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Molesey

Putting Local Business First

Matters

Keeping a Community Together

February 2018 Issue 17

FREE to 9000 Homes and Businesses in East and West Molesey

Hampton Court Chase : Tutankhamen : Recycle Plastic : Are you a “Leaper� Or email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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Welcome! Christmas and New Year have now long gone. We are now heading towards Spring and from there Summer. Lots to look forward to. For me, one of the main tasks is to get back into the garden and begin the annual tidy up. Certainly after the high winds we experienced in January. Everything is all over the place! In this month’s issue we hear about Henry VIII’s hunting grounds, and remember Howard Carter breaking the seal on Tutankhamen's tomb. We look at Scouting in Molesey, the

February 2018 Molesey Conservatives talk to the Elmbridge Neighbourhood Team, and we recall when our own Princess Elizabeth found out she would be Queen. Two last things, firstly don’t forget Valentines Day, and secondly please turn to page 14, and try to help find much loved Louis the cat! See you in March!

Reader Offers Longacres - £’s off Roses Imber Court - Discount on Weddings booked by 1st April The Mitre - 6 Nations Meal and Beer £15.95 Lodge Bros - £100 off a Will or Lasting Power of Attorney Tyres 4 Less - Free winter check Esher Tyres - 15% off until 28th Feb Time For You - £15 off with the advert Oven Man - Free microwave test Village Windows - 20% off until 28th Feb

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Contents Hampton Court Chase Scouting in Molesey Opening the Tomb of Tutankhamen Are you a Leaper? Molesey Conservatives 2018 - The Year of The Dog Recycle Plastic The Horse Rangers A Princess becomes a Queen Films for Valentine’s Day Safer Internet Day Urban Wildlife Garden Recipe of the Month Garden View Molesey Resident’s Association Dominic Raab Events we like Index of Advertisers

Molesey Director: Paul Chard Telephone : 07946 494288 Email : paul@villagematters.co.uk Website :www.villagematters.co.uk Cover Photo courtesy of Molesey Matters reader Sally Findlay Send any photos (300dpi) for consideration to: paul@villagematters.co.uk Check us out on Facebook. @moleseymattersmagazine

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Hampton Court Chase Source Various In the United Kingdom a chase is a type of common land used for hunting to which there are no specifically designated officers and laws but instead reserved hunting rights for one or more persons. Similarly, a Royal

Chase. The chase was designated for the "nourishing, generation, and feeding of beasts of venery, and fowls of warren” and of course for Henry’s favourite pastime, stag – hunting. During his later years, when Henry found it difficult to travel to his favourite hunting grounds, he acquired further land between East Molesey and Oatlands, his palace in Weybridge. To connect the two palaces, a new road was created along the route of the present Hurst Road, by-passing the villages of East and West Molesey After Henry VIII’s death in 1547 the Chase was disparked and the land either sold or leased. The Act setting up the Chase however has never been rescinded so, technically, the area remains to this day a royal forest, although of course much changed.

MOUSE

Chase is a type of Crown Estate by the same description, but where certain rights are reserved for a member of the British Royal Family. In 1539 Hampton Court Chase was created an 'Honour' by an Act of Parliament instigated by Henry VIII and passed as a public act by approval of Parliament and the King. Henry thereby created the first forest since the New Forest of William the Conqueror and obtained the rights to a share of cattle and game to Hampton Court Palace that Henry had acquired from Cardinal Wolsey in 1525 He acquired the manors adjoining Hampton Court, which included Esher, the Waltons, Oatlands and Byfleet, and converted the land lying south of the Thames into a fenced-off forest, to be known as the Hampton Court To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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Scouting in Molesey New research proves that Scouting helps young people to develop a sense of community spirit, curiosity about the world and tolerance of others, as well as a host of practical skills for life. Scouts are one-third more likely to take an active role in their communities.

Can you give a couple of hours a week as an adult volunteer in Molesey to support? We already know that Scouting develops socially engaged young people – individuals who are curious, kind, welcoming, active, resilient and extraordinarily equipped with skills for life. Now, we have evidence to back it up. A new research study has revealed, or rather – confirmed, that Scouting develops strong community engagement in young people, fostering a culture of curiosity and acceptance .Commissioned by The Scout Association, the study gathered data from over 2,000 young people, both Scouts and nonScouts, and was independently conducted by SocStats, an agency that specialises in measuring impact in social sector organisations. The findings are an inspiring reminder of why we do what we do. As it turns out, Scouting really can change the world. By creating a culture of curiosity and acceptance in young people, Scouting strengthens communities and contributes to greater social cohesion. Here are a few highlights from the report: Scouts are one-third more likely to take an active role in their communities Scouts are one-third more likely to help out in their local area, feel greater responsibility to their local community and volunteer to help others Scouts are 18% more likely to be curious

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about the world around them and 12% more likely to accept diversity in other people’s backgrounds and beliefs Unsurprisingly, Scouts are 32% more likely to be physically active than young people who don’t take part in Scouting Scouts are also 13% more likely to demonstrate mental resilience The research highlighted how Scouting develops skills that are vital in the workplace. Compared to their non-Scouting counterparts, Scouts are: 17% more likely to demonstrate leadership skills 11% more likely to be better problem solvers 19% more likely to show emotional intelligence 17% more likely to be able to work well in teams

1st Molesey (Jaguar) Sea Scout Group The Hut, 193 Walton Rd, Molesey, West Molesey KT8 2DY info@jaguarseascouts.org.uk @jaguarseascouts

Source : The Scouting Association

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16th February 1923 Howard Carter breaks the seal on the Tutankhamen’s burial chamber Source: Wards Book of Days The discovery of the intact tomb of Tutankhamen was the foremost contribution to the study of Egyptology. Howard Carter had received little or no education. He had been born in Brompton, London, in 1874, brought up in Swaffham, Norfolk, and given some training in drawing and painting. At the age of 17, he obtained a post with the British Archaeological Survey of Egypt, copying hieroglyphs and drawings. Carter worked for eight years with the British Survey, copying out inscriptions and hieroglyphs for translation by the erudite members of the group, and would have liked to have carried out his own excavations but promotion was denied to him on account of his lack of education. In 1899, Carter obtained a job with the Egyptian government’s Antiquities Department, supervising excavations in the Valley of the Kings, the most prolific excavation site in Egypt. He discovered the tombs of Hatshepsut and Thutmose IV, and his research indicated the existence of a previously unknown pharaoh, Tutankhamen. Unfortunately, Carter was obliged to resign after an altercation between the site guards and a group of bellicose French tourists. In 1907, Carter was sought out by Lord Carnarvon, a distinguished collector, who promised funds for a private search for the elusive Tutankhamen. Carter searched for years for the lost pharaoh but without results, and Carnarvon was on the point of discontinuing the operation, when, in 1922, Carter found the entrance to a tomb. He telegraphed Carnarvon to come at once, hoping that this was indeed the resting place of To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

Tutankhamen and not daring to enter without his patron being present. When Carnarvon and his entourage eventually arrived, Carter made a breach in the doorway and, with the aid of a candle, saw a hoard of gold and ebony effects and two sentinel statues, guarding the entrance of what seemed to be a burial chamber. Carter had to obtain permission from the Egyptian authorities before opening the burial chamber. Meanwhile he catalogued the contents of the antechamber. On 16th February 1923, Carter and Carnarvon, accompanied by Egyptian state officials, opened the sealed doorway and found the sarcophagus of Tutankhamen. It has been suggested, from sources in Carter’s notes, that Carter and his patron had taken a sneak preview of the burial chamber, feeling that their investment of effort and money entitled them to take the honour of the first peek at the tomb. Carter catalogued and recorded the entire collection but, when he unwrapped the linen bandages of the mummy, the pharaoh’s skull fell away from the body and landed on the stone pavement, making a slight indent. Apart from this minor calamity, Carter ensured that the collection reached the safety of the National Egyptian Museum Carter then retired from active archaeology and became a showman of Egyptology, touring the United States, giving illustrated lectures on his discoveries to large and attentive audiences. Carter died at the age of 64, giving the lie to the alleged ‘Curse of the mummy’s tomb’, and is buried in Putney Vale Cemetery.

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Are you a ‘Leaper’? Imagine only having your birthday every four years or so? Yes, you would age chronologically just like everyone else, but if you are a ‘leaper’, aka someone born on February 29th, you rarely get to celebrate your real birthday on the date of your birth. In the United Kingdom and Hong Kong, when a person born on February 29 turns 18, they are considered to

have their birthday on March 1 in the relevant year. In New Zealand, a person born on February 29 is deemed to have their birthday on February 28 in non-leap years. But what is a leap day or year? February 29, is a date added to most years that are divisible by 4, such as 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020, and 2024. The statistics behind the number are surprisingly simple: Four years is equal to 1,460 days, and the leap year rounds it up to 1,461. Assuming the odds of being born are the same for every day, your chances of being a ‘leaper’ turn out to be To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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one in 1,461. A leap day is observed because the Earth's period of orbital revolution around the Sun takes approximately 6 hours longer than 365 days (8,760 hours). A leap day compensates for this lag, realigning the calendar with the Earth's position in the Solar System; otherwise, seasons would occur later than intended in the calendar year. Since 1988, Anthony, Texas, has championed itself as the Leap Year Capital of the World: In 2012, the town’s three-day celebration included a car show, an ice hockey game, and a golf tournament. At the website of the Honour Society of Leap Year Day Babies (“spreading Leap Year day awareness” for 19 years), fellow ‘leapers’ share tales of woe: children who thought their birthdays were taken away, parents begging and bribing doctors to fudge kids’ birth certificates to February 28 or March 1. A leap year conundrum is used in the plot of Gilbert and Sullivan's 1879 comic opera The Pirates of Penzance. As a child, Frederic was apprenticed to a band of pirates until his 21st birthday. Having passed his 21st year, he leaves the pirate band and falls in love. However, since he was born on February 29, his 21st birthday will not arrive until he is eighty-four, so he must leave his fiancée and return to the pirates. The next leap day is February 29, 2020. The last Leap Day was on February 29, 2016. Any readers who have a birthday on February 29th, Molesey Matters would love to hear from you! Source: Various Or call Paul on 07946 494288


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Molesey Conservatives Talk to The Elmbridge Neighbourhood Team Molesey Conservatives have been speaking to Sgt Greg Turner of Elmbridge Neighbourhood Team at Surrey Police to get an update on what is being done about the recent spate of burglaries. He said burglary had been showing a downward trend in recent years but has now started rising in Surrey and nationally. Most crimes are opportunistic, non-violent, ‘quick in and out’ seeking items such as cash, Sgt Greg Turner watches and jewellery. They are typically carried out between 4pm and 10pm. Surrey Police has launched Operation Spearhead to crackdown on the burglars using the deployment of overt and covert resources, as well as ongoing work that isn't allowed to be made public. Six arrests have been made in the last fortnight, with two charged and on remand in Elmbridge. Advice to the community is to be vigilant, look out for neighbours and report anything suspcious to the police by calling 101. Is your home security effective and appropriate? Police guidance can be found at: https:// surrey.police.uk/…/protect-your-home-and…/burglary/ Residents should consider such issues as: •Window and door locks •Remote monitored burglar alarms •Security cameras, both indoor and outdoor (wireless ones are now highly affordable) •Security doorbells Access, particularly from the rear of properties where ladders, garden furniture and single-story extensions have all been used to gain entry. To advertise email paul@villagematters.co.uk

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The Police can be emailed via their webpage, which is monitored during weekday office hours. You can also request a visit from Mike Bessent, crime reduction specialist to provide free bespoke home security advice. Use the form at https://surrey.police.uk/ elmbrid…/east-molesey-weston-green/ You can also sign-up for witness appeals, crime updates, crime prevention advice and news via https://www.intheknow.community/

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CYRILLE REGIS (1958-2018) A Molesey Legend A flood of tributes has greeted the sad and shocking news that Cyrille Regis, the former West Brom and England striker, died on 14th January aged 59. He was a pioneer for black footballers in the game when he played alongside Laurie Cunningham and Brendon Batson at The Hawthorns. Regis, who passed away following a cardiac arrest, won the last of what should have been far more than five international caps in 1987, the year in which he also won the FA Cup

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with Coventry City. His career however began with him earning ÂŁ5-a-week at our own Surrey side Molesey to supplement the ÂŁ20 he earned on building sites working as an apprentice electrician. As a Molesey player, he scored around 25 goals during his one campaign for the club. He was then approached by Borehamwood, but did not join them as he had been told by Molesey manager John Sullivan that he was under contract. Regis later discovered that he was too young to be under a professional contract and quit Molesey to join semi-professional Hayes of the Isthmian League, signing on 7 July 1976. His most prolific time as a striker was with West Bromwich Albion, for whom he scored 112 goals in 297 appearances. He was awarded an MBE in 2008.

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Crossword 1

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Solution on Page 47 6

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Across 1 Place where you can stargaze indoors (11) 9 Member of the clergy (abbr) (3) 10 Seductive woman (9) 11 Rigidly, inflexibly (8) 12 Ban, prohibit (4) 14 Regional style of speech (6) 16 Oat-based breakfast food (6) 18 Alone (4) 19 Loosest fitting (8) 22 Came together again (9) 23 Sense of self-esteem / self-importance (3) 24 No hearing at all (slang) (4,2,1,4)

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Down 24

2 Crowbar (5)

7 Intruders, infiltrators (11)

3 Observing, seeing (8)

8 League, club (11)

20 A bet with equal stakes on both sides (5) 21 Dog's bark (4)

4 Eastern place of worship (6)

13 Congested (6,2)

5 Appraise, estimate (4)

15 Light perfume (7)

6 Rubbish, no good (7)

17 University grounds (6)

By the Molesey Local History Society

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It’s the Year of The Dog! By Sarah Davey 2018 is the Chinese Year of the Dog. Dog is the symbol of loyalty and honesty. People born in the Year of the Dog are said to be honest, friendly, faithful, loyal, smart, straightforward, and have a strong sense of responsibility. There are twelve signs of the Chinese Zodiac: rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog and boar. Here is the folk tale behind them. Long ago in China the Emperor decided to invent a way to measure time. On his birthday he gathered all the animals by a great river and told them that there would be a swimming race. The first twelve animals to cross the fast-flowing river would be declared the winners and each would be named one of the twelve signs of the zodiac. The animals lined up along the river bank. The rat and the cat were best friends and they were worried because they were poor swimmers. So they asked the ox if he would carry them across and the kind ox agreed. He told the cat and the rat to climb on to his back then carried them across the river. They were excited to see that he was leading the race. But before he reached the bank the rat pushed the cat into the water so he could jump on to the ox’s head and leap to the bank claiming first place. The Emperor did not see the rat’s dirty trick so named him the first sign of the zodiac. The poor ox was tricked into second place. The tiger wasn’t a natural swimmer but fought the current all the way across the river to arrive third. The emperor was so impressed he named the tiger the third sign. The rabbit knew he couldn’t beat the river so hopped across on some stepping stones, then jumped on to a log which carried him downstream until he was close enough to jump ashore. ‘Bravo!’ shouted the emperor, ‘I shall call the fourth sign after you.’

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Then a dragon swooped down to the shore. ‘Why didn’t you win the race when you can fly?’ asked the emperor. ‘First I needed to make some rain because the people needed water for their crops. Then I saw a little rabbit sitting on a log in the river so I blew him to shore.’ ‘That is kind,’ said the emperor. ‘You are a worthy winner of the fifth sign.’ He heard the sound of horse hooves. ‘Ah the sixth sign,’ said the emperor, but then a snake, which had wrapped itself around one of the horse’s legs wriggled out ahead and the horse jumped back. So the snake was named the sixth sign and the horse had to be satisfied with seventh. Then a raft arrived at the bank and a goat, a monkey and rooster climbed ashore. They explained how the rooster had found the raft, the monkey and goat had helped clear the weeds and then the goat and monkey had pushed the raft to shore. The emperor was very pleased at their co-operation and named the goat the eighth, the monkey the ninth, and the rooster the tenth sign of the zodiac. The dog arrived in eleventh place in spite of being one of the strongest swimmers. He said he had paused to take a bath because the river was so clean. The last animal to arrive was the boar. He had stopped for a snack then fell asleep. ‘You have still done well,’ said the emperor, ‘The final sign of the zodiac will be named after you. But do Walton you remember Road, the Don’t poor cat?Forget!! By the time he had managed to climb ashore, soaked and shivering he had missed his chance of being a winner. This made him very angry and is the reason why cats have hated rats and try to kill them ever since!

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Can anybody help a fellow reader? I found the article “The Last Thames Frost Fair” in last month’s Molesey Matters really interesting and I thought you would like to see the picture that I am forwarding to you. I don’t know where my parents got this poster advertising a Frost Fair (Froste Fayre!) being held in Hampton but it hung in their hallway for many years. They weren’t old enough to have personally obtained the item at the time of the fair and we moved to Hampton in 1969 with no relatives having previously lived in the area. I particularly love the way the poster is written in olde worlde writing and ‘speak’. It’s a shame it’s not dated though as a clue to which winter it relates to would be of real interest. Regards Carol Taylor

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Sudoku

Solution on Page 47

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Shrove Tuesday th

February 13 is Shrove Tuesday and I will be tossing pancakes with the best of them. Usually I am a traditionalist and favour lemon and sugar topping but this year in the interests of research I canvassed my friends for their favourite sweet and savoury pancake fillings, and tried them out. Here are my top seven. Nutty chocolate spread and banana - This tasty filling bulks the pancakes out, and makes the batter go further. Perfect if there are lots of people at your pancake supper. Fresh mango and Greek yoghurt with a splash of Cointreau - Very sophisticated and utterly delicious Fruits of the forest with vanilla ice cream and a splash of Amaretto liqueur - This one was a

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revelation. The liqueur works brilliantly with the fruit, and the hot pancakes with cold ice cream is a sublime combination. Clearly I have classy friends! Blueberries and maple syrup – This contribution from an American friend goes well with thick or thin pancakes. She tops hers with bacon, but you can leave that out. If you like. Mushrooms, tomatoes and bacon - for a British brunch-style pancake, or maybe a savoury supper. Wilted spinach and Ricotta cheese - Sprinkle with a little fresh nutmeg and this makes a very tasty vegetarian supper. Stewed rhubarb and crème fraîche - You can prepare your rhubarb as tart or sweet as you like. I liked mine tart. The creme fraiche works really well with it. I scraped some vanilla seeds into mine and beat them in before serving. This is officially my new favourite way to eat pancakes. Enjoy.

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Recycle Plastic And Don’t Forget The Bathroom By Monica Chard The recent fabulous Blue Planet 2 highlighted again the shocking state of our oceans and the scourge of plastics on the environment. We have changed our shopping habits and make a conscious effort not to buy cotton buds with plastic. If you can, avoid single use plastics like straws. There are new movements afoot to get coffee cups made in a different way so they can be recycled (yes, we all thought they could but they are coating in plastic, so can’t!). There is a petition also to introduce a deposit scheme to plastic bottles. Over 30 million plastic bottles are thrown away every day in the UK! In countries such as Denmark deposit schemes are widespread. I made the mistake of crushing a beer can when I was there last year and there was a sharp intake of breath around the table. The reason? Cans are taken, along with bottles, to recycling points in supermarkets and put through a machine which issues you with a refund. That surely should be something we can look at in this country. But talking about plastics, you may not be clear on what can and can’t be recycled.

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big difference when it comes to recycling. In particular, plastic bottles are often recycled from the kitchen but get forgotten when it comes to the bathroom. There are lots of plastic bottles from your bathroom you may not realise you can recycle, including shampoo, conditioner and shower gel bottles. You can also recycle hand wash, mouthwash, moisturiser, toilet cleaner, bathroom spray and bleach bottles. Nearly half of all plastics that could have been recycled are thrown away in Surrey every year, that’s almost 4,000 tonnes. If all of these were recycled, as well as helping the environment it could also save Surrey nearly £300,000 a year, which could go towards other council services like social care, libraries and schools. Your recycled plastics could even be turned into new furniture, children’s toys, paint pots and even football shirts. There are some simple things you can do to make it easier to remember to recycle your plastic bottles from the bathroom. Why not put an extra recycling bin upstairs? Or if you live in a flat or don’t have much space, you could try hanging a bag over the back of a door. Just make sure you empty the contents into your recycling bin loose, not in the bag. Mike Goodman, Surrey County Council’s Cabinet Member for Environment and Planning said: “Recycling saves money by reducing disposal costs, so when you recycle from the smallest room in the home you’re helping to protect other council services like schools, roads and social care.” There are some things you can’t recycle from the bathroom, like razors, razor blades and the pumps from soap bottles. It’s easy to check using the Recycle for Surrey app and search tool. To find out what else you can and can’t recycle from the bathroom and from every room in your home visit recycleforsurrey.org.uk

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The Horse Rangers Association Founders Day 17th February - Hampton Court Palace Source: HRA The Horse Rangers Association is a charity dedicated to supporting children and young people from all backgrounds and abilities by giving them the opportunity to develop confidence and life skills through learning to ride and care for horses. Founded in 1954 by Raymond Gordon, we were originally based at Shepperton Studios. They moved to The Royal Mews, Hampton Court during the 1960s and their Patron at this time was HRH Princess Margaret. Raymond Gordon’s vision was to enable young people, who would not otherwise have the opportunity, to learn to look after and ride horses. From early in the charity’s existence, this included young people with disabilities. In 1975 they became a member group of Riding for the Disabled Association (RDA). Today, The Horse Rangers Association continues to offer opportunities to children and young people within our local community. The HRA continue to look at new ways to develop and improve their work and are striving to engage members of our local community in their outreach programmes. They continue to promote their charity and work tirelessly to raise funds for the organisation so that they can continue to exist long into the future, supporting so many individuals to become well-rounded members of society. The HRA

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are very fortunate to have Her Royal Highness Princess Michael of Kent as our Royal Patron. An accomplished horsewoman herself, she has been very supportive and regularly goes to their events. She takes a great interest in the individual Rangers and is extremely popular both with them, the volunteers and the guests whom she meets.

Saturday 17th February 12:30pm to 4:00pm – Founder’s Day In the early 1970s Raymond Gordon, the founder of The Horse Rangers Association, wished his Horse Rangers to have a London Church in which all members, including outlying troops could assemble. He approached Canon David Edwards, who at the time was Rector of St Margaret’s Church, Westminster Abbey. Canon Edwards was delighted to agree, and to mark this special association, he received the Horse Rangers’ Colours in St Margaret’s following the visit of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother to their Headquarters in June 1973. The Colours are installed over the font at the rear of the church, and the founder’s ashes are inurned in the wall, where they are marked by a stone plaque. In 2002 the association re-formed as The Horse Rangers Association (Hampton Court) Limited. Since 2010 the annual service to mark the Founder’s Birthday has been held at the Chapel Royal, Hampton Court Palace. Please come and support the fundraising; and see what the charity achieves. Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


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A Princess becomes a Queen 5/6 February 1952 Source:Various Treetops Hotel is a hotel in Aberdare National Park in Kenya near the township of Nyeri. Originally built in 1932, Treetops Lodge lies in the path of an ancient Elephant migratory route between the Aberdare Ranges and Mt Kenya National park, and is strategically sited right in front of a natural watering hole and salt lick, making it the perfect place to view game.

Treetops became famous around the world when Princess Elizabeth, as she then was, stayed there at the time of the death of her father, King George VI, which occurred on the night of 5/6 February 1952, while she was at Treetops. While the princess was certainly at Treetops on the night her father, George VI, died, she was not told until the following afternoon, by which time she had returned to a fishing lodge called Sagana, 20 miles away, that she had been given as a wed-

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ding present. It was there, beside a trout stream in the foothills of Mount Kenya, that Prince Philip broke the news. She was the first British monarch since King George I to be outside the country at the moment of suc-

cession, and also the first in modern times not to know the exact time of her accession because her father had died in his sleep at an unknown time. On the night her father died, before the event was known, Sir Horace Hearne, then Chief Justice of Kenya, had escorted the princess and her husband, Prince Philip, to a state dinner at the Treetops Hotel. After word of George VI's death reached the new Queen the following day, she returned immediately to Britain. The legendary hunter Jim Corbett, her bodyguard at the time, wrote the now famous lines in the visitors' log book: “For the first time in the history of the world, a young girl climbed into a tree one day a Princess and after having what she described as her most thrilling experience she climbed down from the tree next day a Queen — God bless her.” Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts


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Friends of Fleetside The wildlife and bird song on Molesey Heath at this time of year is lovely to hear and see. The fruit trees we planted this time last year are thriving and the path we reinstated is being well used. Our first project of the year was to open up the overgrown path that starts from the main gate to follow along by the River Fleet to the Mole. We had a successful morning clearing a large part of this area and plan to put in a seat, so you can enjoy the view of the river, watch the wildlife and maybe see a kingfisher that frequents this part of the river. Thanks to all the dog walkers who wished us luck as they passed us on their walks. Please be considerate when parking make sure the gates have enough access for emergency vehicles to get on to the heath and don’t block the resident’s

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drives. The Heath is a lovely walk for everyone so please keep it that way, dog walkers please use the poo bin, thank you. Please use this path to keep it open. We have two more fruit trees to plant to add to the small orchard. The fruit is free for all to enjoy. The community allotments are taking shape another meeting is at the Refresh Centre Walton Road on 14th. February, 2.00 to 4.00 pm. everyone welcome. We have lots of projects planned for the next few months if you would like to get involved, we meet once a month for about an hour, do our good dead then have tea and cake. For more information email: friendsoffleetside@gmail.com Thank you to the M.R.A. for their continued support with all our projects. We look forward to meeting you soon.

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Classic Films for Valentine’s Day You could go out for an expensive meal, or buy a bunch of overpriced red roses…or you could curl up with a glass of wine in front of a classic romantic film. There’s something for everyone, whether coupled-up or happily single. Annie Hall – This was probably the father of all romantic comedies. Alvy (Allen) is a cynical pessimist while Annie (Diane Keaton) is a ditsy, clumsy talented singer and photographer. If you’ve never seen it, don’t expect a neat ending (this is Woody Allen) but it showcases love in all its messy absurdness, and is sharp, funny and never cheesy. Ghost – This was 1990’s second highest grossing movie (Home Alone came out top). Patrick Swayze plays Sam, murdered in the opening scenes. His spirit tries to warn his grieving lover (Demi Moore) that her life too is in danger. To do this he enlists the help of a reluctant psychic played by Whoopie Goldberg. The result is by turns tender, funny, and bittersweet. You will never hear Unchained Melody again without shedding a tear.

complex then this is the film for you. ItalianAmerican widow Loretta (played by Cher) accepts a marriage proposal from her doltish boyfriend, Johnny, but then finds herself falling for his younger brother, Ronny (Nick Cage). She resists, but Ronny blames his brother for the accident in which he lost his hand and has no scruples about pursuing her in Johnny’s absence. As Loretta falls further in love she learns that she's not the only one in her family with a secret romance. Cher is a surprisingly good actor and the chemistry between the leads is great. The Wedding Singer – This engaging film is actually a parody of all things eighties. But the leads play their roles sincerely and that’s what makes this work. Robbie (Adam Sandler sporting a fabulous mullet) is a singer, while Julia (Drew Barrymore) is a waitress. They are both in relationships with the wrong people but fortune intervenes to help them discover each other. This is pure romantic cheese, but it’s top quality cheese so serve with only the best crackers. Happy Valentine’s Day.

Pretty Woman – This is rather cheesy but has survived the test of time (mostly). It’s a Cinderella story really as Vivian (played by Julie Roberts), a prostitute with a heart of gold, is hired by a businessman (Richard Gere) as an escort and turns his life upside down. As Good as It Gets – No cheese here, just dry wit and snarky humour, delivered perfectly by Jack Nicholson playing Melvin Udall, a misanthropic author with OCD who falls for Carol (Helen Hunt), a waitress who can’t stand him. It’s a story of redemption. By Sarah Davey

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Safer Internet Day Safer Internet Day is now celebrated globally in February each year to promote the safe and positive use of digital technology. The day helps to highlight positive uses of technology and to explore how we create a better and safer online community. This year’s slogan is Create, Connect and Share Respect: A better internet starts with you. Here are some steps we can all take to stay safe online:

Create complex passwords - Create strong, unique passwords for all your critical accounts. Corporate hacks are commonplace now. One database breach can reveal tens of thousands of user passwords. If you reuse your passwords, a hacker can take the leaked data from one attack and use it to login to your other accounts. The best advice is to use a password manager to help you create and store strong passwords for all of your accounts. Boost your network security - Now that your logins are safer, make sure that your connections are secure. When you are at home or at work a password-protected router will encrypt your data. When you are out and about you might be tempted to use free, public Wi-Fi. But this is often unsecured, which means it’s relatively easy for a hacker to access your device or information. If you access the internet a lot when you are away from home it’s worth investing in a Virtual Private Network (VPN). A VPN is a piece of software that creates a secure connection over the internet, so you can safely connect from anywhere.

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Use a firewall - This is an electronic barrier that blocks unauthorized access to your computers and devices. It is often included with comprehensive security software. A firewall ensures that all of the devices connected to your network are secured, including Internet of Things (IoT) devices like smart thermostats and webcams. This is important since many IoT devices aren’t equipped with their own security measures, giving hackers a vulnerable point of entry to your entire network.

Watch what you click - Many of today’s online threats are based on phishing or social engineering, when you are tricked into revealing personal or sensitive information for fraudulent purposes. Spam emails, phony “free” offers, online quizzes all use these tactics to entice you to click on dangerous links or give up your personal information. Share selectively - Be cautious about what you share, particularly when it comes to your identity information. Information could be used to impersonate you, or guess your passwords and logins. Think mobile! - Mobile devices face new risks: dangerous apps and fraudulent links sent by text message. Don’t respond to messages from strangers, and only download apps from official app stores after reading reviews first. Make sure that your security software is enabled on your mobile, just like your computers and other devices. By Ian McMullan

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Valid until 28th February 2018

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Do You Need a Hearing Test? Here are five simple ways to tell if it’s time to check your hearing: You often ask people to repeat themselves - It sounds as though people around you are mumbling all the time and you find it hard to hear people unless they’re facing you directly. It's more common to experience hearing loss in the high frequencies so another sign is having trouble understanding women and children who tend to have higher-pitched voices. Your family complains that the TV is too loud If you’re turning up the volume to a point where those around you complain about how loud it is, it might be time to pay attention, especially since listening to excessively loud music can do further damage to your hearing. You hear a ringing or buzzing noise in your

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ears - Tinnitus occurs when you hear sounds like ringing or buzzing noise in your ears when no such sound is present. Sometimes it's temporary e.g. after attending a loud concert. But ringing which doesn’t fade away, without any apparent cause is a common first sign of hearing loss. You strain to hear in noisy places - You struggle to focus on what people are saying in places with background noise, such as a restaurant or shopping centre. This can make you feel very tired. You miss everyday sounds - If people complain you miss their calls or say they have to knock for ages before you answer the door consider it a warning sign, especially if combined with people complaining you have the TV or radio set too loud. Whilst it can be tough to admit your hearing isn’t as good as it used to be, it’s best to take action early on. With the right support and technology, hearing loss doesn’t need to keep you from enjoying all the fun things in life. Book an appointment with your GP or an audiologist today.

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Urban Wildlife Garden You don’t need to live in the country to enjoy wildlife A Blog by Molesey Resident - Della Reynolds It’s February and the garden is feeling pretty sorry for itself. Those bright, optimistic blooms of summer have now been deformed by winter’s icy fingers and hang in limp clumps of tarnished brown leaves. I didn’t put the geraniums away in the frost proof shelter this year mainly because the protective plastic cover is lost somewhere in the loft. To give them credit, the geraniums have attempted to bloom throughout the winter months and given just a glimpse of sunshine would soon push out new buds and leaves. These guys are ready to go. Better than last year when I brought them all out of their snug little shelter only to find that every one of them had died (of boredom). The bulbs which have survived repeated squirrel inspection have signalled the arrival of spring with a show of snowdrops from midJanuary. I love the way that nature persists in the face of adversity which is a lesson to us all. Spring cannot come a moment too soon for me, tired as I am of winter. I had that cough/cold bug in January. The one which puts you in bed for four days with a nose so blocked you need to put straws in your ears to breath. I’m ready now, just as the garden is ready to shake off the dull winter greys and bloom again. Let us hope that March does not have a trick up her sleeve and bring in the snow we have to date avoided. The garden critters appear to be thriving. I read in the RSPB magazine that there is a national decline in starlings but clearly they have not been monitoring the daily squabble who line up on the branches of my tree for their morning meal worm. It will soon be time for them to build their nests and introduce a whole new generation to the fast food fly-by restaurant in East Molesey. Although I put out the food most mornings there is something about food stolen which makes it all the more appealPlease mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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ing. The chips you take from your partner’s plate always taste better than your own and as we know stolen food has no calories. There is a rather cheeky squirrel that gets into my shed so he can go rummaging through the fat ball box. I guess if he manages to get through the cardboard and the plastic covering he can take the whole thing away for a private feast. Also, the mice in the shed have been gradually nibbling away at the plastic lids on the seed boxes. Not happy to eat the seed which invariably get spilled on the floor they want to climb into the box for an orgy of gluttony among the sunflower hearts. The only problem with their plan is that they don’t appear to have an exit route. None of them have thought to weave together a little ladder so they can get both in and out of the seed box. Once they manage to find their way in I’ll know about it as they will all be playing sleeping lions when I open the lid in the morning hoping not to be noticed. Once I’ve got them all out I’ll have to tape up the hole in the lid and the whole game begins again. I know that the slugs have been active over the winter months as I have found them unable to return home before morning and dried out by the daylight. There is a small corner by the bench which appears to be a kind of killing zone for slugs. First one, then another lying dead with no obvious signs of trauma. As if new victims are stopping to rubber neck a third is then found lying close to the dried up corpses. I started wondering if some kind of toxic substance was on the ground here. I did apply some wood oil to the bench in November which may have spilled onto the paving slabs. Without a full autopsy the truth will never be known.

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Recipe of The Month Vanilla Panna Cotta with Raspberry Sauce

Preparation time: 1-2 hours

the fridge for at least an hour, until set.

Cooking time: 10-20 minutes

To make the sauce place the sugar, water and the splash of liqueur into a pan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved.

Servings: 4 Ingredients For the panna cotta 3 gelatine leaves 250ml/9fl oz milk 250ml/9fl oz double cream 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways, seeds scraped out 25g/1oz sugar For the sauce 175g/6oz sugar 175ml/6fl oz water Splash raspberry, cherry or blackcurrant liqueur 350g/12oz raspberries

Remove the pan from the heat and add the raspberries. Use a hand blender to blitz the sauce until smooth. Pass it through a sieve to remove the seeds. To serve, pour the sauce over the panna cotta and garnish with the blueberries and a sprig of mint. Alternative serving method - pour the panna cotta mix into oiled moulds rather than serving dishes, and set in the fridge as before. Blitz half the raspberries into the sauce and strain through the sieve, then stir in the remaining raspberries. When the panna cotta are set, dip the moulds in hot water for a few seconds

To serve Sprigs of fresh mint blueberries (optional)

and

Method To make the panna cotta, soak the gelatine leaves in a little cold water until soft. Place the milk, cream, vanilla pod, scraped seeds and sugar into a heavy-bottomed pan and bring to a simmer. Remove the vanilla pod and discard. Squeeze the water out of the gelatine leaves, then add to the pan. Remove from the heat and stir until the gelatine has dissolved. Divide the mixture between four pretty glass serving bowls and set aside to cool. Place into

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and turn the panna cotta out on to a plate, spoon over the sauce and decorate with blueberries and mint.

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Garden View This month - Greenhouse Joy I am an impatient gardener. By February I am always eager to get started and my greenhouse means that I can do just that. A greenhouse means that I don’t fear the weather, I can potter in my garden all year round and I can grow a range of plants that would not survive without protection. Most gardens have room for at least a tiny greenhouse and its well worth trying to incorporate one into your space. Before choosing a greenhouse, check whether your local planning authority places any restrictions in terms of size or position. Usually there are no problems. Ideally a greenhouse should be placed in a bright spot because poor light and heavy shade will mean sickly spindly plants. Buy as big a greenhouse as you can accommodate because I guarantee that no matter how big it seems at first you will fill it. You can make a greenhouse from poles and polythene but it won’t last more than a couple of years and won’t be pretty to look at. Fully glazed aluminium greenhouses are good value, and if you like wood then go for western red cedar, which ages well and lasts a long time. It’s important to have level foundations You don’t have to heat a greenhouse but I like to because it lets me get an early start in spring, and keeps my tender pot plants alive through the winter. When I had an unheated greenhouse my frost-tender plants rarely survived. I prefer electric heating, which doesn’t smell and doesn’t produce the excessive amounts of water vapour associated with paraffin. Make Please mention Molesey Matters when responding to adverts

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sure you use a qualified electrician and that all the sockets are rated for outdoor use. Fit a thermostat and the heat will only come on when necessary, making it very economical. At the other end of the year make sure you have ventilation, or your plants will cook. If you can afford it go for the automatic arms which open ventilators if the greenhouse reaches a certain temperature. Also consider blinds to help prevent sun-scorch. I arrange my greenhouse with staging on one side and a soil bed on the other for my tomatoes to grow in, and I’ve attached some guttering and a downpipe to a water butt so I can collect rainwater. It’s my little haven in February; where I plant seeds and imagine what my garden will look like in a three months’ time.

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T R E S P A S S E R S

Solution to February Sudoku

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P L A N E T A E O E E V T E M P E I P T R I C T L Y I E C C E N T M O G C O L O B A G O W M E G R O U P E N O U D E A F A S A

R I U M A S A T R E S S E L S V E T O B S C U E S L I N A G I E S T E V I D E G O U N N P O S T

Solution to February Quick Crossword

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NEWS FROM THE MOLESEY RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION Hampton Court Train Service South Western Railway recently consulted on proposed changes to the timetable for a number of its services, including Hampton Court to Waterloo. There were some welcome changes – in particular an earlier first train in the morning, and a later last train back from London in the evening. But there was one aspect of the proposed changes which would badly affect many Molesey residents. Many passengers arriving at Hampton Court Station use the Transport for London 411 bus to get back to West Molesey – but under the proposed new timetable, the train from London would arrive at Hampton Court station shortly after the 411 bus leaves. This is of particular concern in the evening, when there is only one 411 bus an hour. This leaves Hampton Court at 21.19; 22.19; 23.19 and 00.19. Under the new timetable the train would arrive at Hampton Court at 20 minutes past the hour, leaving passengers having to wait an hour for the next bus and, if they are on the last train, missing it altogether. We have contacted South Western Railway to point out that this would cause unnecessary hardship for many people, and we have asked them to reconsider the timetable as a priority, to ensure that the incoming train arrives early enough for passengers to connect with the 411 bus; or liaise with Transport for London to negotiate a slightly later time for the bus to depart. Molesey Residents Association Annual General Meeting Our AGM will take place on Monday 26 March at 8pm at the Molesey Community Centre (also known as Mole Hall). All members are welcome – you can hear what the Association has been busy with over the last year, and there will be an opportunity to talk to MRA councillors and committee members after the meeting, and to enjoy some refreshments. Non-members can attend if they join at the door and pay the modest £3 subscription. Springtime Marie Curie Charity Appeal Spring is not far away now and we look forward to the daffodils blooming all over Molesey (many planted by MRA) as the signs of approaching betTo advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

ter weather. These signs of Spring and regeneration cause many people to think of loved ones no longer with them. MRA will be running its usual Springtime charity appeal again this year. Anyone wishing to remember their loved ones may make a donation to charity via MRA – and we will double any donations we receive (up to a total of £400). Please send donations for £3 upwards, in the form of cheques made out to MRA, to Ernest Mallett at 20, Walton Road, East Molesey KT8 0DF and we will do the rest. Memorial boards will be erected at prominent points around Molesey with the names of the giver and those they wish to remember. Resulting from last year’s appeal Marie Curie Cancer Care received almost £550 and Alzheimers £200 for which they were very grateful. Thank You! MRA Membership We would like to thank sincerely existing members for their ongoing support. If it were not for them, the Association would not be able to represent Molesey’s interests as we do. We are nothing to do with any political party and exist solely for the benefit of Molesey. We would encourage as many existing (and new) members as possible to renew their MRA membership subscriptions either by post or by bank transfer. Increasing numbers of members are doing things this way, and this is a great help given the limited number of collectors we have to knock on doors. . The subscription remains a tiny £3 per household per year (or you can pay £15 for five years – and this is a great help to us). Please forward your subscription to our Treasurer, Colin Bocking at 7 Mole Abbey Gardens, West Molesey, KT8 1QD; or perhaps more conveniently, you can send it by bank transfer to MRA Santander account 86284805, sort code 09-01-28. Please also send an email to: mra.subs@yahoo.com with your name and, importantly, address – so we know who has sent in the subscription! We will then send you a membership card/receipt.

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Dominic Raab Our Local MP With the festive period behind us, we should look forward with optimism to 2018. There are three positive and practical reasons why. First, I am making sure your local concerns about crime are being listened to by the government. I welcomed Home Secretary Amber Rudd and Surrey Police Commissioner David Munro to Elmbridge this month to hear residents’ concerns, in particular regarding a recent local increase in burglaries and lowlevel anti-social behaviour. Surrey Police has launched a burglary operation entitled ‘Operation Spearhead’, which has made available more forensic kits, taken action to raise local awareness, and directed more officers to local burglary hotspots. Surrey police has also recently partnered with Dominic welcomes the Home Secretary National Trading Standards’ ‘Friends Against Scams’ initiative to protect people from becoming the victims of fraud. These measures will build local resilience and make our community safer. Nationally, the government has committed to protecting the policing budget in real terms until 2020, which means a £900 million cash increase by the end of the decade. Next, the expansion of our local schools is making good progress. The application to open the Heathside-Walton Free School has been approved, and the project will move forward with discussions with the Elmbridge Council and local communities through 2018. The school has selected a preferred site, and should open in 2020 at the junction of Terrace Road and Waterside Drive close to Molesey. This will benefit local families. Our local schools will all benefit from the government’s new National Funding Formula. The current projections using today’s pupil numbers show schools across our constituency would see a 6% increase in funding on average. The third piece of good news is that Elmbridge Council will benefit from the Surrey pilot for the 100% business rate retention scheme from April. It means that over the next year up to £28 million more of the money raised in Surrey will stay under the control of our elected councils to provide important local services, from road repairs to local libraries. Finally, in my new role as Housing Minister, I look forward to helping deliver our reforms to build more affordable homes for the next generation and taking a robust approach to rogue landlords to support renters. Best wishes,

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Events Coming Up Some we like... Wreckin’ Ball - Springsteen Tribute Band Live at The Poyntz Arms Formed in 2014 with members from the South London & Surrey areas... Wreckin' Ball are a six-piece rock band performing a tribute to Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band. Created by fans, for fans......Saturday 2nd March 2018 9pm - 11pm Free Admission The Poyntz Arms 85 Walton Road East Molesey Surrey KT8 0DP Friday 2 Mar 2018Contact telephone: 07881682286 Souwest 2018 - South West London Gang Show Looking for something to go this February half term? Why don't you book tickets for you & your family to go to the South West London Gang Show? The show is jam packed full of singing, dancing, sketches & laughter suitable for all ages. All the cast are local members of Scouting & Guiding in the South West London area, ranging from Cubs & Brownies to adult leaders. Tickets are £13.00 each. Buy 10 tickets & get 1 ticket free. Evening performances start at 7.30pm to 10.00pm Saturday matinee performance starts at 2.00pm to 4. 30pm.The Michael Frayn Theatre, Kingston Grammar School (Performing Arts Centre), 70 London Road, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT2 6PYWednesday 14 Feb 2018 to Saturday 17 Feb 2018 The Ian Engelmann Singers: Music for Passiontide and Springtime THE IAN ENGELMANN SINGERS is a small mixed choir from the Walton and Weybridge area who will be joining us in church for a concert called Music for Passiontide and Springtime. They present a delightfully informal concert of unaccompanied part-songs with integrated readings and poems.7pm Admission free; retiring collection. St. Peter’s Church, Burwood Road, Hersham, Surrey, Surrey KT12 4AA Saturday 17 Mar 2018 Crazy for You charts the troubled love story of Bobby, son of a wealthy New York banking family and frustrated Broadway hoofer, and Polly, daughter of the proprietor of a failing theatre in Deadrock, including I Got Rhythm, They Cant Take That Away From Me, Nice Work If You Can Get It and Embraceable You all feature in this exhilarating celebration of the great Broadway musicals. Box office no: 07926 354645 Cecil Hepworth Playhouse, Walton-onThames Hurst Grove, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey, KT12 1AU Thurs 20th Feb - Sat 24th Feb Fiddler On The Roof Jr Hampton Hill Theatre The BRITISH THEATRE ACADEMY presents: This special adaptation of the nine-time Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, . Created by Broadway legends Jerome Robbins, Harold Prince, Jerry Bock, Sheldon Harnick and Joseph Stein, Fiddler on the Roof JR. tackles the universal theme of tradition in ways that reach across barriers of race, class, nationality and religion.: 90 High Street, Hampton Hill, Middlesex, TW12 1NY: www.hamptonhilltheatreclub.org.uk Enquiries: 0845 519 4546 1st – 3rd March Molesey Art Society Spring Exhibition 3rd April - 8th April This art exhibition will feature original and affordable work from some of the finest contemporary craft designers and artists, all members of the Molesey Art Society. Paintings will include (framed and unframed) in all media range from botanical art, landscapes, portraiture, still life and many more subjects by professional and other local talented artists Time: 11- 5pm (except Tuesday and Thursday when opening times are 2pm - 6pm) Admission free St Alban’s Primary School, Beauchamp Road, East Molesey, KT82PG www.moleseyartsociety.co.uk To advertise call Paul on 07946 494288

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Index of Advertisers Bathrooms Funeral Services Walton Bathrooms 5 Alan Greenwood Lodge Bros Building W Brown and Son 51 Garden Services/Supplies J Shopland 19 Easicut Mowers Longacres Care Kimara Support 45 Glazing/Windows/Doors Moor House Care Home 26 Village Windows Car/Repairs/MOT Health/Fitness Esher Tyres and Exhausts 40 MiBody Tyres 4 Less 21 Insurance Hard To Insure Cleaning Services Nick Lewis Cleaning 52 Kitchens Time For You 43 Ashford Kitchens Council Oven Cleaning Adult Help 25 Ovenclean Fostering 33 Oven Man Recycle 31 Mobility Kudos Dentists Gentle Dental Practice 56 Shepperton Mobility Smilessence 28/29 Painters/Decorators Koli Decorators Dog Walking Georgis’s Dog Walking 22 Parent Support Kids Come First Electrical Services Lee McCarthy 20 Piano Lessons Time For Piano Estate Agents Curchods 12/13 Restaurants/Bars/Pubs The Mitre Events Brooklands Museum 7 Roofing Hampton Court Palace 8 Good Roofs Imber Court 17 Schools Halliford School Footcare Dittons Footcare 26 Hampton Court House

Hampton Prep Pre Prep 45 Sell for Cash 35 JC Stamps Storage 46 Low Cost Storage 15 Tailoring Laura Alteration 51 Venues Molesey Boat Club 24 Wills Harvest Wills 35 11 51 48 47 26 20 27 48

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Molesey Matters February 2018  

The only dedicated local community for both East and West Molesey - KT8

Molesey Matters February 2018  

The only dedicated local community for both East and West Molesey - KT8

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