the garden critters are all trying to find a little space to call their own in an overcrowded market. As there is nothing I like better than to interfere with nature just to make my futile existence seem worthwhile, I decided to build them a ‘hibernarium’ some time back. I had seen this idea on the internet. It consisted of stones of interesting shapes with an array of holes, so you could put them together to make a mini-beast habitat for your garden. They were very expensive and I decided I could do the same job using what nature had provided; though I did have to buy a wooden crate to get me started. Into the crate I put some logs on the ground floor as I knew these were popular hiding places. Then above that I placed some upturned flowerpots with just the hole side poking out in an inviting manner. I filled in the gaps with stones, wood

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

cuttings and cut cane, for the little guys to crawl into. On the top I put an old chimney cowl which had been removed when the new wood burner was fitted. This cowl seemed like a perfect minibeast hotel with entrances facing all sides. I could lift the lid at the top to take a peek inside, which was even better. I knew that one or two large spiders had moved in as I saw them dart back and forth when I watered the nearby pots. Other than that I had no idea who my tenants were. So recently I decided to lift the lid and take a look inside the chimney cowl. Underneath a haze of cobwebs I was amazed to see some very large snails inside, apparently too big to fit through the holes. It occurred to me that if a snail

crawled in at the start of winter and its shell grew during the hibernation months then it might not be able to get back out. Perhaps I was setting a death trap in the guise of a five start hotel? A number of the snails were clinging to the sides near to the lid while others lay on the floor. Were they dead, asleep or just waiting for the moment of release?I left the lid off for few days knowing that those who were still active would take off for somewhere more sheltered. I was surprised to find that many of the big chaps lifted their skirts and departed. As I write there are still shells at the bottom – empty quite likely and one or two still clinging to the sides. Shame to waste such a perfect hidey-hole, so I think I put the lid back on for the winter months. Providing I remove it when the season changes then all should be fine for any newcomers who find that their summer silhouette has somewhat altered over the winter months; an all too familiar occurrence in my experience.

35

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


By Nicola Morgan/Author

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

36

www.villagematters.co.uk


Friends of Molesey Library Jane Austen, who would have celebrated her 200th birthday this year, is a tough act to follow, you might think. But one author is bravely attempting to fill those rather large shoes after penning a sequel to Austen’s best-known work, Pride and Prejudice. Terri Fleming will be giving a talk in Molesey this month about her love of Jane Austen’s work and about her own novel Perception, which tells the story of Elizabeth Bennet’s younger sisters, Mary and Kitty, and their own search for a husband. She will be speaking at Molesey Library on Tuesday 21 November, 7.15pm, as part of the Friends of Molesey Library’s popular ‘Meet the Author’ evenings. Tickets are £5 and available on the door

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

or in advance from the library. Proceeds are used by the Friends to improve the library. Terri enjoyed a career in copywriting before seeing the world and settling in England with her husband. Having grown up in Tasmania surrounded by glorious landscape but with little access to the wider world, books became her “joy and refuge” and her love of literature stuck. The Friends of Molesey Library was formed in 2011 by a group of local volunteers to promote our local library and ensure it thrives. Each year we arrange a number of author evenings – our last one in September was a great success – it was a talk by Jenny Wood of the Molesey Local History Society about the photo book, Molesey Then And Now. Steve Bax, Vice-Chair of the Friends, says: “We are delighted that Terri Fleming will be joining us for what promises to be a fascinating talk. I do hope you will be able to join us.”

37

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


D A L M A M A S O A P S H Z C O V E R A W E R I N A B M R E P A Y O O O B O U Q U E E N R D I S P

Robin painted by Evelyn Jones

St Alban’s Catholic Primary School, Beauchamp Road, East Molesey Surrey KT8 2PG To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

T E M P E R A M E N T A L

I A N S S P Y I S S I L E E N L T I D A L R D W A Y O H A R L O B E K N R S L I D E H O A Y I N G

Solution to November Quick Crossword

38

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

39

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Garden View This Month - National Tree Week November 25th marks the start of National Tree Week, which in turn marks the start of tree-planting season. Considering that most of us in the UK have fairly small plots we do love our trees. The trouble is we’re not always terribly good at choosing them. How many times have you

an Amelanchier won’t let you down. Another hard worker is Sorbus hupehensis var. obtusa. This tree has a pretty shape and is attractive throughout the year. In the late spring it is covered in white blossom which is followed by masses of dark pink berries. The blue-green leaves turn red in the autumn. It’s just my opinion of course but without at least one tree, a garden can seem flat and a little dull. Trees provide structure and height but are also a haven for birds and insects, which in turn add colour and life. Why not plant a tree during this week. Our guide has some helpful tips.

How to Plant a Tree

driven through a housing estate and observed an enormous weeping willow or an enormous pine tree completely obscuring a front garden. It can be tricky deciding what sort of tree to plant on a small, suburban plot but there are plenty of candidates. Generally trees up to 810m are considered suitable. The best urban trees offer year-round interest. Varieties of Acer Palmatum are rather lovely. They are elegant trees which have attractive green or purple foliage and colour beautifully in the winter.

Dig a hole at least twice the size of the root ball. Make up a mixture of half compost and half soil from the hole. Put a few inches of this mix at the bottom of the hole. Trees need support so drive a support stake into the hole at one edge. This needs to be done before the tree is planted or you risk damaging the roots. Tip the tree from its container and loosen the roots a little. Place it into the hole and fill in with the soil and compost mixture. Firm it down with your heel. Use proper straps to secure the tree to the post.

For my money Amalanchier Lamarckii is about as hardworking a tree as you’ll come across. During March and April it produces a frothy show of white flowers, then in June these are replaced by attractive deep purple, and supposedly edible - though I’ve never tried them - fruits. Then, when Autumn arrives the tree pulls out all the stops and bursts into fiery colour. If you only have room for one tree then Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

40

www.villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

41

www.villagematters.co.uk


Breakthrough Relief for Back Pain and Sciatica Advertorial By Sam Potter IF YOU suffer from low back pain and sciatica, you are one of over 20 million adults in the UK with this often-crippling spinal condition. Shooting, stabbing and burning pains from the low back and down the legs are all symptoms of a pinched nerve often called “sciatica”. Left untreated, the intense pain can rapidly wear you down and drain the joy out of life. That is, until now. Recent advances in the treatment of sciatica and lower back pain have led to the development and huge success of Non-Surgical Re-Constructive Spinal Care. The excellent results of this treatment have been published in major medical journals. With success rates as high as 90% some back surgeons recommending their patients try this treatment first before having back surgery. In Hampton, London, you can try Non-Surgical ReConstructive Spinal Care at SpineCentral – the office of low back pain and sciatica relief expert Richard Gliddon. Richard and his team of fully trained spinal care specialists have helped over 3,000 patients find relief from their agonising back pain and sciatica. According to Richard, “We use a combination of advanced technology and state of the art muscle testing techniques for precisely diagnosing the cause of your back pain and sciatica; and a unique programme for reconstructing the damaged area causing the pain; this means superior longterm results for most people.” Your invitation for a comprehensive consultation and Sciatica Relief Expert examination to pinpoint the cause of your low back pain Richard Gliddon, says: In 10 years of practice, I’ve never and sciatica... seen a treatment as effective MOLESEY MATTERS has teamed up with the spine therapy as Non-Surgical specialists at SpineCentral, to help readers find relief from their Re-Constructive Spinal Care persistent back and sciatic pain. for patients with sciatica or All you have to do to receive a thorough diagnostic examination lower back pain with the most advanced technology in the world and a comprehensive easy to understand report on your state of health is call 020 89414410. Mention this article (CODE: VMO17) and Richard will happily reduce his usual consultation fee of £147 to just £37. But hurry, due to obvious reasons – this is a time limited offer – with only 50 reader consultations available at this exclusively discounted rate. My advice, don't suffer a moment longer... Find out if Non-Surgical Re-Constructive Spinal Care can help you, book a consultation with Richard and his team now by calling 020 89414410, they are waiting to take your call today.

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

42

www.villagematters.co.uk


Local Resident Adam Searle will be launching his first children's book on the following dates, just in time for Christmas.

Monday 13th November - Hersham Christmas Market. Thursday 23rd November - Christmas Shopping Evening, St. Mary's School, Long Ditton. Saturday 25th November - The Orchard School Christmas Fair, East Molesey.

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

43

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

44

Or call Paul on 07946 494288


NEWS FROM THE MOLESEY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Waste Collection Services Four Surrey Councils (Elmbridge, Mole Valley, Surrey Heath and Woking) have joined together for the purposes of managing their waste collection services, and Joint Waste Solutions (JWS) is the new organisation which has been formed to manage the combined services. Following a competitive tendering process, Amey was awarded the contract for delivering the services, and a roll-out across the four Council areas began in June with Elmbridge. Molesey was one of the first areas covered in the roll-out, and that turned out not to be good news. Unfortunately, as many residents will know all too well, the first weeks of the new contract have been somewhat chaotic, with many waste bin and food collections being missed altogether. MRA Councillors have been taking up these problems with the Council on behalf of residents, and pressing for assurances from the contractors about improving the service. Rob Edmondson, the Managing Director of Amey, has apologised to residents for the inconvenience and frustration which this has caused, and says the company has brought in extra resources, and has been working closely with Joint Waste Solutions and Elmbridge Council to resolve the situation. We hope that by the time residents read this edition of Molesey Matters some semblance of normality will have been restored. But if you do experience further problems Elmbridge Council is encouraging residents to report them online via the Council’s website or, if they do not have access to the internet, by telephone on 01372 474474.

this by bank transfer to the MRA’s Santander account number 86284805, sort code 09-01-28. Existing members can also renew their subscriptions this way, and this is appreciated, as our collectors inevitably find a number of people are not in when they visit. Please also send an email to mra.subs@yahoo.com with your name and, importantly, address – so we know who has sent in the subscription! We will then send you a membership card and receipt. And if you are interested in joining our Committee, or helping with any of our community activities, please contact us via the same email address for more information.

Membership of the Residents Association The Association relies entirely on the support of the residents we represent, and we always welcome new members who are interested the community of East and West Molesey. If you would like to join the Molesey Residents Association the subscription is only £3 per household per year. You can send To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

45

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

46

www.villagematters.co.uk


Dominic Raab Our Local MP I have recently been in contact with the Department for Education to see how the implementation of the new schools National Funding Formula will benefit families in Molesey. |The new formula, announced by Education Secretary Justine Greening on the 14th September, will address historical unfairness in the way school budgets are set. It replaces the opaque and out of date funding system that sees rural and suburban schools receive less money without objective justification. It will be implemented between now and 2020. Projections, based on this year’s intake, show schools across the Esher and Walton constituency would see on average a 6% increase in funding, with some of the schools more prejudiced against by the previous system seeing increases of up to 13.5%. Hinchley Wood School, to take one example, would see an 8.5% increase in funding. In total, this would mean an extra £2.7 million each year for our local schools. That is a real win for local children and parents. The money underwriting the new formula comes as part of the extra £1.3 billion the government are spending on schools over the next two years. Combined with the new funding formula, this will mean that by 2019-20 all secondary schools nationally will receive at least £4,800 of funding per pupil, while primary schools will receive at least £3,500. As someone who has long campaigned for a fairer funding deal for our schools, I am delighted with the news. In 2012, I made the case to the Liberal Democrat Schools Minister David Laws for a new system which recognised the pressures on schools in our constituency, such as the high birth rate and the large number of young families moving into the area. I am pleased that this government is now acting. The new schools funding formula is just one part of a number of positive changes which are set to improve our local education provision over the next few years. Three Rivers Academy is set to expand in 2019, and an application for a Free School in the Molesey/Walton area (known as Heathside Walton Free School) has also been approved, with a new site between Walton-on-Thames and Molesey proposed. It should start admitting pupils in the 2019/20 academic year. These improvements, together with the new funding formula, will increase investment and ease the pressure on school places in Molesey.

Dominic Raab Member of Parliament for Esher and Walton To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

47

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

48

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Events Coming Up Some we like... Hampton Court Palace Ice Rink For the a truly regal skating experience London has to offer this winter, head to the Hampton Court Palace Ice Rink and take to the ice at Henry VIII’s former home. Adults £14/children under 15, OAPs, students and concessions £12/children under 12 £10 and family tickets (3+1 or 2+2) £40. Hampton Court Palace Surrey KT8 9AU Friday 24 Nov 2017 to Sunday 7 Jan 2018 Deck The Halls A Christmas Flower Arranging Demonstration given by renowned flower arranger Nigel Whyles. It starts at 7.45 pm (doors open at 7.00 pm). Tickets at £12 can be ordered from 07895 024207 or 020 8894 6463, email ireneprout@btinternet.com Hampton Hill Theatre, High Street, Hampton Hill, Middlesex TW12 1NZ Monday 6 Nov 2017 Normansfield Christmas Craft Fair This is a wonderful craft fair in the Langdon Down Centre. All proceeds go to the Down's Syndrome Association. 25-30 stalls selling handcrafted gifs - ideal for Christmas shopping. Items on sale are jewellery, ceramics, prints, gifts and much more. Also, a coffee shop and children's craft area. Admission is FREE. We are open from 11am to 4.30pm Normansfield Theatre Middlesex TW11 9PS Saturday 25 Nov 2017 Contact telephone: 0333 1212 300 Squires Christmas Lunch Join us for a fabulous festive feast this Christmas season with great food, beautiful decorations and a fantastic atmosphere! 12-3pm. 3-courses: Adult £18.95 – Child £12.95. 2-courses: Adult £15.95 – Child £9.95. Squires Garden Centre - Woodstock Lane North Long Ditton Surrey KT6 5HN Saturday 11 Nov 2017 to Saturday 23 Dec 2017Contact telephone: 020 8398 7170 Sandown Park Festive Gift Fair 2017 Our Festive Gift Fair is in the large and airy Surrey Hall with all facilities and catering within the room and free parking for more than 3,000 cars. A festive atmosphere offering a wide range of unique and exciting gifts and crafts including jewellery, clothing, candles, soaps, scarves, toys, fine foods and so much more. Adults: £6 Senior/Concessions: £5.40 Under 16’s: Free Sandown Park Racecourse, Esher, Surrey KT10 9AJ Friday 1 Dec 2017 to Sunday 3 Dec 2017 Contact telephone: 07496 060168 Shooting Star Chase Santa Sky Walk Join us for our new festive challenge for 2017. Channel your inner Santa as you climb and zip through the trees in this exhilarating adventure suitable for the whole family (children over 8). Registration is £20 per person and includes your Santa suit, certificate of completion and Christmas stocking goodie bag. Skywalk Adventure, Sandown Sports, More Lane, Esher, Surrey KT10 8AN Saturday 2 Dec 2017 Contact telephone: 01932 823100 Molesey WI meets at Imber Court on the first Wednesday of every month 7.30pm for 8pm, where we have a guest speaker or activity. Visitors are welcome for a £5 fee. First visit is free with a copy of Molesey Matters. Follow us on Facebook - Molesey Women's Institute (Molesey Crafty Ladies). Molesey Local History Society Tuesday 14 November 2017, 8pm Educating Molesey: Memories of Schools and Schooling in Times Past St Lawrence School, Church Road, KT8 9DR

To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

49

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Index of Advertisers Art Exhition Glazing/Windows/Doors Sunbury Working Artists 19 Hi Profile House of Surrey Bathrooms Walton Bathrooms 17 Novaglass Village Windows Building W Brown and Son 16 Health/Fitness MiBody Care for The Elderly Moor House Care Home 8 Slimming World ProMedica 24 43 Spine Central Simply Carers 23 Weightwatchers Surrey Homecare 15 Insurance Complete Cover Car/Repairs/MOT Esher Tyres and Exhausts 30 Hard To Insure Council Kitchens Blue Badge 23 Ashford Kitchens Cleaning Services Oven Cleaning Jackie’s Cleaning 40 Green Badge Oven Clean Nick Lewis Cleaning 37 Ovenclean The Oven Man Dentists Gentle Dental Practice 51 Restaurants/Bars/Pubs Smilessence 26/27 The Averna The Stables Electrical Services Lee McCarthy 31 Roofing Good Roofs Events Hampton Court Palace 6 RM Roofing PAH Santa Fun Run 28 Schools ACS Cobham Funeral Services Alan Greenwood 34 Halliford School Lodge Bros 44 Hampton Court House Garden Services/Supplies Sell for Cash Easicut Mowers 46 JC Stamps Longacres 13

Stoves Kindle Stoves Tailoring Laura Alteration Theatres The Hammond Theatre 25 Venues 43 Molesey Boat Club 42 41 34 36 52 16

14 10 22

2 38

18 46 22

December 2017 Issue Closing on 20th November

9 25

paul@villagematters.co.uk Or call

39 46

Or now book online

5

20 24 32 21

07946 494288 www.villagematters.co.uk

Molesey Advertising Rates (Ex VAT) 1/8th page Quarter page Half page Full Page

We are now on Facebook. Check us out :@moleseymattersmagazine

29

£35 £65 £110 £210

10% off for 3 months for quarter page or larger

Disclaimer: Whilst every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of the information included in this publication, neither the publisher nor the editorial contributors can accept any liability to any party for loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence, accident or any other cause. Molesey Matters does not endorse any advertising material included in this publication. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval systems or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the publisher.

Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

50

www.villagematters.co.uk


To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

51

Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk


Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

52

www.villagematters.co.uk

Molesey Matters November 2017  

The local community magazine for both East and West Molesey

Advertisement